Physical Health Essays (Examples)

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Health of Indigenous Australian Using Ecological and

Words: 2500 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72970397

Health of Indigenous Australian Using Ecological and Holistic Health Paradigm

Patterns of health and illness

Physical Health

Mental Health

Spiritual Health

Social Health

Impact of Broader Environments

Natural

Built

Social

Economic

Political

Critical eflection

Health is a basic component of human life that comprises of multiple facets. The description of health has witnessed dramatic change during past few years, as it has become a holistic phenomenon. Previously, it was considered that a healthy person is the one who does not suffer from any ailment or illness. However in recent times, the physical, psychological and communal aspects of human life have been amalgamated to give a broader perspective to human health which is identical to the concept of indigenous communities (Hjelm, 2010).

Numerous organizations are working extensively for providing adequate health care to the world population since many decades. However, it is appalling to notice that discrimination on social, economic and…… [Read More]

References

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2012, Australia's health 2012, AIHW, Australia.

Biddle, N & Yap, M 2010, Demographic and Socioeconomic Outcomes Across the Indigenous Australian Lifecourse: Evidence from the 2006 Census, ANU E. Press, Australia.

Caltabiano, ML & Ricciardelli, L 2012, Applied Topics in Health Psychology, John Wiley & Sons, Great Britain.

Carson, B, Dunbar, T & Chenhall, RD 2007, Social Determinants of Indigenous Health, Allen & Unwin, Singapore.
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Health and Psychology in the Past Research

Words: 622 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2634400

Health and Psychology

In the past, research findings have pointed out that illnesses are brought about by a constellation of factors. This effectively means that contrary to popular belief, no single factor can be said to cause illness and hence social, psychological and biological factors all have a role to play in relation to illness. It is on this realization that health psychology is founded. In this text, I concern myself on health and psychology.

The elationship between Health and Psychology

In basic terms, psychology concerns itself with mental processes and behavior. According to Pitts and Phillips (1998), health psychology addresses a number of questions regarding the link between health and psychology through identifying how health and illness relates to an individual's emotional psychological bases. In a large way, an individual's physical health remains intertwined (sometimes inexorably) with his or her mental state. Thus effectively, our vulnerability to ailments can…… [Read More]

References

Pitts, M. & Phillips, K. (1998). The Psychology of Health: An Introduction. Routledge
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Health Wars Phillip Day Argues

Words: 614 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60206997



The information contained in Health ars is of tremendous benefit to all readers. e need to take more control over our own health, especially given the rising cost of health care insurance and the exorbitant prices of doctor and hospital bills. Preventing problems depends largely on paying attention to our genetic history: finding out what problems our mothers, fathers, and grandparents and adapting our lifestyle accordingly. Reading Day's book also encourages readers to learn more about common problems and possible solutions that involve diet and lifestyle changes. Taking responsibility for our health is one of the main themes in Health ars. Readers should take heed of what Day believes to be a crisis in modern medicine: the inability or unwillingness to practice common sense prevention.

I would recommend Health ars highly for several reasons. First, I believe that the health care crisis might be one of the most important problems…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Day, Phillip. Health Wars. Credence, 2001.
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Healthcare Hispanic Community and Healthcare This Paper

Words: 503 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76590063

Healthcare

Hispanic Community and Healthcare

This paper is an examination of how the Hispanic community experiences healthcare. The data from a number of articles related to the subject form the basis for the conclusions reached in the analysis.

One study looked at whether Hispanic-specific training should be included for healthcare worker training. It was found that there is a serious lack of training that is currently implemented regardless the community examined. Healthcare workers were unaware of social conventions that were normal among their Hispanic clients which limited the effectiveness of the healthcare treatment given. Because women were unable to discuss personal problems with male healthcare workers and males had similar issues with females, it was difficult for the various agencies to be truly effective. The recommendation, of course, was to include a training curriculum that included cultural training.

Another issue that Hispanic individuals faced is that they were underrepresented in…… [Read More]

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Health Having Developed My Values

Words: 619 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63730499

It is from this spiritual foundation that I wish to approach healthcare as a professional nurse. Healthcare is my duty, and I shall see to it that I "freely give" of my energy to heal the sick and communicate the word of God via my work.

Heartfelt concern for human beings is a core Christian ideal. In a Christian light, healthcare is not as controversial as it is made out to be in the American media. Rather, the issue of healthcare parallels the three Christian norms of love, justice and peacemaking. To love others is to put into practice Jesus' advice to love our neighbors as ourselves. No matter what a patient's background or physical condition, that individual has the right to receive the best care possible. Love is caring in action, which is the job of the nurse. Justice refers to equal treatment of all patients. Within a Christian…… [Read More]

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Health and Social Sciences Grade Course Health

Words: 2334 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84059300

Health and Social Sciences

Grade Course

Health, Well Being and Social Care in UK

Sociological Perspective of Health and Well Being in UK

Psychological Perspective of Health and Well Being in UK

Psycho-Social Needs of Service Users in UK

Health and Social Sciences

This report casts light upon the various aspects of physical and mental health of people living in United Kingdom. The selected sample chosen for this study belongs to the settings of people who do not belong to UK from their old generations and they are spending the lives of homelessness there. In other words, the paper is about physical and mental health of people who belong to other areas of the world but are settled in UK for education of job purpose. Since they are outsiders, they do not have permanent place to live in, they make temporal arrangements depending upon their requirements. Their priorities are different…… [Read More]

References

BBC News, 2011. Archbishop calls for NHS bill to cover spiritual health. [Online] Available at: <  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-15570290  > [Accessed 07 Oct 2012]

Department of Health, 2012. Public Health, adult social care and the NHS. [online] Available at: < http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/index.htm > [Accessed 07 Oct 2012]

International Health Insurance, 2012. 3 Easy Steps to Health Insurance. [Online] Available at: < http://www.international-health-insurance.com / > [Accessed 07 Oct 2012]

Men's Health News, 2012. The Hardest Workout You're not Doing. [online] Available at: < http://news.menshealth.com/the-hardest-workout-youre-not-doing/2012/02/10 / > [Accessed 07 Oct 2012]
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Health Promotion

Words: 3496 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28197192

Health Promotion

The absence of illness does not thoroughly explain "Health", it can as well be described as wellness of the body and mind. More technically, health can be defined from two perspectives -- bodily and psychological health. A state of well-being due to regular exercises, adequate nutrition, sufficient rest, sensitivity to signs of sickness and when to seek help is referred to as Physical health. A person's fitness is showcased by his/her body make-up, cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular stability, and adaptability. Mental wellness refers to psychological and emotional welfare.

As defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO), mental health is "a state of wellness in which an individual discovers and harnesses his abilities, make headways regardless of stress encountered in life, can complete tasks adequately and profitably with substantial end product, and also contributes immensely to the uplift of his or her locality." (Nordqvist, 2015). A means of enabling people…… [Read More]

References

Boundless, 2016. Research Methods for Evaluating Treatment Efficacy - Boundless Open Textbook. Boundless. Available at: https://www.boundless.com/psychology/textbooks/boundless-psychology-textbook/treating-psychological-disorders-19/introduction-to-the-treatment-of-psychological-disorders-99/research-methods-for-evaluating-treatment-efficacy-382-12917/ [Accessed June 27, 2017].

Brassai, L, Piko, B, & Steger, M 2011, 'Meaning in Life: Is It a Protective Factor for Adolescents' Psychological Health?', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 18, 1, p. 44, Advanced Placement Source, EBSCOhost, viewed 27 June 2017.

Cuijpers, P. et al., 2014. EU-Compass for Action on Mental Health and Well-being. PREVENTION OF DEPRESSION AND PROMOTION OF RESILIENCE. Available at: https://ec.europa.eu/health/sites/health/files/mental_health/docs/ev_20161006_co03_en.pdf [Accessed June 27, 2017].

Gillham, J.E. et al., 2012. Preventing Depression in Early Adolescent Girls: The Penn Resiliency and Girls in Transition Programs. Handbook of Prevention and Intervention Programs for Adolescent Girls, pp.124 -- 161.
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Health Care & Faith Diversity it Is

Words: 1406 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31369841

Health Care & Faith Diversity

It is quite obvious how different religions hold different philosophical views on various aspects and even when it comes to healing. Each religion highly upholds their spiritual values hence the need for health practitioners to be cautious while handling varied clientele whether they hold the same religious sentiments or not. In this research we will major on the views held by the Sikh, Buddhist and Judaist religions in comparison to the Christian belief on healing.

Sikh religion

The Sikh hold the belief that when one is sick it is the will of God and that He is merciful to heal; however one has to consider medical treatment in order to get well. During illness: Sikh patients engage in prayers to seek God for help, seek to obtain peace by remembering Gods name, recite sacred hymns (Gurbani) which are words from the holy scriptures (Guru Granth…… [Read More]

References:

Dharma Haven, (2005).Tools for Healing Relaxing and Awakening. Retrieved March 30,

2012 from  http://www.dharma-haven.org/tibetan/healing.htm 

Manitoba, (2006). Core Competencies for Spiritual health care Practitioners. Retrieved March 30, 2012 from http://ahpcc.org.uk/pdf/compaudittool.pdf

Marinell & James (2009). Jewish Views of Illness and Healing. Retrieved March 30, 2012
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Health System Management

Words: 2067 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38807038

Health System Management

State why this issue selected by the student.

In modern lifestyles, work stress is getting very common. Social life and work both have undergone drastic change in this new century. All the professions have been hit directly and even the physical health of the professionals has been affected badly because of it. With the health of the workers the health of the organization is also affected adversely (AACN, 2008).

On one side, where there is a heavy demand of life improving actions on the other side we see a demand of better customer services. It is an employee's duty to fulfill the demand of the customers, even if he is stressed, while doing so he must have a firm believe on the fact that customers are always correct (AACN, 2008).

There lies an indirect link between the hospital's high employer turnover rate during the residency program and…… [Read More]

References

American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2008, September). Fact Sheet: Nursing Shortage. Retrieved March 23, 2009, from AACN Web site:http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Media/FactSheets/NursingShortage.htm

Chulay, M. & Burns, S. (2010) AACN Essentials of Progressive Care Nursing. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill

Hodges, H.F., Keeley, A.C., & Troyan, P.J. (2008). Professional Resilience in Baccalaureate-Prepared Acute Care Nurses: First Steps. Nursing Education Perspectives, 80-89.

Kim, H.J., Shin, K.H. And Swanger, N. (2009). Burnout and engagement: A comparative analysis using the Big Five personality dimensions. International Journal of Hospitality Management 28, 96 -- 104
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Physical and Mental Disorders for

Words: 1325 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61490952

Usually, diagnosis is symptom driven, then combined with testing, forms an opinion, sometimes verified by lab tests, of a specific diagnosis. For instance, someone may have symptoms of nausea, pain, depression, anxiety, and their skin has a yellowish hue. The physician runs blood tests and finds that the liver is malfunctioning and there is likely a diagnosis of hepatitis. In this case, there are both physical and mental symptoms, but it is the physical nature that is diagnosed first. For mental diagnosis, symptoms are also important, but are based more on the functioning of the individual in social systems, or by observing the patient's behavior (How are Mental Illnesses Diagnosed? 2012). Thus, both use symptoms as a guide, but mental diagnosis is more empirical and uses observation, while physical diagnosis uses quantitative measurements.

Etiology- Etiology is the study of basic causation. We now know that there are a number of…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

American Psychiatric Association Practice Guidelines. (2006). PsychiatryOnline. Retrieved from: http://psychiatryonline.org/guidelines.aspx

How are Mental Illnesses Diagnosed? (2012). WebMD. Retrieved from:  http://www.webmd.com/anxiety-panic/guide/mental-health-making-diagnosis 

Curtis, a.J. et.al. (2000), Introduction to Health Psychology, New York: Routledge.

Dombeck, M. (2003). Blurring the Boundary Between Mental and Physical. Seven Counties Services, Inc. Retrieved from: http://www.sevencounties.org / poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=1855&cn=74
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Healthcare for Mentally Impaired Patients Probing What

Words: 3532 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69380077

Healthcare for Mentally Impaired Patients

Probing what information is available about the current status of placement or accommodation and level of personal healthcare available to mentally impaired and emotionally disturbed individuals, it is clear that the analysis is as diverse as there are different mental illnesses. While statistics on managed care treatment for people with severe and disabling mental illnesses are sparse, it is evident that the financial responsibility to care for and house these patients is enormous.

According to Dr. David Satcher, the Surgeon General (1999), approximately 20% of the U.S. adult population has a mental illness. He says, "These illnesses include anxiety disorders, mood disorders, anorexia nervosa, and severe cognitive impairment. More serious mental illnesses include ipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Mental illness accounts for 15% of overall burden of disease -- more than malignant cancer and respiratory diseases -- and as far back as 1996 the direct cost…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Boulard, G. (2000, April). Forgotten Patients the Mentally Ill. State Legislatures, 26, 12. Retrieved February 13, 2004, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.

Callahan, D. (1993, October) Minds and hearts: priorities in mental health services.

The Hastings Center Report.

Fox, M. & Kim, K. (2004, January) Evaluating a Medicaid Home and Community-based Physical Disability Waiver. Family and Community Health. Vol 27: 37.
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Health Self-Assessment Identify Which Three of the

Words: 932 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77143393

Health Self-Assessment

Identify which three of the six dimensions of health you are strongest in.

According to this self-assessment instrument, my three strongest health dimensions are Social Health, Spiritual Health, and Intellectual Health. I scored a 4 out of 5 in each of those areas. By comparison, I scored a 3 in each of the other three measures (Physical Health, Emotional Health, and Environmental Health.

Describe why you think the identified three dimensions are your strongest.

I scored well in Social Health because I am comfortable with the impressions that I make on people and because I tend to get along well with others. I also participate in various social activities and genuinely enjoy interacting with others, including those who are different from me. My family relationships are healthy and fulfilling, I am fully present and available in my personal relationships, I am considerate of others, I contribute positively to…… [Read More]

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Health Needs for Teenage Pregnancies What Are

Words: 742 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98973660

Health Needs for Teenage Pregnancies

hat are the special needs of teenagers who are pregnant? Certainly the fact that an expectant mother in her teens is quite different than a married woman in her mid-twenties in terms of the psychology -- and the physical needs -- of her condition, and so there are things a pregnant teenager needs that are likely different from a mature woman. This paper delves into those special needs and basic situations that teenagers face when pregnant.

The Healthcare Needs of Pregnant Teenagers

First of all, according to Tricia Michels, writing in Public Health Reports, pregnant teens are already facing "stigmatization in many aspect of their lives" just by the mere fact that they are pregnant and all their friends are living normal teenage lives (Michels, 2000, p. 557). Hence, tending to their new unborn babies is another challenge that must be approached with intelligence and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Coila, Bridget. (2010). Health Risks for Pregnant Teens. Livestrong.com. Retrieved December

13, 2012, from  http://www.livestrong.com .

Michels, Tricia M. (2000). "Patients Like Us": Pregnant and Parenting Teens View the Health

Care System. Public Health Reports, Volume 115, 557-575.
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Health Culture & Globalization Health Culture and

Words: 886 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47542333

Health, Culture & Globalization

Health, Culture and Globalization

Culture plays an integral role in the lives of societies and individuals all over the world. Across countries and societies, different kinds of culture exist and govern the daily lives of people. Defined technically, culture is the system of beliefs, norms, values, and traditions that a specific group of people perceives and considers as their worldview. Countries have different cultures, and within each culture exists sub-cultures, created because of the diversity/differences existing from even the same group of people with the same nationality, race, or ethnic membership.

Culture inadvertently affects every aspect of an individual's life. Its influence could be as mundane as deciding what to wear and eat for the day, or as critical and important not only to the individual but also to the society, such as deciding who to vote for depending on the candidate's similarities in beliefs and…… [Read More]

References

Eckersley, R. (2007). "Culture, spirituality, religion and health: looking at the big picture." The Medical Journal of Australia, (186)10 Suppl.

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria. Available at:  http://www.theglobalfund.org/en/ 

Huynen, M., P. Martens and H. Hilderink. (2005). "The health impacts of globalization: a conceptual framework." Globalization and Health, (1)14.
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Health Topic With a Sociological

Words: 1997 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68132507



Does Socio-economic Status Impact lives of People with HIV and AIDS?

Individuals with a lower socio-economic status are more prone to contracting HIV and AIDS virus. This measure also determines how individual status, relates to proper medical care. Lack of socioeconomic strength associated to the practice of risky sexual behaviors results to HIV contraction. Men engage in sexual intercourse with many partners without using a condom (Will 2000). Women at this lower level engage in riskier sexual behaviors. Homeless people are more vulnerable to infection, women in such situations are prone to rape and, men are most likely drug users. Individuals with low socioeconomic resources are prone to injury, which makes the susceptible to the effects of the virus that affects the central nervous system (Earnshaw, Valerie and Stephenie 2009).

Does HIV Infection Affect the Socio Sconomic Status of Infected Persons?

HIV and AIDS have negative impacts on the productivity…… [Read More]

References

Semple, S.J., Patterson, T.L., Temoshok, L.R., McCutchan, J.A., Straits-Troster,

K., Chandler, J.A., & Grant, I. 2003. "Identification of psychobiological stressors among HIV-positive women." Women & Health, 20(4), 15-36.

Earnshaw, Valerie a., and Stephenie R. Chaudoir.2009. "From conceptualizing to measuring HIV stigma: a review of HIV stigma mechanism measures." AIDS

and Behavior 13.6 (2009): 1160-1177.
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Health at Age 19 I

Words: 1731 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39318649

I want to die knowing that I did everything I could with my life to feel and be as successful as possible.

During my golden years, I will continue to exercise as much as possible. The type of exercise I do will be varied, as it will be necessary to incorporate some cardiovascular activity using a gym or personal trainer. I will do yoga and meditate also, perhaps even more often than before. Turning inward for introspection will help me to reflect regularly on my life and how I hope to spend my later years. By the time I die, I will feel ready and at peace with myself.

My personal eulogy will be humble and reflect the fact that I did my best. I want to be remembered as someone who was intelligent and balanced in their approach to life. Being healthy is one of the most important things…… [Read More]

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Health and Fitness Survey Hour Fitness a

Words: 1110 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74445949

Health and Fitness Survey

Hour Fitness, a global leader in fitness, is committed to making fitness accessible and affordable to people of all fitness levels. The company is the largest privately owned fitness chain in the world, with clubs in the United States, Europe and Asia. In the United States, 24-Hour Fitness and its Q. Sports Clubs division are the industry leaders in fitness. In Asia clubs operate as California Fitness. In Europe clubs operate as S.A.T.S. Sports Clubs. In Norway, Sweden and Denmark, clubs operates as Form and Fitness.

Convenient locations, the latest equipment, affordable prices, knowledgeable staff and outstanding service, as well as facilities that are open up to 24 hours a day, seven days a week, are all factors that have contributed to the company's tremendous growth and success.

For this project, Steve Gordon, Personal Training Director of 24-Hour Fitness, Northern California Division, was interviewed on November…… [Read More]

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Health Care -- Introduction of Evaluation Plan

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3562634

Health Care -- Introduction of Evaluation Plan:

Los Angeles Department of Mental Health Services

he Los Angeles Department of Mental Health Services (LADMH) is the largest mental health department in the United States. reating more than 250,000 patients of all ages every year, LADMH stresses the importance of community for adequately addressing mental health issues. Furthermore, in order to serve its stated mission of enriching lives through partnership with the community, the Department has developed six long-term goals supported by multiple short-term goals.

he Mission of the Organization Responsible for Implementing the Program

he stated mission of the Los Angeles Department of Mental Health Services (LADMH) is "Enriching lives through partnership designed to strengthen the community's capacity to support recovery and resiliency" (Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, n.d.)

he Program's Short and/or Long-erm Goals

LADMH is a comprehensive program that stresses the importance of community for effectively addressing…… [Read More]

The stated mission of the Los Angeles Department of Mental Health Services (LADMH) is "Enriching lives through partnership designed to strengthen the community's capacity to support recovery and resiliency" (Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, n.d.)

The Program's Short and/or Long-Term Goals

LADMH is a comprehensive program that stresses the importance of community for effectively addressing mental health issues (Edmund G. "Pat" Brown Institute of Public Affairs, 2010). The organization has six long-term goals supported by multiple short-term goals. The first long-term goal, to "Enhance the quality and capacity, within available resources, of mental health services and supports in partnership with clients, family members, and communities to achieve hope, wellness, recovery and resiliency," is supported by the short-term goals of: developing a system providing a balanced and "transformed continuum" of services to as many County clients as possible, according to the program's resources; providing integrated mental/physical health and substance abuse treatment to improve service quality and the clients' well-being; assisting clients' establishment of their own goals and the best process for achieving those goals; inclusion and support of clients' families as a vital aspect of the clients' recovery (Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, n.d.). The second long-term goal to "Eliminate disparities in mental health services, especially those due to race, ethnicity and culture" is supported by the short-term goals of: developing programs for early intervention for underserved populations; working with underserved communities to provide services in ways that reduce and overcome traditional barriers to treatment such as socioeconomics, culture, race, language, religion, age, disability and sexual orientation; develop programs that reach out to and educate the population in order to reduce the stigma of mental health treatment, promote tolerance of and increase compassion for persons suffering from mental illness, and reduce the incidence/severity of mental illness (Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, n.d.). The third long-term goal to "Enhance the community's social and emotional well-being through collaborative Partnerships" is supported by the short-term goals of: creating effective partnerships/models for integrating mental/physical health and substance abuse treatment; establishing, supporting and enhancing the organization's partnerships with community organizations in natural environments to enhance the community's well-being; increasing collaboration with organizations, individuals and families that serve children and youth in order to address the mental health of children and youth; strengthening partnerships among mental health organizations, courts, probation and law enforcement to best address the mental health needs of the community's children and youth; partnering with educational institutions ranging from pre-school through higher education to enhance the provision of mental health services; and partnering with religious organizations to use spirituality in supporting mental health recovery goals (Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, n.d.; (Edmund G. "Pat" Brown Institute of Public Affairs, 2010). The fourth long-term goal to "Create and enhance a culturally diverse, client- and family-driven, mental health workforce capable of meeting the needs of our diverse communities" is supported by the short-term goals of:
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Health Benefits of Coffee Numerous

Words: 2432 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57378029



The amount of caffeine being consumed is apparently of great importance, as approximately 200 mg can increase one's chances to get better results on an attentiveness performance test while an approximate of 400 mg can do the opposite. Caffeine abuse can lead to serious problems in the case of people who need to be alert. Caffeine was tested in a series of other cognitive-related experiments but none of them produced satisfying results (Snel, Lorist, and Tieges 58).

Coffee contains numerous chemicals, each of them adding to its flavor and to the effects it produces on the body, with the most notable of them being caffeine. The aroma coffee releases is surely seductive, as there is nothing else like it. From the very first moment one opens the coffee recipient numerous microscopic particles are inhaled, stimulating the olfactory nerve, this sensation getting even more intense when the brew is actually ready…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

1. Greene, Lindsey A. "New Grounds for Drinking Coffee," Environmental Health Perspectives 108.7 (2000).

2. Halweil, Brian. "Why Your Daily Fix Can Fix More Than Your Head: Coffee, If Grown Right, Can Be One of the Rare Human Industries That Actually Restore the Earth's Health," World Watch May 2002.

3. Pendergrast, Mark Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee and How It Transformed Our World (New York: Basic Books, 1999).

4. Snel, Jan. Lorist, Monicque M. And Tieges, Zoe. "4 Coffee, Caffeine, and Cognitive Performance," Coffee, Tea, Chocolate, and the Brain, ed. Astrid Nehlig (Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2004)
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Health Eating Disorders an Eating

Words: 1051 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99758213

Some doctors believe that genetic factors are the core cause of a lot of eating disorders. esearchers have found specific chromosomes that may be associated with bulimia and anorexia, specifically regions on chromosome 10 that have been linked to bulimia as well as obesity. There has been evidence that has shown that there is an association with genetic factors being responsible for serotonin, the brain chemical involved with both well-being and appetite. esearchers have also determined that certain proteins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are thought to influence a person's vulnerability to developing an eating disorder (Eating disorders -- Causes, 2010).

The advance of food in Western countries has become extremely problematic. The food that is produced in the U.S. every year is enough to supply 3,800 calories to everyone on a daily basis. This is far more than is needed for good nutrition. Obesity is a worldwide epidemic,…… [Read More]

References

Eating Disorders. (n.d.). Retrieved June 19, 2010, from National Mental Health Information

Center Web site: http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/allpubs/ken98-

0047/default.asp

Eating Disorders. (2009). Retrieved June 19, 2010, from National Institute of Mental Health
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Healthcare Reform Rests on Changes to Nurse Roles

Words: 1648 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86533978

Evolution of Nursing oles in an Enlarged National Health Care System

The Affordable Care Act enables the provision of health insurance to 30 million people above the coverage figures prior to the enactment of the law. Because of this precipitous rise in the number of health insurance members, access to care as a function of the availability of primary care providers has been a leading issue in the transition to the nation-wide system of health care insurance. Public health models and nursing practice arrangements are changing in order to meet the immediate and anticipated care needs that have been brought to bear on the health care systems.

Public Health and Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHCs)

From the earliest days of public health, the roles of nurses have been embedded in the social, educational, and political needs of communities. Health education has functioned as a springboard to community organizing, patient advocacy,…… [Read More]

References

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. (2005, January). CMS.gov. Retrieved from http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Medicare-Fee-for-Service-Payment/ACO/index.html

Kulbok, P.A., Thatcher, E., Park, E., & Meszaros, P.S. (2012, May). Evolving public health nursing roles: Focus on community participatory health promotion and prevention. The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing (OJIN), 17(2). DOI: 10.3912/OJIN.Vol17No02Man01. Retrieved from  http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Vol-17-2012/No2-May-2012/Evolving-Public-Health-Nursing-Roles.html 

National Conference of State Legislatures. (2012, September). The Medical Home Model of Care. Retrieved from http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/the-medical-home-model-of-care.aspx

Reid, R., Haggerty, J., & McKendry, R. (2002, March). Final Report. Defusing the confusion: Concepts and measures of continuity of healthcare. Canadian Health Services Research Foundation, the Canadian Institute for Health Information, and the Advisory Committee on Health Services of the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Deputy Ministers of Health. Retrieved from  http://www.hpm.org/Downloads/Bellagio/Articles/Continuity/cr_contcare_e.pdf
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Health and Reproductive Rights the Issues at

Words: 1281 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87433122

health and reproductive rights, the issues at stake are women's physical health and their physical autonomy. One of the main arguments that the authors make is that women's health has been compromised because of their inability to exercise autonomy. For example, the debate over reproductive rights, whether access to safe and legal abortion or access to birth control, has endangered women's physical safety. However, the ability to exercise autonomy in health control decisions is not limited to reproductive decisions; approximately one in five women between the ages of 18 and 64 lack health insurance, which strips them of the financial ability to make important health decisions (Shaw & Lee, 2009). This leads to discussions of social factors surrounding health.

In chapter seven, which focuses on family systems and family lives, the issues at stake are how family is defined by society. There has been a significant change in society from…… [Read More]

References

Bruggink, H. (2009). Don't give up your day job: Leslie Bennetts on the feminine mistake. In Shaw, S. & Lee, J. (Eds.) Women's voices, feminist visions: Classic and contemporary readings (4th ed.). pp. 404-407, New York: McGraw-Hill.

Cooney, E. (2009). The way it was. In Shaw, S. & Lee, J. (Eds.) Women's voices, feminist visions: Classic and contemporary readings (4th ed.). pp. 369-375, New York: McGraw-Hill.

Goldman, E. (1910). Marriage and love. In Shaw, S. & Lee, J. (Eds.) Women's voices, feminist visions: Classic and contemporary readings (4th ed.). pp. 396-397, New York: McGraw-Hill.

Gomes, C. (2009). Partners as parents challenges faced by gays denied marriage. In Shaw, S. & Lee, J. (Eds.) Women's voices, feminist visions: Classic and contemporary readings (4th ed.). pp. 408-413, New York: McGraw-Hill.
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Health Is Affected by Behaviors Economics and

Words: 1115 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1072453

health is affected by behaviors, economics, and social structure.

Health is affected by behaviors in that if good habits are formed from the latter, the former is then influenced positively. However, if practices like smoking and excess alcohol consumption, the former is impacted negatively. Williams and Torrens (2010) has noted that intake of alcohol "beyond a moderate level is associated with numerous physiological complications including cirrhosis of the liver, various cancers, intestinal disorders, and brain function deterioration…Alcohol abuse results in illness and injury to others, including-but certainly not limited to-vehicular accidents, workplace injuries, poor fetal outcomes associated with fetal alcohol syndrome, and spousal and child abuse." The dietary behaviors people make in their lives has an effect in their lives, for example it may cause "enhanced morbidity and mortality…elevated consumption of fat, sodium, and sugar, leading to an epidemic of obesity and associated problems" (Williams and Torrens, 2010). Health is…… [Read More]

References

Cohen, M. (2000). Changing patterns of infectious disease. Nature, 406, 762-767.

Fauci, A. (2001). Infectious Diseases: Considerations for the 21st Century. Clin Infect Dis, 32(5), 675-685.

OTA. (1976). Development of medical technology opportunities for assessment.. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment.

Olshansky, S., Passaro, D., Hershow, R., Layden, J., Carnes, B., Brody, J., et al. (2005). A Potential Decline in Life Expectancy in the United States in the 21st Century. N Engl J. Med, 352, 1138-1145. Retrieved April 24, 2011, from http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMsr043743#t=article
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Health in the Old Testament

Words: 1516 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69447435

The healing of Hezekiah in 2 Kings 20:1-11 explains that God can provide proper treatment for terminal illnesses and add years to life, but the necessity is to heal your inner self, your soul, which is in your hand. ("The biblical basis of healing in Old Testament," n. d.)

The idea is considered to be very true. Anxiety, distress and tension because of bad habits, irrational ways of living and improper routine practices often brings up the illnesses in a healthy body. By healing one's inner self and practicing meditation and patience, one can improve their inner health that provides strength to improve the physical health. This strength works as perfect aid for the outside healing process assisted by doctors and physicians.

eferences

Siegel, Bernie. (1990) "Love, Medicine and Miracles: Lessons Learned about Self-

Healing from a Surgeon' Experience with Exceptional Patients," Harper Paperbacks.

John ev. (2009) "The Currency of…… [Read More]

References

Siegel, Bernie. (1990) "Love, Medicine and Miracles: Lessons Learned about Self-

Healing from a Surgeon' Experience with Exceptional Patients," Harper Paperbacks.

John Rev. (2009) "The Currency of Healing: Old Testament' & 'The Currency of Healing: New Testament" Retrieved 21 July 2010 from http://www.mountainsideunited.ca/node/311

N.A. (n. d.) "The biblical basis of healing in Old Testament" Retrieved 21 July 2010
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Health Sciences

Words: 4995 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35996922

meticulous construction of the data analysis, statistical tabulation, and interpretation is provided in the following pages.

SPSS was used to manage and calculate the researcher-designed data.

Researcher-Designed Questions

Questions numbered 1-11 were administered as a part of the SF-36 mental inventory. As stated earlier, these questions provide a standard assessment means to assess clinical outcome and mental health. However, they are inadequate to assist in assessing quality of life in patients undergoing on-pump and off-pump by-pass surgery.

Questions 12-30 were research developed and designed to give a more accurate assessment of patient satisfaction with the two procedures. These questions were divided into categories which are representative of factors commonly associated with quality of life. The categories are Mental health, Cognitive ability, Social support, General health, and Bodily pain. Demographic data is contained in questions 21-26 and will be used to identify confounding factors. For purposes of data analysis, the questions…… [Read More]

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Health and Physical Services for the Homeless

Words: 1201 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73509011

Human Services Intervention for the Homeless

Working with homeless people is one of the challenging tasks in the social sector. Similar to other social worker position, supporting homeless people can be very difficult and challenging because most of the homeless people are a drug addict, jobless, and suffer from mental disorders. Homelessness is a condition without having access to a regular dwelling. Thus, homeless are people who are unable to acquire safe, regular, and secure housing units. Thus, anybody cannot just work with this set of the population, social workers or other professionals ready to work with this set of people should possess interpersonal skills to work successfully with them.

The objective of this paper is to address the interpersonal skills to work homeless.

Interpersonal skills to work with Homeless

A strong communication skill is one of the interpersonal skills needed to work with homeless people. A social or health…… [Read More]

Reference

Finfgeld-Connett, D. Bloom, T.L. & Johnson, E.D. (2012). Perceived Competency and Resolution of Homelessness Among Women With Substance Abuse Problems. Qualitative Health Research

22(3) 416-427.

Finfgeld-Connett, D. (2010). Becoming homeless, being homeless, and resolving homelessness among women. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 31, 461-469.
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Interview of a Health Care Leader

Words: 2539 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74030797

Healthcare

The term health care refers to the inter-related system of care provided to persons during illness. In most of the cases, healthcare begins with the family doctor who refers patient to specialists if needed or directly order further diagnostic testing. Community health clinics perform the same procedure as a family doctor, but alongside with that, clinics also provide insight into patterns of health or illness seen within the community. Hospital just form one part of the healthcare community, as are mostly visited when a patient's condition is more acute and requires intervention by the hospitals high-end staff, since more can be done for him in a hospital rather than in a clinic where he is just an out-patient.

Clinics of various types provide very specific services, such as "pain management clinics" these clinics are targeted for towards people suffering from pain conditions. ehabilitation services also form a needed part…… [Read More]

References

DDI (2006) Health Care Global Comparison: Leadership Forecast 2005|2006. DDI, Pennsylvania.

DDI (2007) Leading the Past: Preparing the Future. DDI, Pennsylvania.

Fischer (2007) Culture and cultural analysis as experimental systems. Cultural Anthropology. 21(1) 1-65.

Greenfield D (2007) The enactment of dynamic leadership. Leadership in Health Sciences. 20(3) 159-168.
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Critique of a Hospice Health Promotion Plan

Words: 707 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14806907

Health Promotion Plan

Health Promotion in Hospice

The use of Dorothea Orem's Self-Care Theory as the framework for the health promotion plan, for improving depressive symptoms among hospice patients (Nursing Theories, 2012), is appropriate and consistent with a patient-centered care model. This model provides enough room for a gradient of patient self-care efficacy, from fully autonomous to unconscious, which is appropriate for the hospice setting. The author of Health Promotion in Hospice emphasized the need to increase the care efficacy of both hospice patients and their caregivers and mentioned how the role of a hospice nurse must remain fluid to constantly changing care needs of hospice patients. Under Orem's model there is thus a gradient of self-care need and autonomy that is negatively correlated and where deficits emerge the nurse must step in to meet these care needs.

I would also emphasize the concept of 'nursing client' discussed in Orem's…… [Read More]

References

Hirdes, J.P., Freeman, S., Smith, T.F., & Stolee, P. (2012). Predictors of caregiver distress among palliative home care clients in Ontario: Evidence based on the interRAI Palliative Care. Palliative & Supportive Care, 10(3), 155-63.

Murray, R.B., Zentner, J.P., & Yakimo, R. (2008). Health Promotion Strategies Through the Life Span. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.

Ng, C.G., Boks, M.P., Roes, K.C., Zainal, N.Z., Sulaiman, A.H., Tan, S.B. et al. (2014). Rapid response to methyphenidate as an add-on therapy to mirtazapine in the treatment of major depressive disorder in terminally ill cancer patients: A four-week, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. European Neuropsychopharmacology, published online ahead of print 20 Jan. 2014, doi: 10.1016/j.euroneuro.2014.01.016.

Nursing Theories. (2012). Dorothea Orem's Self-Care Theory. Accessed 2 Mar. 2014 from http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/self_care_deficit_theory.html.
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Health Structures in Government Levels Health at

Words: 1071 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90642390

Health Structures in Government Levels

Health at different Government Levels

Health Structures at Government Levels

Health at Government Levels

A national government has a task in ensuring quality health assurance standards across its region are up-to-date. Similarly, increased rates of unexpected epidemics have put governments under the surge of dealing accordingly with factors that can affect the nation directly and indirectly. Different governmental levels of health are identified and objectified in various agency websites. In this context, I have identified with a state level website; Illinois Public Health Institute website. Information presented to the website articles prioritizes in reducing and preventive, curative diseases, complementing health policies and championing for environmental changes.

Website Article eview

The Illinois Public Health institute articulates its review and implication to health quality through partnership programs. The website has supported state-oriented health involvement in ameliorating health levels, in Illinois. The institution has show-cased partnering programs with…… [Read More]

References

Baum, F and Kahssay, H.M. Health development structures: an untapped resource. World Health Organization. Vol 1 Issue 1. Pg 96-114.

Ladeia, M.L., Jacob, P., Borges, M.C., Rogero, M. M and Ferreira, S.R.G. (2011). Studies of Gene variants related to Inflammation, Oxidative, Stress, Dyslipidemia and Obesity: Implications for a nutrigenetic approach. Journal of Obesity. Vol 1, Issue 1. Pg 1-31.

5th March 2012. Illinois Public Health Institute. Retrieved from URL http://www.iphionline.org / Accessed on 27th March, 2012.
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Health Psychosocial Model of Health Use Questions

Words: 1354 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59055296

Health

Psychosocial Model of Health

Use questions 2, 3, 5, 11, and 12

Many times a health professional will look at a health issue and see only the problem at hand. The difficulty with this approach is that most health problems affect the entire person whether or not the issue is localized or not. The psychosocial model of health looks at more than an individual's physical state to determine how they will respond to treatments in the short- and long-term. A patient's psychological well-being and their support system are as important as a willingness to see a treatment through to the end. The following paper looks at two patients and whether they were well-served from a psychosocial perspective, and, if not, what improvements could be made to serve the patient better.

In the documentaries, two of the patient interviews stood out as especially relevant to this discussion. One of these…… [Read More]

References

Back, A.L., Arnold, R.M., Baile, W.F., Fryer-Edwards, K.A., Alexander, S.C., Barley, G.E., Gooley, T.A., & Tulsky, J.A. (2007). Efficacy of communication skills training for giving bad news and discussing transitions too palliative care. Arch International Medicine, 167, 453-459.

Douglass, J.L., Sowell, R.L., & Phillips, K.D. (2003). Using Peplau's Theory to examine the psychosocial factors associated with HIV-infected women's difficulty in taking their medications. Journal of Theory Construction & Testing, 7(1).

Ellingson, L.L. (2002). Introduction to the field of healthcare communication. Communication Research Trends, 21(3).

Holland, D.J., Bradley, D.W., & Khoury, J.M. (2005). Sending men the message about preventive care: An evaluation of communication strategies. International Journal of Men's Health, 4(2).
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Health Organization Case Study

Words: 1525 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36805554

Health Organization Case Study

The mission of Banner Healthcare is to make a difference in the lives of people through excellent patient care. They achieve this by providing leadership for excellence in patient safety and clinical care. Traditionally, healthcare institutions focused on analyzing aggregate performance, questioning causation, monitoring scorecards and identifying gaps. Planning and managing stages at integral to the process of achieving Banner Healthcare's vision. Planning entails the development of standards, rules, and work teams necessary for the work. Concurrent management involves patient-oriented care and coordinated health care. Across the various work teams, care management efforts and the number of people are involved in making clinical improvements across the organization have been gradually increasing.

This occurs regardless of whether they are work groups, system wide teams, strategic initiatives, and special projects. The work is organized under functional teams. Besides the functional teams, initiative work groups and clinical consensus groups…… [Read More]

Reference

Wickramasinghe, N. & Sharma, S.K. (2010). Creating knowledge-based healthcare organizations. Hershey Penns: Idea Group Pub.
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Healthcare Institutions Are Seeking New

Words: 792 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2633007



Cost is one of the primary issues -- it is cheaper to go to an RN than a doctor, and walk-in clinics have lower overhead costs than physician's offices, which is of great concern to uninsured or minimally insured patients. ait time is another concern -- clinics provide immediate treatment, patients do not have to wait for appointments for a brief, routine procedure, which insured patients may balk at if they merely wish to get a routine culture for strep throat. Using the Internet to access information about insurance and care results in lowered administrative costs for providers, less need for phone operators to provide advice, and results in additional speed for the consumer, in accessing records.

For a patient without insurance, ordering drugs online and not having to pay for a 'live' consult may be more cost-efficient, despite the higher costs of the drugs. Healthcare companies' desire to make…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kantor, Aileen. (Dec 1991). "New role for nurses." Business & Health. Retrieved 23 Jul

2007 at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0903/is_n13_v9/ai_11673858

Wal-Mart to expand walk-in clinics in stores." (24 Apr 2007). AP Wire. Retrieved 23 Jul

2007 at MSN. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18292564
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Health My Definition of Health

Words: 902 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12188327

Since being healthy includes a sound mind, less worrying over financial problems leads to a stronger, sounder mind.

Drinking a lot of water throughout the day is another health-promoting behavior. Drinking a lot of water adds natural moisture to your skin, giving a fresh glow today and helping the aging process tomorrow. It also helps when I exercise to drink more water because being properly hydrated during exercise allows me to have a better, more productive workout. Drinking water also improves my energy and increases both my mental and physical performance. Additionally it allows for proper digestion and relieves headaches and dizziness. For those reasons I believe that not smoking and drinking water regularly are two of my important health-promoting behaviors.

My Detrimental Health ehaviors

As improvements in health become more necessary and evident, the medical industry will continue to work to improve the overall health of all individuals. However,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language. (2005).
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Health & Safety Plan for

Words: 1989 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26774808

Such equipment should be adequate to ensure personnel are protected from chemical exposure to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract. PPE may be upgraded or downgraded by the site industrial hygienist, HSM, or qualified Site Safety Officer based upon site conditions and air monitoring results (Levin, et al., 2002)

Work practice and administrative controls

Administrative controls or work practice controls are changes in work procedures such as written safety policies, rules, supervision, schedules, and training with the aim of reducing the interval, frequency, and sternness of exposure to hazardous chemicals or situations. Workers who handle hazardous chemicals in the workplace should be familiar with the administrative controls required fewer than 29 CF 1910.1200, and the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard. This controls are perhaps most important, because they impact your people directly. On the one hand, they are the simplest, since all it takes is education. On the other hand, education…… [Read More]

References

Annual report on 9/11 health (September, 2009). Retrieved on March 20, 2010 from  http://www.nyc.gov/html/fdny/pdf/2009_wtc_medical_working_group_annual_report.pdf 

Burright, D. et al., (1999). Evaluation guidelines for air sampling methods utilizing chromatographic analysis. OSHA Salt Lake Technical Center, U.S. Department of Labor: Salt Lake City, UT.

Harris, J.S., (ed.) (1997). Occupational medicine practice guidelines: Evaluation and management of common health problems and functional recovery in workers. The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Beverly, Mass.: OEM Press.

Levin, S. et al.,. (2002). Health effects of World Trade Center site workers. America Journal of Industrial Medicine 42:545 -- 547.
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Health Care Roles in Communication Is a

Words: 2187 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48105866

Health Care oles in Communication

Communication is a fundamental piece of health care education and has been shown to improve health outcomes, patient compliance, and patient satisfaction. Quality health care emphasizes knowledge and utilization of communication skills. Health care professionals often express anxiety and lack of confidence and are deficient in a creating a situations that are conducive to open and candid communication with patients (Kameg et. al., 2009).

Effective communication involves gathering information, establishing a relationship or connection with a patient, and supporting the person through words and other non-verbal forms of interactions. Effective communication involves not only the interactions between the staff and the patient but also the interactions between staff and the interactions between the staff in front of the patient. Many times the high demand for services in a health care facility cause the staff to overlook the importance of good communication skills and enables situations…… [Read More]

References

Beer, J.E. (2003). Nonverbal Communication: Communicating across cultures. Cultures at work. Retrieved May 29, 2011 from  http://www.culture-at-work.com/nonverbal.html 

Coiera, E. (2006, May). Communication systems in healthcarre. Clinical Biochemist Reviews. nursing.Vol. 27, Issue 2, 89-98. Retrieved May 28, 2011 from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1579411/ 

Gamble, T.K. & Gamble, M. (2006). Communication works. Burr Ridge, IL: McGraw-Hill.

Health Communication. (2010). Health communication. Healthy people 2010: Objectives for improving reproductive health. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Retrieved May 29, 2011 from  http://www.hhs.gov /opa/pubs/hp2010/hp2010rh_sec2_healthcomm.pdf
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Health Promotion Theory Description and

Words: 1506 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58731126

Pender's is a theory of preventive medicine, for the healthy rather than the chronically ill. However, in an age where lifestyle-related disease are on the rise, it can provide an important function, particularly for nurses facing an epidemic of pre-diabetic and diabetic adolescents reared on poor diets and little physical activity. Some might protest that the genetic component to even Type II Diabetes, or obesity in general, might be unacknowledged in the model, but Pender would no doubt respond to her critics that although it is true that certain individuals have a greater predisposition to certain lifestyle diseases, everyone can act within those parameters to improve their life with preventative medicine, as counseled by her model.

orks Cited

McEwen & illis. (2007). "Chinn & Kramer Model." From Chapter 5 of Theoretical bases for nursing.

Pender, Nola J. (2003). "Most frequently asked questions about the Health Promotion

Model and my professional…… [Read More]

Works Cited

McEwen & Willis. (2007). "Chinn & Kramer Model." From Chapter 5 of Theoretical bases for nursing.

Pender, Nola J. (2003). "Most frequently asked questions about the Health Promotion

Model and my professional work and career." Last modified 4 Aug 2006. Retrieved 14 Sept 2007 at http://www.nursing.umich.edu/faculty/pender/pender_questions.html

Pender, Nola J., Murdaugh, C.L., & Parsons, M.A. (2002). "Assumptions and theoretical principles of the Health Promotion Model." Retrieved 14 Sept 2007 at http://www.nursing.umich.edu/faculty/pender/HPM.pdf
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Health Care A the Different

Words: 2409 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52518976

Day treatment programs can provide services at less cost because the patient goes home at night after being treated during the day, which often is used for rehabilitating chronically ill patients (Sharfstein, Stoline, & Koran, 1995, p. 249). The mere fact of having more choice benefits some patients by giving them more say in their care.

Patient-focused care involves a method for containing in-patient costs for hospitals and for improving quality by "restructuring services so that more of them take place on nursing units rather than in specialized units in other hospital locations, and by cross-training staff on the nursing units so that they can do several 'jobs' for the same small group of patients rather then one 'job' for a large number of patients" (Kovner, 1995, p. 186). Kovner notes a number of barriers to this type of care. One reason has been that hospitals have not had to…… [Read More]

References

Doctors Say Managed Care Strains Patient Relationships (1997, June 9). Westchester County Business Journal 36(23), p. 24.

Kovner, a.R. (1995). Hospitals. In Jonas's Health Care Delivery in the United States, a.R. Kovner (ed.), pp. 162-193. New York: springer Publishing.

Moore, G.T. (1991,

April 24). Let's provide primary care to all uninsured Americans ? now! JAMA, pp. 2108-2109.
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Health Care Reform and Occupational

Words: 683 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26010517



The SG2 report (2010, p. 9) also mentions academic medical centers (AMCs), which will have enter into affiliation agreements in order to comply with the reformed care laws. This will furthermore mean more integrated physician networks and it integration, as mentioned above.

Two further important factors are mentioned by Moyers (2010). She notes that the inclusive nature of health care definitions for occupational therapists is a significant step forward in terms of recognizing the profession as a legitimate health care service. Occupational therapy, for example, is specifically included in the "Innovations in the Health Care Workforce" section of the new legislation. This is significant, because occupational therapists will now be eligible for state workforce grants, slots on the national commission on workforce, and other similar privileges enjoyed by other health care providers.

Other items, excluded from the bill, is the second item the author mentions. She notes that one of…… [Read More]

References

Davis, P.A., Hahn, J., Morgan, P.C., Stone, J., and Tilson, S. (2010, Apr. 23). Medicare Provisions in the Patient Protection. Retrieved from:  http://www.nasuad.org/documentation/aca/CRS%20Reports/April%2023%20-%20Medicare.pdf 

Moyers, P. (2010, Mar. 25). What Health Care Reform Means to Occupational Therapy.

Retrieved from: http://otconnections.aota.org/blogs/moyers/archive/2010/03/25/what-healthcare-reform-means-to-occupational-therapy.aspx

Sg2 Special Report: (2010, May). The Impact of Health Reform
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Health Tsunami Public Health and

Words: 584 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26735915

A 2006 study that examined the rates of depression and other mental health disorders following the December 2004 tsunami found that large numbers of people still faced significant health impairment from the event, and that treatment had been negligible when compared to relief and rebuilding efforts in other areas (CDC 2006). These efforts would likely be made far more effective and efficient, however, if mental health issues were dealt with. Addressing the depression and other mental health maladies that the people suffered from following the tsunami would have led to a better adjusted and more productive (as well as healthier) population.

There was an effective degree of trauma care provided immediately after the tsunami struck, but preventative care measures could have been stepped up during this time to forestall and mitigate the spread of infectious diseases that often comes after a major disaster event (WHO 2005). Obviously, trauma care was…… [Read More]

References

CDC (2006). "204 South Asia tsunamis." Center for disease control. Accessed 14 November 2009. http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/tsunamis/

WHO (2005). "South Asia earthquake and tsunamis: Inter-agency rapid health assessment." World health organization. Accessed 14 November 2009. http://www.who.int/hac/crises/international/asia_tsunami/final_report/en/index.html
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Healthcare -- Legal Issues Religion

Words: 2158 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11354839

While it may not be just to hold an organization liable, absolutely, for every instance of employee negligence, there is a rationale for imposing such liability in many cases. For example, many types of industries entail potential danger to others that are inherent to the industry.

Individual workers are not likely to be capable of compensating victims of their negligence, but the employer benefits and profits financially by engaging in the particular industry. Therefore, the employer should not necessarily escape liability for compensating all harm caused by their activities, regardless of fault in particular instances.

10.A nurse is responsible for making an inquiry if there is uncertainty about the accuracy of a physician's medication order in a patient's record. Explain the process a nurse should use to evaluate whether or not to make an inquiry into the accuracy of the physician's medication order.

Like other highly trained professionals, experienced nurses…… [Read More]

References

Abrams, N., Buckner, M.D. (1989) Medical Ethics: A Clinical Textbook and Reference for the Health Care Professionals. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Caplan, a.L., Engelhardt, H.T., McCartney, J.J. Eds. (1981) Concepts of Health and Disease: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley

Starr, P. (1984) the Social Transformation of American Medicine.

New York: Basic Books
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Health Disparities in the U S A

Words: 728 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12680862

Two elements that are extremely useful in the examination of health care. In this regard therefore, quality is also differentiated along SES. Persons who are higher on the socioeconomic ladder experience better "desired health outcomes."

The access to quality health care also has cultural and SES elements to it. Dressler & Bindon (2000) identify cultural consonance as a factor in determining blood pressure in African-American communities. The implications of this work are that cultural elements play a big role in health care quality and access. Whites tend to have greater access to better health care than minority groups. This access is in terms of the proximity of quality physicians, medical services, and facilities.

The ethical implications of the differential access to health care are troubling (Kulczycki, 2007). This is primarily because a health care discussion is a life and death discussion. Quality health care is the right of every citizen,…… [Read More]

References

Dressler, W.W., Balieiro, M.C., & Dos Santos, J.E.(1988). Culture, Socioeconomic Status, and Physical and Mental Health in Brazil Medical Anthropology Quarterly, New Series, 12

(4): 424-446.

Dressler W.W., & Bindon, J.R. (2000).The Health Consequences of Cultural Consonance:

Cultural Dimensions of Lifestyle, Social Support, and Arterial Blood Pressure in an African-American Community American Anthropologist, New Series, 102
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Healthcare Issue in Culturally Diverse Situation

Words: 2191 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90191911

Healthcare Case Study Schuylkill County, PA

County Overview - Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania is located in the heart of the anthracite Coal region of Pennsylvania where the Schuylkill iver originates. Pottsville is the county seat, and the county showed a population of just under 150,000 as of 2010 with a density of 190 persons per square mile. The total area of the county is 782 square miles, almost all land, less than 1/2 a per cent water. The county's history, likely due to large coal deposits, focused on the railroad and industrialization (Schuylkill Chamber of Commerce, 2011).

The county experienced the high point of its population during the 1920s and 1930s, and has been losing people ever since, most between 1950 and 1970, with about a 1-2% population loss since the turn of the century. This is likely due to the lack of appropriate jobs and opportunities within the county. Schuylkill…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

County Health Statistics - Healthcare 2010. (2009, March). Retrieved from Pennsylvania Department of Health: http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt-in_hi_groupoperator_1=or&in_hi_req_objtype=18&in_hi_req_objtype=17&in_hi_req_objtype=512&in_hi_req_objtype=514&in_hi_req_objtype=43&in_hi_req_objtype=1&in_hi_req_apps=7&in_hi_req_page=10&in_ra_topoperator=or&

Comprehensive Plan. (2010, March). Retrieved from City of Pottsville, PA:  http://www.city.pottsville.pa.us/html/cp1.htm 

Election Statistics. (2010, June). Retrieved from Pennsylvania Department of State: http://www.dos.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/running_for_office/12704

Schuylkill County. (2010, June). Retrieved from Sperling's Best Places USA:  http://www.bestplaces.net/economy/county/pennsylvania/schuylkill
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Healthcare Changes to Healthcare Practice and Delivery

Words: 1016 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29208990

Healthcare Changes

Changes to Healthcare Practice and Delivery: A Study of Two Detroit, MI Healthcare Facilities Separated by Twenty Years

Changes to technology and to the political and regulatory landscape have led to many changes in the ways that businesses in all manner of industries operate. Increased communications capabilities, the shrinking size and cost for advanced technologies, and a variety of other changes have provided many businesses with an opportunity to operate more efficiently, and in so doing have also made many industries and markets more competitive. An examination of some typical businesses operating in these industries today as compared to their counterparts that were in operation twenty years ago provides ample evidence of the changes that have occurred and the ways in which businesses have adapted.

The healthcare industry has by no means been immune from these changes, but in fact has changed more than many other industries due…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, J. & Aydin, C. (2005). Evaluating the organizational impact of health care information systems. New York: Springer.

Armoni, A. (2000). Healthcare information systems: challenges of the new millennium. Hershey, PA: Idea Group.

Wager, K., Lee, F. & Glaser, J. (2009). Health care information systems: a practical approach for health care management. New York: Wiley.
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Health Care Database Design and

Words: 1419 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22182467

A patchwork of laws provided narrow privacy protections for selected health data and certain keepers of that data." (Administrative Simplification in the Health Care Industry) Therefore, new technologies such as relational databases have simplified the data gathering and maintenance processes of all types of healthcare related data like the physician information process. It is not unheard of today for healthcare and insurance providers matching or 'sinking data' on a monthly or quarterly basis because of the availability of better communication capabilities as well as compatible database comparison processes.

Even the doctors themselves have access to providers' systems and databases today. Through automatic telephone systems, business to business Internet portals, and tape or disk delivery processes, all of a physician's personal, office and patient information can be updated easily. In many cases, the entire process including security and confirmation is a completely hands free operation. In other words, without human intervention,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Administrative Simplification in the Health Care Industry. Ed. HIPAA. Health and Human Services. 23 Oct. 2004  http://www.hipaa.com/ .

HMO Patients Can Contact Their Doctors Electronically as Blue Shield of California Expands Online Communication Services. Ed. Unknown. October 29, 2003. Relay Health. 23 Oct. 2004 http://www.relayhealth.com/rh/general/news/newsRecent/news49.aspx.

Hoffer, Prescott, and McFadden. Modern Database Management. 7th ed. Add City: Add Publisher, Add Year.

Database
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Health Care Information and the

Words: 2722 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55750775

Information technology and computers have also begun to affect, in ways that are both bad and good, family life, community life, education, freedom, human relationships, democracy, and many other issues. By looking into the broadest sense of the word it can be seen that cyber ethics should actually be understood as a branch of applied ethics, and ethics should be something that is believed in by all that provide medical information, whether via the Internet or in some other way, since providing false or fraudulent information could be damaging and potentially deadly for many people.

This particular branch of ethics analyzes and studies information technology and what type of ethical and social impacts it has. Within recent years this new field has led to countless courses, workshops, articles, journals, and many other ways of expression. With the World Wide Web becoming so popular when it comes to health care information,…… [Read More]

Gotterbarn, 1991.

Bynum, T.W. (1999) the Foundation of Computer Ethics. A keynote address at the AICEC99 Conference, Melbourne, Australia, July 1999. Published in the June 2000 issue of Computers and Society.

Bynum, 1999.
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Health Seeking Behaviors of Appalachian

Words: 2162 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84721921

15).

Furthermore, and despite its popularity as a tourist destination because of its natural beauty, the Appalachians are not a sterile environment by any means and the people who live there have higher risks for certain types of conditions than their counterparts elsewhere. According to Bauer and Growick (2003), "Americans who live in Appalachia experience unique and different ways of life than most Americans. Appalachian culture runs from the bottom half of the State of New York through the mountains of West Virginia and Southeast Ohio to the flatlands of Alabama. This area of the country offers different perspectives and challenges to life. Because of the geographical vastness and uniqueness of the Appalachian culture, many people with disabilities who live in Appalachia are unable to access rehabilitative services and agencies" (emphasis added) (p. 18).

Likewise, many rural residents throughout Appalachia may have septic tanks and will lack access to other…… [Read More]

References

Anguiano, R.P., & Harrison, S.M. (2002). Teaching cultural diversity to college students majoring in helping professions: The use of an eco-strengths perspective. College Student Journal, 36(1), 152.

Barrett, E., Hackler, R., Highfill, K.A., Huang, P., Jiang, X., Monti, M.M., & Peipins, Lucy. (2002). A Norwalk-like virus outbreak on the Appalachian Trail. Journal of Environmental Health, 64(9), 18.

Bauer, W., & Growick, B.M. (2003). Rehabilitation counseling in Appalachian America. The Journal of Rehabilitation, 69(3), 18.

Brown, J.W., & May, B.A. (2005, April). Rural Appalachian women's formal patterns of care. Southern Online Journal of Nursing Research, (2)6, 1-21.
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Healthcare Integrity Is a Major Issue for

Words: 1315 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2662441

Healthcare

Integrity is a major issue for healthcare organizations because there are many avenues for fraud, and for people to demonstrate a lack of ethics. The problem is that the temptation is sometimes too great and despite the fact that there are laws in place to guard against these practices unethical behavior takes place anyway. The government, which supplies a lot of the money which goes for treatments through Medicare and Medicaid, has structured certain laws to make sure that the practices of healthcare organizations are ethical, but billions of dollars in fines are still doled out every year. The big drug companies complain of arcane and hard to decipher legalese, but the fact is that although they realize the issue and the penalty they continue to subvert the law. This paper looks at qui tam statutes and cases, Medicare and Medicaid admissions criteria, installing a corporate integrity program, and…… [Read More]

References

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASLHA). (2010). Summary of self- referral and anti-kickback regulations. Retrieved from  http://www.asha.org/practice/reimbursement/medicare/regulations_sum.htm 

Hanford, J.T. (2001). Regulation of the healthcare professions. Ethics & Medicine, 17(3), 188-190.

Louthian Law Firm. (2012). Healthcare fraud qui tam whistleblower protection lawsuits.

Mattie, A. & Ben-Chitrit, R. (2009) The federal False Claims Act and qui tam actions: What every healthcare manager should know. Journal of Legal, Ethical and Regulatory Issues, 12(2), 49-65.
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Healthcare Government Regulations the Role of Government

Words: 2113 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46728609

Healthcare Government egulations

The role of government regulatory agencies and government regulations in general is particularly important in health care. The reasons for this are many, but the most important of those reasons is that health care delivery is a special case with regard to consumer use, as to some degree all individuals have the right to safe and ethical treatment and treatment that above all else does no harm. Government regulatory agencies and government regulations therefore become a sort of watch dog for healthcare, attempting to make sure that treatment to all patients is safe, ethical and equitable. Government regulatory agencies are especially keen on identifying universal barriers to health care by establishing public insurance, rules and regulations as well as funding and also attempting to eradicate some of the health care disparities that exist today. To do so they have created and regulate many pieces of legislation that…… [Read More]

Resources

By the Numbers. (2011). Modern Healthcare, 41(27), 9.

Prial, D. (2007, July 18). A painful prescription. Record, The (Hackensack, NJ).

Rothstein, M.A. (2011). Currents in Contemporary Bioethics. Journal Of Law, Medicine & Ethics, 39(1), 91-95. doi:10.1111/j.1748-720X.2011.00553.x

Webster, P. (2011). Value of e-prescribing questioned. CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal, 183(14), 1575.
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Healthcare Access the Health of Any Single

Words: 564 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51186709

Healthcare Access

The health of any single person is the most important and most limiting factor about that person's ability to complete physical tasks and live a useful and purposeful life. Healthcare is a term that is widely used but never discussed in how it can best be accessed. The purpose of this essay is to identify and describe a useful plan that helps solve the dilemma of people acquiring a proper and useful source of healthcare. The ethical component of the situation will also be introduced to help demonstrate how practical this plan can be.

To many, healthcare is often associated with doctors, nurses, hospitals, drugs and surgery. It seems that more people are sick or are diseased with some sort of affliction than ever before. Tanner (2008) made the point that "a closer look shows that nearly all health care systems worldwide are wrestling with problems of rising…… [Read More]

References

Cohen, J. (2008). Does Preventive Care Save Money? The New England Journal Of Medicine, 14 Feb 2008. Retrieved from http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp0708558

Lowes, C. (2011). Reviewing Medical Ethics. Philosophy International Journal Of Health, 12 June 2012.

Tanner, M. (2008). The Grass is Not Always Greener: A Look at National Health Care Systems Around the World. CATO Institute, 18 Mar 2008. Retrieved from http://www.cato.org/publications/policy-analysis/grass-is-not-always-greener-look- national-health-care-systems-around-world
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Health Care Legislative Bill

Words: 1387 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5151645

Healthcare Legislative Bill

The expanded and improved Medicare for all Acts

The Expanded and mproved Medicare for All Act was introduced to the House of Representatives in 2009 and seeks to lobby for the implementation of a common single-payer health care system throughout the United States o0f America. The bill if enacted would require that all medical care costs be paid for automatically by the government instead of private insurances for the same. The move will significantly alter the role of private insurance companies as merely offering supplemental coverage especially when the kind of medical care sought is not all that essential (McCormick, 2009).

With the Expanded and mproved Medicare for All Bill, the country's national system will be paid for through taxes and the monies that will replace the regular insurance premiums. Proponents of the bill argue that by eliminating the need for private insurance companies in the national…… [Read More]

Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science, (2010), Insuring America's Health: Principles and Recommendations

The American Journal of Medical Practices, (2011), The Impact of single-payer Medicare

Program, New York
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Healthcare in Finland Norway or Sweden or Switzerland

Words: 948 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45622070

Healthcare in Sweden

The healthcare system in Sweden is used as one of the model systems in the world. hen Johan Hjertoqvist from the Timbro Policy Group spoke before the Montreal Economic Institute in 2002, he said, "...you refuse to accept the consumer as an equal partner, you still look upon the client, the patient, as an inferior partner in the relation" and "you deny the need for good working condition when it comes to the staff, etc." (http://www.iedm.org/conference5_en.html).Moreover, he stressed the need to move interests and priorities away from the processes and production organization to "the quality of the outcome for the consumer" (http://www.iedm.org/conference5_en.html).Quality seems to be synonymous with healthcare in Sweden.

Two important characteristics of the Swedish healthcare system are that it is "decentralized and it is run on democratic principles" (http://www.si.se/docs/infosweden/engelska/fs76.pdf).All residents of Sweden are covered by the national health insurance system which covers medical care, pharmaceuticals,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fact Sheets on Sweden: The Health Care System in Sweden. Swedish Institute. May 1999. http://www.si.se/docs/infosweden/engelska/fs76.pdf.(accessed 06-27-2003).

Gennser, Margit. "Sweden's Health Care System."  http://oldfraser.lexi.net/publications/books/health_reform/sweden.html .

A accessed 06-27-2003).

Hadenius, Stig; Lindgren, Ann. "Sweden: On Sweden Health care." Countries of the World. January 01, 1991.
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Health Prevention Programs

Words: 2666 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64756401

Health Promotion Lesson Plan

The concept of health promotion is thought of as "the science and art of helping people change their lifestyle to move toward a state of optimal health" (Dunphy et al., 2011, p 25). Serious heart conditions can be prevented, which is why it is so important to utilize community education techniques in order to help try to warn community members of the complications before they occur. This current lesson plan works to create three separate community lesson plans, based on specific age ranges. The age 18-29 focuses primarily on the use of social media and health advocacy efforts in association with the American Heart Association. For ages 30-49, there is also a focus on these two, combined with more community oriented issues, and for 50-60, there is much more of a focus on financial training along with community organized workshops.

Prevention has become a major issue…… [Read More]

References McLeod, Saul. (2010). Erik Erikson. Developmental Psychology. Simply Psychology. Web.  http://www.simplypsychology.org/Erik-Erikson.html
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Healthcare Finance

Words: 410 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97173600

Healthcare Finance: hat is the break-Even analysis approach and its application in health care organizations?

Unfortunately, hospital and health care budgeting of resources has become increasingly important in this cost-conscious era of health care. The last decades of cost-controlled medicine have required fiscally conscious approaches to the healthcare for many organizations, often at the expense of patient services. A financial analyst must strive to minimize this, yet still keep the organization afloat. A segment that does not make money or at least break even for the health care provider may have to be eliminated.

Health care facilities may take longer to break even on their initial investment than other forms of businesses. Also, the break-even period for primary care is different compared to tertiary care. Still, developing any break-even action plan begins with a clear understanding of any significant shortfalls against benchmark, with a special focus on provider productivity in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Halley, Marc D. & Lloyd. (Nov 2000) "How to Break Even on an Acquired Primary Care Network." Healthcare Financial Management. Retrived 17 Apr 2005 at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3257/is_11_54/ai_66936335/pg_2
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Health Diversity Promoting Diversity in

Words: 561 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56577798

While promoting and encouraging diversity in hiring and advancement policies and actions is a definite area of concern for health care managers and executives, and this necessarily has an effect on the diversity of care ultimately offered to patients, this latter issue should be dealt with between physicians and patients themselves as much as possible (IDHM 2010). Manager involvement in this issue should consist of a broader appraisal of the physician's attitude towards cultural diversity in the patients seen by the physician; it could be that the efficacy and quality of care being provided by this doctor is diminished by a lack of cultural understanding. Developing a full plan of care for the individual patient in question, however, is not something that a manager at the health care organization should become involved in directly.

The ethical provision of healthcare includes meeting each individual patient on their own terms, applying their…… [Read More]

References

ACHE. (2010). Amercian College of Healthcare Executives. Accessed 4 August 2010.  http://www.ache.org/ 

IDHM. (2010). Institute for Diversity in Health Management. Accessed 4 August 2010.  http://www.diversityconnection.org/