President Of The United States Essays (Examples)

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United States Government Is a

Words: 717 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16900273

The Supreme Court is the most powerful body of men in the United States, contrary to what many people believe.

The powers of the three branches of government are enumerated in the three charters of freedom: The Declaration of Independence, Constitution of the United States, and the Bill of ights. Together, these documents enumerate the rights and freedoms of the citizens of the United States, inherent by virtue of their citizenship; and they enumerate and limit the powers of the three branches of government in such a way as to create a system of checks and balances that cause the actions to be scrutinized by the other branches, and, if the office of the President, or the president, does not agree with legislation crated by the House of epresentatives, sent to the United States Senate for approval, the president can veto the bill containing the legislation. Likewise, the president's veto…… [Read More]

Reference List

U.S. Federal Government, located online, found at http://www.usa.gov/Agencies/federal.shtml, retrieved 1 February 2008.
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USA World Bank Case Study

Words: 3179 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72332397

22 (United States Census Bureau). Finally, Best Market esearch surveyed a disproportionate amount of those with incomes under $20,000 per year (United States Census Bureau), sample issues that most likely arose from the media of the survey, a survey. In addition to these severe sample discrepancies, the fact that the data was collected significantly earlier than the implementation date of the project is a serious time fallacy. Additionally, the statistical data only collected survey data from customers who logged onto the U.S.A. World Bank's web site. This limits the types of persons questioned to either customers of USA World Bank, those who are interested in USA World Bank, and those who accidentally stumbled onto the bank's web site. Thus, the population will not be random because it includes mostly those who already have a preference toward banking with USA World Bank, making the question regarding changing banks nearly meaningless.

Best…… [Read More]

References

Arsham, Hossein. (2008). Statistical Thinking for Managerial Decisions. Retrieved October 5, 2008, from the University of Baltimore.

Web Site:  http://home.ubalt.edu/ntsbarsh/Business-stat/opre504.htm#rrstatthink 

News You Watch Says a Lot About How You'll Vote." (2008). Retrieved October 5, 2008 at http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/election_20082/2008_presidential_election/news_you_watch_says_a_lot_about_how_you_ll_vote

United States Census Bureau. (2008). Retrieved October 5, 2008, from the United States
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United States' Task of Setting Policy With

Words: 2510 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38461137

United States' task of setting policy with other countries is not always a difficult task. We have enjoyed productive and positive relations with Canada for nearly all of our country's history. While we started out our relationship with Mexico on hostile terms, both countries have worked hard to establish a positive relationship based on mutual interests and concerns. It isn't always as easy to identify the important issues when countries are farther away and when they are located in areas with long histories of turbulence and conflicting needs. Such is the situation we face with the Middle East, an area made up of several different countries, some of whom often war among themselves and where shifting allegiances have historically taken place. The Middle East has a particularly troubled past, and it is not possible for any one country to set policies that will be warmly accepted by all the Middle…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Barry, Tom, and Honey, Martha. 1999. "Turkey: Arms and Human Rights." Foreign Policy in Focus: A Think Tank Without Walls, 4:16. Accessed via the Internet 12/9/02. http://www.fpif.org/briefs/vol5/v5n03isr.html

Le Gail, Michael, Ph.D. St. Olaf College, with Le Gail, Dina. 2000. Middle East. Accessed via the Internet 12/9/02. http://www.puhsd.k12.ca.us/chana/staffpages/eichman/Adult_School/us/spring/foreign_policy/3/middle_east.htm

Mark, Clyde R. 2002. U.S. Congressional Research Service, Clyde R. Mark Foreign Affairs, Defense, and Trade Division, Updated Nov. 14, 2002. Accessed via the Internet 12/9/02. http://www.uspolicy.be/Issues/MiddleEast/middleeast.htm

Zunes, 2000. Stephen. "The U.S. And the Israeli-Syrian Peace Process." Foreign Policy in Focus: A Think Tank Without Walls, 5:3. Accessed via the Internet 12/9/02. http://www.fpif.org/briefs/vol5/v5n03isr.html
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US President James Buchanan

Words: 1706 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42931265

U.S. President James Buchanan

James Buchanan, fifteenth President of the United States (James Buchanan, n.d.), was born on April 23, 1791 in Cove Gap, Pennsylvania (BUCHANAN, James, (1791-1868), n.d.). He moved when he was five to Mercersburg, Pennsylvania. He was born into an affluent merchant family. He went to school at the Old Stone Academy prior to going to Dickinson College in 1807. He then learned law and was admitted to the bar in 1812. He began his career as a lawyer prior to combination the military to fight in the ar of 1812. He was then selected to the Pennsylvania House of Representatives and then to the U.S. House of Representatives. In 1832, he was chosen by Andrew Jackson to be the Minister to Russia. He came back home to be a U.S. Senator in from 1834-35. In 1845, he was selected Secretary of State under President James K.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"BUCHANAN, James, (1791-1868)." Bio Guide Congress, n.d. Web. 3 May 2011.

"James Buchanan." Answers, 2011. Web. 29 April 2011.

"James Buchanan." Tulane, n.d. Web. 3 May 2011.

Kelly, Martin. About.com, 2011. "James Buchanan - Fifteenth President of the United States."
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United States Accept Reject International Criminal

Words: 2465 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34035114

"..three asymmetric methods that could be used to exploit the Court: (1) misusing the Court's investigative processes, (2) filing questionable or fraudulent complaints, and (3) manipulating mass media (Austin, W. Chadwick, Kolenc and Anthony Barone, 2006, p. 291)."

Finally, the issue of how the court might deal with the problem of international terrorism is not well understood (Yarnold, Barbara, 1991). The court's authority to extradite and prosecute terrorists from third world countries needs to be better defined Yarnold, p. 1). The United States has not signed on to the ome Statute, and understanding the U.S. role of protecting its own, should the U.S. continue to reject

The ome Statute is becoming clouded by the strength and power of the international community and courts (Dietz, Jeffrey, 2004, p. 137). Under the powers of the ICC, any American prosecuted in the court would be denied the protections guaranteed Americans under the Bill…… [Read More]

References

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108538094

Aksar, Y. (2004). Implementing International Humanitarian Law: From the AD Hoc Tribunals to a Permanent International Criminal Court. London: F. Cass. Retrieved October 29, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108538096

Austin, W.C., & Kolenc, a.B. (2006). Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf? The International Criminal Court as a Weapon of Asymmetric Warfare. Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law, 39(2), 291+. Retrieved October 29, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5016812758

Danner, a.M. (2003). Navigating Law and Politics: The Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court and the Independent Counsel. Stanford Law Review, 55(5), 1633+. Retrieved October 29, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002006263
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United States Military and Environmental Law

Words: 6165 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54567760

U.S. MILITAY AND ENVIONMENTAL LAW

Military & Environmental Law

Environmental Analysis and Impact of the United States Military

Military activity affects the environment in direct and indirect ways. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of military training and readiness activities and the impact of armed conflict and war on the environment. Most environmental impact that results from armed conflict and war occurs in foreign and not domestic environments. However, military training and readiness activities have the potential to impact both domestic and international environments. Different standards apply to the regulation of military activity based on the geographic, national, and political arenas in which military activity occurs. Another dimension that affects the environmental impact standards to which the military is held accountable is based on the perceptions and attitudes of lawmakers, citizens, and warriors toward peacetime and readiness operations vs. armed conflict and war. This paper will…… [Read More]

References

Bearden, D.M. (2007). Exemptions from Environmental Law for the Department of Defense: Background and Issues for Congress, CRS Report for Congress. Retrieved http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/natsec/RS22149.pdf

Boelaert-Suominen, S. AJ. (XXXX) The Effect of Marine Safety and Pollution Conventions During International Armed Conflict, International Environmental Law and Naval War, Defense Institute of International Legal Studies. Retrieved http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/navy/np15_envir_law_naval.pdf

Currents Magazine, (2010, Fall). Navy Air Systems Command, Environmental Issues. Retrieved http://www.enviro-navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?pg=currents

Customary International Humanitarian Law. (2010). ICRC, Customary IHL Database, International Committee of the Red Cross, Retrieved http://www.icrc.org/customary-ihl/eng/docs/v1_rul_rule44
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American Presidents the United States

Words: 791 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78380521

His accomplishments included simplifying government jobs, and helping create the Democratic Party. He is most remembered as a great general and for defying Congress. Martin Van Buren served from 1837 to 1841. He was married to Hannah, and he died in 1862. His vice-president was ichard Johnson, and his nickname was the "Little Magician." His accomplishments included regulating banks and federal funds, and creating an independent treasury. He is most remembered for the Panic of 1837, and for being opposed to slavery. William Henry Harrison served in 1841 and died after only one month in office. He was married to Anna. His vice-president was John Tyler. He is most remembered for being the first president to die in office. John Tyler served from 1841 to 1845. He was married to Letitia and then Julia and he died in 1862. His nickname was "Old Tippecanoe." His accomplishments included annexing Texas and…… [Read More]

References

Editors. "Biographies." Vice-Presidents.com. 2006. 22. Sept. 2006. http://www.vicepresidents.com/Biography%202006.htm

Editors. "The Presidents of the United States." WhiteHouse.gov. 2006. 22 Sept. 2006. http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/presidents/index2.html
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Immigration to the United States

Words: 710 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98152586

S. And formed a country overflowing with thoughts, ways of life and backgrounds. The people arrived and continue to do so for many reasons, but, for all time, to realize one thing -- an improved life for their families. And, they have changed our nation, mostly for the better.

When we ask are we in favor of immigration, how can any one of us say no. For, except the Native Indians, we have all immigrated to this country either directly or via our ancestors who have given up their former lives to come here and proclaim themselves Americans.

Immigration gained more support in 1965 when President Johnson signed into law the Immigration Act of 1965. It changed and enhanced the methods used to allow immigrants to be admitted to the U.S. And it allowed more individuals from third world countries to come to America. This included Asian populations, which had…… [Read More]

Both Presidents Johnson and Kennedy wanted to change immigration law for many reasons, but in doing so they would confirm this country's principles of America being a land of the free, where all people are equal. The Immigration Act of 1965 was the culmination of that dream.

It is interesting to note that even though the Immigration Act of 1965 was not made into law to end discrimination, it was certainly seen as a major factor in doing just that.

The bottom line is that we can see, from the founding of our country up to the present day, America is a land where people can start new lives. From the founding fathers to current leadership, the U.S. has always been in favor of admitting those from any country who can declare their allegiance to this country and contribute to its well-being and sense of community. And that is the way it should always remain.
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Structure of the United States

Words: 832 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4491856

This leads to a high degree of autonomy for some subcommittees, while other subcommittees have only limited autonomy. Those with a high degree of autonomy will play a more direct role in legislative issues.

In addition to the committees, Congress has an entrenched leadership system. The highest rank is the Speaker of the House. Each party also has a Leader and a hip. The leader runs the party's activities in the House. The hip keeps track of legislation and works to make sure that party members vote in the manner desired by the party leader. The Speaker is the leader of the majority party; while the Majority Leader is second-in-command of the party. The Minority Leader is the leader of the minority party.

Leadership of the Senate is the Vice President of the United States. The party leaders have more power, however. Each party has a leader, as well as…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Heitshusen, V. (2007). Committee Types and Roles. Congressional Research Service. Retrieved November 13, 2009 from http://www.rules.house.gov/archives/98-241.pdf
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Prison Reform the United States

Words: 3176 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7254901

The average felony sentence imposed upon federal and state offenders in 1996 was 62 months, or just over 5 years. On average these prisoners actually serve 45% of a state sentence for a mean prison stint of 2 years and 4 months, and 85% of a federal sentence for a stint of 4 years and 5 months. Once they are released, the recidivism rates are high. According to Lin (2000), "incarceration, as it stands, does not prevent recidivism" (p. 4). In addition, even if the released prisoners do not commit another crime, it does not mean that they become self-supporting and contribute to their community as much as possible.

.Lin (2000) argues that it is not clear that prisons, as institutions, have the capacity to provide the type of environment required for preparation of returning to the outside world. Prisons are not presently designed to be schools or factories, most…… [Read More]

References

Alexander, M. (2010) Is Mass Incarceration the New Jim Crow? NY: New Press

Durham, a.M. (1994) Crisis and reform: current issues in American punishment. Canada: Little Brown and Co.

Johnson, R. Hard Time: Understanding and Reforming the Prison

Katz, L., Levitt, S.D., & Shustorovich, E. (2003) Prison conditions, capital punishment and deterrence. American Law and Economics Review, 5(2):318-343,
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USA Patriot Act

Words: 1150 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22588166

Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools equired to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism is the extended terminology that refers to the U.S.A. Patriot Act which, following the events of 9/11 was passed by the Senate immediately and almost unanimously. When the Pentagon and the World Trade Center were attacked in 2001, concerns over national security and America's susceptibility to terrorist threats emerged more so as the country remained baffled at what had just happened. Governmental figures needed to address people's concerns and overall, the issue of law enforcement being able to prevent such attacks from ever happening again. With Assistant Attorney General Viet Dinh having authored the act shortly after the events and upon reviewing existing practices and methodologies, Jim Sensenbrenner, member of the epublican Party, presented it to Congress. It should be noted that, generally, the Patriot Act is embedded in America's history of electronic surveillance that emerged…… [Read More]

Reference List

American Civil Liberties Union. (2009). Reclaiming patriotism: A call to reconsider the Patriot Act. Retrieved from  https://www.aclu.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/safefree/patriot_report_20090310.pdf 

Democratic Policy Committee. (2011). H.R. 514, Patriot Act extension. Legislative Bulletin. Retrieved from  http://www.dpc.senate.gov/docs/lb-112-1-14.pdf 

Henderson, N.C. (2002). The Patriot's Act impact on the government's ability to conduct electronic surveillance of ongoing domestic communications. Duke Law Journal, 52, 179-209. Retrieved from http://scholarship.law.duke.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1168&context=dlj

Roundy, M.D. (2006). The Wiretap Act -- Reconcilable differences: A framework for determining the "interception" of electronic communications following United States v. Councilman's rejection of the storage/transit dichotomy. Western New England Law Review, 28, 403-438. Retrieved from  http://assets.wne.edu/164/19_note_Wiretap_.pdf
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United States Terrorism - Operations

Words: 2111 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76555060



Domestic Terrorism

Since the days of the Old West, domestic terrorism has dug its roots into the United States. From Timothy McVeigh, whose motivations for the Oklahoma City bombing ranged from his complaints over the governments' dealing with certain political situations to his anger over the violence he witnessed during his stint in the military, to eco-terrorists and animal-rights activists who use violence in order to win others to their cause, the scope of terrorism is the United States is both large and diverse. While FBI agents search large cities for Al Qaeda terrorists in the United States, small town police arrest protestors who threaten to set fire to abortion clinics and make threats to far left and right wing organizations. Because a great deal of domestic terrorism centers around political ideas and activism, targeting domestic terrorism has become a rather controversial subject. Some argue that the demonstrations that often…… [Read More]

References

Baggett, Jay. (2007). Law Would Make Minutemen Guilty of 'Domestic Terrorism.'

Retrieved June 30, 2008, at http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=53857.

Bergen, Peter and Swati Pandey. (2005). The Madrassa Myth. Retrieved June 30, 2008, at  http://www.nytimes.com /2005/06/14/opinion/14bergen.html.

Cooke, Jeremy. (2001). School trains suicide bombers. Retrieved June 30, 2008, at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/1446003.stm.
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United States Reform 1870-1932 the

Words: 326 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3717302

he Progressive Movement in the early twentieth century had a somewhat similar though less socialist-leaning agenda; regulation of business and the environment were major policies of Progressives. heodore Roosevelt was the leading figure of the movement, along with Democrat William Jennings Bryant.

In 1896, Bryant ran for President against McKinley in one of the most intense elections in United States history. Multiple parties and factions backed each candidate, and McKinley's coalitions of businessmen, large-scale farmers, and skilled workers beat Bryant and his more populist movement. his had a dramatic effect on the country, taking the government in one direction and leaving a sizeable majority of the public feeling unrepresented by their government. his public pull and the tension it created with the federal government continued to shape policy through World War I and into the Great Depression, when many of the Populist and Progressive reforms were finally introduced by Franklin…… [Read More]

The years between the Civil War and the New Deal were marked with major changes in policy, government structure, and the world at large. Though race policy was largely regressive following the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments, other reform movements pushing for institutional change gained steam during this period. The struggle for women's suffrage and other rights was truly galvanized in 1848, but was put on hold during the Civil War and completely ignored by the Constitutional amendments following the war. By 1920, women's suffrage was finally established nationally.

The other major reform movements of this period were the Populist and Progressive movements. The Populists grew out of various labor and farm movements. Labor unions began to be discussed and formed during this period, though they would not gain a strong foothold until around the 1920s, following the same timeline as women's suffrage. Some elements of the Populist ideal were government or collective ownership of railroads and communication systems and an income tax somewhat similar to what we have today. The Progressive Movement in the early twentieth century had a somewhat similar though less socialist-leaning agenda; regulation of business and the environment were major policies of Progressives. Theodore Roosevelt was the leading figure of the movement, along with Democrat William Jennings Bryant.

In 1896, Bryant ran for President against McKinley in one of the most intense elections in United States history. Multiple parties and factions backed each candidate, and McKinley's coalitions of businessmen, large-scale farmers, and skilled workers beat Bryant and his more populist movement. This had a dramatic effect on the country, taking the government in one direction and leaving a sizeable majority of the public feeling unrepresented by their government. This public pull and the tension it created with the federal government continued to shape policy through World War I and into the Great Depression, when many of the Populist and Progressive reforms were finally introduced by Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal programs.
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United States Macroeconomic Policy Most

Words: 1075 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65606115



With a lower interest rate, that incentive no longer exists and this is usually an instrument by which private entities can be driven out of saving and into investing into new business on the market. Obviously, such an action usually creates the appropriate momentum for economic development, creating jobs, increasing governmental revenues through revenues from taxation and helping the country out of the economic recession.

In terms of fiscal policies, the measures that the government needs to take will all attempt to move the IS curve further to the right and, in this sense, to stimulate the national economy, reduce the period that the country will pass through the recession and determine a national economic growth. There are two important means by which this can be done: increased governmental spending and decreased taxes, with a less restrictive taxation policy. As we can see on the IS - LM graph, both…… [Read More]

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United States A Polarized Nation in Recent

Words: 1260 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44651203

United States: A Polarized Nation

In recent decades, the United States had become a far more self-interested nation, that is, a nation in which most people are more concerned with their own interests, or their own small group's interest (e.g., the AARP lobby; the pro-life movement) than with the interests of the nation as a whole. As a result, the United States as a country is now more polarized than ever before, around special interests such as these. In this essay I will discuss polarization within the United States, in terms of political parties as well as other matters.

The extent of America's polarization, along political lines, may be most plainly seen through the results of U.S. Presidential elections within in the past two decades. The last two landslide presidential elections were won by Ronald Reagan in 1980, against Jimmy Carter, and then again by Reagan in 1984, against Walter…… [Read More]

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United States v Alabama Prejudice

Words: 785 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12261488



Viewpoint

Discriminatory practices were encouraged, such as the Jim Crow laws that supported segregation. However, the push for segregation led to increased inequities borne by the Negroes. Many southern states encouraged segregation, as well. The original Civil ights Act of 1957 had a limited scope, which impinged upon the rights of others.

Pros & Cons

During this time, many discriminatory cases were in the spotlight, and this was no exception. The case heightened awareness, as well as the flaws of the law. Civil ights bills were evolving, as this case ruling was a milestone in history. Conversely, many Negroes lost their lives to the cause, thus paving the way for a more equitable justice system.

elevance Today

Although not as prevalent today, prejudice and discrimination is still experienced by many. Civil rights are no longer reserved for race, but it has extended to other protected classes, such as gender, religion,…… [Read More]

References

A&E Television Networks (2011). History of Alabama. Retrieved from http://www.history.com/topics/alabama

Dysart Schools. (n.d.). Theories of Prejudice and Discrimination. Retrieved from https://www.google.com/#q=prejudice+theories&hl=en&prmd=imvns&ei=8SrQTp2tIZP_sQLpxt3IDg&start=0&sa=N&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&fp=5f6e1c9d40277296&biw=1078&bih=570

Findlaw. (2011). Supreme Court: United States v. Alabama, 362 U.S. 602 (1960)

362 U.S. 602. Retrieved from http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/scripts/getcase.pl?court=us&vol=362&invol=602
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US Postal Service

Words: 1522 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4564769

United States Postal Service (USPS) is an independent body of the federal government that is mandated with the responsibility of providing postal service in America. The agency was known as the U.S. Post Office Department in 1971 when it was totally managed by the United States government. In addition to be referred to as Post Office, Postal Service or U.S. Mail, USPS is one of the few agencies of the government that are clearly authorized by the U.S. Constitution. Since its inception, the United States Postal Service has developed to an extent that it is the largest post in the world since it provides more mail to more addresses in a bigger geographical region. The success of this organization can partly be attributed to its strategy to fulfill or realize its mission, organization design and structure, and its organizational culture and its cultural values.

USPS Mission and Strategy

The United…… [Read More]

References

Matsch, R.P. (2013, July 9). In the United States District Court for the District of Colorado.

Retrieved October 4, 2014 from  http://smartgunlaws.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Bonidy-Docket-Version.pdf 

United States Postal Service. (2014, April 3). ELM Revision: Organizational Structure Policies

and Job Evaluation Processes. Retrieved October 4, 2014, from  http://about.usps.com/postal-bulletin/2014/pb22386/html/updt_005.htm
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United States Senator Bill Nelson

Words: 680 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14179737

As Nelson puts it, "I've asked the president to use money from leftover stimulus funds. . . I've also asked him to help minimize the job losses after the space shuttle is retired, in part, by transferring other NASA-related work to Cape Canaveral" ("U.S. Senator ill Nelson," Internet). Obviously, since Cape Canaveral is located in Florida, Senator Nelson is attempting to guarantee that the space program continues to help increase the financial coffers of the state, not to mention the creation of many jobs for those with expertise in the space sciences.

In 1986, Senator Nelson became the only member of the U.S. Congress to ever have flown in space and as a result is now a very outspoken advocate for space exploration. In 2001, Senator Nelson stated that the International Space Station is also of great importance, "Not the least of which. . . To support research activities in…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

"Senator Bill Nelson on the Space Program." Real Clear Politics. July 20, 2009. Internet.

Accessed November 10, 2009 from  http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/ 

2009/07/20/senator_bill_nelson_on_the_space_program_97556.html.

"Statement of Senator Bill Nelson: Senate Space Roundtable." September 26, 2001. Internet.
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Leadership United States Had Been Involved With

Words: 971 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57001182

Leadership

United States had been involved with the world affairs from 18th century to the present and its most prominent role was during the pre-world war era and post-world war affairs of the world.

Particularly when President Dwight Eisenhower and John Kennedy ruled, the economic prosperity of the United States began to grow on a vast scale. Their eras were considered the most successful era for United States in relation to economic prosperity. President Eisenhower and Kennedy ruled United States from 1953 to 1961 and 1961 to 1963. In their time of governance, United States took a revolutionary step in bringing change in the way people brought up lives in America (Moss & George, 2010). These Democrats controlled Congress for a period however; they could not pass liberal legislations due to the enforcements of Conservative Coalition.

The involvement of United States with worldly affairs in the light of President Eisenhower…… [Read More]

References

Bush, G.W. (2001). Public paper of the presidents of the United States. Chicago: Government Printing Office.

Moss, & George. (2010). Vietnam: An American Ordeal. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Shapiro, R.Y., Kumar, M.J., & Jacobs, L.R. (2000). Presidential Power. New York, NY [u.a.]: Columbia Univ. Press.
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Covert Action the President of the United

Words: 1287 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23186697

Covert Action

The President of the United States is responsible for the protection of the American people and in order to accomplish this objective the President, in his official capacity, is both the leading diplomat as well as the Commander in Chief of the armed forces. With this power he has the obligation to create a foreign policy that protects the interests of the nation and defends the people of the United States. Presidents therefore possess a number of tools which can be utilized in order to accomplish these goals including political, economic, and even military ones. Within the list of potential actions that a president can take to accomplish an effective foreign policy lies one which everyone recognizes as necessary, and therefore uses, but nobody likes to admit they are doing so: Covert Action. But while presidential use of covert action in defense of the United States can become…… [Read More]

References

Best, Richard. (1996). Covert Action: An Effective Instrument of U.S. Foreign Policy?

Congressional Research Service. Retrieved from  http://congressionalresearch.com/96-844/document.php 

"Executive Order 12333 United States Intelligence Activities." (4 Dec. 1981). National

Archives. Retrieved from http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/codification/executive-order/12333.html#3.4
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U S Constitution the United States

Words: 1010 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44955678



Article III describes the judicial branch of government, including the Supreme Court. It establishes that there is one court, the Supreme Court, however Congress may create lower courts, although judgements and orders may be reviewed by the Supreme Court. The trials of all crimes, except those involving impeachment, shall be by jury and held in the state where the crimes were committed, but if not committed within a state, the Congress will decide where the trial will take place. The judicial power extends to all cases arising under the Constitution, the laws of the United States, and treaties made, or which may be made, under their authority. No one can be convicted of treason without the testimony of two witnesses to the same act, or on confession in open court. The Congress has the power to decide the punishment of treason.

Article IV establishes the relationship among the states, and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

United States Constitution." Cornell Law School. Retrieved May 22, 2006 at http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/constitution.table.html#articlei
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Ability of USA to Counter Terror DHS

Words: 702 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73574398

Ability of USA to Counter terror

DHS and enhancement of Special Operations Forces structure

Posse Comitatus Act of 1878 proscribed the use of military in civilian law enforcement. Currently, there are terrorists who are born and bread within the United States territory. These terrorists sometime carryout their heinous acts using Weapons of Mass Destruction (Brown, 2005). They also have networks that cannot be easily broken down by the Homeland Security agencies. It is the Department of Defense that has such capabilities. That is why the Coast Guards use facilities that belong to the Navy to ensure that banned drugs are never shipped into the United States. Special operations forces can train officers within the Department Of Homeland Security on how to reduce vulnerability to terrorism. They can also help in evaluating the adequacy of existing physical security systems. Department of Homeland Security has got no capability of combating terrorists threats…… [Read More]

References

Brown, T.D. (2005). The Role of Special Operations Forces in U.S. Homeland Security and Homeland Defense. Retrieved October 22, 2012 from http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA433677

Mann, W.R. (2010). Duvdevan: Israel's Most Elite Counter Terrorist Unit. Retrieved October

22, 2012 from  http://www.realfighting.com/duvdevan.php 

Malvesti, M.L. (2010). To Serve the Nation: U.S. Special Operations Forces in an Era of Persistent Conflict. Washington: Center fir a New American Security.
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two greatest and two worst presidents in US history

Words: 1058 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51914120

House of Representatives passed Health Care reform. What is the next step in the legislative process before it goes to the President to be signed? Do you think it will be signed by the President in its present form or will it die before it gets to him, and why?

A bill is first introduced into the House by one of its members, who becomes the bill's sponsor. Fellow house members may join him/her as bill advocates or cosponsors. The presence of several cosponsors or congressional heads signing onto the bill may elevate prospects of the bill successfully being passed into law. However, the bill needs to first progress across every official procedural obstacle within both Houses prior to reaching the president and being enacted as a law. Following its introduction, the presiding official of each chamber refers the bill to the established committee with jurisdiction over the theme (e.g.,…… [Read More]

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U S Government the United States

Words: 3390 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36660284

This as an important moment in the history of the Cold War because it marked the start of a new series of talks between the Palestinians and the Israeli side. This moment also proved the importance of the State Secretary in relation to the issues of foreign policy and the international community.

At this moment, some of the most important cabinets in the executive concern issues such as internal affairs and job security. These are essential portfolios from the perspective of internal and external factors. The homeland security refers in particular to aspects which take place inside the borders of the U.S. And tackle the threats that are visible on the U.S. territory. There are several departments inside the Homeland Security portfolio. These concern issues of counterterrorism, border security, immigration, or cybersecurity

. Counterterrorism measures are crucial at this moment, especially given the national security advisory which changed to orange…… [Read More]

References

Department of Homeland Security. 2010. Accessed from http://www.dhs.gov/index.shtm

Department of Homeland Security. Counterterrorism. 2010. Accessed from http://www.dhs.gov/files/counterterrorism.shtm

Department of Labor. On the Recovery Act. 2009. Accessed from  http://www.dol.gov/recovery/ 

Department of Defense. Travels with Gates. 2010. Accessed from   http://www.defense.gov /
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Constitution the United States of America Is

Words: 1402 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70293869

Constitution

The United States of America is a democracy, a form of government which is supposed to be controlled by the people of this country. It is not a true democracy where the people vote on every issue, but a representational democracy the citizens vote for other people who will be responsible for the running of the nation as well as for the creation and passing of most laws. On the federal level, the functions of the government are broken into parts, each responsible for different functions. America's government is composed of three separate branches: the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial (Greenberg & Page 2010). The separation of powers as written in the Constitution is designed so that each branch can give their attention to the functions of their branch and also prevents any of the branches from becoming too powerful which would then lead to the destruction of the democracy…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Barrett, T. & Cohen, T. (2013, April 13). Senate rejects expanded gun background checks. CNN.

Retrieved from  http://www.cnn.com/2013/04/17/politics/senate-guns-vote/ 

Greenberg, E. & Page, B. (2010). The Struggle for Democracy. Pearson.

Madison, J. (1778). Federalist no. 51: the structure of the government must furnish the proper checks and balances between the different departments. Retrieved from  http://www.foundingfathers.info/federalistpapers/fed51.htm
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US as an International Peace-Keeping Force

Words: 1328 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39908156

U.S. ole as 'Policemen of the World'

Thesis and Outline Draft

Introduction and Thesis

currently holds the most important and influential role in international politics and represents a decisive player in all recent international conflicts. This role takes the form of political and military interventions, international and bilateral engagements as well as multilateral brokerage of peace talks. The basic principles of such an approach are the fostering of peaceful, democratic, and secure international environment. At the same time though, it must be pointed out that the entire international community does not always support such actions and often it has been said that the United States acts as the "policeman of the world" (Kissinger, 1995). It must be stressed that the current approach the United States have on foreign policy has not changed since the end of the Civil War and has guided the U.S. In military and political interventions in…… [Read More]

References

Calvocoressi, P. (1987) World politics since 1945. New York: Longman.

Federal News Service (2013) "America is not the world's policeman: Text of Barack Obama's speech on Syria," Associated Press, available online at http://www.ndtv.com/article/world/america-is-not-the-world-s-policeman-text-of-barack-obama-s-speech-on-syria-417077

Kissinger, H. (1995) Diplomacy. London: Simon & Schuster.

Shahshahani, A. And Corina Mullin (2012) "The legacy of U.S. intervention and the Tunisian revolution: promises and challenges one year on," Interface: a journal for and about social movements, Volume 4 (1): 67 -- 101, available online at  http://www.interfacejournal.net/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Interface-4-1-Shahshahani-and-Mullin.pdf
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United States Healthcare Programs to Citizens Compare

Words: 1798 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48925524

United States healthcare programs to citizens compare with the healthcare provided to residents in other countries? That question will be the focus of this paper, along with the background to the decision of major health insurance companies to support the candidacy of Republican Mitt Romney.

here does the U.S. stand in the world when it comes to healthcare?

According to a statement by the Speaker of the House of Representatives, John Boehner, the U.S. has "…the best health care delivery system in the world" (Politiface.com). Boehner, who was a guest on the CBS Sunday program "Face the Nation," was commenting on the candidacy of Mitt Romney. On the July 1, 2012 program, Boehner said he supports Romney for president because Romney "…understands that Obamacare will bankrupt our country and will ruin…" that healthcare system that the speaker believes is best in the world (politifact.com).

Meanwhile on Fox News Sunday (also…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Balanced Politics. (2009). Should the Government Provide Free Universal Health Care for All

Americans? Retrieved November 17, 2012, from  http://balancedpolitics.org .

Business Insider. (2012). Health Insurance Companies Are Worried About A Romney

Victory. Retrieved November 17, 2012, from  http://www.businessinsider.com .
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United States at the Beginning of 1855

Words: 1044 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66160257

United States, at te beginning of 1855, seemed to be te strongest it ad ever been wit Western expansion, a flourising economic outlook, and tousands of new immigrants bringing teir ard work to America's newest factories and fields. However, te tension was mounting politically, tension tat would lead to an inevitable, long-suffering war tat killed tousands of Americans, and canged te landscape of our nation forever. Te climax came wen Abraam Lincoln was elected President in 1860, and te Civil War became unavoidable from tat moment on.

Before te election of 1860, many tumultuous appenings caused panic, depression, and conflicts between Americans. For example, 1855 saw wat was later pegged te "Bleeding at Kansas," during wic pro- and anti-slavery citizens clased (p. 428). Te figt tat ensued over Kansas in Congress as well as territorially brougt fort te notion tat slavery tensions would not be easily controlled.

1857 saw an…… [Read More]

http://azimuth.harcourtcollege.com/history/ayers/chapter13/13.4.battle.html. American Passages Website.

The News of Lincoln's Election," The Charleston Mercury, November 8, 1860. Online Version:

http://azimuth.harcourtcollege.com/history/ayers/chapter13/13.4.mercury.html. American Passages Website.
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United States of America Has a Long

Words: 1938 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 973824

United States of America has a long driven history where two political parties ruled the territory and its people since it assumed independence. Several presidents with different political and moral beliefs/views have come into power, which largely influenced the policies and strategies that they employed to run the country. Liberalism is one of the prime political beliefs found in America's political system that promotes freedom. On the other hand, the opposite political idea that has long existed in America is termed as Conservatism (Lipsman, 2007).

Liberalism that is presently promoted as progressivism by its supporters believes that citizens can do nothing without the assistance of their ruler. It encourages a governing system that allows the leaders to control the lives of its entire populace. Moreover, it supports the idea of benefitting the country by granting social power and rights to its people (Lipsman, 2007).

On the other hand, Conservatism deems…… [Read More]

References

Brux, J.M. (2007). Economic Issues & Policy. Fourth Edition. Canada: Cengage Learning.

Deutsch, K. (2010). The Dilemmas of American Conservatism. USA: University Press of Kentucky.

Lipsman, R. (2007). Liberal Hearts and Conservative Brains: The Correlation Between Age and Political Philosophy. USA: Ron Lipsman.

Watts, D. (2006). Understanding American Government and Politics: Second Edition. Second Edition. Manchester University Press.
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United States of America Initially Adopted an

Words: 615 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83260687

United States of America initially adopted an isolationist stance After the American War for Independence in 1781.

Why did the United States of America initially adopted an isolationist stance After the American War for Independence in 1781.

In 1775 the thirteen British colonies in North America rose up against their parent country Great Britain. The war was known as the American evolution and was seen by the British Crown as an affront to its rule, as a result it increased its strangle hold upon the colonists (Anonymous, 2002).

From this attempt to rule by an iron hand forced the colonists to officially declare war upon the British and form a new government with their own Constitution. The war ended in 1781 and America was recognized as an independent nation by the British Government in 1783 (Anonymous, 2002).

However, in 1778, before the end of the war America had already signed…… [Read More]

References

Anonymous (2002) The American Revolution[online] accessed at http://ragz-international.com/american_revolution.htm

Cole W.S. (1991) My History is America's History [online] accessed at http://www.myhistory.org/historytopics/articles/isolationism.html (Cole, 1991)
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United States Engaged in a

Words: 3295 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89899979

urrently the United States consumes more than 19.6 million barrels of oil per day, which is more than 25% of the world's total oil consumption. Through its isolationist policy agenda, the U.S. government has been able to leverage its military and economic might to control most of oil production in South America. Instead of attempting to restructure the financial infrastructure of South American oil producers such as Panama, Ecuador and Peru, the United States has promoted a policy of singular reliance on U.S. aid. As a result, the United States receives the majority of advantages conferred by these country's vast oil supplies. Similarly, the United States has used its military might to create strong unilateral connections with OPE nations as well. Subtly, the United States has reached secret agreements with the Saud family of Saudi Arabia to maintain their current royal hierarchy with U.S. military protection as long as they…… [Read More]

Cole, Wayne S. (1981). "Gerald P. Nye and Agrarian Bases for the Rise and Fall of American Isolationism." In John N. Schacht (Ed.), Three Faces of Midwestern Isolationism: Gerald P. Nye, Robert P. Wood, John L. Lewis (pp. 1-10). Iowa City: The Center for the Study of the Recent History of the United States.

Schacht, John N. (Ed.). (1981). Three Faces of Midwestern Isolationism: Gerald P. Nye, Robert P. Wood, John L. Lewis. Iowa City: The Center for the Study of the Recent History of the United States.

Hanks, Richard K. "Hamilton Fish and the American Isolationism, 1920-1944." Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Riverside, 1971.
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United States Deficit Surplus and Debt Have

Words: 642 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41434402

United States Deficit, Surplus, and Debt Have an Effect on the United State's Financial Reputation on an International Level

The objective of this study is to examine how and why the United States deficit, surplus and debt have an effect on the United States' financial reputation on an international level.

The United States has been historically viewed as a country that is financially sound. In 2011, as the United States government appeared it was going to default on its debt it is reported that there was a great deal of "bitterness, division and dysfunction that resounded around the world." (Sanger, 2011, p.1) It is reported that the United States is experiencing a diminishing of its "aura as the world's economic haven and the sole country with the power to lead the rest of the world out of financial crisis and recession." (Sanger, 2011, p.1) Additionally, the United States debt levels…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Levit, MR et al. (2011) Reaching the Debt Limit: Background and Potential Effects on Government Operations. Congressional Research Service. 11 Feb 2011. Retrieved from:  http://fpc.state.gov/documents/organization/157101.pdf 

Sanger, DE (2011) In World's Eyes, Much Damage Is Already Done. 31 Jul 2011. The New York Times. Retrieved from:  http://www.nytimes.com /2011/08/01/us/politics/01capital.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
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United States Digressions With Current

Words: 3373 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10462754

Therefore, any war waged on a terrorist group then becomes a war to protect the personal liberties of those who can not do so themselves.

However, the United States itself has not even been able to stand up to the standards of liberated individual rights. Within the context of the most recent foreign soil wars, American soldiers in a military base have proven that the nation itself is unable to live up to its high standards of personal liberty. In a prisoner of war camp located at a military base in Guantanamo Bay, American soldiers violated international prison code standard during a humiliating act of submission where prisoners were forced to perform unlawful acts and behaviors at the behest of the soldiers on duty, (Sullivan, 2008). The very rights which were being so violently being protected in the eyes of the American public were actually being violated in our backyard.…… [Read More]

References

National Security Council. (2008). The national security strategy of the United States of America. www.whitehouse.gov.17 May. 2008. http://www.whitehouse.gov/nsc/nss.pdf

Radelet, Steve. (2005). Think again: U.S. foreign aid. www.foriegnpolicy.com.18

May, 2008. http://www.foreignpolicy.com/story/cms.php?story_id=2773

Shah, Anup. (2006). Criticisms of current forms of free trade. Free Trade and Globalization. 18 May. 2008. http://www.globalissues.org/TradeRelated/FreeTrade/Criticisms.asp#ErodingWorkersRights
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US History and Politics

Words: 1587 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92305729

Conservative American Presidents

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and discuss the return to conservatism in the American presidency after the 1980s. It will compare the similarities to earlier periods in the 19th and 20th century, and discuss what relationship there is between this return to conservatism, and the continued struggle for U.S. military dominance and economic globalization.

THE RETURN TO CONSERVATISM IN AMERICAN POLITICS

The country emerged from orld ar II as the dominant world force and with a booming national economy.

It was able to construct a series of political, economic, and military alliances that tied most of the former great powers together against its only rival, the Soviet Union. This unique postwar situation could not last forever, and in the 1960s and 1970s the "American Century" began to unravel (Florig 153).

It was this unraveling that Americans were worried about, and so they turned to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anderson, Dennis M. "Ronald Reagan." Popular Images of American Presidents. Ed. William C. Spragens. New York: Greenwood Press, 1988. 563-578.

Dansker, Emil. "William Howard Taft." Popular Images of American Presidents. Ed. William C. Spragens. New York: Greenwood Press, 1988. 211-234.

Editors. "Warren G. Harding." The American President. 2002. 13 August 2002. http://www.americanpresident.org/kotrain/courses/WH/WH_In_Brief.htm

Editors. "Ronald Reagan: Impact and Legacy." The American President. 2002. 13 August 2002. http://www.americanpresident.org/kotrain/courses/RR/RR_Impact_and_Legacy.htm
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United States Should Use Its

Words: 2975 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87619689

("USAID Family Planning Program Timeline: 1970s-1980s").

President Regan's successor, President George H.. Bush, continued to adhere to the Mexico City Policy. In 1993, it was rescinded by President Clinton. President George . Bush reinstated the policy in 2001 by establishing conditions in the grants awarded to USAID. In addition, President George . Bush extended the policy to apply to any "voluntary population planning" assistance provided by the Department of State. (Obama).

Progress in family planning policy was made in other areas. The federal government recognized that special attention in providing family planning counseling should be paid to countries where overpopulation threatened biodiversity or endangered species. ("USAID Family Planning Program Timeline: 1990s-2009").

In addition, the federal government, especially USAID, worked to use family planning policy to promote the awareness of HIV disease and to promote health practices that would restrict the spread of such diseases. In 2003, USAID established new guidelines…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Clinton Hillary. Foreign Policy Address at the Council on Foreign Relations, May 5, 2009. U.S. Department of State. Web. May 24, 2010.

Griswold v. Connecticut, 381 U.S. 479 (1965).

Jones K.A. "New Complexities and Approaches to Global Health Diplomacy: View from the U.S. Department of State." PLoS Med 7(5). Web. May 24, 2010

Obama, Barack. "Memorandum to the Secretary of State: Mexico City Policy and Assistance for Voluntary Population Planning," January 23, 2009. Web. May 24, 2010.
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United States President George Washington

Words: 1100 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 565984

Jefferson asked Lewis to fully explain to the Indians that the white explorers were interested in trade, not in seizing their lands (Ambrose 154). This showed that Jefferson used a steady hand and smart policies regarding the estern frontier and that he understood diplomacy with the Native Americans, whom he respected very much.

The Civil ar: The fact is, most Americans probably believe that the only issue that precipitated the Civil ar was slavery, and though slavery was at the center of the north-south feud, it was not alone as a spotlighted issue. The bottom line issue that tore the country apart was state's rights; in other words, did states have a right to go against the will of the national government? Could a Southern state continue to keep slaves in bondage because their cotton crops (hence, their economic power to survive) depended on slave labor? The answer of course…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ambrose, Stephen E. (1996). Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson,

and the Opening of the American West. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Jones, Robert Francis. (2002). George Washington: ordinary man, extraordinary leader.

Bronx, NY: Fordham University Press.
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United States Government Should Grant

Words: 3332 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61418791

4 trillion and $3.6 trillion, an impressive boost to the U.S. economy in those years, the IPC explains. A study conducted by Arizona State University determined that when a person has a bachelor's degree that person earns about $750,000 more over the course of a lifetime of earning than a person with just a high school diploma earns.

The data from that study indicates that as of 2006, those working without a high school diploma earned approximately $419 per week and had an unemployment rate of 6.8%, the IPC explains. Those with a bachelor's degree earned approximately $962 per seek and their rate of unemployment was only 2.3%; over their careers college graduates earn "in excels of 60% more than a high school graduate, and workers with advanced degrees earn two to three times as much as high school graduates" (IPC, p. 2).

The Dream Act would remove the uncertainty…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Associated Press. (2011). Court rules against Arizona immigration law. Justice Department filed suit to block law it says violates U.S. Constitution. Retrieved May 4, 2011, from http://www.msnbc.msn.com.

Barreto, Matt. (2010). Senators who opposed DREAM Act may fact Latino roadblocks in 2012.

Latino Decisions. Retrieved May 7, 2011, from http://latinodecisions.wordpress.com.

Bennett, Brian. (2011). GOP drafts legislative assault on illegal immigration. Los Angeles
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United States Bomb Its Way to Victory

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 884773

United States Bomb its Way to Victory in Vietnam?

What was John F. Kennedy's "New Frontier" in American foreign policy? What approach did his administration take to the Third World?

The New Frontier policy was a plan to provide aid to foreign countries. He wanted to help Third World countries by increasing their levels of education and boost their economies thereby eventually making them self-sufficient.

Describe and analyze the circumstances and outcomes of the Kennedy administration's crises with Cuba.

The major issue between the United States and Cuba was the Cold War which divided the countries politically. Cuba, being Communist sided with the U.S.S.R. against the U.S. And allowed the U.S.S.R. To have nuclear missiles on their island, pointed at the U.S.

In what ways did Kennedy deepen U.S. involvement in Vietnam? Why did Kennedy believe U.S. engagement/influence in Vietnam was crucial to his foreign policy? How were Kennedy's attitudes…… [Read More]

President Johnson "Americanized" the Vietnam War by introducing more troops into the country and limiting the use of Vietnamese troops. In the Gulf of Tonkin in 1964, Vietnamese weapons supposedly fired on American ships. This account has since proven to be false. It is important because Johnson, very well knowing the truth, intentionally misled the government and the American people. Congress never officially declared war on Vietnam.

6. In what ways was the American nation polarized by the war in Vietnam? What effect did the anti-war movement have on American society? Describe the ways in which 1968 was a year of upheaval (in the U.S., and elsewhere in the world)? How did the Vietnam War shape the election of 1968?

The people of the United States were divided over the American involvement in the Vietnam War. Some viewed it as necessary to protest Communism and others considered it an immoral war that the country should not be involved in. The anti-war movement served to divide the country along the lines of Vietnam support and to further the hippie and counter culture movements. 1968 was a year of upheaval because of the U.S. involvement in Vietnam and the assassinations of both Martin Luther King, Jr. And Robert F. Kennedy. The war shaped the U.S. election
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United States Postal Service Summary

Words: 2820 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53172371

The continuing economic recession that began in 2008 in the United States greatly exacerbated that revenue problem as people reduced their unnecessary use of postal services and increased their use of private-sector competitors such as United Parcel Service (UPS) and Federal Express (FedEx). To date, the USPS has been slow to respond to competition, particularly in relation to the adoption of the bar coding system that has long been in use by UPS and FedEx and that is considered to have been instrumental in their increase of the market share (Brewster & Dalzell, 2007).

The USPS already has formal plans to adopt such mechanisms by the year 2013, but those plans preceded the economic crisis of 2008 and the precipitous nature of funding issues affecting its operations in the current political climate. In that regard, the USPS is also saddled with significant pension obligations that have inspired considerable attention in…… [Read More]

References

Anonymous. (2011). Personal Interview Conducted by the Researcher on November 2,

2001 with a current USPS employee working as a Letter Carrier since 2000. The

Interview was conducted on the strict condition of absolute anonymity.

Brewster, M. And Dalzell, F. (2007). Driving Change: The UPS Approach to Business.
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United States Still the World's

Words: 3011 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27607486



Models of Media and Politics

A review of media / political models sheds some light on why the United States' cultural themes have been such a dominant dynamic in Europe, among other global venues. In describing the three models of media and politics, Daniel C. Hallin and Paolo Mancini report that the media in Southern Europe (the "Mediterranean" or "Polarized Pluralist Model") is "an institution of the political and literary worlds" more than it is market-driven (Hallin, et al., 2004 90). The North and Central European model is called the "Democratic Corporatist Model" -- and is certainly more market-driven and far less politically driven; and the third model is the "North Atlantic" or "Liberal model" of media and politics (Hallin 87).

The North Atlantic or Democratic Corporatist model, according to Mark a. aker II encompasses Germany, Austria, Switzerland, the "Low Countries" and Scandinavia, and can be broken down into three…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Arango, Tim, 2008, 'World Falls for American Media, Even as it Sours on America. The New York Times, Retrieved Nov. 24, 2010, from  http://www.nytimes.com .

Artz, Lee, and Kamalipour, Yahya, 2007, the Media Globe: Trends in International Mass Media. Rowman & Littlefield: Landham, MD.

Baker, Mark a., 2010, 'Hallin & Mancini, the North / Central European or Democratic Corporatist Model by: Mark a. Baker II', Global Media. Retrieved Nov. 24, 2010, from  http://globalmediastudies.blogspot.com .

Hallin, Daniel C., and Mancini, Paolo, 2004, Comparing Media Systems: Three Models of Media and Politics. Cambridge University Press: New York.
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United States Had Waited One

Words: 1041 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56327600

This would have given Hitler an advantage in Africa, and he could have conceivably taken over much more territory and been much harder to control and subdue. In addition, on the Pacific front, the Japanese were attempting to take over as much territory as they could find, all the way to Australia and beyond, and the Americans defeated them many times during 1942, including at the Battles of Coral Sea and Midway, where countless Japanese soldiers died, and numerous Japanese ships were sunk. If America had not entered the war, Japan could have gotten a much bigger foothold in the Pacific, and might have been impossible, or much harder to stop.

In Europe, there might have been far more dire consequences if America had not entered the war until 1942. England was weakening, and it is very conceivable that the country could have fallen to the Nazis in 1942. This…… [Read More]

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United States Should Apply Greater

Words: 986 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46105061

Instead of providing a democratic model that Chinese companies could follow, American companies and not only go to China for the advantage of paying a lot less for the same work. The fact that our government tolerates and encourages such practices must change.

After the 1989 massacre in Tiananmen Square, one of the sanctions imposed on China was to be denied any World ank loans. A year later, the sanction was reduced as China was supposed to improve its human rights practices in order to get World ank loans. This measure, as many others, was never applied, as China is now one of the main beneficiaries of World ank loans and has done little in changing its human rights practices. Despite the fact that U.S. could have used its influence in the World ank and impose strict sanctions on China, it preferred not to do so, most probably based on…… [Read More]

Bibliography

China (includes Tibet, Hong Kong, and Macau)," Country Reports on Human Rights Practices - 2005, released by the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006, available at http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61605.htm;

Christensen, Nick, a Standoff Between Giants: America's Policies Towards the Human Rights Record of China, December 9, 1998, available at  http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rtanter/F98PS472PAPERS/CHRISTENSEN.NICK.CHINA.HTM ;

Kourous, George and Tom Barry, "U.S. China Policy: Trade, Aid, and Human Rights," Foreign Policy in Focus, Vol. 1, No. 5, November 1996.
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United States Military's Efforts to

Words: 2355 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61315156

Integrating women into the military, like with African-American men, would also contribute to more cohesive fighting units again serving to promote a united, strong U.S. military organization.

Anti-female bias in the military

The struggle for equality in the military for women parallels that of African-American men in many other ways. As a direct result of the need for additional "manpower," women's push for better treatment in the military, and a desire for a larger, stronger military, in 1948, the Women's Armed Services Integration Act was enacted. This act made it possible for women to become permanent members in the military.

Once again, as with African-American men, that act alone was not enough to ensure integration thus leading to a multitude of policies designed to accomplish that end. Almost immediately following this act, in 1949, it was changed to eliminate women with dependent children. This was not changed until the 1970's.…… [Read More]

References

Borlik, A. (1998, June). DOD Marks 50th Year of Military Women's Integration

Retrieved January 12, 2012, from U.S. Department of Defense website:

  http://www.defense.gov / news/newsarticle.aspx?id=41380

Blumenson, M. (1972). Eisenhower
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United States Singled a Shining Democratic Governance

Words: 1010 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37198611

United States singled a shining democratic governance;, U.S. system governance immune criticism. Scholar One of the critiques of democracy discussed within the articles for this assignment is greatly associated with the role that private property and wealth plays in democratic societies. Specifically, within Santas' "Plato's criticism of democracies in The epublic," the author alludes to the fact that the influence of these two external aspects of government -- the private property and wealth of the individual chosen to govern in a democracy -- has the innate potential to corrupt and to subject the needs of the masses who are governed to those of the individuals who are governing.

There is a great possibility that the author is correct regarding this point of criticism. One of the points of validity for this notion is the fact that it is found in literature and is one of the chief points of disparagement…… [Read More]

References

Beard, C.A. (1993). "Framing the Constitution." American Government: Readings and Cases. New York: Harper Collins.

Gilley, B. (2009). "Is democracy possible?." Journal of Democracy. 20 (1), 113-125.

Ranney, A., Kendall, W. (1951). "Democracy: confusion and agreement."

Santas, G. (2007). "Plato's criticisms of democracy in The Republic." Social Policy & Political Foundation. 70-89. 4, 430-439.
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United States Foreign Policy in

Words: 822 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9214985

2005). Instead of economic and military interventionism, the new American leadership proposed relations based on commerce and, more importantly, diplomacy. The United States would therefore keep interventionism at a minimum.

Because it was based on a keen common sense and core values, FDR's vision came to be known as the "good neighbor" foreign policy. Together with his wife Eleanor, FDR drew up the blueprints for a system based on "common ideals and a community of interest, together with a spirit of cooperation." Rather than seeing other nations as means to promote American interests, FDR believed that American well-being depended heavily on the well-being of its satellite countries as well. This was a direct contrast to the paternalistic attitude that characterized interventionism.

As a result of these non-interventionist policies, FDR was able to build much more goodwill. Thus, by World War II, many Western nations threw their support behind the Allies.…… [Read More]

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United States May Be Losing Its Credibility and Influence

Words: 739 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54259479

United States in decline -- again? The answer if one is looking at the question during the year that this article was published (2007) is yes, the U.S. was in decline in many ways -- and continues to be in decline. In Michael Cox's scholarly article clearly points out that following orld ar II, and the subsequent Cold ar years, the U.S. was considered hands down the strongest nation in the world. Communism was on the decline, which was a point in America's favor after those Cold ar years of outreach by both capitalism and communism to try and impose influence on nations all over the world.

Cox is correct when he says that Ronald Reagan has been "almost completely rehabilitated by a new generation of historians" who, when comparing Reagan to George . Bush, see Reagan in a different light altogether. Maybe it is the fact that "hindsight is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cox, Michael. "Is the United States in decline -- again?" Royal Institute of International

Affairs 83, no. 4 (2007): 643-653.
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United States Operates as an Indirect or

Words: 1691 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54966308

United States operates as an indirect or representative democracy meaning that a select group is elected by the whole to serve as representatives while attending to public matters. This is in contrast to a direct democracy which holds that all eligible members of a society can personally direct public affairs. This distinction is often overlooked by most Americans who believe that the term democracy has no qualifications.

In order to fully grasp American government, it is essential to understand the Framers of the Constitution referred to it as republic in form. Their intention was to have representatives direct government operations. In other words, voters select representatives who in turn carry out government business. The reasons for this procedure are manifold. Most notably, the Framers foresaw the electorate making poor decisions based on transitory emotions thereby leading the country in an unwise direction. Given such predispositions, the Framers felt that minority…… [Read More]

References

Wilson, James Q. & Dilulio, John J. (1998). American Government. Boston: Houghton Mifflin

Company.
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United States Is the Diversity

Words: 5913 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62722507

Because of the newer mobility of a significant amount of suburban America, driving to national parks was even more an option. The more people visited the Parks, it seemed, the more of a synergistic effect upon their funding and use (Jensen and Guthrie, 2006).

By the Johnson Administration in the 1960s, coupled with more media attention, there was increased public awareness of America's natural treasures. This was now that "Parks for People" Campaign. During this period there was also a fairly significant new awareness about ecology and the natural environment. The mission of the National Parks Service was called into question. eacting to this, Congress passed the General Authorities Acts of 1970, which became known as the "edwood Amendment," since a large part of the Act was devoted to conserving edwood National Park. Based on political pressure from citizens, Congress was also forced to provide a rather significant funding increase…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

The National Park Service. (2002, March). Retrieved October 2010, from U.S. History.com:  http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1605.html 

National Park Services Almanac. (2008). Washington, DC: National Parks Service, GPO.

Blackburn, S. (2007). Plato's Republic. New York: Atlantic Monthly Press.

Brown and Pozner. (2001). Exploring the Relationship Between Learning and Leadership. Leadership and Organizational Develpment, 68(2), 274-80.
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US Healthcare Reform Initiatives

Words: 659 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67518663

The United States is relatively unique in the world community for offering healthcare through a variety of employer-provided and government insurance systems. While most US citizens obtain healthcare via their employers, others have health insurance via a variety of government-provided programs such as Medicaid or Medicare. Still others purchase their insurance from health insurance companies themselves because they do not receive employer coverage and are unable to qualify for Medicaid. This suggests that cooperation between insurance companies, providers, and the government is necessary to improve delivery, reduce costs, and expand access to all patients.

One of the first presidents to attempt to orchestrate broad-sweeping healthcare reform, Bill Clinton, recently underlined the need to embark upon reform in a collective and unified effort. “The former president called on attendees to embrace evidence-based medicine as a means to bend healthcare\'s cost curves and lauded Medicaid expansion as a means to keep health…… [Read More]

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United States a Democracy the

Words: 1069 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90855666

The Executive Branch (President and Cabinet) executes spending and Congressional instructions, makes appointments to certain governmental posts, and is the Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces. The Judicial Branch (Supreme Court) exercises judicial review over the constitutionality and interpretation of laws; determines how Congress meant the law to apply, and has a panel that serves for life (Constitutional Topic: Separation of Powers).

There are a number of criticisms focused on the actual level of democracy or even democratic representation in the United States of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. First, many governmental officials (Supreme Court justices, etc.) are appointed, not elected, and therefore may operate outside the will of the populace. Second, in order to be elected to a state or national office now requires a huge amount of funding; putting elected office outside the purview of most people. Thus, it is not necessarily the "best" people…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Cassier, E. The Philosophy of the Enlightenment. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1968.

"Constitutional Topic: Separation of Powers." March 2009. U.S. Constitution.net. December 2010 .

Dahl, Shapiro and Cheibub. The Democracy Sourcebook. Boston: MIT Press, 2003.

"Democracy vs. Republic." June 2004. Albatrus.org. December 2010 .
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United States Has Waged a War on

Words: 3075 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29492571

United States has waged a "War on Drugs." Within this endeavor the nation has passed and implanted some extremely tough laws regarding drugs, on a local, state and national level. The laws are meant to act as a deterrent for those who abuse drugs by way of sales, manufacturing and use. The laws send people to prisons for a long time as well as create probation and parole status for many who violate the laws.

The belief is that stricter laws will reduce the number of drug offenses and drug use in the United States. Those who draft and pass the legislation for tougher drug laws believe that the fear of jail and other punishments will deter people from drug use, manufacturing and sales. While this has been going on for the last few decades the nation has continued to wrestle with drug issues. It is unclear whether the tough…… [Read More]

Martin Kasindorf, Elders: Study Drug Legalization., Newsday, 12-08-1993, pp 17.

Holland's Drug Policies: The Lesson for Canada

http://www.readersdigest.ca/mag/2000/08/think_drugs.html
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United States of America Consists

Words: 867 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71391454

Parties that may have been overlooked due to lack of advertising, can now demonstrate to millions of people at a time what their party beliefs are, which at times can be radically different from the two main parties.

The third party proposal has been around for a very long time, but like with everything, change is met with resistance. The idea that a "debate" is in a sense a two person, or in this case, a two party ordeal is something that many people are still in agreement with. The idea that there is a right and a wrong, a yes or a no, makes it impossible for parties who offer compromises or ideas that incorporate a little bit of everything, to become a "main" party (Abramson et al. 365). Under the current electoral system in the United States, what matters is having more votes than any other candidates. A…… [Read More]

References:

Belenky A.S. "A modified "winner-take-all" rule for awarding state electoral votes in U.S. presidential elections and a game model for its analysis" Mathematical and Computer Modelling, Volume 48, Issues 9-10, November 2008, Pages 1308-1325

Abramson, Paul R., Aldrich, John H., Paolino, Phil, and Rohde. David W. "Third-Party and Independent Candidates in American Politics: Wallace, Anderson, and Perot." Political Science Quarterly. Vol. 110, No. 3 (Autumn, 1995), pp. 349-367

U.S. Electoral College. Office of the Federal Register. 4 May 2011.

Electoral System
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US Airways and American Airlines Merger Essay

Words: 2687 Length: Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21177447

Background

In early 2013, the merger between US Airways and American Airlines became official, and by April 2015, the final regulatory hurdle – FAA approval - had been cleared (Maynard, 2013; Holmes, 2015). The merged airline had significant strategic implications, including US Airways leaving the Star Alliance (Maynard, 2013). The implementation at the time the deal was announced was expected to take between 18 and 24 months, and that time frame remains valid – FAA approval is a precursor to the final operating merger between the two airlines.

The deal was announced in early 2013 was yet another in an ongoing round of consolidations within the US airline industry. The deal was worth $11 billion, and was structure shortly after American emerged from bankruptcy proceedings (Isidore, 2013). American was losing market share prior to the deal, and US Airways was vulnerable as one of the smaller domestic carriers, so there…… [Read More]

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US Foreign Policy

Words: 1320 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63245547

U.S. Foreign Policy

American foreign policy occupies a unique place in the world. American foreign policy regarding interacting with other nations is a non-homogeneous mixture of politics, economics, and the unique American culture which believes that both the success of political and economic agenda's cannot be separated from the ways which a country treats it's people. To be specific, American has a difficult time forming positive relationships with nations that oppress, imprison, or otherwise trample their people's basic human rights to life, liberty and the individual pursuit of happiness. As he stated during his administration, President Jimmy Carter described the connection between human rights and American foreign policy this way.

Human rights is the soul of our foreign policy, because human rights is the very soul of our sense of nationhood."

American foreign policy is also seen as a function of the president, and the president must take the lead…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Allen, M., and P.P. Pan. Bush touts U.S. values to Chinese. Washington Post, 2002, February 22, p. A01.

Carter, J. Openings to Cuba: We must find common ground. Washington Post. 2002, May 24, p. A35.

Kane, John. American Values or Human Rights? U.S. Foreign Policy and the Fractured Myth of Virtuous Power Presidential Studies Quarterly, Vol. 33. 2003

Sullivan, K. Carter urges democracy for Cuba. Washington Post, 2002, May 15, p. A14.
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United States Foreign Affairs Since

Words: 1325 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94151338

S. financial institutions and private investors.

France and ritain utilized U.S. loans to pay for their part of the war with Germany. oth countries bought large quantities of all types of arms from us on credit. Those loans have to be paid back, or, with or without a military defeat, the U.S. financial and economic situation would become desperate.

Third, and probably the most significant reason that the United States must enter the war against this aggressor, is the interception of the Zimmerman telegram, just this past January. German Foreign Minister Arthur Zimmerman sent German Minister to Mexico, von Eckhard a coded message which was decodified and translated by ritish cryptologists. In that telegram, Zimmerman proposed to the government of Mexico that they join the German side of the war, and, in return, after the cause was won, Germany would offer Mexico a portion of U.S. territory for helping them…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Alexander, M., & Childress, M. (1981, April). Teaching with documents: The Zimmerman telegram. Retrieved December 11, 2009, from The National Archives:  http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/zimmermann/ 

Hollweg, B. (n.d.). Why did America enter World War I? Retrieved December 11, 2009, from University of Maine-Farmington: http://students.umf.maine.edu/~spencebj/subwarfare.html

Public Information Office. (n.d.). American entry into World War I - 1917. Retrieved December 11, 2009, from U.S. Department of State: http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ho/time/wwi/82205.htm

Smitha, F. (1998). MacroHistory and World report: Slide to war in Europe, 1911-1914. Retrieved December 13, 2009, from fsmitha.com:  http://www.fsmitha.com/h2/ch04.htm
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US Obligation to Privacy

Words: 1076 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40549015

Privacy & Civil Liberties

needs to communicate goals to the American public that include protecting the nation against threats to national security, ensuring the safety of citizens, friends, allies, and nations with cooperative relationships (Clarke, 2013). Promote national security and foreign policy interests, including counterintelligence, counteracting, and international elements of organized crime. Protect the right to privacy. Protect democracy, civil liberties, and the rule of law, eliminating excessive surveillance and unjustified secrecy. Promote prosperity, security, and openness in a networked world adopting and sustaining policies that support technological innovation globally and establish and strengthen international norms of Internet freedom and security. Protect strategic alliances that preserve and strengthen strategic relationships, protect those relationships, and recognize the importance of 'cooperative relationships'.

The U.S. government must protect national security and personal privacy that includes Fourth Amendment rights. Risk management should involve the rights to privacy, freedom and liberties on the internet and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Clarke, R.A. (2013). Liberty and Security in a Changing World. The President's Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies.
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United States in Iraq Stay or Go

Words: 2685 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83304468

Temperatures and tempers are soaring in Iraq, and every day the news flashes tell the stories of one, two, three, or more American soldiers who died in combat. hether it was justified or not, the actual war to seize power from Saddam Hussein came and went in a matter of weeks. On a high note, the United States public rallied behind the President and imagined throngs of joyous happy smiling Iraqi men, women, and children. The mews media has cooperated gracefully, and CNN, Fox, NBC, and every other major news network delivers exactly what the hite House wants us to hear: that Iraq is better off with the Americans in control. Granted, Saddam was a dictator. He and his minions grew fat off his nation's main natural resource: petroleum, while most Iraqi citizens lived without some basic human rights and freedoms. Hussein and his regime also systematically persecuted whole ethnic…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Garamone, Jim. "Security Will Set Stage for Iraqi Economic Growth, Bremer Says." DefenseLink. U.S. Department of Defense. 20 June 2003.

Hertzberg, Hendrik. "?

" The New Yorker.

Jiminez, Marina. "Iraq: Going Home." National Post. 27 March 2003.
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US Intelligence Community After 9 11

Words: 956 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61163610

EOGANIZATION OF THE U.S. INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY

The eorganization, Challenges, and Problems of the U.S. Intelligence Community 9/11 Attacks

The proposal to restructure the intelligence community through the creation of DNI was floated for long before 9/11. The Commission's recommended for National Counterterrorism Center that represented virtual approaches of bridging executive branch departments and implementing interagency coordination. Later, Congress enacted a bill, and the president signed Intelligence eform and Terrorism Prevention Act that led to the implementation of the recommendations. This study analyzes the rationale behind and legal provisions concerning the reorganization. The associated problems and challenges are also identified.

First, the reforms aimed at equipping the U.S. intelligence community with strategies to prevent Intelligence failures. The debate within the abilities of the DNI to induce preventative intelligence failures that focus on powers awarded and denied to such official capacities. Psychological failures happen as analysts cope with inherent uncertainties of evidence…… [Read More]

References

Katherine, M.B., Darmer, R.M., & Rosenbaum, S.E. (2004). Civil Liberties vs. National Security in a Post9/11 World. Amherst NY: Prometheus Books.

Nacos, B.L. (2012). Terrorism and Counterterrorism. New York: Longman/Pearson