Religion And Theology Essays (Examples)

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Religion Qualifications of the Divine and the

Words: 2413 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83807781

eligion

Qualifications of the divine and the nature of supreme reality are core concepts of any religious tradition. Hinduism and Buddhism conceptualize the divine and the nature of reality in complementary yet distinct ways. Buddhism emerged from Hinduism, in a manner not wholly unlike the way Christianity emerged from Judaism. Therefore, there are several core similarities in the cosmologies and the conceptualizations of divine reality between these two faiths. Moreover, the religious practices and philosophies of Buddhism and Hinduism tend to be more similar than they are different. These similarities should not obscure the real and practical differences in the ways Hindus and Buddhists conceptualize and communicate matters related to the nature of the divine, and the nature of supreme reality. In particular, Buddhism avoids distinctions between a divine and a profane realm; there are no actual Buddhist deities or gods. Hinduism boasts a plethora of gods and goddesses, although…… [Read More]

Reference

Cline, Austin. "Hinduism: Origins, Beliefs, Practices, Holy Texts, Sacred Places." About.com. Retrieved online: http://atheism.about.com/od/bookreviews/fr/Hinduism_2.htm

"Basics of Buddhism." Retrieved online:  http://www.letusreason.org/Buddh1.htm 

Freeman, Richard. Interview data received February 21, 2013.

The Heart Sutra. Translated by Kumarajiva and Pevahouse. Retrieved online: http://www4.bayarea.net/~mtlee/heart.txt
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Religions of Rome

Words: 817 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43120600

eligions of ome

Throughout history, religion has been having a major impact on the societies around the world. In the case of the omans, they had numerous religions that were practiced throughout the reign of the empire. To fully understand these ideas requires looking at the chapter titled Sol the Sun in the Art and eligions of ome. This will be accomplished by summarizing the various points and discussing a broad theme from the chapter. Together, these different elements will provide the greatest insights as to how specific practices from other cultures affected various oman religions.

In Sol the Sun in the Art and eligions of ome, it is talking about the worship of the sun god name Sol. He was a mythological figure that was considered to have the most power among the various oman pagan gods. This is because the omans believed that the sun was a vital…… [Read More]

References

Sol in the Roman Empire, 1 -- 30.

Beard Mary. Religions of Rome. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

Goldhill Simon. Being Greek Under Rome. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2006.

Mary Beard, Religions of Rome (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), 167 -- 363.
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Religion Christianity and Islam Religions

Words: 1093 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51351581

Both faiths ascribe to a heaven and a hell, belief in angels and the devil. Moreover, Islam and Christianity teach against crimes against humanity to include violence, gambling, adultery, lying, theft and murder. Both teach that children are to respect their parents and husbands and wives are to be respected. Both Islam and Christianity teach against same sex marriage, homosexuality, fornication, and vulgarism. Both teach of modesty in presentation to the rest of the world. Observation of societal laws is also important to believers in Islam and Christianity (Asad 60).

Traditions

Islam and Christianity both believe in zakat or charity; extending one's self to those less fortunate. Both traditions teach fasting as a way of getting closer to God as well as enhancing each individual's God like qualities. Despite recent extremist practices by some Muslims, both Islam and Christianity are faiths based on a tradition of peace (Asad 103). Although…… [Read More]

References

Asad, Talal. Formations of the secular: Christianity, Islam, Modernity.2003. Web.

Games, Alex & Victoria Coren. Balderdash and Piffie. One Sandwich short of a dog's dinner. (2007): 143-144.

Goddard, Hugh. Christian-Muslim Relations: Yesterday, today and tomorrow. International Journal for the study of the Christian church, 3.2 (2003): 1-14.

Lowenthal, Kate. The psychology of religion: a short introduction. 2000. Web
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Religion Anselm Aquinas and Hume

Words: 2500 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24187463



Thus, Sam argues that although the world often seems unjust (and is filled with innumerable instances of evil), yet P. is solved through the belief that every condition (good, in this case) necessitates an equal and opposite condition (evil, as it were.) However, Gretchen counters by asking whether those who behave in an evil way are ever punished for their transgressions, and whether there is any motivation for people to not simply act in their own best interests, whether or not this involves behaving in an immoral manner. Sam's rejoinder appeals to the afterlife as the site in which the importance of morality becomes manifest: "But the doctrine of an afterlife, in whatever form, says that this isn't the whole story" (47). However, Sam disregards the fact that God is purported to pardon many sinners, which would ostensibly mean that he regularly pardons instances of injustice.

The dialogue between Sam…… [Read More]

References

Anselm. Proslogium. Trans. S.N. Deane. Internet History Sourcebook. Fordham University, Aug. 1998. 10 Sep. 2012. Retrieved from http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/basis/anselm-intro.asp.

Aquinas, T. Summa of Theology. Trans. B.P. Copenhaver. Publisher Unknown, 2005.

Hopkins, J. A New Interpretation of Anselm's Monologion and Proslogion. Minneapolis: Arthur J. Banning Press, 1986.

Hume, D. Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. Unknown Publisher, 1779.
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Religion Comparison Religions in Ancient

Words: 2389 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75013626

According to Bass, "Hinduism is the only major religion lacking an adequate explanation as to its origin," as no definitive Hindu text exist that that date before 1000 B.C. Indeed, because Hinduism is one of the religions that views time as cyclical rather than linear, what information is available about Hinduism does not give a very accurate picture of its history (Bass 5). hat can be gleaned from this history is the fact that Hinduism is one of the oldest religions with one of the oldest societies in the world. Just as their origins are difficult to define, the beliefs of Hinduism are varied depending on one's personal interpretation of the religion. However, one of the more important aspects of Hinduism is its social caste system. This belief states that there are four casts, and each "has its rules and obligation for living." The three castes are Brahman, priests, hatriyas,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"A Concise History of Islam and the Arabs." Mid East Web. n.d. 11 June 2009.



Abdullah, Mohd Habibullah Bin. "The Story of Creation in the Quar'an and Old

Testament." Bismika Allahuma. 15 October 2005. 11 June 2009.
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Religion Theology

Words: 687 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72297697

Religion/Theology

Environment and Globalization

Christine Burke calls for a Christina response to the issue of environment and globalization in her essay entitled Globalization and Ecology. She sets forth her estimation of the steps that the Christian world needs to take to change the current affects of globalization on the earth and the societies that inhabit it. Burke calls for "active participation'42 by the Christian community in understanding, "ecological awareness'42 to shape that action, and a "new participation'42 by "creative leadership'42 to engage in action. The goal she stresses is to move from the "individualistic mindset'42 toward one that is "holistic and inclusive."

The Christian community needs to understand the narrow focus of the global community. It is a focus, according to Burke, which idealizes only income and wealth vs. social responsibility. In turn, individual societies suffer as global corporate interests destroy their ecologies. Because corporations operate in what seems to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Burke, Christine E. "Globalization and Ecology." Earth Revealing, Earth Healing Ecology and Christian Theology. Ed. Denis Edwards. 2001 by The Order of St. Benedict, Inc.: Collegeville, Minnesotta.
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Religion the History of Religion

Words: 586 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26194776

Without an understanding of the Arian crisis, it is difficult to understand why later theological debates ensued and tore apart people who essentially believe in the same basic religion. Some Christians might take for granted that Christ is divine, whereas others view Jesus more as a human messenger of God. The Romans were debating this very issue several thousand years ago.

Second, the story of Arius and Athanasius shows that Christianity was not founded by Jesus Christ. Christianity was founded by those who came after Jesus. Christianity was also formed over time, and as the result of crises as bloody and violent as the one that Rubenstein describes in When Jesus Became God. Jesus set in motion a chain of events that would lead to the formation of a new religion, even though Jesus himself might only have been trying to reform Judaism. Jesus may have preached of a new…… [Read More]

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Religion in Your View How Can Christians

Words: 398 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23558523

Religion

In your view, how can Christians and Muslims work to understand one another better?

One of the first ways Christians and Muslims can work to understand one another is to recognize their shared heritage as "people of the book." Their religions are important to their identities and worldviews, and knowing this will also shed light on their common ground. Both Christians and Muslims believe in the veracity of the Hebrew Bible as the cornerstones of their religion. The common grounds between the two faiths, including the stories of the Old Testament, can be starting points for religious dialogue.

Once Christians and Muslims realize they are from a common background, they may be able to inspire compassion in one another. However, it is also important for Christians and Muslims to recognize and understand d their differences and more importantly, respect those differences. Valuing diversity, Christians and Muslims can appreciate that…… [Read More]

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Religion and Politics Are Issues

Words: 1251 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1586274

This time period also marked a great deal of expansion for different European nations. This expansion occurred through the conquering of certain territories.

Machiavellian Leaders

Machiavelli believed that great leaders had to possess certain attributes. He asserted that a "leader needs an analytical attitude without a sense of shame or guilt. Political calculation is required to control, rather than be victimized by events (Deluga, 2001)." In other words, a Machiavellian leader believes that the end justifies the means. These individual tend to have extremely charismatic personalities and that power to persuade large populations of people that there actions are justified.

The Machiavellian Leaders chosen for the purpose of this discussion will be Elizabeth I, Peter the Great and . Queen Elizabeth I was loved by the people of England to the extent that she had completely loyal subjects. She used her leadership qualities to defeat Spain. In addition she was…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Deluga, R.J. (2001)American presidential Machiavellianism: Implications for charismatic leadership and rated performance. The Leadership Quarterly

Volume 12, Issue 3, Autumn 2001, Pages 339-363

Grell, O. P Bob Scribner. (2002) Tolerance and Intolerance in the European Reformation. Cambridge Press

King Phillip II. Retrieved February 22, from:  http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/king-philip-ii-spain.htm
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Religion Is One of the

Words: 960 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55045800

Tradition says that a dying person should be put on the floor in order for them to be closer to the earth. After the ailing person dies, the body is washed and prepared for funeral practices. Most Hindu people would rather have a Hindu priest pray and bless their recently departed relative.

4.In Hinduism, people that don't believe are not threatened to perish in hell as they are given another chance to recognize the religion as having great importance in one's life. From the Hindu point-of-view, hell is something experienced by people that have a bad Karma.

Hindu people believe that they've attained a level of happiness when they reach a perfect Karma and their mind and body are pure. Hinduism regards life as being complex process in which the soul undergoes several phases of reincarnation in order to reach a final phase where it is saved and reincarnation no…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Chopra, Anita. Alagiakrishnan, Kannayiram. "HEALTH and HEALTH CARE of ASIAN INDIAN-American ELDERS." Retrieved April 8, 2009, from Stanford University Web site: http://www.stanford.edu/group/ethnoger/asianindian.html

2. Wendell, Thomas. "Wendell Thomas." Kessinger Publishing, 2003.

3. "Hindu American Foundation Denounces Temple Entry Ban on Harijans (Dalits) in Orissa." Retrieved April 8, 2009, from the Hindu American Foundation Web site: http://www.hinduamericanfoundation.org/media_press_release_jagannath_harijan.htm

4. "Hinduism." Retrieved April 8, 2009, from diehardindian Web site: http://www.diehardindian.com/demogrph/moredemo/hindu.htm
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Religion & Politics The Impact

Words: 1503 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90404369

Race factored in creates a shift in the view which can be correctly applied to that which affects voting and as well globalization has created its' own impact on voting choices made by the American individual.

ILIOGRAPHY

Campbell, David E. (2004). Acts of Faith: Churches and Political Engagement. Political ehavior, 26 (2), 155-180.

Clawson, Rosalee a. And Clark, John a. (2003). The Attitudinal Structure of African

American Women Party Activists: The Impact of Race, Gender, and Religion. Political Research Quarterly, 56(2), 211-221.

Clinton and Giuliani Seen as Not Highly Religious; Romney's Religion Raises Concerns (2007) the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press. 6 Sept. 2007. Online available at: http://people-press.org/report/353/clinton-and-giuliani-seen-as-not-highly-religious-romneys-religion-raises-concerns

Kelly, Nathan J. And Kelly, Jana Morgan. (2005). Religion and Latino Partisanship in the United States. Political Research Quarterly, 58 (1), 87-95.

McClurg, Scott D. (2006). The Electoral Relevance of Political Talk: Examining

Disagreement and Expertise Effects in…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Campbell, David E. (2004). Acts of Faith: Churches and Political Engagement. Political Behavior, 26 (2), 155-180.

Clawson, Rosalee a. And Clark, John a. (2003). The Attitudinal Structure of African

American Women Party Activists: The Impact of Race, Gender, and Religion. Political Research Quarterly, 56(2), 211-221.

Clinton and Giuliani Seen as Not Highly Religious; Romney's Religion Raises Concerns (2007) the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press. 6 Sept. 2007. Online available at: http://people-press.org/report/353/clinton-and-giuliani-seen-as-not-highly-religious-romneys-religion-raises-concerns
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Religion in the News Religion

Words: 1559 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95527829

And maybe mass suicides are the old way's means of presenting their final argument. "Whether this is truly the case or not, suicides both individual and collective are only going to increase as frenetic technological changes tear apart tradition and destabilize cultures throughout the world."

4. Conclusion

Mass suicides are a form of protesting against the changing systems of beliefs; a means of escaping the unsatisfactory world around or pathways to heaven, conducted by weak and sometimes ill minds, led by a diabolic genius who has the capability of playing with others' minds. They exploit religious beliefs in order to make a less or more well founded statement.

And religious exploitation towards the advantage of an individual or group of individuals is not a procedure we are strange from. We should however bear in mind that we are beginning to demolish universal values. And after all, what will happen to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Joost Abraham Maurits Meerloo, Suicide and Mass Suicide, 1962

Mass Suicides in Recent Years, CNN News, March, 1997, http://www.cnn.com/U.S./9703/27/suicide.list/index.html, last accessed on November 15, 2007

Mass Suicides Raise the Question: Why?, CNN News, March 1997, http://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/9703/27/nfm/suicide.psychology/index.html, last accessed on November 15, 2007

Mass Suicide, Holology Department of Research, http://www.holology.com/suicide.html, last accessed on November 15, 2007
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Religions of East Asia Including

Words: 855 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61109450

. The Dao is the source of all power which embodies all beings and encompasses both the yin and the yang. Remarkable quiet and serene, the Dao is rarely detected by humans, but provides invulnerability to those who posses it. Dao philosophy calls for its followers to refrain from certain foods and sexual activity, and also separates the role of the state from the lives of its citizens.

The great philosopher Confucius, also known as Kong Fu-Xi, evolved his teachings out of Dao philosophies. Confucius, like estern philosopher Socrates, is known to modern man through the others attempting to preserve his teachings. He took Dao teachings and evolved them into an entirely different sect. Unlike Daoism and later the Shinto religion, he believed that men were the source of the secret life, rather than the cosmos. The Analects of Confucius are dialogues between his followers and he which best embodies…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Confucius. The Analects. Penguin Classics. New York. 1998.

Noss, David S. History of the World's Religions. Prentice Hall. 12th ed. 2008.
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Religion and Sociology Challenges to

Words: 1316 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48674123

(40) The foundation of the story demonstrates the social pull of religion as a way of life, that is inclusive, despite its obvious contradictions to the modern world, belief systems and economy. In a sense the social desire to fit in and be seen as different are met by the acceptance of the church as a lifestyle. According to Durkheim, "Deep down, no religion is false.... Each in its own way is true, for each answers given conditions of human life."

Blend et al. 30)

Max eber also committed a great deal of his life and scholarship to the sociology of religion, affirming repeatedly that religion must exist to transform society into a moral society, rather than one that meets the conditions of the natural instincts of man, being amoral in the sense that they are often simply self serving, yet he also reiterated the importance of studying the ways…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Blend, Charles, et al. Emile Durkheim, 1858-1917: A Collection of Essays, with Translations and a Bibliography. Ed. Kurt H. Wolff. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press, 1960.

Sharlet, Jeff, "Through a Glass, Darkly: How the Christian Right is Reimagining U.S. History" 33-43.

Turner, Bryan S. Max Weber: From History to Modernity. London: Routledge, 1993.

Wood, Richard L. Introduction to Politics and Religion
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Religions of the World Islam

Words: 1825 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73856366

It is because of this that Hinduism has become as powerful now as it has ever been (Hopfe and oodward 77-113).

Buddhism

Among the most powerful religions of the world, comes Buddhism. Its great history is one that makes this spiritual belief one that has withstood time. Not only is its origination in one of the most populated countries of the world, but the powerful influence that it has had on other religions and on the political institutions from which some nations base their governments, it has become clear that Buddhism, just as Christianity and Islam have become, is a great powerful influence on the insurgence of political atmospheres, and extremists views (Hopfe and oodward 134-155).

Buddhism is most closely associated with peaceful teachings and non-violent approaches to everyday issues. Because of this great belief in that everything can be resolved through peaceful means, governments have chosen to also adapt…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hopfe, Lewis M. & Woodward, Mark R. Religions of the World. 11th Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2009. Print.
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Religion on Planet Earth Based on Careful

Words: 558 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74990487

eligion on Planet Earth

Based on careful observation of the beliefs and practices of people on earth, I can state that human beings are mostly religious people. There are five characteristics that define their religiosity. First, religious people function in groups. They share the same beliefs and perform the same activities as part of their religious activities. Within each group, there is a hierarchy of ranks and people but all people generally identify with the group as a whole.

The second religious characteristic of humans is faith. I have encountered people with different religions. But all of them have faith. Faith involves beliefs in a deity or deities and the existence of supernatural beings called angels and demons. Each religious group believes in it and the group generally agrees upon the fundamentals of faith. The fundamentals are believed to be sacred and are very important for the adherents. The fundamentals…… [Read More]

References

Johnstone, R.L. (2007) Religion in Society: A Sociology of Religion, 8th Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson-Prentice Hall.
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Religion in the Leviathan the

Words: 968 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30972305

" (Leviathan, Chapter 12).

This passage speaks directly to man's relationship with God in Hobbes' eyes. The idea that God exists pre-logic erupts into an understanding that faith and fate play such an integral role in Man's life. Whatever we may do to secure our happiness we may do, but fate and faith play a larger role than we would generally care to admit to be the case.

In general, Hobbes philosophy on religion does satisfy a lot of philosophic ends. It points at one true course (Christianity) and also obviates the need to justify religion in the face of logic and philosophy. As in, we do not need to logically defend Christ's birth, the stories of his life and the prophets, and subsequently the parable of his cruxifiction. In fact, we do not even need to defend logically the basic premises of religion or specifically Christianity.

Instead, we can…… [Read More]

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Religion Should Be Eliminated From

Words: 2379 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55729778



Essentially, science utilizes the power of reason and logic in its search for the truth while religion depends almost wholly upon faith, being a belief in something without any evidence whatsoever to support it. In the realms of science, investigators seek to understand natural phenomena through direct observation and experimentation which makes it mandatory that all interpretations of the facts be provisional and testable. Statements made by any authority, revelation or appeal to the supernatural are not part of this process, due to the absence of supporting evidence.

Thus, in the eyes of religious scholars and authorities, all opposition to what science has uncovered is based on faith and mythological revelation which takes precedence over evidence. Also, the tenets of religion have not, for the most part, changed much over time and cannot be validated when subjected to the scientific method.

Like many others that study the natural world, scientists…… [Read More]

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Religion in the Literary Works

Words: 1076 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96785449



Machiavelli shared Douglass' opinion concerning the role of religion in one's society. He believed that religion is instrumental in bringing about not only a moral society, but also a just one. In his discourse, "The Prince," he asserted that the ideal leader, the Prince, must not "...deceive friends...be without faith, without mercy, without religion..." This invoked the belief that a leader, in order to become effective, efficient, and respected by the civil society, must also be of moral character. This means that in the same way as people let their lives be influenced by religion and its values and beliefs, so too must the Prince engage in a lifestyle dominated by religion. A religious individual is a moral individual, hence commanding the respect of his people and giving him credibility to lead over society.

However, it is also vital to note that while he put premium to religiosity, Machiavelli's characterization…… [Read More]

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Religion in Spite of the Conflicts Between

Words: 983 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25607609

Religion

In spite of the conflicts between the world's great monotheistic faiths, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam share much in common. Each of these religions was born in the Middle East, and each of these religions values sacred texts as being important ways for human beings to receive the word and knowledge of God. As monotheistic religions, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam eschew idol worship or the worship of Gods that are not their own. At the same time, these religions have very similar concepts of God. The Gods of each of these four religions in omniscient, omnipotent, and omnipresent: a concept of God that actually originated with Zoroastrianism ("God, Zoroaster, and Immortals," n.d.). Zoroastrianism is the oldest of these four faiths, followed by Judaism. The followers of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are collectively referred to as "people of the Book" because all value the Hebrew Bible, which is known…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Basic Beliefs of the Qur'an." Retrieved online:  http://people.ucalgary.ca/~elsegal/I_Transp/IO4_QuranBeliefs.html )

"God, Jesus, and the Saints." BBC Religions. Retrieved online:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/christianity/beliefs/basics_1.shtml 

"God, Zoroaster, and Immortals." BBC Religion. Retrieved online:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/zoroastrian/beliefs/god.shtml#findoutmore 

Huda. Allah (God) in Islam. Retrieved online: http://islam.about.com/od/godallah/a/god.htm
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Religions and Development it Is Popularly Believed

Words: 2215 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6893573

Religions and Development

It is popularly believed that countries, where religion has major influence in governance, tend to develop slower than those where religious beliefs are not a main influence or consideration. This statement uses the cases of poor and traditionally colonized Christian countries in Southeast Asia, like the Philippines; Russia; and the African countries to support the claim.

The four major monotheistic religions in the world all tend to bar changes in one's life. Their faith or lifestyle does not involve material acquisition and is even hostile to it. They are bound to the wiles and stated will and preferences of an unseen Deity. Their happiness consists precisely in denying their own progress and contentment, the furthering of their blessings and potential. India is a supreme example of this. ut this blind adherence to brutal fate and faith is also taken advantage by some opportunists, such as in the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baha'i International. 1999. Values, Norms and Poverty: A Consultation on the World Development Report 2000. South Africa

Bohlin, Sue. 2000. A Short Look at Six World Religions. Texas, USA:

Probe Ministries International

Hilton, Ronald. 2001. Religion and Poverty. (accessed 16:03:03). http://www.standford.edu/group/wais/religion_relandpoverty42501.html
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Religion as a Positive Force

Words: 445 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88404558



While art is certainly a part of culture, other cultural gifts to history mark religion as a positive force. Without the music, ceremony, poetry, and holy books of Muslim, Hindu, and Christian texts, the world would be without significant Beauty. In their own ways, each of these traditions shaped the cultures that would come after them in significant theological, intellectual, and cultural ways. Burhan writes that Islamic influence in the world has included charity, justice, and unity. Wade writes that even as Christianity is often vilified as a blight to mankind, it made great contributions to science, freedom, ethics and morality, medicine, etc. In conclusion, the ancient history of Eurasia would not have been the same without religion. While religious wars are certainly an important part of history, religion's contributions in the areas of art and culture suggest the positive role religion played in the shaping of contemporary society.

eferences…… [Read More]

References

Burhan, R. "Islam's Contribution and Influence on the World." Institute of Islam and Arabic Studies.n.d. 26 July 2009.

Komaroff, Linda. "Early Islamic Period: Art." The Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

2007. 26 July 2009.

Wade, Rick. "Not a Threat: The Contributions of Christianity to Western Society."
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Religion and Science Are Often

Words: 2242 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98794853

The question should also be specific enough that there would not be a large number of sub-questions that would have to be answered first or that might alter the value of the central question. At the same time, if the question were too narrow, then the researcher might find that it ruled out other possibilities that might emerge. The question also must generate data that tests the hypothesis, and a simple yes or no answer would be too simple for a good research question. The question cannot be such that it raises a question that cannot be quantified, for then the data would not lead to a useful answer or one that would be testable by others. The question must also be formulated so that it is clear to other researchers who may want to test the hypothesis as well or replicate the original research, and the question must be…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Eliade, Mircea. Myth and Reality (Religious Traditions of the World).

Waveland Press; Reprint edition, 1998.

McGrath, Alister E. Science & Religion: An Introduction. New York: Blackwell Publishers, 1998.
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Religion Our Universe and Our

Words: 2489 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91328581

The aim of Christian faith is not to reject the truth of the universe or our individual characteristics, like some religions give, but to gratify our genuine yearnings. Christian faith gives an extremely reasonable contentment, as it encompasses the most ideal manner and justifies our encounter of the world and our own feelings of being. Christian belief accords importance to reason and, of course has a justification for reason. Among the other religions, Christian faith is the most sensible, and thus it can be proposed as the most advanced.

A question might be posed that if God has the supreme power as per Christianity, then what is the reason behind the Almighty unable to resolve the evils of the universe completely. Christianity considers that the Almighty was not behind the making of this world in this collapsing state of affairs or with immorality and pain. He made it entirely good…… [Read More]

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Religion What Roles Do the

Words: 1633 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50906528

There was no time to allow better preparation of the bread. They had to move out of Egypt in before Pharaoh could realize. The bitter herbs symbolized the bitter life experienced in Egypt. They remained as captives of slavery for many years, and a moment of redemption approached. In the book of Exodus, one sympathizes with the Jews that served life of slavery without freedom.

However, one feels delighted because of the happy conclusion when the Jews attain freedom and redemption. Passover offers a bonding moment that brings together everyone that shares the Jewish customs. The home and most Jewish families celebrate the holy days such as the New Year in Jewish calendar and the Day of Atonement. They celebrate these holy days at night of the eve of the holy day and families prepare meals before performing the synagogue service. They serve the meals with apples and honey which…… [Read More]

References

Heehs, Peter, ed. 2002. Indian Religions: A Historical Reader of Spiritual Expression and Experience. New York.

Online Conference on Socially Engaged Buddhism. Journal of Buddhist Ethics, April 2000, available online at http: / / jbe.gold.ac.uk.

Queen, Christopher, Charles Prebish and Damien Keown. 2003. Action Dharma: New Studies in Engaged Buddhism. London: Routledge Curzon.
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Religions of Rome

Words: 693 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1239553

Religions of Rome

Long before the mythological figure of Romulus founded Rome, Rome was already being influenced by other religions, specifically the Greek religion when it was occupied by King Evander. King Evander was said, in common folklore, to have shown the escaping Trojan hero Aeneas the city, and the idea that Aeneas was a 'proto-founder' of Rome who brought his household gods to the city became a commonly-accepted part of the city's mythology. It was another great hero, Tarquin the Great, who laid the foundation for the city's temple to Jupiter, Juno, and Minerva, three of the most important gods in the Roman pantheon. y the time of the deposition of Tarquin the Proud, the structure of the Roman religion had been established.[footnoteRef:1] Thus, one of the most striking characteristics of the early Roman religion was that, unlike other religions of many early civilizations, no single family or leader…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beard, Mary, John North & Simon Price. Religions Of Rome: Volume 1-A History

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.
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Religion and Mysticism Two of the World's

Words: 683 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24589729

Religion and Mysticism

Two of the world's major religions, Islam and Christianity seem to be very different belief systems. hen comprising a mental picture of a practitioner of one and then the other, they seem to have very different characteristics. However, when examined more closely, it becomes evident that the two religions are based on some of the same principles of kindness towards others, inherent goodness, and most specifically some sort of supernatural or spectacular being that is stronger than anything on earth. Sufism is the branch of Islam which is most comparable with Christian Mysticism, both of which look to some sort of spiritual power that has more strength than mere mortals.

Sufism stems from the Islamic religion. Muhammad is considered the prophet of both sects and this is why the two are so often linked, however Sufism teaches that the spirituality can be combined with any religion. "No…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

"Sufism: The Mystical Side of Islam." Islamic Studies in Christian Perspective. Print.

"Sufism -- What is it?" All About Religion. 2002. Print.

Zuck, John. "What is Christian Mysticism?" Wild Things. 2008. Print.
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Religion in America

Words: 647 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90343026

Religion

here is a rather complex juxtaposition between the ideals of the founding of the United States and the presumption of religious conversion. he historical and sociological paradigm of religion in America actually spans the great migration of tribes from Asia over the Alaskan land bridge and evolved into various Native American cultures and the European contact between the early 1600s and even into the 20th century. Most of the Amerindian cultures worshiped a naturalistic religion that focused on harmony with nature, a group of Gods that represented spirits of parts of nature, and ways to explain all the natural phenomenon (weather, birth, death, etc.) that are common to human cultures. Religion was more all-encompassing and an approach to explain the universe. Since everything within the universe was part of the natural order, and therefore sacred, these cultures tended to revere all that was in nature and placed humans as…… [Read More]

This conundrum was not adequately addressed during the Constitutional Convention, and it was not until Thomas Jefferson became President that the issue became publically important. In 1802, for instance, members of the Danbury Baptist Association wrote to Jefferson with concerns about the Constitutional requirement for freedom of religion. Jefferson replied, assuring the coalition that there freedoms would be protected and cherished. He noted his previous work from 1777-79 under the Virginia Statute for religious freedom: "Whereas, Almighty God hath created the mind free… That even the forcing him to support [a state religion] or that teacher of his own religious persuasion is depriving him of the comfortable liberty of giving his contributions…That our civil rights have no dependence on our religious opinions any more than our opinions in physics or geometry…yet we are free to declare… the natural rights of mankind" Lippy). This, in essence, formed the basis of the notion that the State cannot make a law establishing a religion or force individual citizens to follow anything other than what they deem appropriate for their own individual belief and need.

Source:

Lippy, C. Introducing American Religion. New York: Routledge, 2009.
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Religion Has Been a Controversial Almost Political

Words: 636 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24761585

Religion has been a controversial, almost political matter since its invention. In fact, modern religion was considered as a form or means of civilization. This is clearly seen from many colonization stories where colonialists urged the natives to abandon their ways of worship and embrace the 'civilized ones'. Europe was one of the modern civilizations where it gave Christianity emerged. The clergy used to work closely with kings in passing of judgment and Popes crowned kings. The entire title of Europe being secular is ironic in a number of ways. Firstly, the article states that Europe does not place much attention to religion affecting public life. This is ironic because Europe itself used to execute civilians who did not conform to the ways of the church. Currently, we see a Europe with a diminishing trend in terms of religious practices. If such continues, the region is taking a direction of…… [Read More]

Work cited

Pew Research Center. Secular Europe and Religious America: Implications for Transatlantic

Relations. Pew Research Center. Web. 2005. Accessed 19 February 2014
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Religion Although Europe Is Becoming

Words: 584 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73292513



ith regard to strong network ties, religions like Mormonism and Jehovah's itnesses will grow in communities with strong social connections that already exist. Thus, a few core members of the community become converted. Those core members are trusted in the community, and therefore community members are far more likely to embrace the faith through their trusted friends, neighbors, or family members than by total strangers. The growth of Mormonism and Jehovah's itnesses may also have to do with deeper psychological issues in places where these sects have been growing. Just as consumer behavior is linked to psychological theories, including theories of personality, so too is behavior regarding choice of religion. Mormonism and Jehovah's itnesses both demand a strict adherence to a set of rules related to personal conduct and social behavior. Proselytizing actively is also considered part of one's religious duty and social contract.

Therefore, what Stark and Iannacoone say…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Lippy, Charles. Introducing American Religion. Routledge, 2009.
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Religion of the Spirits in Responding to

Words: 1074 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17287136

Religion of the Spirits

In responding to adherents of the Religion of the Spirits, one might expect very different statements by St. Thomas Aquinas and the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. Indeed, these two personalities are opposite ends of the religious scale, with the former believing without any doubt that God exists and Catholicism is the true religion, and the latter being a believer in nihilism, physical life as the only existence that can reasonably be expected, and the non-existence of God. One similarity between Aquinas and Nietzsche is that they both believe unshakably in their respective viewpoints. There is therefore not much likelihood that the Religion of the Spirits will be able to convince either of their "truth."

If believers in the Religion of the Spirits were therefore to try and convince Thomas Aquinas of the truth of their religion, I believe he would in turn explain to them that there…… [Read More]

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Religion & Life Cycle Different Religious Visions

Words: 1447 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49387521

Religion & Life Cycle

Different religious visions, different life cycles: The religious experience according to Rosenstock-Huessey and the Medicine Rite

Religion has always been the binding force that enabled humanity to create meaning in their lives and maintain unity among them. As a way of expressing spiritual reality, religion is instrumental in providing humanity a way of converting into concrete form (i.e., rituals and religious symbols) the different emotions associated to one's belief in a religion. Perhaps one of the most important functions that religion has for humanity is that it is able to depict humanity as the most important creature that the Supreme Being (or God) had created in the universe. That in our attempt to give meaning and purpose in life, we humans subsist to religion in order to validate that we, indeed, matter the most to God above anything else. This spiritual reality, despite its selfish nature,…… [Read More]

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Religion the Protestant Reformation Forced

Words: 625 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2823439

Finally, the Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca is quite unique but still has parallels in both Judaism and Christianity. For example, many Catholics flock to the Vatican for Easter or for local churches and cathedrals throughout Europe for their historical meaning or for their connection with certain saints. Similarly, many Jews feel that they must visit Israel at least once in their lifetime, just as the Muslims believe it is their duty to visit Mecca.

8. Medieval Islam and Christianity demonstrate remarkable parallels. Although Muslim scholars developed a more advanced system of mathematics than the Catholics did, and their academic sophistication can be easily said to trump that of the Catholic Church, the two religions both exuded political and military might. Their tolerance of other religions was weak, although the Moors in Spain did permit admirable leeway for the Jews when the Jews would have been more severely persecuted under Catholic…… [Read More]

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Religion and or Science

Words: 1625 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4479455

eligion or Science?

Since the enaissance, there has been a vocal debate between religion and science. Galileo was imprisoned and sanctioned because of his views of the universe, the sun, and the way planets moved. As science progressed, this debate became even more heated. However, in the late 20th century, there has also been a mitigating discussion about the way that religion and science can actual coexist as explanations of the universe. In fact, as physicists look into the wondrous world of smaller and smaller particles, they find that the laws we through governed the universe do not really fit in with the abstract dimensions of time, space, quarks, and the study of the basic attributes of matter and the universe (Schroeder, 2010, p.xi ). On some level, the debate between science and religion is based on the notion of reason (the scientific method) versus faith. eason implies what can…… [Read More]

Russell, C 2002, 'The Conflict of Science and Religion,' in G. Ferngren, ed., Science

And Religion: Some Historical Perspectives, Baltimore, Johns Hopkins

Schroeder, G. (2001). The Hidden Face of God: How Science Reveals the Ultimate Truth. New York: The Free Press.
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Religion Pilgrimage Is a Central Element in

Words: 628 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65622779

Religion

Pilgrimage is a central element in religion. Ancient polytheistic religions like those in Greece and Rome used pilgrimage at certain times of year, often creating massive festivals. hile many pilgrimages have a social dimension, others can be profoundly personal and mystical too. Pilgrimage is inherently difficult, and the travails of the journey are part of the process. It is necessary to undertake pilgrimage as a rite of passage. This is especially true in Islam, in which hajj, the pilgrimage to Mecca, is one of the Five Pillars. There are several elements of religious pilgrimage, including the personal, political, and the spiritual.

Motivations for pilgrimage range from a need to prove one's spiritual strength and merit to a need to conform to the dictums of society. In some cases, the pilgrimage serves as an act of communion, prayer, or meditation. Buddhist approaches to pilgrimage, such as those described in Journey…… [Read More]

Works Cited

From the Diary of Ennin, 838-847.

From Journey to the West, or The Monkey-King, 17th century.

Modern Portrait of Xuanzang.

From Naser-e Khosraw, Book of Travels.
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Religion Each of the Variations

Words: 1459 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20290593

I agreed with Paul's perspective that the resurrection of Jesus is spiritual and cannot be fully understood by the human mind. I also believe that following death, Christians will not experience a physical rebirth, but expect to live an immortal, spiritual life in heaven. Paul's perspective encourages rebirth as a spiritual phenomenon. I think this belief closely ties with the second view of the resurrection, which is the resurrection occurred only in the imagination or faith of those closest to Jesus. Paul believes the resurrection of Jesus is spiritual, and liberates Christians from death by promising an immortal life in the likeness of Jesus. I feel there is a strong psychological element to this belief that can be explained as faith and the hope for death to not be the end of existence. Paul's point-of-view explains death is not an ending, but the beginning of immortal life. I agree with…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chidester, D. Patterns of Transcendence: Religion, Death, and Dying. 2nd ed. Belmont, CA:

Wadsworth Publishing, 2001. 169-179. Print.

Kramer, K. The Sacred Art of Dying: How the world Religions Understand Death. Mahwah, NJL

Paulist Press, 1988. 139-152. Print.
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Religion the Gospel of Matthew

Words: 651 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31866689

Religion the Gospel of Matthew

There are a number of similarities between Helmut Koester's article, The Gospel of Matthew: Jesus as the New Moses, and that of Marilyn Moses, also entitled The Gospel of Moses. Both of these works examine the reason and purpose that the book of Matthew was written, and explore the impact upon the immediate surrounding community of Christianity. However, in order to best summarize these works, it is necessary to do so individually, in order to gain the best understanding of these articles.

Koester's article primarily focuses on the book of Matthew's portrayal of Jesus as being directly descended from Abraham and aligned with traditional Israeli law. This is a particularly important aspect of the Koester's article (and the book of Matthew), because it verifies the fact that Jesus's teachings and works are directly in accordance with the Israeli tradition which preceded his existence, and which…… [Read More]

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Religion -- Color and Sound

Words: 1133 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39245349

Like Khan, Huxley focused on the sensations of the person (himself) having the mystical experience. During his experience, Huxley felt he had no impairment in his mind or gaze, an intensity of vision without an outer and imposed substance to induce the hallucination, and had a sense that his impetus of motion or will was impaired into a state of stasis (a direct contrast with Khan's focus on the ability of music to provide motion to parallel the nature of the divine). Above all, Huxley called his sense of harmony through visual means mystical because his visual experience eliminated any sense of division inner/outer divide in perception. As he looked at the flower, and Huxley felt he was becoming the flower.

This stands in direct contrast to Kepler's schema of harmony, which is dependant upon perceptions of distinction from outside, as an observer perceives defined opposites. Kepler's definition of harmony…… [Read More]

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Religion Is an Extremely Controversial

Words: 884 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34326421



Religion does not necessarily need to be considered to be something spiritual, as it can also teach people in relation to moral values and about how they can distinguish between good and bad.

A modern school system needs to be fair towards everyone and this can only be made possible by school authorities allowing children to express themselves without restraint. Parents should have the right to decide what their children will learn in school. Religion is generally beneficial for opening people's minds and for preparing them to behave properly in the contemporary society.

Works cited:

1. lanzer, Perry. (1998). "Religion in Public Schools: In Search of Fairness." Phi Delta Kappan, Vol. 80.

Perry lanzer's article presents readers with solid arguments regarding to why the teaching of religion in schools must not be regarded as something immoral. Also, the paper brings support to religion and reveals the reasons for which it…… [Read More]

Glanzer, Perry. (1998). "Religion in Public Schools: In Search of Fairness." Phi Delta Kappan, Vol. 80.

Wright, Elliot a. (1999). "Religion in American Education." Phi Delta Kappan, Vol. 81.

Brewster, Karin L. & Cooksey, Elizabeth C. & Guilkey, David K. & Rindfuss, Ronald R. (1998). "The Changing Impact of Religion on the Sexual and Contraceptive Behavior of Adolescent Women in the United States." Journal of Marriage and Family, Vol. 60, No. 2.
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Religion Israel L Jones Role of

Words: 2790 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52405505

However, prior to the creation of Israel the numbers were much higher (currently approximately 300,000 Palestinian Christians live in the U.S. alone (2004). Interestingly, the Israeli Army does not differentiate between Arab Christians and Arab Muslims in their occupation activities. In fact, in many areas Palestinian Christians are particularly hit by civilian casualty occurrences (Halter, 2001). In fact, Palestinian Christians identify so strongly with the Palestinian cause that statements like, "The Arab Palestinian Christians are part and parcel of the Arab Palestinian nation. e have the same history, the same culture, the same habits and the same hopes..." coming from the Anglican Bishop of Jerusalem, the Reverend Riad Abu al-Assal, is typical of the community as a whole.

It is for this reason that Palestinian Christians are particularly baffled by the pro-Israeli stance taken by many estern, non-Arab Christians (including, most notably, Jerry Fallwell, Ralph Reed, and Pat Robertson to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Armstrong, Karen. (1997). "Jerusalem: One City, Three Faiths." Ballentine: New York.

Avalon. Yale Law School (Staff). (2003). "The Balfour Declaration." Web site. Retrieved on April 19, 2005, from,  http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/mideast/balfour.htm 

Halter, Kristel. (2004). "Arab-Christian Suffering in the Holy Land. (Waging Peace)." Washington Report on Middle East Affairs. 1 December.

Nasr, Seyyed Hossein. (2003). "Islam: Religion, History, and Civilization." Harper, San Francisco.
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Religion Is Jesus the Only Savoir Is

Words: 1909 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2051126

eligion

Is Jesus the Only Savoir? Is onald H. Nash's opportunity to develop a passionate and well-developed argument answering yes: yes, Jesus is the only Savoir. However, Nash does not rest on the reader's understanding or experience of faith to make his case. The author takes a different approach, using logic and reason to explain that at least to a believer in Christ, there can be no other paradigm other than Christian absolutism. According to Nash, pluralism by its very definition violates the tenets inherent in the New Testament. It is therefore impossible for a theologian, especially a Christian one, to be a pluralist.

Nash's scapegoat, for better or worse, is John Hick. Hick is a theologian who has succumbed to the temptation of thinking pluralistically and who attempts to show that Jesus is in fact not the only savior. Nash picks apart Hick's argument by revealing the logical fallacies…… [Read More]

References

Bible: New International Version (NIV)

Johnsey, Allen. "A Critique of Is Jesus the Only Savior?" Nov 5, 2006. Retrieved online: http://www.mainstreetmission.com/index.php?p=1_76_A-Critique-of-Is-Jesus-the-Only-Savior-

Johnson, Keith E. "John Hick's Pluralistic Hypothesis and the Problem of Conflicting Truth-Claims." Retrieved online:  http://www.leaderu.com/wri/articles/hick.html 

Nash, Ronald H. "Is Jesus the Only Savoir?" Christian Research Institute. Retrieved online:  http://www.equip.org/articles/is-jesus-the-only-savior/
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Religion of Australian Aborigines a

Words: 1910 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65077696

Many claim Islam increases their sense of worth. Islam particularly appeals to disaffected young men. Solomon, 23-years-old, participated in a television interview. "It's not a part of our religion to stand there and get stepped on," Solomon said. "That's why Islam is so good for the Aboriginal people." (Australian Aborigines...)

Europeans prefer the name "Koori" for Aborigine, even though they named the native Australians "Aborigine." Aborigine, however, means "from the beginning." Aborigines "taught their children dances, songs, and stories for both sacred and non-sacred rituals that taught them traditions and history of the past, present and future." (Australian Aborigines...) Along with plants, animals, other natural objects, man categorized himself with his totem. Aborigines focused on and blamed the supernatural for every scenario. Some individuals believed a victim of a spell would usually sicken and die, because they believed it would happen. At one time in the Aborigines' religion, the "medicine…… [Read More]

References

AIPR Fact sheet: Psychic and Mystical Experiences of the Aborigines. (2002). 07 December 2006. http://www.aiprinc.org/aborig.asp.

Australian Aborigines Dreamers. (2002). 7 December 2006. http://www.religionportal.com/ReligionFinder/religions/australiaaborigines.htm.

Australian Aboriginal Religion." (2006). 7 December 2006. http://philtar.ucsm.ac.uk/encyclopedia/westoc/abor.html.

OZ CITY AUSTRALIA - Australian Aborigines. (2001). 07 December 2006.  http://ozcity.faithweb.com/aborigines.html .
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Religion One of the Most Important Contemporary

Words: 1216 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17998202

eligion

"One of the most important contemporary developments in the religious field among U.S. Latinos has been the rapid growth of evangelical Protestantism, particularly Pentecostalism," (Vasquez 617). Pentecostalism is a charismatic, evangelical Protestant denomination. Known best for its espousal of "speaking of tongues, faith healing, divine visions and miracles," Pentecostalism has enjoyed a strong presence in Latin America alongside Catholicism (Kunerth). Pentecostalism is growing among American Hispanics, too, both because of immigration from countries with an already strong Pentecostal base but also because of social, political, and personal psychological changes within the Hispanic-American community. Many new immigrants from Latin America, especially Nicaragua, Honduras and the Caribbean, are already Pentecostal because of the religion has flourished there for decades (Kunerth)

However, Pentecostalism was born in the United States. The religion reflects a uniquely American religious culture. William J. Seymour is widely credited with being the "father of Pentecostalism," after starting what…… [Read More]

References

DePalma, Anthony. "God's Word, Echoing in English; Hispanic Pentecostal Churches Face Bilingual Problem." The New York Times. 02 Jan, 2003. Retrieved online: http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/02/nyregion/god-s-word-echoing-english-hispanic-pentecostal-churches-face-bilingual-problem.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm

Espinoza, Efraim. "Hispanic Pentacostalism." Enrichment Journal. 2011. Retrieved online:  http://enrichmentjournal.ag.org/199904/059_hispanic.cfm 

Garza, Jennifer. "Hispanics Increasingly Drawn to Pentecostal Church." Hispanic News. 9 May, 2009. Retrieved online: http://hispanic.cc/hispanics_increasingly_drawn_to_pentecostal_church.htm

Kunerth, Jeff. "Hispanics Flock to Pentecostal Churches." Orlando Sentinel. 02 Jan, 2010. Retrieved online:  http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2010-01-02/features/os-hispanic-pentecostals_3-20100101_1_pentecostal-churches-hispanic-congregation-pew-hispanic-center
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Religion More Than a Word

Words: 3223 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18229038

And bee it also Enacted by the Authority and with the advise and assent aforesaid that whatsoever person or persons shall from henceforth use or utter any reproachfull words or Speeches concerning blessed Virgin Marv the Mother of Our Saviour or the holy Apostles or Evangelists or any of them shall in such case for the first offence forfeit to the said Lord Proprietary and his heirs Lords and Proprietaries of this Province the sume of five pound Sterling or the value thereof to be Levyed on the goods and chattells of every such person soe offending, but in case such Offender or Offenders, shall not then have goods and chattells sufficient for the satisfying of such forfeiture, or that the same bee not otherwise speedily satisfyed that then such Offender or Offenders Shall be publiquely whipt and bee imprisoned during the pleasure, of the Lord Proprietary or the Lieut.…… [Read More]

Works Cited www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=90445657

Bonomi, Patricia U. Under the Cope of Heaven: Religion, Society, and Politics in Colonial America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988. Questia. 24 Sept. 2007 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=90445659.

A www.geocities.com/lawandabrewer_uncp"Brewer, Jaques, Jones, and King. (2001). 23 Sept 2007 http://www.uncp.edu/home/canada/work/allam/16071783/religion.htm.

Crossing the Ocean to Keep the Faith: The Puritans. (2007) Library of Congress. 23 Sept 2007  http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/religion/rel01.html .

Friedrich Von Schlegel (1772-1829), German philosopher. Idea 14 in Selected Ideas (1799-1800), Franklin, Benjamin. His Autobiography. Vol. I, Part 1. The Harvard Classics. New York: P.F. Collier & Son, 1909-14; Bartleby.com, 2001. www.bartleby.com/1/1/.23 Sept 2007  http://www.bartleby.com/1/1/4.html .
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Religion Augustine Divine Grace and

Words: 6715 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32713443

In Chapter 5, the great churchman informs us that Water is in fact an apt designation for the Divinity, better than any of the other elements.

Water possess the unique properties of being more moveable than earth (though less movable than air) while at the same time being essential to the creation and sustaining of life, as in the way water must be added to the soil in order for plants to grow.

This signification of matter first conveys its end, that is, that for the sake of which it was made; secondly, its formlessness; thirdly, its service and subjection to the Maker. Therefore, it is first called heaven and earth; for its sake matter was made. Secondly, the earth invisible and without form and darkness over the abyss, that is, the formlessness itself without the light, as a result of which the earth is said to be invisible. Thirdly,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101597555

Augustine. Augustine of Hippo, Selected Writings. Translated by Clark, Mary T. New York: Paulist Press, 1984.

Augustine. Confessions, Trans. Albert C. Outler, Ph.D, D.D. (1994, orig. pub. 1955).

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101602917
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Religion How Could God Do

Words: 1795 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48816209

They angered God, and as God has done throughout the ages, He punished the Jews. Many of them retain their faith and hope in God, and retained it even during their time in the concentration camps - it was the only thing that helped them to survive when all other hope had died. On the other hand, many Jews saw the camps as a place where they lost their belief in God. They questioned how He would allow such a thing to happen, and felt He had turned His back on them when they needed Him the most. Neither of these reactions is surprising. Another historian believes this gap between acceptance and denial of God will continue. He writes, "I believe that Jewish religious thought will continue to demonstrate this tension between mixed intentions, innovation, and conservation well into the future" (Braiterman 164). Faith is a tenuous thing for many.…… [Read More]

References

Braiterman, Zachary. (God) after Auschwitz: Tradition and Change in Post-Holocaust Jewish Thought. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1998.

Mandel, Naomi. "Ethics after Auschwitz: The Holocaust in History and Representation." Criticism 45.4 (2003): 509+.

Mathis, Andrew E. "General Semantics and Holocaust Denial." ETC.: A Review of General Semantics 63.1 (2006): 52+.

Raphael, Melissa. The Female Face of God in Auschwitz: A Jewish Feminist Theology of the Holocaust. New York: Routledge, 2003.
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Religion Desilva David 2001 New

Words: 597 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54243867

The value of discipleship stresses the cohesion between the events of the past and the present, a fundamental tenant of psychotherapy. Discipleship also implies a mediation between God and his agents on earth, and the therapist always functions as a mediator between God's grace and earth. Community is also an important tenant of modern therapy, namely that no psychologically healthy human being is a spiritual and social island. Everyone needs social resources to fall back on, such as the church and the family. In particular for Christian counselors, the family often comes to the forefront as part of the patient's community as well as the church community. And apocalypticism focuses on the future and the patient's hopes and plans, over the course of the inner and outer changes weathered during the counseling relationship.

These four important challenges or concepts offered by the book for effective Christian counseling thus form a…… [Read More]

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Religion Argument Why Religion Should

Words: 558 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96820091

If the teacher and the majority of the class were engaged in prayer, that student will undoubtedly be receiving the message that his or her beliefs are inferior and not as important. Schools are the primary institutions of forming social and political identities, and it is for this reason that they must be kept religiously neutral.

Allowing religion into public schools will only increase feelings of separatism and inequality in this country. It is not only Constitutionally forbidden, but it is also ethically and morally prohibited. Whether or not the religion is permitted to directly influence the workings of the class, members of non-dominant religions or who are not at all religious will necessarily feel inferior to the rest of the class. The protection of their rights in the face of other's actions is the primary concern of the Constitution.

Outline

Introduction

I. Freedom of religion is a founding principle.…… [Read More]

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Religions in Africa by Ibigbolade

Words: 628 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79107609

She points out that there has been such division in modern Christianity that it is difficult to describe a universal Christian worldview. However, she describes the basic beliefs and practices that are considered universal to Christians. She also discusses Christianity's waves in Africa, the first one occurring in the first century a.D. Jesus was taken to Egypt to avoid being killed by King Herod and Jesus' early message spread into North Africa. Christianity did not become a major influence in African religion until the 1800s, and is now one of the two primary religions practiced in the country.

Finally, Aderibigbe discusses Islam. She describes Islam as a monotheistic religion worshipping Allah. She describes the historic origins of Islam, which grew out of the teachings of Mohammed. She also links Islam to Judaism and Christianity, naming it the third in the three Abrahamic religions. She describes the major themes of Islam…… [Read More]

References

Aberibigbe, I. (2012). Chapter Five: Religions in Africa. In I. Aderbigbe & a. Ojo Eds.

Continental Complexities: A Multidisciplinary Introduction to Africa, ( pp.61- 84). USA: University Readers, Inc.
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Religion and Ethics Ethics Diversity

Words: 836 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54349957

"Even in an era that's more accepting of spirituality, the prospect of religion seeping into secular institutions, especially corporate ones, makes many uneasy" (Conlin 1999).

To tread a delicate balance between showing respect for religious differences and still allowing and encouraging spiritual and ethical concerns to be discussed in the workplace can be difficult. To do so "most companies and executives are careful to stick to a cross-denominational, hybrid message that's often referred to as secular spirituality. It focuses on the pluralistic, moral messages common to all the great religions, such as...respecting the interconnectedness of all actions and things, and practicing the Golden Rule. But it also puts a premium on free expression and eschews cramming beliefs down other people's throats" (Conlin 1999). Still, there is no way that 'all of the people can be pleased, all of the time,' to co-opt a phrase from P.T. Barnum. Every time a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abernathy, Bob. "Faith in the Workplace." Episode Number 822. 28 Jan 2005.

13 Dec 2007. http://www.pbs.org/wnet/religionandethics/week822/cover.html

Conlin, Michelle. "Religion in the Workplace: The growing presence of spirituality in Corporate America." Business Week. Special Issue 1999. http://www.businessweek.com/1999/99_44/b3653001.htm

Religion in the workplace: Asset or debit?" Religion: News writers. 16 May 2005.
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Religions of the Far East Are Often

Words: 1308 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56766101

Religions of the Far East are often clumped into a monolithic entity, perceived as essentially alike by those not familiar with the complexity and individuality of these traditions. Closer examination, however, shows that the major religions with roots in the Far East demonstrate a wide variety of beliefs. The tendency to group them under the heading of "Eastern religion" alone does not allow for the different histories, beliefs, and practices of these traditions. This tendency, however, has some validity in that Eastern belief systems do share many characteristics. In this essay, I will explain the basic precepts, including similarities of, differences in, and the relationship between three major Eastern traditions: Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism.

First, I will give a basic overview of the three belief systems, exploring their histories and general precepts . Then, I will explore the specific beliefs which these faiths share, as well as the beliefs which…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Edwards, L., 2001. A Brief Guide to Beliefs. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press.

Esposito, J., Fasching, D., and Lewis, T., 2002. World Religions Today. New York: Oxford University Press.

Hopfe, L. And Woodward, M., 2001. Religions of the World, 8th ed.. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Sharma, A., 1993. Our Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins Publishers.
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Religion and Globalization and Religion

Words: 500 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1913183

This book, written from a scholarly viewpoint by professors of religion, looks at the dynamics of seven major religious traditions and how those traditions are adapting to the world of globalization.

Rifkin, I. Spiritual Perspectives on Globalization: Making Sense of Economic and Cultural Upheaval. Woodstock, VT: Skylight Paths Publishing. Print.

For author, speaker and journalist Ira Rifkin, globalization is changing how humans live at a very rapid, and sometimes unpredictable, rate. Some of this change revolves around the shift in values from individual cultures and the anger and uncomfortability humans are left with when faced with change. The book, written in lay terms without undue citations, examines Catholicism, Islam, Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Baha'i, tribal religions and Protestantism to explain how each view the economic, social and religious aspects of globalism. The major point focuses on how the social constructs that tend to arise out of spirituality can not only enhance…… [Read More]

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Religion Part Two of Ronald Nash's Book

Words: 1966 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63946071

eligion

Part Two of onald Nash's book Is Jesus the Only Savior? deals with the topic of religious inclusivism. Inclusivists "insist that all people must have a chance to be saved," regardless of their belief in Christ.[footnoteef:1] Not quite the opposite of exclusivism, inclusivism does allow for the potential ability of non-believers to be saved, but just emphasizes the unlikeliness of that actually occurring.[footnoteef:2] Kanno presents inclusivism as a view that tacitly approves religions other than one's own but " as a preparatory stage to one's own religion."[footnoteef:3] Hick's stance on inclusivism is that it is just a "soft form of exclusivism."[footnoteef:4] Because Nash is a hard exclusivist, the author finds certain problems with the inclusivism stance. [1: Nash, onald H, 1994. Is Jesus the Only Savior? p. 104.] [2: obinson, B.A, 2011. "How People View the Status of eligions Other than Their Own." etrieved: http://www.religioustolerance.org/rel_plur.htm] [3: Kanno, Hiroshi, n.d.…… [Read More]

References

Bible: New International Version

Kanno, Hiroshi, n.d. Inclusivism and Religious Tolerance in the Lotus Sutra. Retrieved online: http://www.iop.or.jp/0515/kanno.pdf

Nash, Ronald, 1994. Is Jesus the Only Savior? Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan.

Robinson, B.A., 2011. How people view the status of religions other than their own. Retrieved online:   http://www.religioustolerance.org/rel_plur.htm
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Religion and Politics

Words: 3527 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61687506

eligion and Politics

All religions aim to provide a code of life for mankind. Apart from other tenets, this code establishes laws that govern all areas of man's life. Thus the laws established by the religion Islam are termed as Shariah. The term Shariah means all of the Islamic Laws and is derived from four basic sources. These sources are The Holy Quran, Sunnah, Ij'ma (consensus) of the Companions (Sahabah) and Qiyas or analogical deduction. These laws are not just limited to areas such as marriage or divorce; rather, the Islamic laws cover every action performed by an individual or a society. The term Shariah is also synonymous with Fiqh. However the term Fiqh means knowledge of all the Islamic Laws (Shariah). It can also be taken to mean the Knowledge of the sources from where the Islamic Laws (Shariah) have been extracted.

Shariah or Islamic Laws are divine ways…… [Read More]

References

S.Q. Fatimi, Islam Comes to Malaysia. Malaysian Sociological Research Institute, (MSRI), Singapore. 1963;

EDITH M. LEDERER, Associated Press Writer, U.N. Development Fund for Women protests stoning sentence against Nigerian woman., AP Worldstream, 08-28-2002.

Author not available, Mexico's president to fight death penalty in Nigeria., AP Worldstream, 08-28-2002.

D'ARCY DORAN, Associated Press Writer, Nigerian government 'totally opposed' to death by stoning sentence., AP Worldstream, 08-22-2002
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Religion Has Been Truly Affected

Words: 340 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38064634

They have tended, however, to remain tied to the restrictive interpretive options set in place by earlier thinkers preoccupied with the issue of secularization. In part, this is because they lacked a sufficiently comprehensive and detailed understanding of the nature of the changes gripping late modern societies. (69)

It is evident that religion still stands strong regardless of new religious movements; all that has happened is that there are individuals that view religion from a different perspective now than they may have previously, and that in fact may not be such a bad thing. Researchers also say that this new wave is bringing people into various religions that have not previously been associated with before. Depends on ones view whether that is positive or negative.

orks Cited

Dawson, Lorne L. "Chapter 3 the Sociocultural Significance of Modern New Religious Movements." The Oxford Handbook of New Religious Movements. Ed. James R.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dawson, Lorne L. "Chapter 3 the Sociocultural Significance of Modern New Religious Movements." The Oxford Handbook of New Religious Movements. Ed. James R. Lewis. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004. 68-93.
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Religion -- Concepts of Death

Words: 1471 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8665709



The work of Chidester explores different types of death, and symbolizes three patterns describing the transcendence of death: ancestral, experiential, and cultural (12). Types of death, and the way death is imagined, can help human beings die in a meaningful way, give life ultimate meaning, and significance (Chidester: 12). The ancestral transcendence represents a type of biological death, meaning this form of transcendence provides a way for the individual to connect with a continuous biological chain of parents and offspring (Chidester: 12). This is significant as the family line is not broken by death; death provides an ongoing continuity of family. The psychological type of death is considered experiential transcendence, and represents "profound and often intense psychological experiences that embrace death in acceptance or ecstasy" (Chidester: 14). Accepting and embracing death signifies death as a psychologically peaceful experience. A third type of death is social, referred to as cultural transcendence,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chidester, D. Patterns of Transcendence: Religion, Death, and Dying. 2nd ed. Belmont, CA:

Wadsworth Publishing, 2001. 1-36. Print.

(Chidester: XX)

The song "Eleanor Rigby" by The Beatles is a song about loneliness, wanting, and hopelessness. The song begins with the lyric, "Ah, look at all the lonely people." The line is repeated twice and gives an obvious nod to the song's theme of loneliness. The song details Eleanor Rigby's life to embellish her loneliness and her longing for a better life. The first line about Eleanor is, "Eleanor Rigby picks up the rice in the church where a wedding has been/Lives in a dream." This lyric explains Eleanor throwing rice after a wedding ceremony, and dreams of having her own wedding and belonging. She is alone, and wishes for something more from her life. Eleanor Rigby lives her life in isolation, and this is signified by the lyric, "Waits at the window, wearing the face that she keeps in a jar by the door/Who is it for?" Eleanor puts on a mask, "wearing a face," so that no one will be able to tell how lonely and empty she feels. The line, "Who is it for?" suggests, "What's the point? Why bother?" There is a sense of hopelessness. The song departs from The Beatles "pop-rock" sound, and has no drums, guitar, or piano accompaniment. The song only uses string instruments, adding to feeling of loneliness. The absence of other instruments allows for the desperation of the strings to be heard, and the isolation of the strings mimics Eleanor Rigby's isolation. A wish that people might have when they die, as suggested by the song, is to not die alone. The lyric, "All the lonely people/Where do they all belong?" suggests, "Where do the lonely people go?" And if no one is witness to their life, how does one know where the lonely people go? According to the song, Eleanor Rigby did not get this common wish. The lyrics states, "Eleanor Rigby died in the church and was buried along with her name/Nobody came." Eleanor Rigby died alone, and no one attended her funeral. The phrase, "was buried along with her name" refers to her being buried with her memory. She was alone in the world, and there is no one left behind to remember her; there is no memory by which she can continue to live.
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Religion Before I Started This

Words: 575 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50828742



Divine Command Theory is the ethical theory that says that what God wills or command determines the moral status of various actions, or in other words, "an act is right if and only if God wills or commands it...an act is wrong if and only if God forbids it" (Religion pp). Yet, this simply states what people are supposed to do, and does not take into account free will and individual accountability (Religion pp). This is also a version of absolutism, for it claims that certain acts are right or wrong universally, whether or not one believes in God (Religion pp).

Divine Command Theory presents two problems:

There are many different interpretations of God's commands (and one would think that if God were God he would make the truth explicit so that it could be known).

DCT presupposes God's existence.

Religion pp).

hen faced with a situation, I generally seek…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The Divine Command Theory." http://www.philosophyofreligion.info/divinecommandtheory.html

Religion and Morality." http://uwadmnweb.uwyo.edu/philosophy/courses/Bengson/PR%204-2123.htm
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Religion Sacred Ways Indigenous Sacred

Words: 355 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85725362



In addition, many religious groups are reviving their sacred ways because the westernized Christian religions do not meet their needs or desires. Many indigenous people feel left out or ignored in western religions, and so, they turn to their indigenous sacred ways because they conform to their belief systems and their values better than religions that were founded on European principles and beliefs. Many people, as they explore their pasts, find that their sacred ways seem to speak to them in a way that other organized religions may not. In addition, indigenous people, no matter who they are or where they live, have cultural ties to these sacred ways, and they may simply feel more comfortable with them, as if they are a better fit than other belief systems. It makes sense for a number of reasons, and more people are discovering their roots and sacred ways every year.… [Read More]

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Religion Interview I Interviewed a

Words: 1886 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73261182

As a matter of fact, she seems very open to new ideas and theories, as she was able to discuss my beliefs with me in a very open manner.

Although Carol claims she does not strongly adhere to her original fundamentalist beliefs, she still belongs to the Baptist Church. She raised two children with the husband she found at Bob Jones and her family attended and still attends church together. She disagrees with some of the newly-imposed strictures that the Southern Baptist Convention has handed down, but she has faith in the future of the denomination. She believes that the basic organization of the Baptist Church as a whole is the way that churches should be organized. hen she was a young person, meetings were held in a democratic fashion, using Robert's Rules of Order. Even in the youngest classes of Sunday School. She believes that her parents' strongly protecting…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Armstrong, Karen. The Battle for God. New York: Alfred a. Knopf. 2000.

Jones, Steven. "Fundamentalism." New Religious Movements. July 17, 2001. Website available at http://religiousmovements.lib.virginia.edu/nrms/fund.html.

Pojman, Louis P. "Gilbert Harman's Internalist Moral Relativism," the Modern Schoolman, Vol. 68 (November, 1990), pp. 19-39.

Robinson, B.A. "Eschatology, End Times and Millennialism." Religious Tolerance. 2006.  http://www.religioustolerance.org/millenni.htm .
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Religion in the Resurrection of Christ Wallace

Words: 658 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47042853

eligion

In "The esurrection of Christ," Wallace outlines an argument against the watering down of gospel by denying the resurrection. Wallace points out that many modern "Christians" are trying too hard to fit the gospel truth into the modern world, due largely to pressures from the media and the dominant culture. A denial of anything that resembles the "supernatural" is a trend among academics and all who also deny the power of faith. Starting from this premise, Wallace engages the reader in a well-constructed and organized outline of why the resurrection is central to Christian doctrine. To guide the reader, Wallace organizes the argument using numbered points so that they are easy to follow. The argument is focused on the resurrection, as a specific topic of discussion. However, the resurrection is itself a broad and deep subject. "The esurrection of Christ" is paradoxically a broad and focused argument.

Wallace's argument…… [Read More]

References

"Resurrection Arguments, Refuted." Retrieved online:   http://commonsenseatheism.com/?p=12174  

Wallace, Daniel B. "The Resurrection of Christ: Theological Implications." Retrieved online: http://bible.org/article/resurrection-christ-theological-implications
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Religion Meaning Ethics Future Monotheism Means the

Words: 707 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37019438

eligion

Meaning

Ethics

Future

Monotheism

Monotheism means the worship of one god.

Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are all monotheistic religions: God demands an exclusive relationship with His followers and an acknowledgement of His unique power.

All major monotheistic faiths have a concept of the 'end of days' or final judgment

Deism

God as the divine watchmaker.

God sent into motion the universe with His power but we are now able to use our own reason to govern our lives.

Enlightened reason and science is the best way to understand the future.

Naturalism

The natural world is the source of meaning.

Ethics can be found 'in nature.'

ather than formal religion, we must look to nature for guidance.

Nihilism

Life has no inherent meaning.

There is no system of morality inherent to the human condition beyond that which we construct.

We are adrift and not heading to a purposeful future.

Existentialism…… [Read More]

References

Exodus. (2012). Bible Gateway. Retrieved at:

http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Exodus+20%3A5&version=NIV

Zunjic, Bob. (2012). Jean Paul Sartre. Phil 358. University of Rhode Island. Retrieved at:

http://www.uri.edu/personal/szunjic/philos/human2.htm
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Religion and Violence Throughout History

Words: 376 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87992524



iolence in scripture occurs in a certain context, and with the direct sanction of God. While some imagine themselves to be instruments of God on earth, it has to be taken into account that we no longer live in a world where violence is at the order of the day. We no longer live and die in wars to gain territory or to fulfill prophesies. Instead, the main purpose of religion today is comfort in times of trouble as well as a guide for living well. The Rabbi should therefore emphasize these qualities. Followers should gain an understanding of the Scripture not only in the context of today's life, but also in the context of the time of writing. God is not a perpetrator of violence merely for its sake. His followers should not take it upon themselves to perpetrate violence in the context of a world that is ruled…… [Read More]

Violence in scripture occurs in a certain context, and with the direct sanction of God. While some imagine themselves to be instruments of God on earth, it has to be taken into account that we no longer live in a world where violence is at the order of the day. We no longer live and die in wars to gain territory or to fulfill prophesies. Instead, the main purpose of religion today is comfort in times of trouble as well as a guide for living well. The Rabbi should therefore emphasize these qualities. Followers should gain an understanding of the Scripture not only in the context of today's life, but also in the context of the time of writing. God is not a perpetrator of violence merely for its sake. His followers should not take it upon themselves to perpetrate violence in the context of a world that is ruled by intellect and restraint.

Source

Traer, Robert. Ending Religious Violence in Dharma World (Man/Feb 2004, vol. 31), pp. 9-13.
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Religion Judaism and Christianity European

Words: 673 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95099784

ased on the gospels of the New Testament, Jews acted as the murderers of Jesus Christ who in Jewish history is claiming to be the Son of God. Criticizing today's Christian practices such as idolatry which is purely against time old philosophy of the scripture continually arouses negative notion on the true authority of Jesus on his teachings.

Most of the parables of Jesus written in the gospels of the New Testament have survived and prospered in the heart and mind of all Christians. The parable of the Prodigal Son and the parable of the lost sheep are some of the parables that depict the importance given by God towards mankind.

The growth of the early Christian Catholic Church have sporadically developed worldwide since its founding after the death of Jesus Christ with Apostle Peter as the first Pope. The church traces its origin from the 12 Apostles in their…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Judaism; Wikipedia Encyclopedia (2005) Extracted July 22, 2006; Website;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Judaism

Why the Jews Rejected Jesus: The Turning Point in Western History; David Klinghoffer (March 2006) Extracted July 22, 2006
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Religion - Perspectives on God

Words: 311 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95031637

" Likewise, it seems that those who learned their moral values strictly within religious principles are ether offended or simply incredulous at the suggestion that moral rules are capable of being derived logically, without reference to any God.

Chances are, if there is any such thing as a "God," especially an omniscient one, he (or she) would give more moral "credit" to those who try to do the right thing for its own sake than to those who do good deeds (or refrain from indulging their immoral urges) primarily out of fear. In that regard, the irony of doing the right thing out of concern for well-being of one's own eternal "spirit" after physical death while simultaneously characterizing those who choose to do right without any such fear or concern about an "afterlife" would hardly be lost on any genuinely omniscient…… [Read More]

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Religion the Truth of the

Words: 658 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73242773

The messiah, or "anointed one" is referred to also in the book of Psalms: "Thy throne, O God, is for ever and ever: the sceptre of thy kingdom is a right sceptre. Thou lovest righteousness, and hatest wickedness: therefore God, thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows," (Psalm 45:6-7). These and many other Old Testament references illustrate the importance of the messiah for the Israelites, and the role that the messiah would play as a spiritual leader.

Because of the abundance of historical and prophetic material substantiating Christ, countless Christians have spread the word of the gospel around the world. From the personal testimony passed down for two thousand years, individuals like me have been able to develop our own relationship with Christ. We draw upon the wisdom of those who have gone before us, reading scripture and participating in the Christian community. It…… [Read More]

References

"Historical Jesus: A Recent Movement to Reinterpret the New Testament Record." All About Jesus. Retrieved May 11, 2010 from  http://www.allaboutjesuschrist.org/Historical-Jesus.htm 

"History of Jesus Christ." History World. Retrieved May 11, 2010 from  http://www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?historyid=ac34 

"Which Old Testament prophecies did Jesus fulfill?" Retrieved May 11, 2010 from  http://www.biblestudy.org/prophecy/old-testament-prophecies-jesus-fulfilled.html
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Religion Both Ahab and Manasseh

Words: 1230 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1778958



3. Ahab and Manasseh are powerful examples of how the human will is ultimately weak without God. Their failure to effectively lead the Israelites through a vulnerable period of history shows that neither Ahab nor Manasseh understood how important their faith was to their ability to govern. The stories of Ahab and Manasseh can therefore illustrate valuable lessons related to leadership in general. One of the ways these stories can be used to teach spiritual truths is by examining how and why Ahab and Manasseh failed as kings.

Moreover, these stories teach well through negative examples. These kings show us what not to do, just as inspirational stories in the Bible show us how to positively conduct our lives. Ahab succumbed to greed and egotism. Although he repented in the end, he was unable to have faith until he suffered. Manasseh ruled as if he were a child his entire…… [Read More]

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Religion Give a Justification for

Words: 329 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82893339

and, why not punish the sinners themselves rather than Jesus who was supposed to be pure?

3. Though Jesus was a peasant with no political power, how has he come to be regarded as a king (Christ)?

There is political power and there is also religious power. Although Jesus was a peasant with no political power on earth, he came to be regarded as a king (Christ) because he was anointed by God. God has religious power. Many accept God as the supreme highest authority and believe that they should carry out his will.

Thus, those who believe in the power of God and who also believe that God had anointed Jesus as king are willing to readily accept Jesus as their…… [Read More]

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Religion Saint Anselm the Duke of Canturbury

Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14305436

Religion

Saint Anselm, the Duke of Canturbury, was "one of the most important Christian thinkers of the eleventh century," (Sadler). This is because Anselm used a reasoned philosophical argument to address theological questions. In Cur Deus Homo, or hy God Became Man, the author addresses the Incarnation of Christ and the theme of Atonement for sin from this philosophical perspective. Anselm distinguishes between "different ways in which an action or state can be just or unjust, specifically just and unjust at the same time," (Sadler).

hy God Became Man is divided into two sections. The first part addresses sin and redemption in a general fashion. Anselm outlines the concept of sin as fulfilling the satisfaction of God, which is related the concept of being indebted to God. This is outlined best in Chapter 11 of Book 1. The author states, "To sin is nothing else than not to render to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anselm. Cur Deus Homo (Why God Became Man). Retrieved online: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/basis/anselm-curdeus.asp

The Holy Bible, NIV.

Sadler, Greg. " St. Anselm of Canturbury." Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Oct 2006. Retrieved online:  http://www.iep.utm.edu/anselm/
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Religion Workshop Missiology for a

Words: 1818 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50237491



Identify prejudices and biases in traditional Christian approaches to non-Christian religions, both in general and specifically.

Identify possible objections to Christianity, in terms of theology, ethics, and missiology.

esolve the challenges associated with new era missiology and new era ministry, by developing a comprehensive plan for the future.

Materials: Today's materials will be the same as the previous days.

Activities:

9:00-9:10: Opening prayer

9:10-11:00: Crash course/review of world religions based on credible source material written from each faith's point-of-view or from a non-biased, scholarly source.

11:00-12:00: Each participant uses his or her personal electronic device or notebook to write down specific areas of concern and possible roadblocks to interfaith dialogue.

12:00-1:00: Lunch

1:00-2:00: Share the concerns addressed by each participant openly, engaging in a dialogue of our own. Understanding that our participants are from diverse backgrounds, each will have unique perspectives on multiple faiths. Some will have had first-hand experiences…… [Read More]

Reference

Kenneth Cracknell, In Good and Generous Faith: Christian Responses to Religious Pluralism (Pilgrim Press, 2006).
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Religion Christianity Judaism & Islam

Words: 993 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17998341

Thus, the adoption of Christianity by these and other European nations created new forms of government and new ways of living a just and moral life.

In contrast, those that practice Judaism, as compared to Christians, tend to be socially and economically liberal and strongly support individual liberties with regard to many societal issues. However, Judaism also reflects "Enlightenment beliefs about the value and sanctity of each individual conscience," meaning that semi-Christian beliefs and practices were adopted by many Jews in Europe as a result of the spread of Enlightenment ideals during the middle years of the 18th century (Parratt, 212).

As compared to Christianity, Islam has played practically no role in the development of Western civilization (except perhaps for the many religious wars between Christianized nations and Islamic nations in the past one thousand years or so), yet in today's modern world, Islam has taken a foothold in many…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baker, Liva. World Faiths: A Story of Religion. Israel: Abelard & Schuman, 1965.

Eliade, Mircea. The HarperCollins Concise Guide to World Religions. San Francisco:

HarperCollins, 1991.

Gilsenan, Michael. Recognizing Islam: Religion and Society in the Modern Arab World.
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Religion & Curbing Violence Has

Words: 1235 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63915802

The issue remains debatable, but a case can be made that the mainstream judgment was terribly wrong in a cultural sense" (right 17).

Schools and educational institutes play a vital role in teaching religious traditions and imparting knowledge regarding religion. The most important aspect of teaching religion is to adopt proper method of teaching. Avoiding controversial and extremist point-of-views and including positive elements from religious teachings from various religions could help in developing tolerance in the generation that growing in the era when religious violence is at its peak.

Other School of Thought

The other school of thought makes the case against religion when it comes to controlling violence. They argue that it is the religion that encourages violence simple on the basis of religious differences. People belonging to one religion consider them superior to others. Examples of all major religions including Christianity can be given when these religions induced…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Wright, Elliott a. 'Religion in American Education'. Phi Delta Kappan. 81.1. (1999): 17.

Volf, Miroslav. 'More Religion, Less Violence'. The Christian Century. 119. 8. (April 10, 2002): 32.

Bennett, Gary L 'Preventing School Violence: Is Religion the Answer'. Free Inquiry. 19. 4. (Fall 1999): 28.

Vernon, Glenn M. Sociology of Religion. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1982.
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Religion and Politics Religion and

Words: 1607 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83348255

Even though the lines may be quite bold between democrats and republicans, the BBC found that 65% of Americans believe "churches should not endorse candidates," and 51% agree that "churches should express views on political matters" (Greene 2002-2008, graphics box).

IV. Summary/Conclusion

The question of whether or not a candidate's personal religious beliefs should be used on the campaign trail is a problematic one, with two equally valid points-of-view. Those who say it should state that this is information that they need to know as voters, since religion is important to them. Those who say it should note state that this information increases fraudulent activities among campaigners and casts a frightening forecast for what the candidate may do in office. The data seems to support both sides, suggesting that voters think the candidate's religious ideas and the church should be involved in his or her bid for office. However, the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Atheists. (2009, Jan. 20). Atheists Thank President Obama for Mention at Inauguration. Retrieved Jan, 25, 2009, from Opposing Views. Web Site: ttp:/ / www.opposingviews.com/articles/opinion-atheists-thank-president-obama-for-mention-at-inauguration

Greene, R.A. (2004, Sept. 15). Religion and politics in America. Retrieved Feb. 24, 2009 from the BBC. Web Site:  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/3658172.stm 

Montanaro, D. (2007, Oct. 30). The Role of Religion in Politics. Retreived Jan. 24, 2009 from MSNBC. Web Site: http://firstread.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2007/10/30/438033.aspx

Chaava, M. (2002-2009). Should religion play an important role in choosing presidential candidates? Retrieved Jan. 24, 2009, from Helium. Web Site: http://www.helium.com/debates/132931-should-religion-important-choosing/side_by_side
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Religion the New Human Potential

Words: 1267 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14434348

In fact the aims of theosophy when it was founded was to "form the nucleus of a Universal Brotherhood of Humanity without distinction of race, creed, or color," and also "to promote the study of Aryan and other Eastern literature, religions, and sciences," and also "to investigate the hidden mysteries of nature." (Prothero 197). New Human Potential Movement members have written books but none have penned a book that is recognized as a sacred text or as a key piece of religious dogma.

As an eclectic faith, the New Human Potential Movement has a less rigid code of ethics than most other religions do. Like ceremonial magickal traditions, moral relativism and ambiguity is tolerated. However, there are a few beliefs that are cohesive enough for scholars to define the New Human Potential Movement as a religion rather than as a cult or a simple offshoot of New Ageism. One of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Neusner, Jacob. "Introduction." In Religion, Science, and Magic: In Concert and Conflict. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992.

Neusner, Jacob. "Introduction." In World Religions in America. 4th Edition. Westminster John Knox, 2009.

Prothero, Stephen. "From Spiritualism to Theosophy: 'Uplifting a Democratic Tradition." Religion and American Culture: A Journal of Interpretation

Vol. 3, No. 2 (Summer, 1993), pp. 197-216.