Patient Safety Essays (Examples)

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Health Care and Medical Mistakes

Words: 304 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64050509

Unintentional Death
The role of patient safety in quality care should be front and center; however, as the IOM (2000) reported, too many patients are dying as a result of medical error. To protect patients, the IOM recommended several courses of action that the federal government could undertake in order to address this issue. This resulted in the development and application of several federal initiatives that are used to prevent unintentional death from medical errors.
These initiatives were detailed in the FDA’s Federal Actions to Reduce Medical Errors and Their Impact.  Some of the initiatives include incorporating a mandatory reporting system that would allow the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to collect information on medical errors and resulting deaths from the more than 500 hospitals and clinics operated by the Department of Defense (serving 8 million patients) to better understand the phenomenon and why these accidents occur. Additionally,…… [Read More]

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Patient Nurse Compliance With Scd

Words: 1618 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91082263

" (Morris & Woodcock, 2004)

V. Murakami et al. (2003)

In the work entitled: "Deep Venous Thrombosis Prophylaxis in Trauma: Improved Compliance With a Novel Miniaturized Pneumatic Compression Device" the authors state that: "Intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) devices prevent lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis (LEDVT) when used properly, but compliance remains an issue." (Murakami et al., 2003) the study conducted by Murakami et al. (2003) is stated to be a."..prospective trial in which trauma patients (mean age, 46 years; revised trauma score, 11.7) were randomized to DVT prophylaxis with a standard calf-length sequential IPC device (SCD group) or a miniaturized sequential device (continuous enhanced-circulation therapy [CECT] group). Compliance rates for all subjects were averaged in each location: emergency department, operating room, intensive care unit, and nursing ward." (Murakami et al., 2004) the study results state that: "Total compliance rate in the CECT group was significantly higher than in the SCD group…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Kehl-Preutt, Wendy (2006) Deep Vein Thrombosis in Hospitalized Patients: A Review of Evidence-based Guidelines for Prevention. Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing March/April 2006. Vol. 25 No.2. Online available at http://www.nursingcenter.com/prodev/cearticleprint.asp?CE_ID=636024.

Chang, David et al. (2002) Compliance with sequential compression device prophylaxis in at-risk trauma patients: a prospective analysis. Am Surg. 2002 May;68:470-3 Online available at http://lib.bioinfo.pl/auid:1350109.

Practice Alert: Deep Vein Thrombosis Prevention" (2006 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Journal " Vol. 23 No. 1 January 2006.

Morris, Rhys J. & Woodcock, John P. (2004) Evidence-Based Compression: Prevention of Stasis and Deep Vein Thrombosis. Ann. Surg. 2004 February 239(2): 162-171.
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Patient Falls Preventing Patient Falls the Primary

Words: 996 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64395033

Patient Falls

Preventing Patient Falls

The primary goal of every hospital and care facility is the health and safety of their patients. hile some problems, such as illness cannot be avoided, compounding illness with injuries can and should be avoided. Risks such as slipping, tripping, and falling while in the hospital are an increasing problem for hospitals. The purpose of this paper is to identify a preventable patient injury and suggest a corrective policy for the hospital to reduce the amount of incidence.

Identification of Problem

Patient falls are a growing problem in hospitals. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "In 2004, 14,900 people 65 and older died from injuries related to unintentional falls; about 1.8 million people 65 and older were treated in emergency departments for nonfatal injuries from falls, and more than 433,000 of these patients were hospitalized." (National Center for Injury Prevention…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hitcho EB, et al. (2004). Characteristics and circumstances of falls in a hospital setting: a prospective analysis. J Gen Intern Med;19(7):732-9.

Landro L. (2005). The informed patient: hospitals aim to curb injuries from falling; risk for young patients. Wall Street Journal: Mar 23;D1, D7.

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention. Falls among older adults: an overview. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2008. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/factsheets/adultfalls.htm.

U.S. Department of Veteran's Affairs. Morse Fall Scale. Available at http://www.patientsafety.gov/CogAids/FallPrevention/index.html#page=page-4
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Patient to Nurse Ratio Nursing

Words: 752 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80166796

Many advocates of the move feel that lower patient to nurse ratio would lead to additional savings because it would reduce nurse turnover rate, lawsuits, complications and length of stay. Nursing unions in the state of California have asked for a PTN ratio of 3 to 1. The health association however agreed on 5 to 1 which sound more reasonable than the originally proposed 10 to 1. (othberg, 2005)

Patient to nurse ratio when it is too high can definitely adversely affect care. And with baby boomers aging and needing healthcare, we know that number of people looking for healthcare will continue to rise in the coming years. However staff shortage continues to pose a serious problem. And unfortunately, the problem doesn't always lie with cost control. While it is true that most of the problems with staff shortage can be attributed to hospitals cutting down their costs and hence…… [Read More]

References

Michael Rothberg, 2005. Improving Nurse-to-Patient Staffing Ratios as a Cost-Effective Safety Intervention Med Care 2007;45: 571-578)

Patricia W. Stone, PhD,* Cathy Mooney-Kane,

Nurse Working Conditions and Patient Safety Outcomes.
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Patient Handoffs Majority of the Medical Errors

Words: 2315 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67770180

Patient Handoffs

Majority of the medical errors take place in the patient's handoffs. A shift among the doctors is a common practice. There are a number of old patients who approach around 16 different doctors in a year, while young patients who are healthy refer to normal physicians and to specialists as well (Philibert, 2008). In a hospital normally, less attention is given to the patient by his primary doctor, while the trainees and the hospitalists are more involved in that patient. Patients are rotated to different doctors with an average of fifteen times in a five day stay at the hospital. Young doctors often accept appointments of more than 300 patients in a month, in their initial training period just because of time pressure (Chen, 2009, p. 1).

Alteration that have been brought about in the patients care have increased the quality of the services that are offered to…… [Read More]

References

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. (2010). Electronic health records overview. Retrieved from http://www.cms.gov/EHealthRecords/

Chen, P.W. (2009, September 3). When patient handoffs go terribly wrong. The New York Times. Retrieved from  http://www.nytimes.com 

Decision support systems may reduce inappropriate medical tests. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.theexigencegroup.com/news/intelligence / article:decision-support-systems-may-reduce-inappropriate-medical-tests-/

Encinosa, W.E., & Bae, J. (2011). Health information technology and its effects on hospital costs, outcomes, and patient safety. Inquiry, 48, 288-303. doi:10.5034/inquiryjrnl_48.04.02
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Patient Records New York City

Words: 514 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60966175

The author also explains that the data stored in the system can be used to help public health officials identify medical issues facing the community as well as track various trends from the community and public health perspectives.

Article Relevance

(How does this article relate to you as doctor?)

As a physician, I recognize that my time will be in very short supply. Therefore, any system or resource capable of saving time and increasing the efficiency of the healthcare services that I provide will be greatly appreciated. Similarly, patient safety, elimination of medical errors, and patient outcome are always paramount concerns for any physician. Therefore, I would welcome the opportunity to use EHR systems to the extent they address those issues positively. Moreover, as a physician, I am always interested in any approach that might be beneficial to human welfare and community and public health issues. According to the article,…… [Read More]

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Patient Room Handedness in Acute

Words: 623 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79583370



Structured interviews of the subjects were conducted at the end of each individual set of simulation runs to obtain triangulation data.

Video segments were coded by nursing experts.

Statistical and content analyses of the data were conducted.

Limitations

All nurses were female. Males may have provided different response. The sample may have been too small; only 10 individuals of each handedness were involved. The sample was extracted from only one environment, the participants were familiar with environment. Replication of various other environments may have provided different response. The repeated measures design may have influenced response second time around.

Commentary

I found details of structured interview to be too vague. The best accounts of experimental studies are those that reader can replicate. Many of the steps of this study were sufficiently elaborate for repllication, but I found details of interview questions vague and incompletely elaborated upon so that one left with…… [Read More]

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Patient Was Admitted Due to a Broken

Words: 1175 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90551981

patient was admitted due to a broken hip which required a total hip replacement (TH). This injury has required two weeks of in-hospital rehabilitation to this point, and Mr. Trosak will probably need more physical rehabilitation to completely recover from the injury. Since there are secondary concerns (such as some loss of cognitive function (text, 462)) after a fall, it will be necessary to monitor M. Trosak. The falling incident could also reoccur due to the fact that the patient resides on the second floor of his apartment building. It will be necessary to ensure that Mr. Trosak understands the risk of a recurrence, and that he has sufficient assistance.

Prior to being hospitalized for the fall, Mr. Trosak was not taking any prescription medication, and he has not had a physical examination for more than ten years. While admitted, the patient was found to have chronic hypertension, which is…… [Read More]

References

Smith, M., & Segal, J. (2011). Depression in older adults and the elderly. Retrieved from http://www.helpguide.org/mental/depression_elderly.htm

Vanwanseele, B. (2009). To rehab or not to rehab following a total hip replacement. Retrieved from http://sydney.edu.au/research/opportunities/opportunities/561

Text.
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Patient Specific Assessment and Alarm Fatigue

Words: 2771 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17727235

Alarm Fatigue

Theories in nursing generally center on the relationship of four concepts -- nursing, environment, person and health. These concepts are interrelated and impact one another in diverse ways, often seen in issues of nursing when problems arise that require analysis. The issue of alarm fatigue is one problem in nursing that touches on each of these four concepts. Alarm fatigue can be defined as exhaustion that occurs for nurses when they are exposed to many alarms throughout their shift, which causes "sensory overload" and the nurses to develop a "non-existent response to alarms" (Horkan, 2014, p. 83). Complacency and dissension can follow in the nursing workplace as too many alarms for nurses can render them unresponsive.

Alarms are needed in nursing because they alert nurses and care providers to emergency situations that require immediate action and intervention, especially in the intensive care unit. However, nurses and staff work…… [Read More]

References

Despins, L., Scott-Cawiezell, J., Rouder, J. (2010). Detection of patient risk by nurses:

a theoretical framework. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 66(2): 465-474.

Horkan, A. M. (2014). Alarm fatigue and patient safety. Nephrology Nursing Journal,

47(1): 83-85.
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Patient Acuity System

Words: 1153 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66152599

Patient acuity system provides the nurses and other healthcare practitioners in health cares' information that can guide them in their attention towards the patients. The nurses track information and then weigh them in accordance to the urgency of assessment. The basis that the nurses use is the complexity of the level to which patients are unwell. An example is the determination of whether the patients immediately require ventilation and those who do not need any. The nurses are able to pick on the various patients in the healthcare and then record the data. In a single healthcare, there are many patients with different degrees of illnesses. As a result, they all require varying levels of evaluations from the nurses. It is, therefore, imperative that the nurses spread their attention appropriately to avoid any inconveniences. This system helps the nurses to determine the attention that patients require within a short period.…… [Read More]

References

Brennan, C., & Daly, B. (2009). Patient acuity: a concept analysis. Journal Of Advanced Nursing, 65(5), 1114-1126. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2648.2008.04920.x

Garza, A., Gratton, M., McElroy, J., Lindholm, D., & Glass, E. (2008). The association of dispatch prioritization and patient acuity. Prehospital Emergency Care, 12(1), 24-29.

Lewis, R. (2008). Comparison of a 5-level triage classification system with a 4-level triage classification system as it relates to acuity assignment and predictability of patient outcomes. Southern Online Journal of Nursing Research, 8(2),

Perroca, M., & EK, A. (2007). Utilization of patient classification systems in Swedish hospitals and the degree of satisfaction among nursing staff. Journal of Nursing Management, 15(5), 472-480. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2834.2007.00732.x
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Patient Centered Medical Homes

Words: 3042 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30529280

Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMH) are often confused as being actual "homes" for patients to be admitted in and given medical treatment and care. PCMH is actually a health care model based on which health care is provided to patients, under the supervision of physicians. The PCMH model of health care provides patients with continuous, comprehensive medical care, in order to increase the chances of achieving the goal of benefitting the patient with as much attention and medical care in order to maximize his/her health outcomes.

Over the years the PCMH model of health care has become widely adopted and preferred. This is because of the philosophy and approach that the model adopts in organizing and delivering the health care initiatives. The PCMH model is based upon delivering medical care and attention to patients with team-based health and medical experts that are focused strongly on the quality and the safety…… [Read More]

Bibliography

109-432, P.L. (2006, December 20). TAX RELIEF AND HEALTH CARE ACT OF 2006. Public Law 109-432 (109th Congress) .

Backer, L.A. (2009). Building the Case for the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Family Practice Management 16 (1), 14-18.

De Geest, S., Moons, P., Callens, B., Gut, C., Lindpaintner, L., & Spirig, R. (2008). Introducing advanced practice nurses/nurse practitioners in health care systems: a framework for reflection and analysis. Swiss Medical Weekly (138), 621-628.

NASHP. (2013, April). Medical Home & Patient-Centered Care. Retrieved from The National Academy for State Health Policy: http://www.nashp.org/med-home-map
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Patient Centered Medical Homes

Words: 964 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73130692

Patient Centered Medical Homes

In the 1960s, the medical home concept referred to as patient centered medical home was developed.In order to reform the healthcare in the U.S.; the patient centered medical homes are evolving as a centerpiece of efforts (Bates, 2010). Basically, PCMH can be defines as a primary care model that offers coordinated and comprehensive care to the patients in order to improve health outcomes. PCMH is also recognized by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA). Patient centered medical homes can be portrayed as a team of people working together in form of a community. The purpose is to improve the health as well as healing of the people in that community. In comparison with the primary care, PCMH is more responsive towards the needs of local patients.

PCMH offers a number of benefits including complementary nutrition as well as wellness counseling along with providing prevention education…… [Read More]

References

Aysola, J., E.J. Orav, and J.Z. Ayanian. 2011. "Neighborhood Characteristics Associated With Access To Patient-Centered Medical Homes For Children." Health Affairs no. 30 (11):2080-2089.

Bates, D.W., and A. Bitton. 2010. "The Future Of Health Information Technology In The Patient-Centered Medical Home." Health Affairs no. 29 (4):614-621.

Nutting, Paul A., William L. Miller, Benjamin F. Crabtree, Carlos Roberto Jaen, Elizabeth E. Stewart, and Kurt C. Stange. 2009. "Initial Lessons From the First National Demonstration Project on Practice Transformation to a Patient-Centered Medical Home." Ann Fam Med no. 7 (3):254-260.
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Patient Centered Medical Home

Words: 1114 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82102409

Patient-Centered Medical Home

Medical Home

How the Patient-Centered Medical-Home reducing cost and improving quality and safety for patients.

The patient centered medical home is a platform that fills a need in the current healthcare system. The U.S. healthcare system has been plagued for quite some time with a trend of substantially rising healthcare costs as well as another trend of slipping quality standards. These two trends are argued to be a phenomenon that has emerged at least partly from poor planning and ineffective use of resources. One solution to some of these issues can be found in the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model of primary care. This model has been developed with the coordination of long-term physician-patient relationships in mind. Developing these relationships further can not only reduce costs in unnecessary procedures that are the result of the missed opportunity for preventive care, but also have been shown to improve…… [Read More]

References

Christensen, E., Dorrance, K., Ramchandiani, S., Lynch, S., Whitmeore, C., Borsky, A., . . . Bickett, T. (2013). Impact of a Patient-Centered Medical Home on Access, Quality, and Cost. Military Medicine, 135-141.

Ewing, M. (2013). The Patient-Centered Medical Home Solution to the Cost-Quality Conundrum. Journal of Healthcare Management, 258-266.

Kern, L., Dhopeshwarker, R., Edwards, A., & Kaushal, R. (2013). Patient Experience Over Time in Patient-Centered Medical Homes. American Journal of Managed Care, 403-410.

Nielsen, M., Olayiwola, J., Grundy, P., & Grumbach, K. (2014). The Patient-Centered Medical Home's Impact on Cost & Quality. Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative, 1-38.
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Patient Noncompliance in Patients Advanced

Words: 4937 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60710636



These studies demonstrate that there are several factors associated with patient noncompliance, regardless of the disease being treated. Medication side effects represent only one of these issues. Nurse practitioners could help to resolve many of these issues by being proactive and asking questions about side effects in patients at risk for becoming noncompliant. They may also be able to predict noncompliance in patients that are prescribed medications with known side effects. By informing the patient of the side effects and giving them practical ways to cope with them, the nurse practitioner can play an active role in helping to eliminate patient noncompliance.

Education was found to play an important role in patient noncompliance. The overall educational level of the patient was found to be important. The nurse practitioner can take positive action by being aware of the patient's overall educational background. Extra care must be taken with those of low…… [Read More]

References

Barber, N., Parsons, J., Clifford, S., Darracott, R., & Horne, R. (2004). Patients' problems with new medication for chronic conditions. Quality and Safety in Healthcare. 13(3): 172-175.

Chatterjee, J. (2006). From compliance to concordance in diabetes. Journal of Medical Ethics. 32(9): 507-510.

Chisholm, M., Lance, C. & Mulloy, L. (2005). Patient factors associated with adherence to immunosuppressant therapy in renal transplant recipients. American Journal of Health- System Pharmacy. 62 (17): 1775-1781.

Eastern, J. "Dismissing Patients Properly." 1 Jun 2006. OB/GYN News. Accessed 11 Sept. 2008. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0CYD/is_/ai_n26906768.
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Safety the Etiology of the Majority of

Words: 1121 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92081626

Safety

The etiology of the majority of cases of Parkinson's disease (PD) is unknown. What is known is that the disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that results from a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the area of the brain known as the substantia nigra (Hatfield, 2013). In addition, it is speculated that the disease is related to some type of genetic susceptibility and environmental risk factors that largely remain unidentified. Epidemiological research has suggested that there may be an association between exposure to pesticides and the onset of PD; however, this research is very mixed with some studies indicating that there is such relationship and a number of others failing to demonstrate such an association (Dardiotis, Xiromerisiou, Hadjichristodoulou et al., 2013). Dardiotis et al. (2013) reviewed the research and made a case that perhaps the relationship between pesticide use and PD is moderated by a genetic susceptibility. However, one of…… [Read More]

References

Dardiotis, E., Xiromerisiou, G., Hadjichristodoulou, C., Tsatsakis, A.M., Wilks, M.F., & Hadjigeorgiou, G.M. (2013). The interplay between environmental and genetic factors in Parkinson's disease susceptibility: the evidence for pesticides. Toxicology, 307, 17-23.

Hatfield, R.C. (2013). The everything guide to the human brain. Avon, MA: Adams.

Liew, Z., Wang, A., Bronstein, J., & Ritz, B. (2014). Job Exposure Matrix (JEM)-derived estimates of lifetime occupational pesticide exposure and the risk of Parkinson's disease. Archives of Environmental & Occupational Health, 69(4), 241-251.
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Safety Effectiveness of Emergency Management and the

Words: 588 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85712575

Safety

Effectiveness of Emergency Management and the eadiness of Trauma Centers

Emergency Management and the eadiness of Trauma Centers are fundamental facilities in any given State and country. These facilities come in handy in times of disasters and traumatic events. Most traumatic centers are health care facilities or departments, which offer immediate response in such times of emergency. Emergency management and trauma centers handle mitigation, response, preparedness, and recovery. Emergency management includes activities such as evacuation, decontamination, disaster recovery, and integration with other community emergency groups. These facilities play a key role in providing care to both natural and man-made disasters (Premier, 2012).

The phenomenon, issue, or condition to be researched

In order to create a safe surrounding in the community, emergency management and traumatic centers have to be established (Trunkey & Potter, 2006). Often, disastrous situations call for urgent and high demand for patient care. For instance, the traumatic…… [Read More]

References

Premier (2012). Emergency preparedness for healthcare facilities. Premier: Transforming Healthcare Together. Retrieved July 12, 2012, from https://www.premierinc.com/safety/topics/disaster_readiness/#top

Trunkey, D.D., & Potter, C.J. (2006). U.S. trauma center preparedness for a terrorist attack in the community. National Foundation for Trauma care, 1-43.
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Quality and Safety Health and

Words: 1418 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60969782

Typically, accurate documentation assists in limiting errors. (Stanford Hospital & Clinics, 2012).

Car et al. (2008) point out that integrating of electronic health within a healthcare organization enhances quality and safety of patients. The author argues that electronic health record assists the healthcare provider to readily access comprehensive information in order to minimize the incident of error as well as enhancing patient safety and quality of healthcare delivery. While Stanford Hospital and Clinics has made several efforts to enhance quality healthcare delivery and patient safety within the hospital environment, however, the issue of medical errors is still rampant within the healthcare sector in the United States. Meanwhile, there are several ways the issue of error incidents can affect the healthcare delivery.

Impact of Error incident on Healthcare Delivery

A major effect of error incident within the health sector is the decline in the quality healthcare delivery and the issue could…… [Read More]

References

Ballard, K.A.(2003). Patient Safety: A Shared Responsibility. ANA Periodicals. 8(3).

Car, J. Black, a. Anandan, C. et al. (2008). A Systematic Overview & Synthesis of the Literature. Report for the NHS Connecting for Heath Evaluation Programme.

Library Index (2012). Challenges Change and Innovation in Health Care Delivery -- Safety.

Institute of Medicine. (2001). Crossing the quality chasm: A new health system for the 21st century-Summary. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2-4.
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Quality and Safety Over the

Words: 1497 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5787452

This is important, because it is showing how a lack of: following up and monitoring safety standards can increase the long-term financial problems facing a heath care facility. (Master, 2005, pp. 259 -- 285)

At the same time, there is also the possibility that the lack of focus on safety could expose the hospital to possible law suits. This is because the plaintiffs could use this information to show, how the staff is negligent in the quality care that they are providing to them. Once this occurs, it means that the costs for: medical malpractice insurance and other operating expenses will rise. While, the facility will have the negative publicity from: these lawsuits and there is the possibility of increased amounts of regulation (surrounding internal procedures). This is important, because it is showing how these kinds of issues will have an adverse effect on: the reputation and economic viability of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Grol, R. (2008). On the Trail of Quality and Safety. British Journal of Medicine, 336, 74 -- 76.

Master, K. (2005). Role Development in Professional Nursing. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Manser, T. (2009). Team Work and Patient Safety. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 53 (2), 143 -- 151.

Vincent, C. (2008). Is Health Care Getting Safer. British Journal of Medicine, 13, 337 -- 345.
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nursing alarm'safety and alarm management

Words: 742 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52764514

.....clinician responses to alarms? For example: Physical barriers, physical layout of the unit, RN-pt ratio.

The observed influences include the type of alarm, such as whether it was a bed or bathroom alarm versus a technology alarm coming from something like the IV pump.

2. How, as a student, are you educated about alarms and your response to them? How might education regarding the various patient alarms be an issue associated with alarm response?

I have done some research on the clinical implications of alarms and alarm fatigue. For example, Cyach, et al. (n.d.) found that too many alarms causes alarm fatigue, and also creates a "false sense of security," (p. 5). The researchers also found that staff is sometimes not educated about the different types of alarms and what they mean.

3. Who is responsible for alarm response?

The delegation of authority for responses will vary from case to…… [Read More]

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nurse advocacy and patient autonomy

Words: 747 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41321337

.....nurse assigned to care for this patient, I would strongly advocate on behalf of the patient's autonomy. The clash between patient autonomy and the healthcare system and its representatives like nurses can only be resolved by being honest in this situation. The patient is under a high degree of stress, not only because of his health condition and the fear that brings out in him, but due to other stressful life events including his financial situation. He was also supposed to get married immediately before the bypass surgery was scheduled, and this is bound to add to his level of stress. The primary issue here is providing what the patient needs to keep him safe during the procedure, and if he insists on using his own pump, which he has successfully used for the thirty years he has lived with the disease of diabetes, then he should use his own…… [Read More]

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Management of Immunocompromised Patients in Beginning I

Words: 2391 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85496540

Management of Immunocompromised Patients

In beginning I writer specific nursing assignment. The Question: 2000 Words While clinical placement asked prepare a single room an admission. The patient requiring admission isolation room immunocompromised.

Immunocompromised patients usually require isolation in order to prevent them from becoming infected with infections from other patients which is known as protective isolation. For the immunocompromised patients, their immune system is unable to fight the infectious diseases. There are many diseases or conditions that lead to immunodeficiency in patients.

One is AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). The pathophysiology of AIDS starts when the person's CD4+ T cell count begins to decrease as the disease kills these cells. This is HIV-induced cell lysis where the virus enters the CD4+ cells where it inserts its genetic information to the cell nucleus thus taking over the cell and replicating itself. The virus then mutates extremely rapidly thus making it more and…… [Read More]

References

Agusti, C., & Torres, A. (2009). Pulmonary Infection in the Immunocompromised Patient: Strategies for Management. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Bodey, G.P. (2010). Managing Infections in the Immunocompromised Patient. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 40(Supplement 4), S239. doi: 10.1086/427328

Glauser, M.P., & Pizzo, P.A. (2009). Management of Infections in Immunocompromised Patients New York: Elsevier Health Sciences.

Hayden, R.T. (2008). Diagnostic Microbiology of the Immunocompromised Host. Washington, DC: ASM Press.
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Encourage Patients Active Involvement in

Words: 1292 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63177148



(3) Goal 13A states that the means for patients and their families should be defined and communicated in regards to reporting of concerning about safety and that encouragement should be provided for them to follow through on this.

(4) Goal 15 states that the organization "identifies safety risks inherent in its patient population; and (5) 15A states "The organization identifies patients at risk for suicide. [Applicable to psychiatric hospitals and patients being treated for emotional or behavioral disorders in general hospitals -- NOT APPLICALE to CRITICAL ACCESS HOSPITALS] (the Joint Commission, 2009)

Stated as the only change to the 2007 Disease-Specific Care National Patient Safety Goal is the noted change to 8 which adds that the complete list of medications is provided to the patient upon discharge from the health care facility. (the Joint Commission, 2009)

The work of Cooper (2009) entitled: "NYC Hospital to Educate Patients Using Opinionmeter Survey…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Stoessel, Kathleen B. (2009) the Joint Commissions' National Patient Safety Goals: Implications for Infection Preventionists. Virgo Publishing. 2009 July 08. Online available at: http://www.vpico.com/articlemanager/printerfriendly.aspx?article=252020

Powell, Stephen M. (2009) Can the Ambulatory Care Setting Learn Lessons from Other High Risk Domains. Advocate MD. Online available at: http://www.advocatemd.com/downloads/risk_management/CantheAmbulatoryCareSettingLearnLessons.pdf

2007 Home Care National Patient Safety Goals (2006) the Joint Commission 1 June 2006. Online available at: http://www.jointcommission.org/PatientSafety/NationalPatientSafetyGoals/07_ome_npsgs.htm

2007 Disease-Specific Care National Patient Safety Goals (2006) the Joint Commission 1 June 2006. Online available at: http://www.jointcommission.org/PatientSafety/NationalPatientSafetyGoals/07_dsc_npsgs.htm
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Progress Made in Medication Safety Practices

Words: 1205 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29199720

Medical Safety

Poor medical safety practices result in over 40,000 deaths per year, of that 7,000 deaths are attributed to medication-related medical errors. There is no excuse for negligence when it comes to human lives. It is imperative that the medical community introduce sound medication safety best practices to eliminate adverse outcomes related to medication prescriptions. Best practices include the implementation of standardization and protocols in addition to the use of technology to reduce errors.

Medical Safety Practices

Medical practitioners are relied upon to provide solutions, acting as the first and many times, last hope of those in dire need. But despite this great responsibility to patients whose lives are entrusted in medical staff studies show that out of every 100 patients admitted to a medical facility 2 patients will experience a medical error due to incorrectly prescribed or administered medication. The results can be mild but can also be…… [Read More]

References

Bates, David W.; Spell, Nathan; Cullen, David J., et al. (1997).The Costs of Adverse Drug Events in Hospitalized Patients. JAMA. 277:307 -- 311.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (National Center for Health Statistics). (1999). Births and deaths: Preliminary data for 1997. National Vital Statistics Reports.

Grissinger, M., Globus, N.J. (2004). How Technology Affects Your Risk of Medication Errors. Nursing2004. 34(1), 36-41.

Institute of Medicine. (2000). To Err Is Human: Building A Safer Healthcare System.
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Managing Quality Safety and Individual Performance in Healthcare

Words: 1578 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35585285

With the ever-changing health care sector, reimbursement has increasingly been tied to care quality and health care outcomes. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have particularly been changing the way hospitals are reimbursed, with hospitals that deliver high quality care and report better health outcomes getting higher reimbursements than those that perform poorly. This has led to increasing prominence of the pay-for-performance approach. Under this approach, hospitals that report greater patient satisfaction, reduced error rates, lower readmission rates, and higher recovery rates for chronic illness get higher reimbursements than their poorly-performing counterparts. The implication is that health care organizations must pay greater attention to performance, especially in terms of quality, safety, and individual performance. Measurement and models used in the commercial world for these three aspects are considerably relevant to the health care sector. This paper discusses the usefulness of the total quality management (TQM) model, the Organization…… [Read More]

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Informatics Implication for Nursing Safety

Words: 1316 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67386841

challenging environment that the world faces has placed much strain and stress on the health care industry and their many institutions. Despite the rapid advances in technology, nutrition and fitness, the world is in constant need of medical treatment and assistance. The role of the nurse and the professional duties that accompany this experience has also changed rapidly along with technology and medical advancement. It is important to investigate how nurses can take advantage of these newly developed systems to perform at a higher level and eventually ease the suffering and pain that accompanies medical procedures in today's day and age.

Informatics is a newly formed discipline that provides some of the solutions to the many problems that nurses are faced with. The purpose of this essay is to discuss and highlight the importance of informatics and its synthesis into the nursing profession. The essay will first give some background…… [Read More]

References

Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (2008). Nursing Informatics: Scope and Standards of Practice, ANA 2008. Retrieved from  http://www.himss.org/resourcelibrary/TopicList.aspx?MetaDataID=767 

Oroviogoicoechea, Cristina, Barbara Elliott, and Roger Watson. "Review: evaluating information systems in nursing." Journal of clinical nursing 17.5 (2008): 567-575.

Thede, L., Schwiran, P., (February 25, 2011) "Informatics: The Standardized Nursing Terminologies: A National Survey of Nurses' Experiences and Attitudes - Survey I*" OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing Vol. 16 No. 2.
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ED Patient Boarding

Words: 1342 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90565104

ED Patient Boading |

Emegency Depatment Patient Boading

Emegency Depatment (ED) cowding is a nationwide cisis which affects the efficiency and the quality of patient cae (Sox, Bustin, Oav, et al., 2007). A huge contibution to patient ove-cowding is the boading of admitted patients in the ED. An altenative use of time which is lost in the admitting of patients is used to teat patients who ae waiting to be seen; this is seen typical in ove-cowded EDs. The ovecowding of EDs esult in isking patient safety and altenatives to this should be obseved.

Holding admitted patients in EDs always was known to be bad fo patient flow, but thee is a gowing body of eseach showing that it also hams patients. Thee is significant evidence which demonstates that ED cowding due to boading is esponsible fo poo outcomes (Sox, Bustin, Oav, et al., 2007). In many hospitals, it is…… [Read More]

references for boarding locations when hospitals are at full capacity. Ann Emerg Med.

Greene J. (2007). Emergency department flow and the boarded patient: how to get admitted patients upstairs. Ann Emerg Med. 49: 68-70.

Holliman CJ, Wuerz RC, Kimak MJ, et al. (1995). Attending supervision of nonemergency medicine residents in a university hospital ED. Am J. Emerg Med. 13:259 -- 61.

Richardson DB. (2006). Increase in patient mortality at 10 days associated with emergency department overcrowding. Med J. Aust. 184: 213-216.

Sox CM, Burstin HR, Orav EJ, et al. (1998) The effect of supervision of residents on quality of care in five university-affiliated emergency departments. Acad Med.73:776 -- 82.
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RFID System for Patient Tracking

Words: 3588 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8372815



There are various applications of the FID technology in the healthcare. These are explored by a HIBCC,(2006 ) report that studies the application of the FID technology in the healthcare setting with emphasis on its benefits, limitations as well as recommendations The report categorically pointed out that that the applications of the FID technology in the health care settings are numerous. They range from being used in the management of the hospital's supply chain to the management of the patients themselves. In terms of the supply chain management, the FID technology can be used in the organizing the delivery of supplies such as pacemakers, artificial limbs as well as defibrillators. This is because the supply chain of these crucial items is very complicated and requires the timely delivery of the consignments. The high degree of traceability that is needed to track the shipments from the supplier up to the time…… [Read More]

References

Anonymous (2004), RFID in the hospital, in RFID Gazette. July 15,

2004

Aarts, J., Doorewaard, H., and Berg, M.(2004), "Understanding implementation: the case of a computerized physician order entry system in a large Dutch university medical center," Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, vol. 11, no. 3,

Chin-Yin,(2000)RFID-Enabled Analysis of Care Coordination and Patient Flow in Ambulatory Carpp. 207-216.
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Quality and Safety in Healthcare

Words: 1647 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10681556

Quality & Safety

The quality and safety of health care services has been a major issue in the recent past because of the significance of these factors in the improvement of patient outcomes and enhancing the effectiveness of the health care system. Health care professionals and practitioners have increasingly focused on the need to improve the quality and safety of their services given the constant increase in patient population. As a result, various measures have been developed and implemented in attempts to enhance the quality and safety of care services and improvement of practices. These measures include delivery of patient-centered care, safety initiatives, teamwork and collaboration, informatics, quality improvement, and evidence-based practice. There are several ways with which incidents or interactions in each of these components are handled and can be improved based on leadership/management theory content.

Patient Centered Care -- Interaction

A bedside report was not done at bedside…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Evanoff, Bradley, Patricia Potter, Laurie Wolf, Deborah Grayson, Clay Dunagan, and Stuart Boxerman. "Can We Talk? Priorities for Patient Care Differed Among Health Care Providers." Advances in Patient Safety 1 (n.d.): 5-14. AHRQ -- Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: Advancing Excellence in Health Care. Hhs-logoU.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Web. 20 Apr. 2015. .

"How Fast Is Too Fast For IV Push Medications." ISMP Medication Safety Alert. Institute for Safe Medication Practices, 15 May 2003. Web. 20 Apr. 2015. .

Laws, Dawn, and Shelly Amato. "Incorporating Bedside Reporting into Change-of-Shift Report." Rehabilitation Nursing 35.2 (2010): 70-74. Rehabilitation NURSING. Rehabilitation NURSING, Mar.-Apr. 2010. Web. 20 Apr. 2015. .
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Postoperative patient falls an annotated bibliography

Words: 3307 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32867843

Postoperative Patient Falls

Hospitalized patient falls affect health in huge way as they directly affect safety of patients as well as the concern for the quality of healthcare public health facilities around the world provide to patients. While limited data and information is available concerning inpatient falls following patients going on surgery, falls among hospitalized patients have been extensively studies. Falls is one of the major causes of morbidity like lacerations, closed head injuries and fractures among patients (Vhurch et al., 2011).

It has been shown that fall measurements determine patient outcomes since falls are often reported as adverse events in hospitals among the adult patient population. Falls make up a big part of the problems plaguing the health sector globally. Of all the adverse events in a hospital setting, falls is one of the most significant with nearly 3-20% of inpatients experiencing a fall at least once over the…… [Read More]

Mandl, L.A., lyman, S., Quinlan, P., Bailey, T., Katz, J. & Magid, S.K. (2013). Falls Among Patients Who Had Elective Orthopaedic Surgery: A Decade of Experience from a Musculoskeletal Specialty Hospital. Journal of orthopaedic & sports physical therapy, 43(2), 91-96.

Quigley, P. & White, S. (May 31, 2013). Hospital-Based Fall Program Measurement and Improvement in High Reliability Organizations, OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing Vol. 18, No. 2

Vitor, A.F., Moura, L.A., Fernandes, A.P., Botarelli, F.R., Araujo, J.N. & Vitorino, I.C. (2015). Risk for Falls in Patients in The Postoperative Period, Cogitare Enferm. 20(1):29-37.
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Managing Quality Safety and Risk

Words: 2671 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69475225

He or she is also entitled to proper medication to deal with the disease.

It's not just the responsibility of medics to offer health care but the family members of the sick too play a very important role in caring about health. y accompanying the sick person to hospital and administering the prescribed medicine at home. As well, family members offer support by praying and giving the sick member company. Did you know that even loneliness is a health hazard.

Quality health care is individual responsibility. Every individual is supposed to make sure they have the best health always. Contagious diseases should be avoided at all costs, however, should we contact them then we should care for ourselves. A sick person should maintain bodily cleanliness and eat the right foods. Ones health should not also cause harm to neighbors at home and in public. Global concerns are also rising quickly…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baum F (1998).The new public health: an Australian perspective, Oxford University Press,

Melbourne.

Mannion R, Konteh F, Davies H (2008) Measuring culture for quality and safety improvement: a national survey of tools and tool use, Quality and Safety in Health Care (in press).

Mannion R, Davies H, Marshall M (2005) Cultural attributes of 'high' and 'low' performing hospitals. Journal of Health Organization and Management 19(6):431-9.
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Analyzing Patient Injuries and Malpractice

Words: 2089 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56761963

clinical cases and examine malpractice perspectives.

Background Info

Concerns over mounting healthcare expenses have resulted in increased inquiry into medical practices. With the rise of malpractice risk and medical liability to unprecedented levels, the field of medical law has influenced defensive medical practice as healthcare providers endeavor towards liability risk mitigation (Nahed, et.al, 2012).

Elements Needed to Prove Malpractice

Medical malpractice is associated with four fundamental elements, all of which have to be present for forming the base for any claim. For any case of medical malpractice to succeed, an attorney is required to prove all four aspects, which are: duty, causation, damages, and breach (What are the Elements of a Medical Malpractice Claim? n.d.). The first element -- Duty -- implies that health care professionals owe their patients the duty to take reasonable and appropriate action; i.e., the practitioner is accountable for delivering some form of treatment or care…… [Read More]

References

Florida Healthcare Law (n.d.). - A Florida Medical Malpractice Blog - Shoulder Dystocia Erbs Palsy. What are the Elements of a Medical Malpractice Claim? -- Florida Healthcare Law - A Florida Medical Malpractice Blog - Shoulder Dystocia Erbs Palsy. Retrieved March 8, 2016, from http://floridahealthcarelaw.com/what-are-the-elements-of-a-medical-malpractice-claim/

Kurreck, & Twersky. (2012). Home -- AHRQ Patient Safety Network. Residual Anesthesia: Tepid Burn -- AHRQ Patient Safety Network. Retrieved March 8, 2016, from http://psnet.ahrq.gov/webmm/case/276

Nahed, B., Babu, M., & Smith, T. (2012, June 22). Malpractice Liability and Defensive Medicine: A National Survey of Neurosurgeons. Retrieved March 7, 2016, from http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0039237

Saltzman, J. (2008, January 29). Medical Malpractice Attorneys Lubin & Meyer -- Boston, MA, NH, RI. Family Sues in Operating Room Fall - Wrongful Death Lawsuit. Retrieved March 8, 2016, from http://www.lubinandmeyer.com/news/or_fall.html
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Nurse-To-Patient Ratios Is it Important

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50584823



cute care facilities try to maintain low costs and employ quality nurses. Within this statement is a double standard. How can we have quality nurses and cut costs at the same time? This is where the skill mix comes into play. In the skill mix, there are Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), and unlicensed staff. If the lesser skilled staff free RNs they can be better able to perform their nursing duties and assessments. If acute care facilities can agree on an appropriate number of each type of staff member within the facility, they might be better able to accomplish safe patient outcomes while keeping costs down.

Determining nurse-to-patient ratios is a complex issue where one solution is not sufficient to cover all circumstances. The merican Nurses ssociation assembled a panel of nursing and health professionals to research appropriate staffing levels. The panel developed the following Matrix for…… [Read More]

Aiken and colleagues have been pioneers in studying nurse patient ratios and their relationship to patient outcomes.

Aiken, Sochalski, and Lake (1997) demonstrated that nursing presence, whether measured as RN ratios or as RN hours relative to other nursing personnel hours, is significantly correlated to mortality. When studying patient outcomes in specialized AIDS units,

Aiken, Sloan, Lake, Sochalski, and Weber (1999) found that at 30 days post admission, mortality rates were 60% lower in magnet hospitals, and 40% lower in dedicated AIDS units than in conventional scattered bed units. The researchers concluded that higher nurse patient ratios were a major factor in these lower
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Improving Patient Satisfaction Studies Have

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15860012

The baseline data for the study was recorded during the first 2 weeks of the 6-week study period. The study design consisted of analyses of the data collected from the experimental (1-hour rounds and 2-hour rounds) versus the control nursing units with a nonrandom assignment of hospital units to these respective groups (the assignment was the responsibility of chief nursing officers and nurse managers). Although the determined to conduct 1-hour or 2-hour nursing rounding was left up to the nursing executives at the participating hospitals, the principal investigator ensured that the sample was stratified as to type of unit (i.e., medical, surgical, or combined medical -- surgical), unit size, and frequency of nursing rounds.

7.

Adequacy of the Sample

The researchers identified 26 different reasons for the use of call lights by patients in their review of the literature and coded data from the 14 hospitals whose data satisfied the…… [Read More]

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Strategy in Reducing Patient Falls and Injuries in Hospitals

Words: 938 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15542295

Bed Alarms and Chair Alarms to educe Patients' Falls in A Short-Term Care Facility

Importance of bed alarms and chair alarms

Bed alarms have been taunted as not useful in the modern day healthcare deliveries. Nonetheless, the significance of these facilities always strikes much admiration from different healthcare facilities. Alarms are important as warning gadgets that every section of an organization should consider in its ranks. Hazard preparedness requires that all possible strategies adopted to ensure that there is safety for all the people, and even the property being used within a healthcare facility (Vincent, 2010). Thus, the bed and chair alarms are just material things that have been used to provide avenues for the protection of human health, minimizing and eventually stopping the occurrences of cases like patient fall and strain at the health facilities. In the modern hospitals, communication within and without the healthcare facilities between the patients…… [Read More]

References

Vernikos, J. (2011). Sitting Kills, Moving Heals: How Simple Everyday Movement Will Prevent Pain, Illness, And Early Death-- And Exercise Alone Won't. Fresno, Calif: Quill Driver Books

Vincent, C. (2010). Patient Safety. Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell.
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Mildreds Case Study Helping a Falling Patient

Words: 1614 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35677242

Mildred's Case Study

Mildred's Story was made to form part of a 'ecognizing isk and Improving Patient Safety' course. The progression takes a novel method to educating healthcare professionals in regards to the significance of non-clinical services, behavior and attitudes in guaranteeing the safety of the patient. It attracts upon the experiences of patients that are within healthcare settings, and information achieved from other high-risk businesses, to come up with a strategy allowing healthcare workers to disapprovingly appraise and interfere in the development of patient danger. There are so numerous prospects of improvement in Mildred's case study, but the writers designated Effective communication & patient assessment to resolve the issue of (patient falls).With that said, instead the researcher has used the SPO model along with using formwork (FOCUS- PDSA) also using tools (Fishbone, 6 huts, flow chart and 5 whys) in order to improve effective communication and patient assessment to…… [Read More]

References

Alireza, N., 2014. Evidence of Using FOCUS PDCA. [Online]

Available at: http://npmcweb-en.tbzmed.ac.ir/Uploads/37/cms/user/File/54/MEP/Effectiveness.pdf

[Accessed 10 December 2015].

Anon., 2015. What is the quality improvement process?. [Online]
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Critcal Analysis Paper on Patient'satisfaction

Words: 1460 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78256183

patient satisfaction with the care provided by nursing staff and physicians, as well as how satisfaction can be improved through better communication among physicians and nurses, and with their patients. It will, in particular, deal with a nursing student's own clinical experience with patients and their perception of healthcare provider-patient communication. In addition, the paper will examine the student's project which considered the strategy of updating white boards in patient rooms regularly for better communication.

Ten medical surgical ward patients were interviewed during rounds by a student, who rated patient satisfaction and tried to discover some common theme. While patients expressed satisfaction with how nursing staff delivered care, they felt physicians didn't keep them informed. A number of patients were visited by two or more doctors. However, there was no communication between doctors, leading to issues such as a patient being marked "not ready for surgery" by the cardiologist, owing…… [Read More]

References

(2008). Home - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Improving Patient-Staff Communication Through White Boards - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Retrieved August 6, 2016, from http://www.rwjf.org/en/library/articles-and-news/2008/06/improving-patient-staff-communication-through-white-boards.html

(n.d.). Institute for Healthcare Communication. Impact of Communication in Healthcare - Institute for Healthcare Communication. Retrieved August 2, 2016, from  http://healthcarecomm.org/about-us/impact-of-communication-in-healthcare/ 

(2011). JBI COnNECT+. Effective communication between registered nurses and adult oncology patients in inpatient settings. Retrieved August 2, 2016, from http://connect.jbiconnectplus.org/Viewsourcefile.aspx?0=7112

(n.d.). Journal of Nursing - RN Journal. The Importance of Communication and Education toward Patient Literacy. Retrieved August 2, 2016, from http://rnjournal.com/journal-of-nursing/the-importance-of-communication-and-education-toward-patient-literacy
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ED Patient Boarding Overcrowding in

Words: 587 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78364451

This would include more effective use of space and transfer strategies. There needs to be available strategies to help release some of the overcrowding within ED areas, especially within the context of peak periods.

Therefore, the research will look to find the most effective are to actually place these overflowing patients, where they are still in reach of ED services, while not overcrowding the actual ward itself. This research will explore the use of electric bed tracking systems as a way to effectively manage over populated areas and make the most advantage of other wards with less population. esearch suggests that "Electric systems for tracking bed status can be helpful in increasing the transparency of bed availability," (McLarty & Jeffers 2008 p 3). Are such practices feasible in an already tight hospital budget?

If this question can be answered effectively, it will have a huge positive impact on the healthcare…… [Read More]

References

McLarty, Jim & Jeffers, Lori. (2008). Is your patient throughput sending out an SOS? Healthcare Financial Management. Web. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3257/is_7_62/ai_n28072667/

Zimmerman, Richard S. (2004). Hospital capacity, productivity, and patient safety -- it all flows together. Frontiers of Health Services Management. 20(4)33-35.
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CPOE and Patient Health

Words: 2892 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89907782

CPOE primary use to manage cost and quality in the physician and pharmacy interaction?

An electronic process that enables providers of health care to manage the results of orders entered in to a computer electronically is known as Computer Provider Order Enter or CPOE. In line with the reports of Institute of Medicine (IOM) titled, "To Err is Human: uilding a Safer Health System and Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century," CPOE has commanded increased attention. Hospitals should be rewarded for introducing prescription systems as recommended by Leapfrog Group, which is a coalition of private and public providers of health care benefits. In ever-rising numbers, Health care systems are implementing CPOE as a way of improving both the quality of patient safety and care. The implementation of CPOE is, however, not only an information technology innovation, but it also encompasses delivery of health care…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2015, Febuary). Computerized Provider Order Entry. Retrieved from Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: http://healthit.ahrq.gov/key-topics/computerized-provider-order-entry

Centre for medicare and medicaid services. (2012). Stage 2 Eligible Professional Meaningful Use Core Measures Measure 1 of 17. Centre for medicare and medicaid services.

Classen, D., Avery, A., & Bates, D. (2007). Evaluation and Certification of Computerized Provider Order Entry Systems. Journal of American Medical informatics Association, 48-55.

Eslami, S., Abu-Hanna, A., & De. Keizer, N. (2007). Evaluation of Outpatient computerised physician medication order entry systems: A systematic review. Journal of American Informatics Association, 400-406.
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Role of Hourly Nurse Rounds in Reducing Falls Pressure Ulcers Call Lights Patient Satisfaction

Words: 3560 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59174424

hourly nurse rounds help to reduce falls, pressure ulcers, call light use and contribute to rise in patient satisfaction base on evidence base practice

The healthcare center is faced with numerous challenges affecting clinical results and client satisfaction (e.g., ulcers, use of call light and falls). The above challenges have brought on the need to develop and institute an appropriate framework to improve patient care delivery by means of better and increased interaction between patients and nurses. Chiefly, the creation of this sort of system necessitates striving for required authorization and assistance from leaders and staff members in the organization. This involves meeting with top management at organization appraisal board meetings, in addition to collaborating with peers concerning existing best practices for handling the issue. Taking into account organizational issues and nursing-related evidence-based practices (EBPs), the best answer to dealing with current issues is hourly nurse rounds. Implementing this recommended…… [Read More]

References

AIPPG (2011). Comfort theory. Nursing Theories. Retrieved September 5, 2015 from http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/comfort_theory_Kathy_Kolcaba.html

Brosey, L., & March, K. (2015).Effectiveness of Structured Hourly Nurse Rounding on Patient Satisfaction and Clinical Outcomes. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 30(2), 153-159. doi:10.1097/ncq.

Carroll, D., Dykes, P., & Hurley, A. (2010). Patients' perspectives of falling while in an acute care hospital and suggestions for prevention. Applied Nursing Research, 23(4), 238-241. doi:10.1016/j.apnr.2008.10.003

Deitrick, L., Baker, K., Paxton, H., Flores, M., & Swavely, D. (2012).Hourly Rounding. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 27(1), 13-19. doi:10.1097/ncq.0b013e318227d7dd