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We have over 1000 essays for "Positive Behavioral Support System"

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Using Positive Behavior Supports and Instruction

Words: 773 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 25772508

Positive in Student Behavior Change

The purpose of this research is to investigate ways to increase positive behavior of students in special education programs who spend time in inclusive general education settings. The research design is action research, which generally means that quantitative data collection will be conducted, although the stakeholders in the action research project may chose to also collect qualitative data. Since the unit of analysis will be individual students in classroom settings, a case study framework for the action research is both logical and practical.

What methods are effective for increasing positive behavior during instructional time?

What methods are effective for increasing positive behavior throughout the school building.

What data collection approach will inform all phases of the positive behavior intervention.

What supports are needed by school administrators to increase the positive behavior of students with learning difficulties?

Target Behaviors

The goal of the action research is…… [Read More]

References

Horner, R. (2013, March 18). Presentation at the Orange County RtI Conference. Rob Horner University of Oregon www.pbis.org Orange County RtI2 Conference. Retrieved from  http://www.ocde.us/PBIS/Documents/OC%20RtI%20Keynote%20Rob%20Horner.pdf 

Georgia Department of Education. What Is Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports? Georgia's PBIS Framework. Retrieved from  http://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/Special-Education-Services/Documents/PBIS/What%20is%20PBIS.pdf 

Lodico, M.G., Spaulding, D.T., & Voegtle, K.H. (2010). Methods in educational research: From theory to practice.
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Pbis Lit Positive Behavioral Intervention and Support

Words: 2347 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43563621

PBIS Lit

Positive Behavioral Intervention and Support (PBIS) in Elementary Schools and in Impoverished Settings

Extensive research has been carried out examining the design and implementation of Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports (PBIS) programs in schools, districts, and on even larger state scales. The research is highly consistent in finding positive effects on behavior and learning through the successful implementation of PBIS programs, however there are significant variations found in implementation schemes and in the environmental effects on the success of PBIS programs and interventions. Less research specifically pertaining to the implementation of PBIS on Title I elementary schools is available, however the literature that has been produced in this area clearly suggests difficulties in implementation but some measure of success when programs can be successfully designed and carried out.

There are currently approximately ten-thousand or more schools that have implemented PBIS programs (based on the latest data available and…… [Read More]

References

Barnes, C. (2002). Standards reform in high-poverty schools. New York: Teacher's College Press.

Barrett, S., Bradshaw, C. & Lewis-Palmer, T. (2008). Maryland Statewide PBIS Initiative: Systems, Evaluation, and Next Steps. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions 10(2): 105-14.

Bradshaw, C., Koth, C., Bevans, K.,, Ialongo, N. & Leaf, P. (2008). The impact of school-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) on the organizational health of elementary schools. School Psychology Quarterly 23(4): 462-73.

Bradshaw, C., Reinke, W., Brown, L., Bevans, K. & Leaf, P. (2008a). Implementation of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) in elementary schools: observations from a randomized trial. Education and Treatment of Children 31(1).
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New Teacher Supports

Words: 1556 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 78892105

New Teachers

SPECIAL EDUCATION GRADES 8 -- 12

The objective of this study is to interview a teacher and have them review their experiences in a graduate program and discuss components of the program that have been of particular value to them and why these program components have been of value. This study will have the teacher discuss their practicum or field work, observation lessons, including strengths and limitations of the lessons, what areas were discussed during post-observation conference with the observing professor, including recommendations for strengthening teaching skills and building positive relationships with students on the high school level. This study will additionally review five articles that address the problems facing new teachers (in both general and special education) and the kinds of documented supports that have been found to help new teachers effectively respond to such problems.

Introduction

The work of Stansbury and Zimmerman (2000) reports that one-third…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Romano, M. And Gibson, P. (2006) Beginning Teacher Successes and Struggles: An Elementary Teacher's Reflections on the First Year of Teaching. The Professional Educator. Volume 28, No. 1. Spring, 2006. Retrieved from: http://www.theprofessionaleducator.org/articles/archives/spring2006.pdf

Ruef, MB, Higgins, C. And Glaeser, BJ (nd) Positive Behavioral Support: Strategies for Teachers. Digital Commons. Retrieved from:  http://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1032&context=gse_fac 

Stansbury, K. And Zimmerman J. (2000) Lifelines to the Classroom: Designing Support for Beginning Teachers. Knowledge Brief. Retrieved from:  http://www.nmu.edu/Webb/ArchivedHTML/UPCED/mentoring/docs/DesigningSupport.pdf 

Teacher Induction: Improving State Systems for Supporting New Teachers. (2012) NASBE Discussion Guide. National Association of State Boards of Education. Mar 2012. Retrieved from:  http://www.newteachercenter.org/sites/default/files/ntc/main/pdfs/brf_nasbe_discussion_guide_teacher_induction_0312.pdf
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Defend the First Practice Against

Words: 1581 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91340055

Few issues could be more important in this era of school shootings and violence. Therefore, it is positive to note a Very Good rating directly on the mark, the best overall composite score of the five scales considered here. This denotes that the schools observed have done relatively well in preventing security breach of staff or student property, that vandalism and destruction of school property are effectively prevented, that the grounds are kept in presentable condition, that a school is a generally safe environment for all in attendance and that the school provides a fair and reasonable regulatory atmosphere for learning.

Part 3:

Question 1:

Based on the findings from this module, it would make a great deal of sense to initiate a school-wide Positive Behavioral Support System (PBSS). It bears noting that while instructors felt that they were doing a positive job of supporting student needs and that the…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Baldwin, S.C.; Buchanan, a.M. & Rudisill, M.E. (2007). What Teacher Candidates Learned About Diversity, Social Justice, and Themselves From Service-Learning Experiences. Journal of Teacher Education, 58(4), 315-327.

Loveless, T. (1999). The Tracking Wars. Brookings Institution Press.

U.S. Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP). (2008). Social Skills Instruction. CPACINC.org.

University of Kansas. (2011). Teaching Self-Management Skills.  http://www.specialconnections.ku.edu
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Behavioral and Cognitive Behavioral Theories

Words: 2290 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 71659198

Behavioral and Cognitive Behavioral Theories

Psychodynamic and Cognitive Behavioral Theories

In this paper, there is going to an examination of Cognitive Behavioral and Psychodynamic theories. This is accomplished by focusing on: the two theories, their theoretical concepts, micro skills / techniques and a summary of these ideas. These elements will show how each one can address issues impacting the patient and the long-term effects upon them.

In the world of psychology, there are different theories which are used to explain how someone reacts to various stimuli. The result is that there has been contrasting ideas about the best way to understand human behavior. Two schools of thought which are very popular are the psychodynamic and cognitive behavioral approaches. (Okun, 2008)

To fully understand them requires examining each one. This will be accomplished by focusing on the two theories, their theoretical concepts, micro skills / techniques and a summary of these…… [Read More]

References

Larson, P. (2012). How Important is an Understanding of the Clients Early Attachments. Counseling Psychology Review, 27 (1), 10 -- 18.

Lucia, M. (2012). Therapeutic Activities and Psychological Interventions. Counseling and Psychotherapy Research, 12 (2), 118 -- 127.

Okun, B. (2008). Effective Helping: Interviewing and Counseling Techniques. New York, NY: Brooks and Cole.

Parpottis, P. (2012). Working with the Therapeutic Relationship. Counseling Psychology Review, 27 (3), 91-97
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Behavioral Finance Human Interaction a Study of the Decision-Making Processes Impacting Financial Markets Information Processing

Words: 22258 Length: 81 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 76441446

ehavioral Finance and Human Interaction a Study of the Decision-Making

Processes Impacting Financial Markets

Understanding the Stock Market

Contrasting Financial Theories

Flaws of the Efficient Market Hypothesis

Financial ubbles and Chaos

The stock market's dominant theory, the efficient market hypothesis (EMH) has been greatly criticized recently for its failure to account for human errors, heuristic bias, use of misinformation, psychological tendencies, in determining future expected performance and obtainable profits.

Existing evidence indicates that past confidence in the EMH may have been misdirected, as the theory's models do not show a thorough understanding of trading operations in a realistic light.

Researchers have suggested that a variety of anomalies and inconsistent historical results demand that traditional financial theories, namely the EMH, be reconstructed to include human interaction as a key decision-making process that directly affects the performance of financial markets.

This research paper aims to determine whether or not there is a…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Barrett, Larry. (January, 2001). Emotional investing a recipe for disaster. CNET News.com.

Bernstein, Peter. (1998). Against the Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons.

Brennan, Phil. (March 12, 2002) The Great Stock Market Scam. NewsMax.com.

Business Week. (September 29, 1997) The Perils of Investing Too Close to Home.
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Marketing and Information Systems

Words: 2196 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 16892002

Role of Information Systems in Marketing

The objective of this study is to examine the role of information systems in marketing in terms of the information that is necessary for decision making. Additionally this work will examine the role of IS for this function within the organization and the benefits of IS for the functional users at the operational level, the use of data at all levels of the organization and how IS has affected processes for this functional perspective.

Decision Making and the Marketing Information System

The work of Ismail (2011) entitled "The Role of Marketing Information System on Decision Making: An Applied Study on Royal Jordanian Air Lines (RJA)" reports a study that has the objective of emphasizing the importance of the utilization of the marketing information system (MKIS) on decision-making through making clear the requirement for decision-making that is both "quick and effective…due to time saving and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bahloul, MY (nd) The Role of Marketing Information System Technology in the Decision Making Process Case Study: The Banking Sector in Gaza Strip. Islamic University of Gaza. Retrieved from:  http://library.iugaza.edu.ps/thesis/98936.pdf 

Chapter 9: Marketing Information Systems (nd) FAO Corporate Document Repository. Retrieved from:  http://www.fao.org/docrep/w3241e/w3241e0a.htm 

Hansen, W, (2000). Internet Marketing, Cincinnati, Ohio: South-Western Publishing.

Harmon, RB (2003) Marketing Information Systems. Retrieved from:  http://www.iped-uk.com/marketing_information_system.pdf
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Information System and Business Management

Words: 13763 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 15593

Creating Organizational Value through the Integration of Information Technology: A Management Perspective

Change Management and the Construction of a eceptive Organization

Transformational and Participative Leadership

A Decentralized Organizational Culture

Effective Utilization of esources

Simulations

Performance Monitoring Systems

isk Management and Support Strategies

When considering the ever-changing and highly competitive global landscape of business today, firms must stay at the cutting edge of their respective fields in order to sustain profitability in the long-term. With the current exponential growth of technology and the computerization of business and learning, consumers and investors have become much more connected to the businesses they patronize (Kurzweil, 2001). Accordingly, companies are faced with the continuous task of finding new ways to understand and subsequently accommodate the needs of those customers and shareholders, while simultaneously securing lucrative business models and job environments. In doing so, businesses must be able to efficiently integrate and utilize various sources of…… [Read More]

References

Aladwani, A.M. (2001). Change Management Strategies for Successful ERP Implementation. Business Process Management Journal, 7 (3), 266-275.

Anthony, S. (2010, May). Three Critical Innovation Lessons from Apple. Retrieved July 26, 2011, from  http://hbr.org/anthony/2010/05/three_critical_innovation_less.html 

Antonelli, C. (2000). Collective Knowledge Communication and Innovation: The Evidence of Technological Districts. Regional Studies, 34 (6), 535-547.

Ashkenas, R., Ulrich, D., Jick, T., & Bossidy, L. (2002). The Boundaryless Organization: Breaking the Chains of Organization Structure. United States: John Wiley and Sons.
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Perinatal Loss Support at Time

Words: 5174 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 41031712

Armstrong's findings additionally relate that due to previous research and the influence of perinatal loss on postpartum depression on partnered relationships. Armstrong states that differences in continued psychological stress between mothers and fathers after a subsequent birth is another area requiring further evaluation. Specifically stated is that it is necessary to evaluate "...the strength of partnered relationships during future childbearing experiences is important to identify any potential influence of the loss on couple, as well as family, outcomes. Understanding possible gender differences may help neonatal nurses and other healthcare providers to recognize couples at risk for discord." (2007)

Neonatal nurses are those who work closely with infants and parents and in the best position to make identification of depression and to pose questions about the individuals symptoms including:

1) mood;

2) appetite;

3) energy or fatigue levels;

4) ability to concentrate; and 5) as well the neonatal nurse is in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gold, K.J., Dalton, V.K. And Schwenk, T.L. (2007) Hospital Care for Parents After Perinatal Death. Obstetrics and Gynecology Vol. 109. No. 5 May 2007.

Hughes, P., Turton, P., Hopper, E. And Evans, CDH (2002) Assessment of Guidelines for Good Practice in Psychosocial Care of Mothers After Stillbirth: A Cohort Study. The Lancet 2002;360:114-18.

Alexander, K.V. (2001) the One Thing You Can Never Take Away": Perinatal Bereavement Photographs. The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing Vol. 26(3) May/June 2001. 2001 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Solution

Words: 1140 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 14881754

It also relaxes them and helps build rapport, and it can give you ideas to use for treatment...Everybody has natural resources that can be utilised. These might be events...or talk about friends or family...The idea behind accessing resources is that it gives you something to work with that you can use to help the client to achieve their goal...Even negative beliefs and opinions can be utilised as resources. (p. 451)

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy also works with negative aspects of the client's life as a way to increase the positive aspects of his or her life. Cognitive behavioral therapy is a more established therapy than in solution-based therapy, although the two are conceptually twinned. The major goal of cognitive behavioral therapy is to solve difficulties that arise in the client's life as the result of the presence of behaviors and cognitions (that is, thoughts) along with emotions that are dysfunctional (Albano…… [Read More]

References

Jones, D. (2008). Becoming a brief therapist: Special edition. London: Lulu Enterprises.

McCullough, J.P. (2003). Treatment for chronic depression: Cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy. London: Guilford Press.

Miller, S.D., Hubble, M.A., Duncan, B.L. (1996). Handbook of solution-focused brief therapy. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

O'Connell, B. (1998). Solution focused therapy. Los Angeles: Sage.
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ERP Systems Challenges of Enterprise

Words: 22297 Length: 81 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 27293594

ole-based EP systems are critical for the siloed, highly inefficient architectures of legacy EP systems to be made more relevant, contribute greater financial performance, and lead to higher levels of overall customer satisfaction.

c. Purpose of the study

The purpose the study is evaluate how enterprises who adopt role-based EP system implementations are able to attain higher levels of financial and operations-based performance vs. those that rely on silo-based, more functionally defined EP structures. ole-based EP systems have been proven to lead to greater order accuracy, velocity and customer satisfaction as a result. The ability to gain greater visibility throughout supply chains, better manage pricing, discounts, implement and maintain contract management systems, and also deliver consistently high customer service have all been attributed to role-based EP systems. Conversely siloed EP systems that are managed strictly to functional areas have been shown to severely limit the ability of enterprises to be…… [Read More]

References

Aberdeen Research (2005) -- New Product Development: Profiting from Innovation. Aberdeen Research. Boston, MA. December 2005

Abrams and Andrews 2005, Management Update: Client Issues for Service-Oriented Business Applications, 2005. Gartner Group. 20 July 2005.

Aimi, G. (2005).- AMR Research (2005, October 25). Retailers Save Money by Controlling in-Bound Logistics. (Alert). Boston, MA

Akkermans, H., & van Helden, K. 2002. Vicious and virtuous cycles in ERP
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Positive Behavior Context and Literature May's Experience

Words: 1282 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 99342084

Positive Behavior

Context and Literature

May's experience in the classroom is not unique. Many teachers find that they spend an inordinate amount of time working on behavioral difficulties as opposed to actually teaching material. May was fortunate that she was in a school in which the administration was supportive of both inquiry-based research and the use of literature to help mitigate situations and grow as a teacher. The particular advantage May had using outside literature was a combination of alternative point-of-view and experience. May would not have the time or resources to go through the types of research, data collection and analysis, and number of students that others have already done. She is also able to glean additional insights from others who have tried and succeeded, and tried and failed, with techniques. Often, too, reading other materials spurs ideas that one can pick and choose -- this works for my…… [Read More]

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Positive Influence Using Disc in

Words: 1170 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 41132434

This is again an illustration of how awareness of types and subtypes can prove useful.

Steady types are introverts who seek stability and show intense organizational loyalty. They are the backbone of many work teams and workplaces, enforcing rules and mutual respect through a good personal example. However, this can put them at odds with the more daring dominant types, although steady types like to follow a leader. Some steady subtypes, like 'the relater' are more driven to seek personal stability, which can cause them to ignore an organization's need for change along with steady 'harmonizer types' who also seek to minimize conflict. Having too many relators and harmonizers on a team that needs to foster change and overcome change resistance may be problematic. However, other steady type subtypes like 'the specialist' who seeks to know more about his or her organizational role and 'the go-getter' who seeks "a steady…… [Read More]

References

Chapman, Bruce. (2010). Personality styles. Business Balls. Retrieved August 11, 2010 at  http://www.businessballs.com/personalitystylesmodels.htm 

McCloud, Megan. (2010). The real you according to the platinum rule. Suite 101. Retrieved

August 11, 2010 at http://self-awareness.suite101.com/article.cfm/the-real-you-according-to-the-platinum-rule

Smith, M.K. (2005) Bruce W. Tuckman - forming, storming, norming and performing in groups. The encyclopedia of informal education. Retrieved August 11, 2010 at www.infed.org/thinkers/tuckman.htm.
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Positive and Negative Effects Video Games Have in Relation to Addiction Human Interaction and Violence

Words: 5997 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31230091

Computer Games esearch

When considering the short history of computers, video and PC gaming are very recent on the timeline of technology. This is one of the reasons why there have not been many conclusive studies on the negative and/or positive effects of electronic games on children and young adults -- the most formative years. With the ever-increasing interest and involvement of children in this activity, much concern has been expressed about the impact of these games, especially ones of a more violent nature, on physical and psychological development. At the crux of the debate is the question of whether they are detrimental to a young person's health. There are specific concerns about such factors as aggression, addiction, criminal activity, obesity and reduced academic achievement.

Studies thus far show both positive and negative results from playing video and PC games. Some research finds that the playing or observing of violent…… [Read More]

References Cited

Anderson, C.A., and K.E. Dill "Video Games and Aggressive Thoughts, Feelings, and Behavior in the Laboratory and in Life. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2000, 78, 772-790.

Ask, A., Autoustinos, M., and A.H. Winefield, "To kill or not to kill: Competitive aggression in Australian adolescent males during videogame play." Children in the New Media Landscape. C. van Feilitzen and U. Carlsson (Eds.). Goteborg, Sweden: UNESCO International Clearinghouse on Children and Violence on the Screen, 2000.

Bowman, R.P. And J.C. Rotter. "Computer games: Friend or foe?" Elementary School Guidance and Counselling, 1983, 18, 25 -- 34

Calvert, S.L., and S. Tan, (1994). "Impact of Virtual Reality on Young Adults' Physiological Arousal and Aggressive Thoughts." Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 1994, 15, 125-139.
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Positive and Negative Stress in the Workplace

Words: 9457 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38630500

1. Introduction
The modern 21st century has posed new challenges for the organizations to survive and grow (Smith et al. 2010). As they are operated and managed by human beings, the challenges are ultimately faced by the individuals who are responsible for making decisions and implementing them (Nieuwenhuizen, Weiss and Rossouw, 2009). As challenges are multifaceted, and human lives are divided into various aspects, it is difficult to excel in every field. The gap between desired and actual state of mind leads to stress and has a high impact on employee performance and productivity.
The concept of supervision is not new in business settings. It may be rooted right in the main essence of organizational structure from where delegation of authority and chain of command were introduced. In lieu of human psychology to stay conscious when being observed and monitored, it is more likely that they are not in normal…… [Read More]

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Extra Page for Pagination Purposes

Words: 5371 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 9785054

In fact, PBS is an inclusive approach since it becomes increasingly applicable to different segments of society such as multicultural youth and urban youth (Utley, Kozleski, Smith, & Draper, 2002). Perhaps, the reason this form of support applies so universally because it uses a collaborative team of people whom know and care about the troubled teenager. hese individuals such as family members, teachers, counselors, and administrators come together and determine functionally the processes which this individual performs and which ones he/she has trouble with or, in other words, together -- with the assistance of the student too -- they put together a functional behavioral assessment and then determine the specific, individualized needs of the student (Carr, 2002). Based upon that particular student's needs, the team derives approaches to help reduce the problem behavior and replace it with appropriate behavior. he reason that this process is said to have lasting effects…… [Read More]

Twenty-second Annual Report to Congress on the Implementation of the Individuals with Disability Act. Washington, D.C.: Author.

Utley, C.A., Kozleski, E., Smith, A., & Draper, I.L. (2002). Positive Behavior Support: A Proactive Strategy for Minimizing Behavior Problems in Urban Multicultural Youth. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 4(4), 196+. doi:10.1177/10983007020040040301

doi:10.1177/10983007030050020301Warren, J.S., Edmonson, H.M., Griggs, P., Lassen, S.R., Mccart, A., Turnbull, A., et al. (2003). Urban Applications of School-Wide Positive Behavior Support: Critical Issues and Lessons Learned. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 5(2), 80+.
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Applied Behavior Parent Education for

Words: 853 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79146220

This claim is supported by other researchers cited in the work including Albin, Lucyshyn, Horner, & Flannery (1996).

The applied behavioral and positive behavior approach developed by Symon considers individual and family needs for patients with autism as part of the larger system and factors that might influence a child's behaviors, in order to develop more comprehensive support interventions.

The author supports use of applied behavioral analysis procedures where parents would work with their children via a clinic or at home in a controlled setting that encourages one-on-one interaction. The role of the parent in this situation would be to present children with "a variety of discrete instructional tasks" that would require on-step commands. The child participating would be rewarded for giving correct responses and punished for not giving correct ones, in order to train children to respond to different commands and reinforcing positive behavior.

The approach suggested by the…… [Read More]

References

Schoen, Alexis a. "What Potential Does the applied Behavior Analysis Approach Have for the Treatment of Children and Youth with Autism?" Journal of Instructional Psychology, 30(2), (2003):125

Symon, Jennifer B. "Parent education for autism: Issues in providing services at a distance." Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 3(3), (2001):160

Applied Behavior Analysis
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An indepth analysis of Early Childhood Special Education Curriculum

Words: 9575 Length: 32 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48996400

Early Childhood Special Education Curriculum, Instruction and Methods Projects

This beginning chapter delineates education to the young children with special needs. In particular, early childhood special education mirrors impact and acclaimed practices resultant from the special education and early childhood fields. In the present, emphasis that is laid on early childhood does not encompass whether these young children can be provided with special needs service in typical settings but focus is rather on how the design of these inclusive programs can be most efficacious. Therefore, taking this into consideration, it is necessary to have early intervention for children with disabilities. However, an important element that is delineated in the chapter is that in as much as these children have special needs, they ought not to be treated in a dissimilar manner. The programs of early intervention for kids and preschoolers with special needs have to be centered on the similar…… [Read More]

References

Blackwell, W. H., & Rossetti, Z. S. (2014). The Development of Individualized Education Programs. Sage Open, 4(2), 2158244014530411.

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. (2011). Inbrief: The Science of Early Childhood Development. Retrieved from:  http://developingchild.harvard.edu/index.php/resources/multimedia/videos/inbrief_series/inbrief_science_of_ecd/ 

Cook, R. E., Klein, M. D., Chen, D. (2012). Adapting Early Childhood Curricula for Children with Special Needs, 8th Edition. New York: Prentice Hall.

Edutopia. (2007). Smart Hearts: Social and Emotional Learning Overview. Retrieved from:  http://www.edutopia.org/social-emotional-learning-overview-video
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Trait and Behavioral Approaches to

Words: 2267 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79377309

unsuccessful leaders in modern society, one will notice modern leaders considered successful are those that embrace change and work to empower subordinates and followers in a non-threatening manner, and in a manner that is consistent with other's ideologies and spiritual beliefs (Siegel, 2001). This confirms the theory of transformational leadership where leaders work to enable change in an uncomplicated and organized fashion. This theory of leadership is possible and logical today because so much of our time is invested in change, whether it is technological in nature (Couillard & Lapierre, 2003) or strategically based.

Complicating matters are modern notions of "transactional leadership" which suggest leaders, especially those working in an organizational context, must work to motivate people using an exact system. This system would reward and punish those who accomplished or failed to accomplish their goals (Gerzon, 2003). This seems illogical however, if one considers how far leadership has come…… [Read More]

References

Barker, R.A. (2001) the nature of leadership. Human Relations, 54(4): 469-93.

Barnett, T. & Shubert, E. (2002) Perceptions of the Ethical Work Climate and Covenantal

Relationships. Journal of Business Ethics, 36(1): 280-90.

Bennett, N., Wise, C., Woods, P., & Harvey, J. (2003) Distributed Leadership.
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Designing Culturally Gender Sensitive Behavioral

Words: 1354 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 14774169

" (National Association of School Psychologists, 2004) the integrity of treatment will be "maximized if the intervention's goals and plan are developed in a culturally sensitive and cooperative manner." (National Association of School Psychologists, 2004) it is stated that implementation problems "...may be linked to unidentified variables." (National Association of School Psychologists, 2004) if this should be the case, it is necessary to explore openly potential barriers. In the evaluation of the intervention, the parents should not be under a negative judgment when goals are failed in being met but instead the goals should be acknowledged as unmet and then barriers to treatment success should be collectively reviewed then designed and implemented.

II. GENDER SENSITIVE INTERVENTIONS

The 10th Annual Conference "Aggression and Suicide Among Children and Youth: Focus on Gender Differences" relates that increasing evidence exists that boys and girls "differ in the development, expression and consequences of aggressive behavior…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aggression and Suicide Among Children and Youth: Focus on Gender Differences (2006) Melissa Institute. Online available at  http://www.melissainstitute.org/documents/May2006Conference.pdf 

Culturally Competent Consultation in Schools: Information for School Psychologists and School Personnel. National Association of School Psychologists. Online available at  http://www.nasponline.org/resources/culturalcompetence/cc_consultation.aspx 

Sheridan, S.M. (2000). Considerations of multiculturalism and diversity in behavioral consultation with parents and teachers. School Psychology Review, 29, 389-400.

Tarver Behring, S., & Ingraham, C.L. (1998). Culture as a central component to consultation: A call to the field. Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation, 9, 57-72.
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Best practices involved in changing the Accounting Information System AIS

Words: 2874 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90956709

Abstract

This particular report is an evaluation on AIS through case analysis and presentation involving AIS failure, possible alternatives the firm may have had and just how the management should have strategized to avert the failure. In the end, the paper reveals best practices for migration from another system to AIS.
To change the Accounting Information System (AIS) best practices

Accounting info systems (AIS) has transformed business processes on a worldwide scale. When financial data is entered into the AIS, financial statements and reports are created at several business levels to make profitability certain. Steinbart and romney (2012) revealed that the accounting systems process information to offer data to users so that they can not only plan, but also manage and operate respective businesses. Given this situation, accounting info system are viewed as a method which helps management in their planning and balance processes by offering data that is both…… [Read More]

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Motivational Strategies to Support ADHD Learners in the Classroom

Words: 1546 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29266343

Motivational Strategies to Support Learners in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Classrooms

Motivational strategies in the classroom in general represent a challenging enterprise, but the need for such effective strategies in classrooms with young learners suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is particularly pronounced. The condition affects the ability of students to learn in a number of ways that can detract from the most thoughtful motivational strategies, though, and teachers in crowded classrooms may find themselves as a distinct disadvantage trying to satisfy the mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act as a result. To determine what motivational strategies have proven effective in classrooms with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder learners, this paper provides a review of the relevant peer-reviewed and scholarly literature, followed by a summary of the research and important findings in the conclusion.

eview and Discussion

The prevalence of attention deficit…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders

(4th ed., text rev.). Washington, DC: Author.

Burcham, B. & L. Carlson. 1999 'Promising Practices for Serving Students with Attention

Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.' School Administrator, vol. 51, no. 10, p. 32.
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Family Systems Theory A Case Study

Words: 2897 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 90599096

Family Systems Theory: Vignette II

Discussion of what's going on in this family

Claudia and Margaret had suffered violence at a young age and therefore, are prone to commit acts of aggression, with the chances of developing more symptomatology like anxiety, aggression, depression and low levels of self-esteem, as compared to those who led a violence-free childhood. Being victims of, and exposed to, family violence during childhood years can make Claudia and Margaret victims or offenders. Margaret was a victim of violence when she was young and resorted to aggression as the means to resolving conflicts in her relationships; her personality structure incorporates shame, anger and guilt. Claudia, also being victimized in childhood, cannot regulate her emotions, particularly anger, and exhibits more tolerance to adult intimate abuse. As they were both victimized or exposed to abuse, they not only display aggressive behaviors, but also possess ineffective ways of coping and…… [Read More]

References

Substance abuse and dependence within the gay/lesbian community. (2008). Retrieved April 8, 2015, from  http://www.hebpsy.net/articles.asp?id=1804 

Beatty, D.M. (2013).Effects of Exposure to Abuse and Violence in Childhood on Adult Attachment and Domestic Violence in Women's Same-Sex Relationships (Doctoral dissertation, Seton Hall University).

Kolko, D.J., Simonich, H., & Loiterstein, A. (2014). Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: An Overview and a Case Example. In Evidence-Based Approaches for the Treatment of Maltreated Children (pp. 187-212).Springer Netherlands.

Trepper, T.S., McCollum, E.E., De Jong, P., Korman, H., Gingerich, W., & Franklin, C. (2008). Solution focused therapy treatment manual for working with individuals research committee of the solution focused brief therapy association. Retrieved July, 23, 2008.
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Analyzing the Behavioral Consultation

Words: 1945 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 70121322

behavioral consultation, including its goals, assumptions, communication within the context, and the area of conjoint behavioral consultation.

Goals of Behavioral Consultation

Palmer and colleagues describe the process of behavioral consultation as a multistage process of problem solving that offers services to clients indirectly. A consultee-consultant relationship facilitates the triadic relationship, with the consultant endeavoring to modify client behavior through instilling skills to effectively resolve future problems, in the consultee. Hence, organizational change successfully ensues, with the aid of the multistage approach to problem solving.

Assessment, evaluation and intervention are interlinked; this is the most effective means of treating the client. The stages of evaluation and assessment typically depend on noticeable, specifiable, and measurable data measurements. None of the existing widely-accepted human behavioral or personality theories strongly disagrees with the notion of humanity being, to a considerable degree, products of the environment surrounding them. But behavior therapy states quite precisely how…… [Read More]

References

Cautilli, J., Riley-Tillman., Axelrod, S., & Hineline, P. (2005). Current Behavioral Models of Client and Consultee Resistance: A Critical Review. International Journal of Behavioral Consultation and Therapy, 1(2). Retrieved, from  http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ844353.pdf 

(2012). Drug Rehab in Los Angeles -- Alcohol Detox Orange County - Sovereign Health Group. Manipulative behavior: How to spot and stop the signs - Sovereign Health Group. Retrieved July 13, 2016, from  http://www.sovcal.com/behavioral-health/manipulative-behavior-how-to-spot-and-stop/ 

Palmer, D., Pham, A., & Carlson, J. (n.d.). Springer Link. Behavioral Consultation. Retrieved July 13, 2016, from  http://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007%2F978-0-387-79061-9_312 

(n.d.). Psychology Today: Health, Help, Happiness + Find a Therapist. Social Learning Theory -- Psychology Today. Retrieved July 13, 2016, from  http://www.psychologytoday.com/basics/social-learning-theory
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Statistics for the Behavioral and Social Sciences

Words: 3816 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 97885517

eduction of Prejudice

The Contact Hypothesis of Gordon Allport and the eduction of Prejudice

The literature covering the nature of prejudice, its scope, the effects of prejudice, and methods to reduce on prejudice is among the most extraordinary body of literature in all of social science. The total volume of research on the topic of prejudice is quite extraordinary and this body of work reflects several decades of scholarly investigation of the meaning of prejudice, its assessment, its etiology, its consequences, and methods to reduce prejudice. There are very few areas of study that have attracted a greater range of theoretical perspectives than the area of prejudice. Theorizing about the nature and manifestation of prejudice has also been accompanied by many spirited debates about the appropriate way to conceptualize methods to reduce prejudice in people. The result has been a rich body of measurement instruments and reduction strategies. The most…… [Read More]

References

Allport, G. (1954). The Nature of Prejudice. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.

Aron, A., Aron, E. & Coups, E. (2011). Statistics for the behavioral and social sciences: A brief course. (5th Ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice-Hall.

Bar-Haim, Y., Ziv, T., Lamy, D., & Hodes, R.M. (2006). Nature and nurture in own-race face processing. Psychological Science, 17 (2), 159-163.

Binder, J., Zagefka, H., Brown, R., Funke, F., Kessler, T., Mummendey, A., Maquil, A., Demoulin, S. & Leyens, J. (2009). Does contact reduce prejudice or does prejudice reduce contact? A longitudinal test of the contact hypothesis among majority and minority groups in three European countries. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 96(4), 843-856.
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Disorder of Emotional Behavioral

Words: 1935 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74349818

Persons with Emotional Behavior Disorder

Importance of assessment of emotional and behavioral disorders in schools

Identifying and assessing emotional and behavioral disorders in schools (EBD) helps identify and address a number of risky behaviors among youths in good time. Students suffering from EBD experience difficulties when learning, have challenging social relationships, experience depression and anxious moments as well as exhibit inappropriate behaviors. School, administrators usually know these students, as they need a lot of support and different resources to be able to survive in a school environment (Davis, Young, Hardman & Winters, 2011).

Early identification of these problem behaviors help school administrators provide the necessary support students need before the situation gets out of hand or becomes impossible to manage. Even though students at risk of EBD have less severe characteristics and frequency than those already diagnosed, early identification is crucial in improving educational outcomes (Davis, Young, Hardman & Winters,…… [Read More]

References

Angold, A., & Costello, E. (2000). A review of issues relevant to the creation of a measure of disability in children based on the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning and Disability (ICIDH-2). https://devepi.duhs.duke.edu/pubs/who.pdf.

BASC,.BASC-2 Summary - Behavior Assessment System for Children, 2nd Edition. Retrieved 2 March 2015, from  http://basc-2.szapkiw.com/basc-summary/ 

Connecticut State Department of Education,. (2012). Guidelines for Identifying and Educating Students with Emotional Disturbance. Retrieved 2 March 2015, from  http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/publications/edguide/ed_guidelines.pdf 

Davis, S., Young, E., Hardman, S., & Winters, R. (2011). Screening for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. Nassp.org. Retrieved 2 March 2015, from  http://www.nassp.org/tabid/3788/default.aspx?topic=Screening_for_Emotional_and_Behavioral_Disorders
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Education Behavioral Issue -- Tourette's

Words: 2136 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Application Essay Paper #: 16501400



Issues of resistance are also high on the list of concerns about the school system, with the popular view being that race and economic class are the primary motivators and influencers of the way students resist teacher authority, assignments, and classroom/school activities. Definant behavior is increasing in some demographic areas, and seems to peak in secondary school. Often, disaffected or disadvantaged students are more defiant, sometimes due to that being the only psychological way they feel any control in their lives. Definance in the form of student conflicts exists, just as it would in the adult world, with the difference being that students do not yet have developed frontal-coretex areas, and therefore lose control more often. Understanding the link between psychological issues and definance often gives educators a better way to deal with individual problems (McFarland, 2001).

This leads quite succinctly to the idea that a number of at-risk youth…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Brenninkmeijer, J. (2010, February). Taking Care of One's Brain. Retrieved September 2010, from History of the Human Sciences:  http://hhs.sagepub.com/content/23/1/107.short?rss=1&ssource=mfc 

Capuzzi and Gross. (1996). Youth at Risk. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.

Cooper, Heron and Heward. (2007). Applied Behavior Analysis. New York: Prentice Hall.

Fields, B. (2000). School Discipline: Is there a Crisis in Our Schools? Australian Journal of Social Issues, 35(1), 73+.
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Family and Community Support and

Words: 2900 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 45705115

...in the end 'the addict has to want to change' and if the addict does not want to change it does not matter what program..." that the addict is in. (National Institute of Justice, 2005) the National Institute of Justice reports that a woman "often retains legal custody of a child while in prison, and once out, may not have the child immediately returned to her by the family member caring for the child." (2005)

Sarah Samson reports in the work entitled: "Groundbreaking Study Identifies Crucial Factors for Successful Community Reintegration of Ex-Prisoners in altimore" published in 2004, that Programs that help prisoners stay connected with their families, get drug treatment, and work while in prison can increase the chances that they will successfully reintegrate back into society, according to a new study released today by the nonpartisan Urban Institute. The study breaks new ground by recording prisoners' perspectives on…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baltimore Prisoners' Experiences Returning Home," by Christy Visher, Vera Kachnowski, Nancy La Vigne, and Jeremy Travis, has been made possible by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, OSI-Baltimore, the Abell Foundation, the Russell Sage Foundation, the Maryland Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention, and the John D. And Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Community Supervision and Reentry (2008) Urban Institute Prison Reentry Portfolio. Online available at  http://www.urban.org/projects/reentry-portfolio/community-supervision.cfm 

Pelissier, Bernadette (2004) Gender Differences in Substance Use Treatment Entry and Retention Among Prisoner with Substance Use Histories. Research and Practice. American Journal of Public Health August 2004. Vol. 94 No. 8. Online available at  http://www.ajph.org/cgi/reprint/94/8/1418.pdf 

Powell, M. Anne; and Nolan, Clare (2003) California State Prisoners with Children:
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Financial Systems Economic Growth and

Words: 2741 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 15183623

This aspect of the study were inclusive of works of "economic historians on the development of financial systems" most particularly the "banking systems" worldwide and exactly what the resulting impact will be. (Rousseau & Sylla, 2001) hile the two identified "strands of literature" one dealing with domestic and the other international developments, are no always related to one another" but are however, both elements of the story called financial globalization." Definition of a "Good Financial System" states that there are five key components which are: (1) Sound public finances and public debt management; (2) Stable monetary arrangements; (3) a variety of banks, some with domestic and others with international orientations, and perhaps some with both orientations; (4) a central bank to stabilize domestic finances and manage international financial relations; and: (5) ell-forming security markets."

Impacts of Globalization on National Economies

Impacts on the economies of the world have been stated…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Rousseau, Peter L. And Sylla, Richard (2001) "Financial Systems, Economic Growth and Globalization"

Financial Systems, Economic Growth and Globalization" 2001 Oct 15 Online available at  http://www.nber.org/~confer/2001/globes01/sylla.pdfr.org/~confer/2001/globes01/sylla.pdf 

Bruno, Giovanni S.F. et al. (2003) Measuring the effect of globalization on labor demand elasticity: An empirical application to OECD Countries ISBN 1616-4814. FLOWENLA Discussion Paper 2 available Online at http://www.eastwestmi gration.org retrieved from the Internet 26 May 2006

Gartzke, Erik (2003) War, Peace, and the Invisible Hand: Positive Political Externalities of Economic Globalization International Studies Quarterly Volume 47 Issue 4-Page 561 - December 2003 doi:10.1046/j.0020-8833.2003.00279.x Quan Li21Columbia University, 2 the Pennsylvania State University
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Role of Family Systems in Development

Words: 730 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6978086

Family system is the basic and smallest social unit of the society that has played a crucial role in the development of countries and cultures. This unit has continued to develop in line with changes in the needs and demands of people as well as the society. Throughout the history of mankind, the family systems have played an important role in the development of children and individuals. However, there are various issues associated with the role of family systems in the development of an individual.

elationship between Family Systems and Healthy Development

As the basic unit of society, family systems have a strong link or relationship with healthy development. The role of family systems in healthy development is directly linked to the method of parenting within the family. This is primarily because a healthy family system can be identified through the method of parenting that is evident within the household.…… [Read More]

References

Hann-Morrison, D. (2012, December 11). Maternal Enmeshment -- The Chosen Child. SAGE

Journals. doi: 10.1177/2158244012470115

Harden, B.J. (2004). Safety and Stability for Foster Children: A Developmental Perspective.

Children, Families, and Foster Care, 14(1). Retrieved from  http://futureofchildren.org/publications/journals/article/index.xml?journalid=40&articleid=133&sectionid=873
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Family Systems and Marriage Psychology

Words: 3816 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 87974286

Psychology of Marriage and Family Systems

The literal meaning of the word "psychopathology" is a mind disorder or disease. Psychological diagnosticians, while assuming that the illness is located inside a person, always use the medical model in treating or studying patients with 'mental illnesses'. In comparison with the approach they take, I present two converging and related psychopathology perspectives. The two perspectives give an analysis based on context from the family's viewpoint. The first approach, the "family systems" approach, is a conception that came up in the 1950s as a substitute to the traditional focus of psychopathology on individuals (Goldenberg & Goldenberg, 1996).

The second approach, "family risk factors" has been in existence in psychopathology but not in the foreground. It tries to identify a couple family aspects of the functioning of the family that are significant in the treatment as well as etiology of patients that have tested positive…… [Read More]

References

Ackerman, N.W. (1958). The psychodynamics of family life. New York, NY: Basic Books.

Ackerman, N.W. (1962), Family Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis: The Implications of Difference. Family Process, 1: 30-43.

Ackerman, N.W. (1962). Family Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis: The implications of difference. Family Process, 1(1): 30-43.

Ackerman, N.W. (1966). Treating the troubled family. New York, NY: Basic Books.
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Promoting Positive Health Behaviors

Words: 1002 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 73279774

Nursing

There are many diseases that can be treated if they are detected at an early stage. A number of such diseases include cancers including colon, cervical and breast cancers. All of the mentioned diseases can be fatal if they are not treated in a timely manner. For treatment in a timely manner, it is important that the disease is detected while it is still benign and not that harmful. For that purpose people need to get screened so that they know if they have any kind of morbidity. Many campaigns are being run all over the world for creating awareness about these screening tests among women so that they can help fight their disease while it is still at an early stage. However, there are many hurdles to the effectiveness of such campaigns and one of which is the financial limitations. Therefore, there is a program that has been…… [Read More]

References:

Backer, E.L., Geske, J.A., Mcllvain, H.E., Dodendorf, D.M. AND Minier, M.D. (2005).

Improving Female Preventive Healthcare Delivery Through Practice Change: An Every Woman Matters Study. JABFP, Vol, 8 (5).

Every Woman Matters Program (2013). Helping Women Live Healthier Lives < http://dhhs.ne.gov/publichealth/Pages/womenshealth_ewm.aspx>

UNFP. 2011. "Comprehensive Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control"  http://www.unfpa.org/webdav/site/global/shared/ENGLISH-%20Cervical%20Cancer%20Guidance.pdf  .
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What Makes Rewards Systems Effective

Words: 2757 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 78368093

Reward Systems

Purpose of the discussion ics that will be discussed

Definition of Reward Systems and expectancy theory

Reward Systems that are Effective in business

Internal and External Rewards

Short-Term/Long-Term Rewards

Reward Systems for teams

Reward Systems and Organizational Performance

Reward systems that are Effective in education.

Reward systems for teachers and administrators

Reward systems for students

Reward Systems play a pivotal role in the world that we live in. Reward systems are used in many different facets including; the business world, the educational system and in the disciplining of children. The purpose of this discussion is to explain what makes rewards systems effective. Our discussion will examine effective reward systems in business, and the educational system. Let's begin by defining reward systems and the expectancy theory.

Definition of Reward Systems and Expectancy Theory

The use of reward systems is directly correlated to the expectancy theory. The expectancy theory asserts…… [Read More]

Bibliography www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000638773

Allen, R.S., & Helms, M.M. (2002). Employee Perceptions of the Relationship between Strategy, Rewards and Organizational Performance. Journal of Business Strategies, 19(2), 115+..

This journal article contains empirical research pertaining to the impact of reward systems in the workplace.

The author provide readers with a glimpse into the human resources and f=how reward systems are used to motivate employees. This article was instrumental in understanding which reward systems are effective in business.

Bafile, Cara (2003) Reward Systems That Work: What to Give and When to Give It!
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School Systems the Educational Leader

Words: 1548 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 99256004

From scheduling lunch shifts to arranging for common planning time, my principal has effectively and efficiently managed the set amount of time that we have in a school day. Collaboration between parents and community members is evident as well. We often have parent / child literacy nights. Annually we also hold a rotherhood Dinner that honors community members that have positively influenced the children in our neighborhoods. Throughout New edford, Carney Academy is highly regarded; our reputation precedes us.

Educational Philosophy 6

Knowledge acquired from textbooks and college classes may give me some techniques and standards that effective leaders must know, however they are not going to teach me everything I need to know. Hopefully, my experiences as a successful coach and an employee of an excellent leader will help in building a solid foundation for me to become an effective leader myself.

ibliography

ass, ernard M (1985), Leadership and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bass, Bernard M (1985), Leadership and performance beyond expectations, New York: Free Press.

Conger, Jay A. And Rabindra N. Kanungo (1987), Towards a behavioral theory of charismatic leadership in organizational settings. Academy of Management Review 12/4: 637-647.

Burns, John M. (1978), Leadership, New York: Harper and Row

Bernstein, R. Should You Be the Boss? Mar 99, Vol. 108 Issue 6, p33, 3p, 1c
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Main Systems of Human Body

Words: 3828 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37436002

The circulatory or cardiovascular system is responsible for moving nutrients, wastes and gases between body cells, transporting blood across the whole body and battling disease (Circulatory System). Its principal elements are the heart, numerous blood vessels, and blood.

The heart forms the circulatory system's core. This 2-sided, 4-chambered pump which distributes blood to various arteries comprises of the right and left ventricles, and right and left atria. The ventricles, situated within the heart's lower half, are responsible for pumping blood to the whole body (away from our heart), whilst the atria, situated within the heart's upper half are in charge of receiving blood from different parts of the human body. The right and left ventricles pump de-oxygenated and oxygenated blood, respectively; de-oxygenated blood is pumped to lungs while oxygenated blood is pumped to the remainder of the human body (smith, 2013). These 4 chambers are connected to one another by…… [Read More]

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Approaching Bowenian Family System Therapy

Words: 2235 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 81484788

Experiential Family Therapy (EFT) is the central place of humanistic therapies and psychology. This therapy includes the works of Fritz Perls, Carl Rogers, and Abraham Maslow, along with the communication theories and family systems of Paul Watzlavick, Don Jackson, and Gregory ateson. It is called a meeting place for all the theorists because clearly the experiential family therapy includes multiple systems used for therapy. The authors ecvar & evcar (2006) like to call these 'experimental approaches to family therapy' instead of 'experimental models'. Virginia Satir, one of the main predecessors of the experiential approach, is also considered to be part of communication approaches as well as experiential (Lester, 2009).

The family tree of the family system has three main parts: (1) the Communications approach of Virginia Satir; (2) the Gestalt experiential approach of Walter Kempler; and (3) the Symbolic experiential approach of Carl Whitaker (ecvar & ecvar, 2006). However, the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Becvar, D.S. & Becvar, R.J. (2006). Family therapy: A systemic integration. Boston, MA: Pearson

Broderick, P., & Weston, C. (2009). Family Therapy with a Depressed Adolescent. NCBI, 32-37. Retrieved from:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2719446/ 

Greenburg, L.S., Watson, J.C., & Lietaer, G. (1998). Handbook of experiential psychotherapy. New York: Guilford

Israelstam, K. (1988). Contrasting four major family therapy paradigms: implications for family therapy training. Journal of Family Therapy, 179-196.
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OCC Versus the Omaha Systems

Words: 1957 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 26238001

Nursing Terminology System Comparison

In the world of nursing, there are different terminologies and systems that are used to communicate information. This helps providers to have clearly defined standards which enhances coordination and communication. However, there are contrasting systems that emphasize different areas. Two of the most notable include: Omaha and CCC approaches. To fully understand their effects requires comparing the two and discussing why there is a need of codification data in EHs with real world examples. Together, these different elements will illustrate how each one is achieving specific objectives that are designed for a variety of healthcare environments. (Schwirian, 2013)

The Omaha Approach

The Omaha system is designed to track and monitor the patient from the moment they are admitted to the time they are discharged from the hospital. It can be utilized by nurses from different skill levels, background and other healthcare professionals inside the organization. The…… [Read More]

References

Barrera, C. (2003). Nursing Care makes a Difference. Outcomes Management, 74, 181-185.

Martin, K. (2005). The Omaha System: A Key to Practice, Documentation, and Information Management. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier.

Moss, J. (2011). Costing Nursing Care. CIN, 29 (8), 455-460.

Rutherford, M. (2008). Standardized Nursing Language. The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 13 (1), 49 -- 57.
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PBS Against Bullying Students With

Words: 3022 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 44348595



Pretraining: Before implementing the actual intervention method, the classroom teacher will conduct two 20 minute group instruction sessions designed how to teach the students to report their peers prosocial behaviors as well as general positive variables that have been observed on the part of their peers. Emphasis will be placed on the fact that all students of the class have to be involved. The teacher will allow the students to select their desired reward as long as this were feasible and practical and will ensure that unanimous approval and interest is evidenced in desired reward. A cumulative goal (e.g. 120 tootles) too will be unanimously decided on. The teacher will ascertain that all students understand the elements and conditions of 'tootling', that all agree to be involved, and that questions, if any, are satisfactorily addressed and answered. Students will be encouraged to provide examples of instances that can be mentioned…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, C.M., & Kincaid, D. (2005). Applying behavior analysis to school violence and discipline problems: School wide positive behavior support. The Behavior Analyst, 28(1), 49 -- 63.

Cashwell, T.H., Skinner, C.H., & Smith, E.S. (2001). Increasing second-grade students' reports of peers prosocial behaviors via direct instruction, group reinforcement, and progress feedback: A replication and extension. Education and Treatment of Children, 24, 161 -- 175.

Cihak, D., Kirk, E., & Boon, R. (2009) Effects of Classwide Positive Peer "Tootling" to Reduce the Disruptive Classroom Behaviors of Elementary Students with and without Disabilities J. Behav Educ 18:267 -- 278

Fairbanks, S., Sugai, G., Guadino, D., & Lathrop, M. (2007). Response to intervention: Examining classroom behavior support in second grade. Exceptional Children, 73, 288 -- 310.
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Learning and Social Deficits in the Elementary Classroom

Words: 1645 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68302708

Evolution of RTI and Its Purpose

The response to intervention (RTI) initiative is a multi-tiered program that is designed to facilitate the early identification of students with special educational and behavioral needs (What is RTI?, 2016). The purpose of the RTI initiative is two-fold, with the first being the provision of high-quality educational services and the second being the screening of all young learners in general education classrooms (What is RTI?, 2016). The evolution of the RTI initiative was based on early experiences with differentiated instruction as an alternative to conventional practices. In this regard, Fisher and Frey (2010) report that, "In many schools, instruction and time are constant -- they do not vary on a student-by-student basis. RTI was designed as a way to encourage teachers to vary instruction and time to create a constant level of learning" (2010, p. 15). The RTI program also includes the key assumption…… [Read More]

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Burnout and Technical College Counselors

Words: 7250 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 98439444

The assumption here is that ounselor burnout may be heightened as a result of the diversity of students who attend post seondary eduational institutions, and the variety of servies the 2-year postseondary ounselors must provide to these students. This assumption is ongruent with the findings of a study by Wilkerson and Bellini (2006) who advise, "Professional shool ounselors are asked to perform multiple duties as part of their daily work. Some of these duties math the desriptions set forth by national standards for shool ounseling programs, whereas others do not" (p. 440).

Consequently, shool ounselors are required to formulate deisions on a daily basis onerning the best way to perform their jobs (Wilkerson & Bellini). Not surprisingly, many shool ounselors are overwhelmed by these onstantly hanging working onditions and requirements, and a number of ounselors experiene high levels of stress as a result. Beause the onnetion between high levels of…… [Read More]

cited in Angerer, 2003). Unfortunately, it would seem that most helping professionals, including counselors, possess characteristics which predisposed them to this construct. For example, Lambie notes that, "Counselors may have increased susceptibility to burnout because of their training to be empathic which is essential to the formation of a therapeutic relationship. In fact, research has found counselor empathy to account for two thirds of the variance in supporting clients' positive behavioral change" (p. 32). The ability to remain empathic to the plights and challenges typically being experienced by students in community colleges is complicated by the enormous diversity that is increasingly characterizing these institutions, of course, but all helping professionals run the risk of becoming burned out while performing their responsibilities by virtue of their empathic sharing. In this regard, Lambie emphasizes that, "Empathy helps counselors understand the client's experience, but at the same time, a counselor may experience the emotional pain of multiple traumatized clients. Empathy is a double-edged sword; it is simultaneously your greatest asset and a point of real vulnerability; therefore, a fundamental skill of effective counselors, being empathic, may place counselors at high risk for burnout" (p. 33).

Citing the alarming results of a national survey of counselors that indicated that incidence may be almost 40%, Lambie also emphasizes that although all professions involve some degree of stress, counselors and other human service providers are at higher risk of burnout compared to other professionals. For example, this author notes that, "Counseling professionals are often in close contact with people who are in pain and distress. This continuous exposure to others' despair, combined with rare opportunities to share the benefits of clients' successes, heightens counselors' risk for burnout" (Lambie, p. 34). Other authorities confirm the incidence of burnout among educators, and cite even higher rates than the foregoing estimate. For instance, Cheek, Bradley and Lan (2003) report that, "Based on several international studies, approximately 60% to 70% of all teachers repeatedly show symptoms of stress, and a minimum of 30% of all educators show distinct symptoms of burnout" (p. 204). Indeed, a study by Lumsden (1998) determined that overall teacher morale was sufficiently severe that fully 40% of the educators who were surveyed indicated they would not choose teaching again as a career, and far more than half (57%) remained undecided at the time concerning ending their teaching career, were actively making plans to leave teaching, or would opt to leave the teaching field in the event a superior opportunity presented itself.

There are some other qualities that typify school counselors that may predispose them to becoming burned out over the course of time (some quicker than others, of course), but which may reasonably be expected to adversely effect the ability of school counselors to maintain their effectiveness in the workplace. For instance, Lambie concludes that, "Common counselor qualities of being selfless (i.e., putting others first), working long hours, and doing whatever it takes to help a client place them at higher susceptibility to burnout. As a result, counselors may themselves need assistance in dealing with the emotional pressures of their work" (p. 34).

Counselors and Characteristics of Burnout

Much
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Neo-Confucianism Is a Philosophy Which Was Born TEST1

Words: 2206 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Application Essay Paper #: Array

Management and Theory

Leadership and coaching go hand in many ways because to coach is to lead, and to lead is to coach others. Indeed, leaders and coaches, whatever the title is really theoretical mentoring within the context of a particular organization or activity. For centuries, scholars and philosophers alike have been trying to find a specific and complete definition for coaching and leadership, but have not had much success. True, leadership is, in part, decision making at the nth level; while coaching takes that decision making and often compartmentalizes it into split-second action. In the era of gloablization, theoretical decision making this has become even more critical now that there are so many divergent cultural opportunities that require new skills, approaches, and even that allow coaching to occur not just in the physical environment, but in the virtual as well, with no regard for geographic or political boundaries (Drucker,…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Alvesson, M., & Karreman, D. (2007). Constructing mystery: Empirical matters in theory development. Academy of Management Review, 32(4): 1265-1281.

Cortes, J. (2012). How Many Coaching Models Can You Find?, Retrieved from:

http://www.what-is-coaching.com/coaching-models.html

Drucker, P.F., et al. (2001), Harvard Business Review on Decision Making, Boston, MA:
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Social Order and the Justice

Words: 1712 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 92580250

If the public trusts the judges and believes that they are administering justice equally among all people, then there appears to be a mutual respect atmosphere, in which the public adheres to the law willingly. However, if there is distrust of the administration, violence and criminal behavior becomes more prevalent, as the people resist unequal administration of the law.

eferences

Moe .C., Gilmour .S. (1995). ediscovering principles of public administration: the neglected foundation of public law. Public Administration eview, Vol. 55. etrieved November 13, 2007 at http://www.questia.com/googleScholar.qst?docId=5001645731.

Monahan, J. (1984).The prediction of violent behavior: toward a second generation of theory and policy. Am J. Psychiatry. Vol. 141:10-15 etrieved November 13, 2007 at http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/141/1/10.

Osborne, D. And Gaebler, T. (1992). einventing Government. New York, NY: Penguin Press.

Paulozzi, L.J.; Spengler, F, and Gower, MA. (1992). An evaluation of the Vermont worksite smoking law.Public Health ep. Nov-Dec 1992. 107(6) 724-726.

Springer, L.M.…… [Read More]

References

Moe R.C., Gilmour R.S. (1995). Rediscovering principles of public administration: the neglected foundation of public law. Public Administration Review, Vol. 55. Retrieved November 13, 2007 at  http://www.questia.com/googleScholar.qst?docId=5001645731 .

Monahan, J. (1984).The prediction of violent behavior: toward a second generation of theory and policy. Am J. Psychiatry. Vol. 141:10-15 Retrieved November 13, 2007 at  http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/141/1/10 .

Osborne, D. And Gaebler, T. (1992). Reinventing Government. New York, NY: Penguin Press.

Paulozzi, L.J.; Spengler, RF, and Gower, MA. (1992). An evaluation of the Vermont worksite smoking law.Public Health Rep. Nov-Dec 1992. 107(6) 724-726.
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Client in Question Is a

Words: 2860 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 28610790

Most individual's who actually exhibit a decrease in appetite happen to be men, "Men tend to have a greater reduction in appetite immediately after working out at moderate to high intensity levels than women do," (Leon 2009:1). In fact, most women tend to eat more after a work out on average than their male counterparts. Along with increasing the client's health, a regular exercise regiment may have a positive affect on the other symptoms of depression she has been exhibiting. Exercising within a social situation can also have the potential to open up social situations and keep the mind focused, both of which can also have a favorable outcome in terms of stimulating the client's appetite. In fact, an exercise routine would in deep perk up not only the body, but also the mind, "stay socially active and mentally alert. Both tend to increase appetite," (Clemen-Stone et al.:658). This is…… [Read More]

References

Clemen-Stone (2002). Comprehensive community health nursing. Elsevier Health Services.

Meiner, Sue. (2004). Care of gastrointestinal problems in the older adult. Springer Publishing Company.

MFI Fellowship. (2008). Understanding depression. Mental Illness Fellowship of Australia Inc. Mental Illness Fellowship Victoria.

Morton, Meredith Jean. (2005). Exercise in cold water may increase appetite. Medical News. Retrieved Mach 29, 2009 at  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/23856.php .
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American Civil Rights History Has

Words: 2247 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 74971377

C. Mayor Adrian Fenty made HIV / AIDS the most important public health priority (Greenberg et al., 2009). Funding from the CDC allowed for a partnership between the D.C. Department of Health's HIV / AIDS Administration and the George Washington University School of Public Health and Healthy Services, which was responsible for the Epidemiology Annual eport for 2007 -- the first to be published for D.C. since 2002 (Greenberg et al., 2009). The Department of Health also initiated a routine HIV screening campaign to help provide testing resources and lower stigma, titled "Come Together DC -- Get Screened for HIV" (Greenberg et al., 2009).

Efforts to address the epidemic in D.C. included a combination of increased resource availability and educational services as offered by public health departments. The "Come Together DC -- Get Screened for HIV" campaign provided approximately 73,000 tests in 2008, which was a 70% testing increase from…… [Read More]

References

Brown, M., & Henriquez, E. (2008). Socio-demographic predictors of attitudes towards gays and lesbians. Individual Differences Research, 6(3), 193-202.

CDC HIV Fact sheet. (2011, November 07). HIV in the United States. Retrieved from  http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/resources/factsheets/us.htm 

CDC Fact sheet. (2011, September). HIV and AIDS among gay and bisexual men. Retrieved from  http://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom/docs/fastfacts-msm-final508comp.pdf 

Greenberg, A., Hader, S., Masur, H., Young, A., Skillicorn, J., & Dieffenbach, C. (2009). Fighting HIV / AIDS in washington, d.c. Health Affairs, 28(6), 1677-1687.
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Social Psychology and What Does it Aim

Words: 2057 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73298341

SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY AND WHAT DOES IT AIM TO STUDY?

Inspired by Kurt Lewin (1951), social psychology adopted the experimental method to study human behavior (Wood & Kroger, 1998). In this regard, Wood and Kroger (1998) report that, "Lewin's experiments in leadership style (autocratic, democratic, laissez-faire) became classics in the new experimental social psychology" (p. 267). Lewins' early work was carried on by Festinger and others who explored cognitive dissonance for the next 20 years at MIT and subsequently at the Universities of Michigan and Minnesota, making this one of the foundations of social psychology (Wood & Kroger, 1998).

Simply stated, social psychology uses the scientific method to study human social behavior (ogers, 2003). According to ogers, psychological social psychology "studies how social events and phenomena influence the ways in which individual people feel, think and act. It is concerned with the psychological processes (such as social perception and cognition) that…… [Read More]

References

Hayes, D. (2004). RoutledgeFalmer guide to key debates in education. New York:

RoutledgeFalmer.

Karakashian, L.M., Walter, M.I., Christopher, A.N. & Lucas, T. (2006). Fear of negative evaluation affects helping behavior: The bystander effect revisited. North American

Journal of Psychology, 8(1), 13.
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Facilitating Organizational Change in Organizations Change Is

Words: 3610 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99157494

Facilitating Organizational Change

Change in Organizations

Change is often resisted at both the individual and organizational levels despite the potential for positive outcomes. The reasons for this are varied and the process of identifying them can be difficult. obbins and Judge (2010) note that most organizations have developed practices and procedures over an extended period and being based on behaviors to which employees are strongly committed are by and large stable. In order for an organization to keep up in an ever evolving world it must learn and change accordingly. This paper examines the characteristics of a learning organization, barriers to change, and some of the elements that must be present in order to bring about organizational change.

Characteristics of a Learning Organization

A "big picture" organizational point-of-view, a supportive organizational culture and a common understanding and agreement of organizational goals are elements necessary for the creation and maintenance of…… [Read More]

References

Brandt, R.S. (1998). Powerful learning. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD).

DuFour, R. (2004, May). What is a "professional learning community"? Educational leadership. Retrieved June 3, 2012, from  http://staffdev.mpls.k12.mn.us/sites/6db2e00f-8a2d-4f0b-9e70-e35b529cde55/uploads/What_is_a_PLC._DuFour_Article_2.pdf 

Harman, W.W. (2001, Autumn). Two contrasting concepts of participatory leadership. Theory into practice. Vol. 20, No. 4, 225-228. Retrieved June 3, 2012, from  http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=4&hid=108&sid=6c89e74f-aaad-4555-9782-20b1233442c0%40sessionmgr111 

Heathfield, S.M. (2011). How to change your organizational culture: Organizational culture change. About.com Hunan Resources Retrieved June 2, 2012, from  http://humanresources.about.com/od/organizationalculture/a/culture_change_2.htm
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Edgar Cayce the Life of

Words: 2394 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31432800



There were many periods of trauma and upheaval in his life. In general, especially in the earlier period of his life, he lived in a secure and comfortable fashion with his supportive wife and friends and "…. In spite of his being uncomfortable with the readings, his life was fulfilling. He had a loving wife, a home, a Sunday School class at the local church, and a good job" (The Life of Edgar Cayce). He also opened a photographic studio and was later able to run his own hospital for a time.

However, his second son, Milton, developed whooping cough shortly after his birth. When the doctors were not effective in curing him, Edgar undertook as reading of his son's condition and found that there was no hope. This was a devastating use of his abilities that traumatized Cayce. After the death of the child both Cayce and his wife,…… [Read More]

References

Edgar Cayce, Clairvoyant (1877-1945). Retrieved from  http://www.dreamscape.com/morgana/phoebe.htm 

Edgar Cayce on the Future. Retrieved from http://www.near-

death.com/experiences/cayce11.html

Edgar Cayce's Prophecies. Retrieved from  http://2012-end-of-world.cyberwitchcraft.net/edgar-cayce.html
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Object Relation Attachment Theories And

Words: 26278 Length: 90 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 34405449

S., experts estimate the genuine number of incidents of abuse and neglect ranges three times higher than reported. (National Child Abuse Statistics, 2006) in light of these critical contemporary concerns for youth, this researcher chose to document the application of Object elation, Attachment Theories, and Self-Psychology to clinical practice, specifically focusing on a patient who experienced abuse when a child. Consequently, this researcher contends this clinical case study dissertation proves to be vital venture, which will contribute to enhancing research in the field of psychology.

For this clinical case study dissertation exploring Object elation, Attachment Theories, and Self-Psychology, along with researching information for the application of these theories to clinical practice, this researcher answered the following research questions.

esearch Questions

What is Winnicott's elational Model Theory?

What is Bowlby's Attachment Theory?

What is Kohut's Self-Psychology?

How may components of these three theories be applied to the clinical case chosen for…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association, (2004). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Test Revised. Washington DC.

Blatt, S. (1974). Levels of object representation in anaclytic and introjective depression. New York: International University Press.

Bowlby, J. (1969) Attachment. Volume One of Attachment and Loss, New York: Basic

Books.
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People Help Themselves An Interdisciplinary

Words: 12988 Length: 47 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 92004923

The study will also be important to those in the future, because scientists have not yet found ways to cure these chronic illnesses or correct some of these problems that are seen today, and therefore it stands to reason that there will be more people in the future who will have to face the same problems as those with chronic illnesses and traumatic injuries today.

Scope of the Study

The scope of the study is relatively large, simply because there has been a great deal written about chronic illness and injuries from the perspective of the physician and from the perspective of the patient. Both sides are important, although the focus here will remain largely on the patient perspective. Because there are so many people today that suffer from a chronic illness or traumatic injury, much study has been done about these individuals. Despite these studies, however, not a lot…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, B.L. (2002). Biobehavioral Outcomes Following Psychological Interventions for Cancer Patients. Journal of Counsulting and Clinical Psychology, 70(3), 590-610.

Brannon, L., & Fiest, J. (2004). Health Psychology: Vol.. An Introduction to Behavior and Health (Fifth ed.) Belmont CA: Thompson/Wadsworth.

DiMatteo, M. (2004). Social Support and Patient Adherence to Medical treatment: A Meta- analysis. Health Psychology, 23(2), 207-218.

Eitel, P., Hatchett, L., Friend, R., Griffin, K.W., & Wadhwa, N.K. (1995). Burden of Self-Care in Seriously Ill Patients Impact on Adjustment. Health Psychology, 14(5), 457-463.
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Nurse Training in Cardiac Procedures

Words: 9322 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74651339

The procedure itself and the hospital stay associated with it is only one small chapter in the patient's life. They will eventually go home and will have many years after the procedure. It is important for the nursing staff to make a positive impact on how they feel about the procedure. The procedure will represent a lasting memory to the patient. If the patient perceives this to be a time of strength and care from nurturing individuals then it will help them to be able to develop the coping mechanisms necessary to learn to live with the after-effects of the procedure.

If the patient sees this as a negative experience, then it could produce unwanted effects such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, or other emotional problems that could have an effect on their ability to cope with the life changes. Those that develop appropriate coping mechanisms will be more likely…… [Read More]

References

Knoll, N., Rieckmann, N., & Schwarzer, R. (2005). Coping as a mediator between personality and stress outcomes: A longitudinal study with cataract surgery patients. European Journal of Personality, 19, 229-247.

Lippke, S., Ziegelmann, J.P., & Schwarzer, R. (2004). Initiation and maintenance of physical exercise: Stage-specific effects of a planning intervention. Research in Sports Medicine, 12, 221-240.

Lippke, S., Ziegelmann, J.P., & Schwarzer, R. (2004). Behavioral intentions and action plans promote physical exercise: A longitudinal study with orthopedic rehabilitation patients. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 26, 470-483.

Lippke, S., Ziegelmann, J.P., & Schwarzer, R. (2005). Stage-specific adoption and maintenance of physical activity: Testing a three-stage model. Psychology of Sport & Exercise, 6, 585-603.
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Mental Retardation This Work Examines

Words: 6188 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58210378

Jones relates that statement of Corrigan: "Our work suggests that the biggest factor changing stigma is contact between people with mental illness and the rest of the population. The public needs to understand that many people with mental illness are functioning, fully contributing members of society." (Jones, 2006) Jones states that "the social cost of stigma associated with mental illness is high because it translates into huge numbers of people with treatable mental illness not getting help." Jones relates the fact that the National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI) is a group of advocates that works toward fighting the "inaccurate, hurtful representations of mental illness" that are found in the media. Jang (2002) states that the National Health Law Program has a priority to access of healthcare. In fact, the Executive Order (EO 13166) was focused toward the implementation of guidelines in overcoming the language barriers. Jang states that LEP…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, S.K. & Middleton, V.A.

Explorations in privilege, oppression and DiversityBrooks Cole 2005. ISBN0-534-51742-0

Barber, J.G. (1995). Politically progressive casework. Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 76(1), 30-37.

Children Who Can't Pay Attention/ADHD (2004) Facts for Families. Academy of child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Online available at  http://www.aacap.org/page.ww?section=Facts+for+Families&name=Children+Who+Can%27t+Pay+Attention%2FADHD
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Managing Organizational Culture

Words: 9860 Length: 34 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 60831953

Human esources

Managing Organisational Culture

The values and behaviors that contribute to the unique social and psychological environment of an organization make up the organizations culture. Organizational culture is the summation total of an organization's past and current suppositions, incidents, viewpoint, and values that hold it together, and is articulated in its self-image, inner workings, connections with the outside world, and future prospects.

In dealing with the management of organisational culture, it is firstly essential to recognize as fully as possible the characteristics of the existing or new target culture to include the myths, symbols, rituals, values and assumptions that strengthen the culture. Organisational culture is not something that can be viewed very easily it is consequently quite hard to replace it. Usually when certain leaders form a company, their values are converted into the actions of the members of that organisation. When other leaders take over, it may not…… [Read More]

References

Background To Business in China. n.d. [ONLINE]. Available at:  http://www.worldbusinessculture.com/Chinese-Business-Style.html  [Accessed 18 August 2012].

Campbell, B. 2010. [ONLINE]. How To Improve Your Corporate Culture. Available at:  http://www.bcbusinessonline.ca/bcb/business-sense/2010/05/28/how-improve-your-corporate-culture  [Accessed 15 August 2012].

Differences in Culture. n.d. [ONLINE]. Available at:  http://www.analytictech.com/mb021/cultural.htm  [Accessed 24 August 2012].

Edgar H. Schein's Model of Organizational Culture. 2010. [ONLINE]. Available at:  http://www.businessmate.org/Article.php?ArtikelId=36  [Accessed 18 August 2012].
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Developing Obesity Program

Words: 4693 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2761708

Obesity Prevention Program: Project Planning

takeholder identification

Childhood obesity-prevention demonstration projects

The ANGELO process

ocio-cultural contextual analyses

takeholder engagement

Engagement workshops

Action plan formulation

The Budget

Financial Analysis

Evaluation methods

The Trans-theoretical model

The evaluation plan

Economic evaluation

Obesity prevention is best carried out through community-based arrangements. This paper provides a guide on the setting of priorities, with regard to the prevention of childhood obesity among the culturally and socially diverse populations of Pinole, Laurel Park and Marina Bay. The literature offers a report on the processes involved in planning and developing efficient projects aimed at preventing obesity among children and young adults. It combines relevant workshops with the processes of stakeholder-involvement to come up with plans of action for six obesity-prevention projects within the named areas. The target population is; children below the age of 12 and adolescents between the ages of thirteen and twenty-one. Analyses of the various…… [Read More]

Secure data

Report results

(Source: University of Kansas, 2013)
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Health Care Disparity in Maryland

Words: 18449 Length: 67 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 96057578



Figure 1 portrays the state of Maryland, the location for the focus of this DR.

Figure 1: Map of Maryland, the State (Google Maps, 2009)

1.3 Study Structure

Organization of the Study

The following five chapters constitute the body of Chapter I: Introduction

Chapter II: Review of the Literature

Chapter III: Methods and Results

Chapter IV: Chapter V: Conclusions, Recommendations, and Implications

Chapter I: Introduction

During Chapter I, the researcher presents this study's focus, as it relates to the background of the study's focus, the area of study, the four research questions, the significance of the study, and the research methodology the researcher utilized to complete this study.

Chapter II: Review of the Literature in Chapter II, the researcher explores information accessed from researched Web sites; articles; books; newspaper excerpts; etc., relevant to considerations of the disparity in access to health care services between rural and urban residence in Maryland…… [Read More]

Potter, S. (2002) Doing Postgraduate Research. London: Sage.

Qualitative research: Approaches, methods, and rigour, (2008, Nov. 7). Microsoft PowerPoint Qualitative Research AdvC08 RS.PPT. Retrieved March 10, 2009 from www.unimaas.nl/bestand.asp?id=11629

Wolvovsky, Jay. (2008). Health disparities: Impact on Business and Economics Summit. Maryland's healthcare at a glance. The Heart of Community Health Baltimore Medical Syste. Retrieved March 10, 2009 at  http://dhmh.maryland.gov/hd/pdf/2008/oct08/Jay_Wolvovsky.pdf
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Fragile X Syndrome

Words: 2837 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 97214966

Fragile X syndrome (also called Martin -- Bell syndrome, or Escalante's syndrome) is the most common single cause of mental retardation and the second most common inherited form of mental retardation, affecting approximately 1 in 1000 males and 1 in 2000 females (Sadock & Sadock, 2007). Fragile X syndrome is the result of a single gene mutation, a mutation of the FM1 gene, located on the X chromosome. Every person has 23 pairs of chromosomes (46 individual chromosomes). Twenty two pairs of chromosomes are autosomes and one pair is an allosome, also known as sex the chromosomes. The allosomes determine the person's gender. Female infants receive two X chromosomes (one each from mother and father), whereas males receive one X chromosome (from the mother) and one Y chromosome (from the father). The site of the Fragile X mutation is on one of these X chromosomes (Sadock & Sadock, 2007).

The…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association (2000). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental

Disorders, IV- Test Revision. Washington, DC: Author.

Atkinson, R.C. & Shiffrin, R.M. (1968). Human memory: A proposed system and its control processes. In Spence, K.W & Spence, J.T. (Eds.) pp. 89 -- 195. The psychology of learning and motivation (Volume 2). New York: Academic Press.

Baddeley, A. (2003). Working memory: looking back and looking forward. Nature Reviews
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Therapies Alternative Theoretical Approaches to

Words: 1120 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 94944450

The benefits of including family in therapy sessions extend far beyond addressing the parents' concerns in this situation, however, and can help to identify underlying problems that led to osa's drug abuse and potentially provide more highly effective long-term solutions to these issues.

Adolescent females were the subject of one study that specifically examined the efficacy of family systems therapy interventions in cases of anorexia nervosa, and the efficacy of this approach compared quite favorable to other therapy techniques (Eisler et al. 2005). Especially noticeable in this study was an increased expression of emotion by all family members, leading to greater openness and a greater ability and willingness to share problems and support each other (Eisler et al. 2005). This effect would likely be highly beneficial to osa and her family as well, as there is almost certainly an underlying stressor that led to osa's drug abuse and overall decline…… [Read More]

References

Cornelius-Whit, J. (2007). "Learner-Centered Teacher-Student Relationships Are Effective: A Meta-Analysis." Review of educational research 77(1), pp. 113-43.

Eisler, I.; Dare, C.; Hodes, M.; Russel, G.; Dodge, E. & LeGrange, D. (2005). "Family Therapy for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa: The Results of a Controlled Comparison of Two Family Interventions." Focus 3, pp. 629-40.

Frelberg, H. & Lamb, S. (2009). "Dimensions of Person-Centered Classroom Management." Theory into practice 48(2), pp. 99-105.

Ready, D.; Gerardi, R.; Backscheider, A.; Mascaro, N. & Rothbaum, B. (2010). "Comparing Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy to Present-Centered Therapy with 11 U.S. Vietnam Veterans with PTSD." Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking 13(1), pp. 49-54.
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Goal Is Not a Strategy

Words: 6751 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 15249790

He also held weekly cookouts and he stood in line with all the crew to show he was on equal footing for that day.

Peter Drucker

One of Abrashoff's heroes was Peter Drucker, often referred to as the "father" of the modern management theory. Drucker predicted the emergence of the innovative knowledge worker -- the kind of talented employee that electronics firms hire as often as they can -- and he developed a management style that sought to "…embrace team members' creativity and intellectual contributions," according to M.E. Oss, writing in Behavioral Healthcare. Drucker developed the idea of decentralizing the workplace, and viewing the workplace as a "human community" that should be built on full trust and deep respect for the worker, not just a place where profit is the sole motive (Byrne, et al., 2005). Drucker treated the workers as "assets" rather than "liabilities" and long before other management…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abrashoff, Michael D. (2002). it's Your Ship: Management Techniques from the Best Damn

Ship in the Navy. New York: Warner Books.

Alic, John a., and Harris, Martha Caldwell. (1986). Employment lessons from the electronics

Industry. Monthly Labor Review, 27-31.
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Health Psychosocial Model of Health Use Questions

Words: 1354 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59055296

Health

Psychosocial Model of Health

Use questions 2, 3, 5, 11, and 12

Many times a health professional will look at a health issue and see only the problem at hand. The difficulty with this approach is that most health problems affect the entire person whether or not the issue is localized or not. The psychosocial model of health looks at more than an individual's physical state to determine how they will respond to treatments in the short- and long-term. A patient's psychological well-being and their support system are as important as a willingness to see a treatment through to the end. The following paper looks at two patients and whether they were well-served from a psychosocial perspective, and, if not, what improvements could be made to serve the patient better.

In the documentaries, two of the patient interviews stood out as especially relevant to this discussion. One of these…… [Read More]

References

Back, A.L., Arnold, R.M., Baile, W.F., Fryer-Edwards, K.A., Alexander, S.C., Barley, G.E., Gooley, T.A., & Tulsky, J.A. (2007). Efficacy of communication skills training for giving bad news and discussing transitions too palliative care. Arch International Medicine, 167, 453-459.

Douglass, J.L., Sowell, R.L., & Phillips, K.D. (2003). Using Peplau's Theory to examine the psychosocial factors associated with HIV-infected women's difficulty in taking their medications. Journal of Theory Construction & Testing, 7(1).

Ellingson, L.L. (2002). Introduction to the field of healthcare communication. Communication Research Trends, 21(3).

Holland, D.J., Bradley, D.W., & Khoury, J.M. (2005). Sending men the message about preventive care: An evaluation of communication strategies. International Journal of Men's Health, 4(2).
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Depression Not Just a Bad Mood Mdd

Words: 3261 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 90318784

Depression: Not just a Bad Mood

MDD: Not Just Another Bad Mood

The term "Prozac Nation" says a lot. This catch-phrase had begun to describe the current state in the U.S. when cases of clinical depression began blooming and treatment turned to medication as a first response. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, over fourteen million of the adult U.S. population suffers from Major Depressive Disorder. Major Depressive Disorder, or MDD, is the leading cause of disability in people ages 15-44. The average age of onset is 32 (U.S. Department of, 2011.) It is often also found co-occurring with other mental disorders, such as anxiety and substance abuse. Perhaps it is worth taking a closer look at a case example in order to better understand this often debilitating disorder in our times.

Taylor is a 24-year-old single, Jewish female presenting with symptoms of depression. She reports that for…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Burns, D.D. (1989). The feeling good handbook. New York, NY: Plume.

Cornes, C.L., & Frank, E. (1994). Interpersonal psychotherapy for depression. The Clinical

Psychologist, 47(3), 9-10.

Cuijpers, P, van Straten, A, Hollon, S.D., & Andersson, G. (2010). The contribution of active medication to combined treatments of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for adult depression: a meta-analysis. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 121(6), Retrieved from  http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?hid=13&sid=568ccfe5-0fe6-4429-92a3 - cb159b2e4044%40sessionmgr115&vid=5&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3