Respiratory Therapist Essays (Examples)

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Therapist-Driven Protocols the Better Option

Words: 1714 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31587110

crto.on.ca/pdf.PPG/OrdersMC.pdf

Ely, E.W., et al. (1999). Large-scale implementation of a respiratory therapist-driven protocol for ventilator weaning. Vol 159 American Journal of Respiratory Critical

Care Medicine

-(2001). Mechanical ventilator weaning protocols-driven by non-physician health-care professionals. Vol 120 Chest: Clinical Investigation in Critical

Care

Harbrecht, .G., et al. (2009). Improved outcomes with routine respiratory therapist evaluation of non-intensive care unit surgery patients. Vol 54 # 7, Respiratory Care:

Daedalus Enterprises. Retrieved on November 23, 2012 from http://www.upmc.com/careers/pathways/allied-health/respiratory/Documents/ImprovedOutcomes_NICU_Patients.pdf

Hess, D.R.(1998). Professionalism, respiratory care practice and physician acceptance of a respiratory consult service. Vol 43 # 7, Respiratory Care: American Association

of Respiratory Care. Retrieved on November 23, 2012 from http://aarc.org/daz/rcjournal/rcjournal/x.RCJOURNAL.COM02.21.07/content

Kollef, M.H., et al. (2000). The effect of respiratory therapist-initiative treatment protocols on patient outcomes and resource utilization. Vol 117, Chest: Clinical

Investigations in Critical Care. Retrieved on November 23, 2012 from http://journal.publication.chestnet.org

Marelich, G.P., et al. (2000). Protocol weaning of mechanical ventilation…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

CRTO (2011). Orders for medical care. Professional Practice Guidelines. College of Respiratory Therapies of Ontario. Retrieved on November 23, 2012 from http://www.crto.on.ca/pdf.PPG/OrdersMC.pdf

Ely, E.W., et al. (1999). Large-scale implementation of a respiratory therapist-driven protocol for ventilator weaning. Vol 159 American Journal of Respiratory Critical

Care Medicine

-(2001). Mechanical ventilator weaning protocols-driven by non-physician health-care professionals. Vol 120 Chest: Clinical Investigation in Critical
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Respiratory Ethics Nursing Ethics in

Words: 1940 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19560657

2008).. This points to the ethical responsibility of nurse educators -- it is not enough to treat the disease, bit one must treat the patient.

Failure to provide the proper level of education to a patient is certainly one way to fail them both ethically and medically, bit the opposite can also be true. That is, it is possible to provide too much care -- what is deemed "medically futile care" -- and this also raises very serious ethical issues in the realm of respiratory illnesses (Sibbald et al. 2007). This particular stuffy found that insufficient communication among the medical team was one of the primary causes for prolonging futile care, which often means increasing and/or prolonging a patient's discomfort without any reasonable expectation of an improvement in their condition (Sibbald et al. 2007).

The ethical choice here, of course, is to end care (with the consent of the patient…… [Read More]

References

Efraimsson, E.; Hillverik, C. & Ehrenberg, A. (2008). "Effects of COPD self-care management education at a nurse-led primary health care clinic." Scandinavian journal of caring sciences, 22(2), 178-85.

Selecky, P.; Eliasson, A.; Hall, R.; Schneider, R.; Varkey, B. & McCaffree, D. (2005). "Palliative and end-of-life care for patients with cardiopulmonary diseases." Chest 128(5), pp. 3599-610.

shiao, J.; Koh, D.; Lo, L.; Lim, M. & Guo, Y. (2007). "Factors predicting nurses' consideration of leaving their job during the SARS outbreak." Nursing Ethics, 14(1), pp. 5-17.

Sibbald, R.; Downar, J. & Hawryluck, L. (2007). "Perceptions of 'futile care' among caregivers in intensive care units." Canadian medial association journal, 177(10), pp. 1201-8.
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Respiratory Care Is a Good Choice for Me

Words: 716 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66273589

Respiratory Care

In Puerto Rico I was a licensed respiratory therapist. When I moved to America, the license that I held was not valid to allow me to continue that line of work. I deliberated whether or not I wanted to pursue a respiratory care degree so as to return to this profession. It is a demanding activity and requires care and patience. However, as I thought about it and what I loved about it in Puerto Rico, I decided to take up this program here in the States. I feel it was the right decision because as soon as I did I fell right back in love with the profession. So, after being away from it for nearly a decade, I have returned to what I love to do, and I am very happy to be able to do it right here in Florida.

Being able to work in…… [Read More]

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Pulmonary Therapist the Health Care

Words: 633 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53887971



For example, Dr. Gutierrez took me around to the different departments and allowed me to meet and talk with Dustin Bowman, one of his patients. He is 23-year-old, was in the U.S. Air Force and just transferred to Haley Hospital about a week ago. He had a Cervical 1 injury, and his left lung was deflated, which completely affected his entire body. He needs a great deal of respiratory care. With this patient and others that Dr. Gutierrez told me about during my observations at the hospital, I clearly came to see how respiratory therapist must know the patient's entire medical condition to fully provide effective treatment.

Respiratory therapists have to be knowledgeable and skillful about cardiopulmonary therapy, but beyond this, they must have the necessary understanding about human physiology, anatomy, and body chemistry to best understand the holistic condition of their patients. For example, to evaluate patients, the respiratory…… [Read More]

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Learning and Respiratory Care Problem-Based

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5012745

In fact it has been proposed that the positive impact observed of PBL on motivation may come from these academically talented individuals rather than the intervention itself (Hwang & Kim, 2006). GPAs and demographic characteristics were not found to be correlated to PBL (Ceconi et al., 2008).

White et al. (2004) found in a study regarding that PBL was not shown to be superior to other learning styles in assisting students to acquire or retain knowledge regarding asthma management. This finding is consistent with the majority of research that has not found greater knowledge acquisition or retention amongst PBL students vs. traditional teaching methods (Albanese, 2000; Beers, 2005; Rogal & Snider, 2008). However, it is not that PBL produces inferior results, most studies have found that there are no significant differences between PBL students and those from traditional curricula on standardized knowledge tests (Beachey, 2007). Beers (2005) points out that…… [Read More]

Many studies have shown that PBL students experience greater motivation toward learning than their traditional counterparts (Hwang & Kim, 2006; Beachey, 2007, Rogal & Snider, 2008). Further PBL has been associated with greater satisfaction in the learning process by physicians than its traditional counterpart (Beachey, 2007; Op't Holt, 2000; Rogal & Snider, 2008). Evaluations of PBL programs have found that not only do students take pleasure in the process, they also believe that they have the capacity to out perform their peers from traditional curricula in clinical settings (Op't Holt, 2005; Kaufman & Mann, 1996). Studies have shown that the teaching method has little bearing on the learning of academically talented students (Hwang & Kim, 2006; Distlehorst, Dawson, Robbs, & Barrows, 2005; Op't Hoyt, 2005). In fact it has been proposed that the positive impact observed of PBL on motivation may come from these academically talented individuals rather than the intervention itself (Hwang & Kim, 2006). GPAs and demographic characteristics were not found to be correlated to PBL (Ceconi et al., 2008).

White et al. (2004) found in a study regarding that PBL was not shown to be superior to other learning styles in assisting students to acquire or retain knowledge regarding asthma management. This finding is consistent with the majority of research that has not found greater knowledge acquisition or retention amongst PBL students vs. traditional teaching methods (Albanese, 2000; Beers, 2005; Rogal & Snider, 2008). However, it is not that PBL produces inferior results, most studies have found that there are no significant differences between PBL students and those from traditional curricula on standardized knowledge tests (Beachey, 2007). Beers (2005) points out that one would expect significant improvement in clinical knowledge and performance in order to advocate for the use of PBL in the classroom due to the extensive resources that are required to utilize PBL curricula.

One would expect that PBL students would be at a significant advantage over their traditional peers due to the clinical application in the classroom (Colliver, 2000). Some
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Problem-Based Learning vs Traditional Teaching in Respiratory Care Education

Words: 2324 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71070351

PBL vs. Traditional

Two of the methods of pedagogy that are currently employed in respiratory therapy are Problem-Based Learning and Traditional Teaching. Both instructional methods can provide a strenuous curriculum for the student interested in comprehensive training in the field of respiratory therapy, and each method has its advantages and (of course) its disadvantages. The focus of this study will be to determine which pedagogical methodology provides the most efficient and effective results in a respiratory therapy educational setting.

To accomplish that objective, the study will administer surveys in questionnaire form to students attending two separate schools that offer training in respiratory therapy. The questionnaires will provide a quantifying response to qualitative, and quantitative, information. Each school's pedagogy will represent either problem-based or traditional teaching methods and students from each school will be asked to complete pre and post training questionnaires and surveys. Additionally, students will be tested on their…… [Read More]

References

Albanese, M.A. & Mitchell, S. (1993) Problem-based learning: A review of literature on its outcomes and implantation issues, Academic Medicine, Vol. 68, Issue 1, pp. 52-81

Ali, M.; Gameel, W.; Sebai, E.; Menom, N.A.; (2010) Effect of problem-based learning on nursing students' approaches to learning and their self-directed learning abilities, International Journal of Academic Research, Vol. 2, Issue 4, pp. 188 -- 195

Allie, S.; Armien, M.N.; Bennie. K.; Burgoyne, N.; Case, J.; Craig, T.; (2007) Learning as acquiring a discursive identity through participation in a community: A theoretical position on improving student learning in tertiary science and engineering programmes, Cape Town, South Africa, accessed at http://www.cree, uct.ac.za., on January 15, 2011

Biggs, J. (2003) Teaching for quality learning at university (2nd ed.), Buckingham: The Society for Research into Higher Education and Open University Press
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Social Interactions Between Alternative Therapists

Words: 4392 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99447605

There are a variety of approaches to diagnosis and treatment in American acupuncture that incorporates medical traditions from China, Japan, Korea, Tibet, Vietnam, and France. " (2002)

The American Medical Association additionally reports: "Acupuncture has been used by millions of American patients and performed by over 5,000 U.S. physicians, dentists, acupuncturists, and other practitioners for relief or prevention of pain and for a variety of health conditions. After reviewing the existing body of knowledge, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration reclassified acupuncture needles from the category of "experimental medical devices" in 1996 and now regulates them just as it does other devices, such as surgical scalpels and hypodermic syringes, under good manufacturing practices and single-use standards of sterility." (2002) Stated in conclusion by the American Medical Association relating to acupuncture is: "In addition to a positive clinical-therapeutic outcome, reported benefits to patients include avoidance of toxic side effects of pharmaceutical…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Astin, John a. (1998) Why Patients Use Alternative Medicine. Journal of American Medical association Vol. 279 No. 19. 20 May 1998. Online available at http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/279/19/1548

Barnes, Linda L. (2008) the Acupuncture Wars: The Professionalizing of American Acupuncture - a view from Massachusetts. Acupuncture Schools U.S. Online available at http://www.acupuncture-schools.us/the%20Acupuncture%20Wars.cfm

Dower, C. (2003) Acupuncture in California. Acupuncture Schools U.S. Online available at http://www.acupuncture-schools.us/acupuncture-in-california.cfm

Frank, Robert and Stolberg, Gunnar (nd) Doctor-Patient Interaction in Complementary Medicine: Homeopathy, Acupuncture and Auyrveda in Germany. Online available at ( http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/ (en)/soz/iw/pdf/stollberg_frank_docpat.pdf
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Education at Valencia College Where I Am

Words: 1824 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8455278

education at Valencia College, where I am studying to be a respiratory therapist. I want to continue my education, with the hope of attending the University of Central Florida. The University of Central Florida does not offer a Bachelor of Science degree in respiratory therapy, but does offer a wide range of degrees related to the medical field. I intend to pursue a B.S. In Health-Sciences, Pre-Clinical undergraduate degree. I feel that this will give me the educational background I need to place me in a competitive position for graduate or professional training, while exposing me to a wide variety of occupations in the medical field.

The four-year university that I have selected is the University of Central Florida in Orlando, Florida. It is a competitive university with a student body of just under 50,000 (49,900) students (Petersons, 2013). The average in-state tuition rate seems reasonable at $6,247 per academic…… [Read More]

References

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2013). Respiratory therapists. Retrieved March 7, 2013 from the Occupational Outlook Handbook website:   http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/respiratory-therapists.htm  

Petersons. (2013). University of Central Florida. Retrieved March 7, 2013 from Peterson's website: http://www.petersons.com/college-search/university-of-central-florida-000_10000671.aspx

University of Central Florida. (2013). Health-sciences, pre-clinical. Retrieved March 7, 2013

from University of Central Florida website: http://www2.cohpa.ucf.edu/health.pro/prospective_students.shtml
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Ventilator Induced Lung Injury Vili

Words: 1560 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32017311

Some of the major objectives of the strategy include lessening regional alveolar distension, atelectasis, oxygen mediated injury, diaphragm injury, and inflammation. The other approaches that can be used to lessen the injury include using high frequency oscillatory ventilation, positioning, neuromascular blocking agents, fluid therapy, and immunomodulation.

Conclusion:

Ventilator Induced Lung Injury is one of the common illnesses that occur among patients with acute lung injury. This disease is mainly attributed to the use of mechanical ventilator to save these patients though there are other risk factors that contribute to the injury.

eferences:

Dreyfuss, D. & Saumon, G. (1998, January 1). Ventilator-induced Lung Injury -- Lessons from Experimental Studies. American Journal of espiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 157(1), 294-323. etrieved from http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/content/157/1/294.long

Feng et. al. (2011, July 19). Pediatric Acute espiratory Distress Syndrome Treatment and Management. etrieved September 26, 2012, from http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/803573-treatment

Galvin, S. & Granton, J. (2011, March 3). educing…… [Read More]

References:

Dreyfuss, D. & Saumon, G. (1998, January 1). Ventilator-induced Lung Injury -- Lessons from Experimental Studies. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 157(1), 294-323. Retrieved from http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/content/157/1/294.long

Feng et. al. (2011, July 19). Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Treatment and Management. Retrieved September 26, 2012, from http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/803573-treatment

Galvin, S. & Granton, J. (2011, March 3). Reducing Ventilator Lung Injury. Retrieved September

26, 2012, from  http://respiratory-care-sleep-medicine.advanceweb.com/Features/Articles/Reducing-Ventilator-Induced-Lung-Injury.aspx
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Arterial Blood Gas Samples Instructions for the

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64959950

Arterial Blood Gas Samples

Instructions for the Sampling of Arterial Blood for Blood Gas Analysis

This document provides the procedure for the drawing of arterial blood from human patients for use in the analysis of blood gasses.

Audience

This document is intended to provide proper and safe steps in the procedure used by respiratory therapists, phlebotomists, nurses and doctors for the procurement of human blood from extremity arteries for subsequent analysis of blood gases (Browning 1989).

Topics Covered

This document covers recommended clinical practice for the sampling of arterial blood (Bruck1985). Because the nature of this procedure uses human clinical subjects and a biohazardous substance, human blood, significant explanation of safety and best clinical practice are covered in the information. Topics covered include:

Safety Guidelines

Clinical Practice Guidelines

Personnel Requirements

Recommended Equipment

Site Selection

Procedure

VII. Complications

VIII. Contraindications

I. Safety Guidelines

Blood is considered a toxic and/or pathogenic substance;…… [Read More]

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Assist You in One or More of

Words: 563 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59266048

assist you in one or more of the following areas of your current (or past) job?

Technical skills

espiratory care is a highly technical profession, so critical thinking skills are very useful in being able to troubleshoot equipment, locate and correct technical problems (Mishoe, 2003). Critical thinking is very useful to the respiratory therapy profession because the position requires the evaluation of information for problem solving which is crucial to operating complex equipment and diagnosing unknown problems in patients who often require immediate care to breathe and survive.

Communication

Critical thinking in communication is crucial for the respiratory therapist to gather and provide information through verbal and nonverbal communication with nurses, physicians, patients, patients' families, other respiratory therapists, and other clinicians (Mishoe, 2003). Gathering appropriate and sufficient information to analyze, evaluate, and make judgments in clinical practice depends on effective communication (Mishoe, 2003). There is a tremendous amount of skill…… [Read More]

References

Bureau of Labor Statistics (2009, Dec 17). Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2010-11 Edition: Respiratory Therapists Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos321.htm

Mishoe, Shelly (2003). Critical Thinking in Respiratory Care Practice: A Qualitative Research Study. Respiratory Care, 48 (5), 500-516.
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Legal Aspects of Healthcare in

Words: 1908 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84121952

Attorneys, however, note that the suits are reflective of an increase in negligent doctors, who are hard pressed to serve a larger and more demanding patient load. Medical care is more costly and it is true that doctors fail to establish bedside relationships with their patients. Others point out that problems lie at the door of the insurance industry and management of hospitals (Committee, p. 1).

Because we discovered the problem in time, Mr. Jones was able to apologize and explain to the patients affected concerning the true nature of his outbursts. They did not have to pay for their treatment and none of them brought lawsuits against Mr. Jones or the hospital. We retained Mr. Jones, but advised him to notify the management if it appeared that there might be future outbursts. It is true that hospitals are much more diligent today because of risk management practices. Because of…… [Read More]

References

Abbott, R.L., Weber, P. And Kelley, B. (2005). Medical professional liability insurance and its relation to medical error and healthcare risk management for the practicing physician. American Journal of Ophthalmology. Vol. 140(6).

Committee to Study Medical Professional Liability and the Dellivery of Obstetrical Care, Institute of Medicine. (1989). Medical Professional Liabilityand the Delivery of Obstetrical Care: Vol I. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

Grol, R. (2001). Improving the quality of medical care: Building bridges among professional pride, payer profit, and patient satisfaction. Journal of the American Medical Association. Vol. 286(20). 28 Nov 2001.

Harris, G. (2006). Senators to unveil new drug safety proposals. The New York Times. 21 Jun 2006. Retrieved January 14, 2008 at http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/21/health/policy/21fda.html?_r=2&adxnnl=1&oref=slogin&adxnnlx=1200373850-0PNMhVh8RDTFqV4OOSZCpQ.
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Name Class Professor Gaps Occur in Various

Words: 4757 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17991635

Name
Class
Professor
Gaps occur in various situations. They can be in lesson plans or healthcare. When it comes to the MICU, practice gaps happen. To implement a quality improvement proposal one needs to see what works and how to use it to meet the needs of the proposal. Early Progressive Mobility in a Medical Intensive Care Unit has shown to be helpful in meeting the medical goals of patients. In this proposal, evidence as well as strategies will show how important it is for patients to gain mobility early on in recovery and the problems these kinds of programs face.
The MICU or ICU is for patients who are very ill. When in the ICU, it's been demonstrated patients acquire weakness from the acute onset of neuromuscular/functional impairment caused by unknown factors other than their critically ill condition. This weakness impairs ventialtor wearing and functional mobility. (AACN PEAL, n.d.,…… [Read More]

References
A framework for diagnosing and classifying int... [Crit Care Med. 2009] - PubMed - NCBI. (n.d.). National Center for Biotechnology Information. Retrieved March 20, 2013, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20046114
AACN PEARL (n.d.). E - Early Exercise and Progressive Mobility Session Notes from NTI 2012 (ABCDE Bundle). American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. Retrieved March 20, 2013, from http://www.aacn.org/wd/nti/nti2012/docs/pearl/early%20exercise%20and%20progressive%20mobility/early-mobility-nti-session-notes.pdf
Armoni, A., & IGI Global. (2002). Effective healthcare information systems. Hershey, Pa: IGI Global (701 E. Chocolate Avenue, Hershey, Pennsylvania, 17033, USA.
Duarte, P. (2012). Mobilization of ventilated patients in the intensive care unit: Patient disposition. Davis, Calif: University of California, Davis.
European Society of Intensive Care Medicine. (2011). Clinical evidence in intensive care. Berlin, Germany: Med.-Wiss. Verl.-Ges.
Garber, J. S., Gross, M., & Slonim, A. D. (2010). Avoiding common nursing errors. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Kotter, J. P. (2012). Leading change. Boston: Harvard Business Review Press.
Lancet. (1975). Screening for disease: A series from the Lancet. London, United Kingdom: The Lancet.
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Who Am I

Words: 367 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83703308

health profession that I am considering is respiratory therapist. Respiratory therapists care for patients who have trouble breathing; for example, from a chronic respiratory disease, such as asthma or emphysema. They also provide emergency care to patients suffering from heart attacks, stroke, drowning, or shock (OOH)

O-Net online lists basic tasks of a RT as the following:

Assess, treat, and care for patients with breathing disorders. Assume primary responsibility for all respiratory care modalities, including the supervision of respiratory therapy technicians. Initiate and conduct therapeutic procedures; maintain patient records; and select, assemble, check, and operate equipment

What we have here then is a combination of patient skills with rigorous attention to order and organization as well as to details. The RT has to be self -- disciplined and enjoy working according to rules. he has to be responsible and able to follow orders. ome administrative and leadership capacity is required…… [Read More]

Sources

OOH respiratory-therapists   http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/respiratory-therapists.htm  

O-Net.com Summary Report for: 29-1126.00 - Respiratory Therapists

 http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-1126.00
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Critical Thinking Skills Determining How

Words: 515 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88275460

For many, the focus is on creating a workable treatment plan based on solid diagnosis. Earning trust through consistency of communication, deciding when and if the level of detail about their diagnosis needs to be shared, and focusing on the patient through customer skills all when combined lead to a cured patient. Client or patient skills are an area that is the most rapid in learning from a critical thinking standpoint. To be effective as a Respiratory Therapist the client or patient skill set must improve with every interaction, because each patient is really a new learning experience as well in this area.

Technical skills require a continual state of learning and passion for improving through knwoedlge. Critical thinking from the previous years of my career to today have also taught me this can never be done in isolation. Technology only matters when patients know you care. The use of…… [Read More]

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My Autobiography

Words: 2913 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1399239

Autobiography of Iviannette Figueroa

In this paper, I will describe my life and how my life experiences have shaped the person that I am today, how they have impacted my dreams, and what I intend to do in the future. In this paper I explore my childhood and how the difficulties that I encountered in that childhood have helped shape the woman I am today. The woman that I am today is a mother, a wife, and a student working towards admission into the respiratory therapist program. Generally, I have worked hard to put a difficult childhood behind me. As a result, I have to acknowledge that an autobiographical paper was very challenging for me. I do not like to think about how my childhood has impacted the woman that I am today. While I am generally self-confident, I realize that the things I like the least about myself are…… [Read More]

References

Deaux, K. & Snyder, M. (2012). The Oxford handbook of personality and social psychology.

New York: Oxford University Press.

DiCanio, M. (2004). Encyclopedia of violence: Frequent, commonplace, unexpected. Lincoln,

NE: Mystery Writers of America.
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Abcde Bundle in ICU

Words: 663 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53406362

ABCDE Bundle in a Medical Intensive Care Unit:

The ABCDE bundle is an important element in the modern critical care setting or a medical intensive care unit. This bundle is a collaborated initiative between several disciplines for the management of patients who are critically ill. The usage of the ABCDE bundle is usually geared towards lessening immobility, oversedation, and the development of delirium, which combine to harm critically ill patients. Notably, the use of this bundle in the intensive care unit requires an understanding the meaning of each of the letters in the bundle in relation to patient care. In addition, the effectiveness of its use requires collaborative initiatives by respiratory therapists, physicians, and other health care professionals.

This bundle involves awakening trials for ventilated patients, which is signified by letter A, spontaneous breathing trials or B, and coordinated efforts between various stakeholders in the care process or C. These…… [Read More]

References:

Balas et. al. (2012, April). Critical Care Nurses' Role in Implementing the "ABCDE Bundle"

Into Practice. Critical Care Nurse, 32(2), 35-47. Retrieved June 21, 2014, from  http://www.aacn.org/wd/Cetests/media/C1223.pdf 

McGann, E. (2012, June 14). ABCDE Bundle: Improving Outcomes for Ventilated Patients.

Retrieved June 21, 2014, from http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/765687
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Academic Artifacts Iviannette Figueroa Academic Planning and

Words: 915 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96027723

Academic Artifacts

Iviannette Figueroa

Academic Planning and Career Exploration

The personal artifact selected is a time management plan for a three-day period between the 19th and 21st. The plan shows the schedule for each day and the times the activities actually occurred:

Saturday the 19th: My plan for the day

am -- Wake up; shower

6:30 am -- Breakfast

7:00 am -- Take babies to day care

am -- Anatomy and Physiology

pm -- Cook the main meal

3:00 pm -- Dinner

pm -- Play outside with the children

7:00 to 9:00 PM -- Study

9:30 pm -- Shower

11:00 pm -- Watch TV; bed

What really happened:

7:00 am -- Woke, showered

7:30 am -- Breakfast

8:00 am -- Drive children to day care; drive to school

to 11:00 AM -- Anatomy and Physiology

12:00 am -- Picked up children

1:00 pm -- Purchased ready-made meal for the children…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Quality Management Pdca Modeling in Healthcare

Words: 1458 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41430170

Healthcare Quality Management

PDCA Modeling in Healthcare

Psychiatric emergencies in medical settings may be particularly challenging since the staff does not encounter them frequently and may not have experience dealing with behavioral crisis intervention. The purpose of this exercise is to help staff improve understanding and coping with nonmedical emergencies that occur in medical settings using the PDCA cycle.

X is a 41-year-old male admitted to a medical unit with a diagnosis of possible stroke. The patient is ambulatory, 5'10," and 350 lbs. Mr. X presented to the emergency department the day before after apparently losing consciousness at home. The initial CAT scan of his head was negative. It is suspected that Mr. X may be an IV drug user since his urine toxicology screening came back positive for opiates. The medical staff thinks that Mr. X had a seizure prior to admission, but he has shown no abnormal signs…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bennet, L., & Slavin, L. (2009, April 3). What Every Health Care Manager Needs to Know. Retrieved from Continous Quality Improvement: http://www.cwru.edu/med/epidbio/mphp439/CQI.htm

i Six Sigma. (N.d.). Focus - PDCA. Retrieved from I Six Sigma:  http://www.isixsigma.com/dictionary/focus-pdca/ 

Pestka, E., Hatterberg, D., Larson, L., Zwygart, L., Cox, A., & Cox, D. (2012). Enhancing Safety in Behavioral Emergency Situations. Medsurg Nursing, 335-341.
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My Goals for the Next Five Years

Words: 819 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72566969

Smart Goals

My Goals For The Next Five Years

Setting goals: SMART

Setting goals is an important part of moving forward in life. Martin Luther King Jr. once said: "If you can't fly then run, if you can't run then walk, if you can't walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward." Of course, all of us would like to fly forward and reach our goals easily. But often long-term goals take a great deal of work to achieve, and are the cumulation of a series of short-term goals that are undertaken step-by-step. My ultimate personal goal in life is to be a good mother to my son and to financially as well as personally support him on his journey to becoming a pilot while I pay off my house. My long-term academic goal is to complete my major successfully. I am studying to be…… [Read More]

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Bucket List

Words: 770 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91030760

Bucket List

The 2007 film The Bucket List depicts two men who are dying of cancer. They each help each other fulfill their final wishes and dreams. As they do so, they realize that most of the things on their "bucket list" were not material fulfillment but emotional and spiritual fulfillment. For example, they travel around the world together but are not truly happy until they are reconciled with their families. This is exactly how I feel about my own bucket list. I might have some materialistic and fun goals that I would like to achieve, such as learning how to SCUBA dive, and flying in a helicopter. However, the most important things in life for me are my children. Before I die, I want to know that they are all happy in their own way. I would love to see them all happily married with children.

Therefore, I could…… [Read More]

References

Kail, R.V. & Cavanaugh, J.C. (2007). Human Development. 5th edition. Cengage.

Reiner, R. (2008). The Bucket List [feature film].
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Efficacy of Problem-Based Learning PBL

Words: 2030 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94716087

As Epstein suggested earlier, there seems to be no downside to this process.

James Colliver (2000) would disagree. He dismisses the assertions that favor the efficacy of PBL; his misgivings parallel Hmelo-Smith's earlier remarks. For instance, Colliver contends that the popularity of PBL is predicated on a kind of mass enthusiasm rather than empirically

based scientific evidence (p.259). Colliver asserts that PBL has not proven valid and lacks confirmation as successful teaching model. His article is largely a condemnation of the assertions that proponents of PBL assert. (He also implicates the cognitive sciences that underscore PBL.)

Colliver believes medical educators must abandon their support of PBL until there is sufficient empirical proof that PBL is, in fact, an effective way to teach people.

After ten years of administering Problem-Based Learning at the University of Missouri's

School of Medicine, Hoffman and her research team sought to examine the overall efficacy of…… [Read More]

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Patients Undergoing Mechanical Ventilation Contract Ventilator Associated

Words: 2974 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20462057

patients undergoing mechanical ventilation contract Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP). This acute medical condition always results in increased death rates and associated medical costs among patients. This article reviews several literatures that try to enlighten masses on the diagnosis, medical treatments and VAP prevention methods. In addition, this article outlines recommendations medical practitioners can implement in their daily practices to curb VAP and offers an insight on controversies that usually arise during VAP diagnoses, treatment plans and prevention methodologies. This article defines VAP to be the causative agent of approximately 25 to 54% mortality rates among patients undergoing mechanical ventilation in ICUs. Factors responsible for VAP among patients include patients' population in ICUs, hospital stay durations and antimicrobial treatments. Even though antimicrobial medications are confirmed to reduce VAP casualties, further studies should be undertaken such as the ones outlined in the literatures below to help in early identification and treatment of…… [Read More]

References

Arroliga, A.C., Pollard, C.L., Wilde, C.D., Pellizzari, S.J., Chebbo, A., Song, J., et al. (2012).

Reduction in the Incidence of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia: A Multidisciplinary

Approach. Respiratory Care, 688-696.

Camargo, L.F., De Marco, F.V., Barbas, C.S., Hoelz, C., Bueno, M.A., Rodrigues Jr., M., et al.
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Mobility Benefits Barriers Challenges Background and Origin

Words: 2815 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46798820

Mobility

ENEFITS, ARRIERS, CHALLENGES

ackground and Origin

Progressive mobility refers to a series of planned and sequential movements aimed at bringing the patient back to his or her baseline (Vollman, 2010). It consists of positioning and mobility techniques. A meta-analysis of 39 randomized trials was conducted to examine the effect of bed rest on 15 different medical conditions and procedures. Four short-term medical conditions were identified for critically ill patients. ut the major and long-term complication was the reduced quality of life after discharge on account of lost physical functions during their stay at the ICU. Another study conducted among survivors of acute respiratory conditions found that they lost 18% of their body weight and suffered much functional limitations from muscle wasting and fatigue. The more than 5 million who get confined at the ICU must come to terms with both the short- and long-term complications of immobility or prolonged…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Adler, J. And Malone, D. (2012). Early mobilization in the intensive care unit: a systematic review. Vol 23 # 1, Journal of Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy:

American Physical Therapy Association. Retrieved on March 21, 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3286494

Baker, C. And Mansfield, L. (2008). Physical rehabilitation following critical illness.

Vol. 9 # 2, Journal of the Intensive Care Society: The Intensive Care Society.
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Normal Saline During Suctioning Adults

Words: 1900 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67492568

(Torpy, 2007)

Some of the symptoms of ventilator assisted pneumonia may be the onset of fever, a higher white blood cell count, and a new or changing lung infiltrate that may be visible on a normal chest x-ray. Cultures taken as samples from the patient's airways may show the presence of microorganisms or bacteria and fungi that would eventually cause the dreaded ventilator assisted pneumonia in the patient. JAMA states that these risk factors may be eliminated to a large extent if the nurses and medical practitioners were to follow certain simple but essential steps in preventing the onset of the symptoms of pneumonia. First and foremost, the nurse must maintain a high degree of hygiene; he must wash his hands both before and after coming into contact with any patient, and second, he must try to keep the bed elevated to a 30 degree head up position, so that…… [Read More]

References

Druding, Mary. C. (1997, Aug) "Re-examining the practice of normal saline installation prior to suctioning" Medical Surgery Nursing, Retrieved 8 October, 2007 at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FSS/is_n4_v6/ai_n18607505

Medscape. (2007) "Should Normal Saline be Used When Suctioning the Endotracheal Tube of the Neonate?" Retrieved 8 October, 2007 at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/552862

Schwenker, Ferrin, M; Gift, a.G. (1998) "A survey of endotracheal suctioning with installation of normal saline" American Journal of Critical Care, vol. 7, no. 4, pp: 255-260.

Torpy, Janet M. (2007, Apr) "Ventilator assisted pneumonia" the Journal of the American
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Cardiac Arrests A Comparison Sutdy

Words: 1310 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30326879

Of the new consults 23 were transferred to ICU and 43 remained on the wards. The transfer of these patients was greatly facilitated and the inpatient ward staff was greatly satisfied with the interaction with the Outreach Team. edside education, expert resources and better patient-family communication were the most valued features of the team when the in-patient ward staff was surveyed. We noted a tremendous increase in the accessibility of the ICU to the hospital population. We did not, however, notice a decrease in the number of cardiac arrests in the hospital." (Simone, et al., 2007)

It was reported in the work entitled: "Pilot Project at TGH Shows that Critical Care Response Teams Can Significantly Reduce Cardiac and Respiratory Arrests and Hospital Deaths" in 2007 that data gathered between May 2005 and May 2006 "on the impact of the critical care response teams on 342 patients in Toronto General Hospital,…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Smith GB, Poplett N. (2004) Impact of attending a 1-day multi-professional course (ALERT) on the knowledge of acute care in trainee doctors. Resuscitation 2004; 61: 117-122.

Smith, Gary B. And Nolan, Jerry (2002) Medical Emergency Teams and Cardiac Arrests in Hospital: Results May Have Been Due to Education of Ward Staff. BMJ 2002 May 18; 324(7347): 1215.

White RJ, Garrioch MA.(2002) Time to train all doctors to look after seriously ill patients -- CCRiSP and IMPACT. Scot Med J. 2002; 47: 127.

Simone, Carmine, et al. (2007) the Introduction of a Critical Care Rapid Response Team in a Canadian Community Hospital. Critical Care: ICU Organization. 22 Oct. 2007. Online available at: http://meeting.chestpubs.org/cgi/reprint/132/4/445.pdf
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Influence of Mean Airway Pressure on Cardiovascular Performance

Words: 2734 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88942822

Airway Pressure on Cardiovascular Performance

HEART-LUNG CONNECTION

The Influence of Mean Airway Pressure on Cardiovascular Performance

reathing, also known as pulmonary ventilation, is the basic connection between the heart and lungs (Williams & Whitney, 2006). The connection allows air between the lungs and the atmosphere and the exchange of gases between the air and the alveoli in the lungs. ody receptors can detect changes involved in the movement of air and the pressure that accompanies it. These receptors can either increase or decrease breathing rate. They encourage slower breathing when blood pressure rises and faster breathing rate if the blood pressure goes down. Meanwhile, an exchange of gases between body tissues and capillaries is needed to maintain life. It brings in the gases living tissues need for survival. lood carries oxygen molecules when leaving the heart and distributes it throughout the body. Very small capillaries coordinate in the flow and…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Byrd, R.P. And Mosenifar, Z. (2010). Mechanical ventilation. Medscape: WebLLC.

Retrieved on August 18, 2011 from http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/304068-overview

Daoud, E.G. (2007). Airway pressure release ventilation. Vol 2 (4) Annals of Thoracic

Medicine: Pub Med Central. Retrieved on August 12, 2011 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2732103
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Reducing Ventilator Associated Pneumonia

Words: 1591 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55127901

Compliance to Ventilator Care Bundles on educing Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP) is a common infection that is acquired by patients who have used mechanical ventilation in health care facilities. This infection has generated numerous concerns in public health because of its negative impacts on health care. Some of these negative health effects include extended hospital stays, increased costs of health care services, and deaths. Consequently, there have been numerous initiatives in healthcare to address this problem including ventilator care bundles. Existing literature on evidence-based practice for dealing with VAP has shown that compliance with ventilator care bundles is the most suitable clinical intervention (Al-Thaqafy, 2014). For this study, the John Hopkins Nursing Evidence Practice Process will be utilized to facilitate compliance to these bundles in order to reduce VAP. John Hopkins developed an equation that helps administrators quantify probable savings through lessening hospital-acquired infections like VAP (Guterl, 2013). This…… [Read More]

References

Al-Thaqafy, M. S., El-Saed, A., Arabi, Y. M., & Balkhy, H. H. (2014). Association of Compliance of Ventilator Bundle with Incidence of Ventilator-associated Pneumonia and Ventilator Utilization among Critical Patients Over 4 Years. Annals of Thoracic Medicine, 9(4), 221-226. doi:10.4103/1817-1737.140132

Guterl, G. (2013). Cost Implications of VAP. Retrieved from: http://respiratory-care-sleep-medicine.advanceweb.com/Features/Articles/Cost-Implications-of-VAP.aspx

Lawrence, P., & Fulbrook, P. (2011). The Ventilator Care Bundle and its Impact on Ventilator-associated Pneumonia: A Review of the Evidence. Nursing In Critical Care, 16(5), 222-234. doi:10.1111/j.1478-5153.2010.00430.x

Mukhtar, A., Zaghlol, A., Mansour, R., Hasanin, A., El-Adawy, A., Mohamed, H., & Ali, M. (2014). Reduced Incidence of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Ventilator-associated Pneumonia in Trauma Patients: A New Insight into the Efficacy of the Ventilator Care Bundle. Trauma, 16(3), 202-206. doi:10.1177/1460408614532622
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Health Care Industry

Words: 1212 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76415813

Health Care

The Staffing Policies Matrix

Hospitals are in the clubs quadrant of the staffing policies matrix. Hospitals are in this sector because careers are slow-moving. This means that the focus is not on constant promotion. Instead, individuals work based on their specialist area, whether it be nursing, rehabilitation, or various medical specialties. On a day-to-day basis the focus is on being reliable and consistent.

Sonnenfield and Pieperl (1988) note that organizations in the clubs sector have a fixed hierarchy with an emphasis on status. This is true of hospitals with overall status based on the hierarchy of professions. This hierarchy has support staff at the lower levels, nurses at the middle levels, medical professionals at the higher levels, and specialist medical staff such as surgeons at the highest level. Within the levels, seniority determines status. Seniority is also the basis on which promotion is generally given. This is a…… [Read More]

References

Porter, M.E. (1980). Competitive strategy: Techniques for analyzing industries and competitors. New York: The Free Press.

Sonnenfield, J.A., & Peiperl, M.A. (1988). Staffing policy as a strategic response: A typology of career systems. Academy of Management Review, 13, 588-600.
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Spiritual Care Practices

Words: 639 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88018180

Spiritual Care Practices

Mitchell, Andrea. (2011), Focusing on mind, body, and spirit while caring for patients and their families. Critical Care Nurse, (31), 69-70.

How did the transport nurse manage the patient's physical needs?

What is so extraordinary about the story of the transport nurse, as related in Mitchell (2011) is the degree to which the nurse, even while dealing with the emotionally-fraught situation of a critically ill patient going to view the body of his dead wife, was able to be mindful of Mr. L's physical needs. For the journey, the patient Mr. L was initially switched to a travel ventilator. However, when he did not tolerate this, the nurse suggested a manual resuscitation bag instead, although the travel ventilator was still brought along during the transport. The transport nurse carefully monitored the patient throughout the visitation. During the ceremony at the chapel where his wife's body was present,…… [Read More]

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Elements of Informed Consent and Considerations of Duty

Words: 701 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22004009

consent is critical to the ethical underpinnings of medical research and procedures in any field. Both verbal and written consent will be required in most situations, because "obtaining written informed consent from a potential subject is more than just a signature on a form," (UCI, 2014). It is our responsibility as health care workers to talk with patients, and be honest about the risks of procedures, their alternatives, and any information related to confidentiality and privacy. Informed consent should be considered more as a "process" than as a one-time event in which a patient signs a form (United States Department of Health and Human Services, 1993). The client, participant in research, or patient needs to be thoroughly debriefed in ways that are comprehensible and meaningful to them, in language they can understand. This is particularly important in situations where the patient and doctor speak different languages or come from different…… [Read More]

References

Coons, S. (2012). Informed consent forms growing too complex. Research Practitioner 13(5).

UCI (2014). How to consent. Retrieved online: http://www.research.uci.edu/compliance/human-research-protections/researchers/how-to-consent.html#definitions

United States Department of Health and Human Services (1993). Office for human research protections (OHRP). Retrieved online: http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/policy/ictips.html
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Nurse I Believe That My Education and

Words: 584 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12857278

Nurse

I believe that my education and my professional experience in management genres, in healthcare -- including working as a nursing assistant and in homecare environments -- and in business have prepared me well for a career in nursing. After reviewing my qualifications and my skill set -- revealing that I have a history of competent, dependable involvement in worthy vocations -- and the extent of my career interests, I believe it will be clear that I am well positioned for a career as a practical nurse.

Reasons that justify my Goal of becoming a Practical Nurse

First of all, I am very familiar with a number of pivotal aspects of medicine and healthcare and have worked extensively in the industry. I have an Associate Degree in Respiratory Therapy (1992) from the California College of Health Sciences through St. Joseph's Hospital in Minot, North Dakota. As a respiratory therapist at…… [Read More]

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Focus Pdca Models

Words: 2506 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53798873

Behavioral Emergencies

FOCUS/PDC Plan

Planning for Behavioral Emergencies on a Non-Psychiatric Unit

Possible Causes

Hospital staffs are trained to deal with minor behavioral problems because they often occur when someone has some type of traumatic injury or occurrence. Especially patients who are confined to an ICU have issues which may cause them to exhibit adverse behavioral issues. Tesar and Stern (1986) list what should be examined as "(1) the presence of delirium or psychosis; (2) the type of ICU setting (e.g., coronary, surgical, respiratory, or medical); (3) a history of psychiatric disorder; (4) a history of central nervous system disorder; and (5) patients' personalities, which affect their reactions to illness and its treatment." Of course, there are many reasons why the staff in the ICU scenario was unprepared for the disruption caused by Mr. X, but by using the FOCUS model (Find a process to improve, Organize a team that…… [Read More]

References

American Hospital Association. (2007a). Case examples. Behavioral Health Challenges in the General Hospital.

American Hospital Association. (2007b). Recommendations. Behavioral Health Challenges in the General Hospital.

Cooke, M. (2010). The safe management of behavioral health patients in non- behavioral health settings. Alabama Safe Management.

DMHRM. (1997). Management of aggressive behavior. Women and Children's Hospital, Adelaide.
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Quality and Safety Issues on Healthcare Delivery

Words: 1363 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78891139

quality and safety issues on healthcare delivery absolutely cannot be underestimated. When quality and safety issues are addressed head on, healthcare delivery improves for the better and patients receive a higher quality of care. The fundamental issues are thus: people are living with an increased life expectancy and a higher rate of survival. This means that the increase range of treatment options put an additional burden on professional healthcare and in lieu of that, a great deal of literature conducted has identified significant shortfalls in the way that healthcare is currently delivered. Main issues that have emerged from this literature are that the way that healthcare is that healthcare is often delivered in a risky fashion, and that failings like these contribute to avoidable morbidity and mortality, and healthcare expenditure. "There have been substantial developments in information technology hardware and software capabilities over recent decades and there is now considerable…… [Read More]

References

Ahrq.gov. (n.d.). Reducing and preventing adverse drug events to decrease hospital costs.

Retrieved from http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/factsheets/errors-safety/aderia/index.html

Bridges, B.R., Davidson, R.A., & Odegard, P.S. (2011). Interprofessional collaboration: three best practice models of interprofessional education. Med Educ Online, 16(10),

Baystatehealth.com. (n.d.). Evidence based acute myocardial infarction care. Retrieved from http://baystatehealth.com/StaticFiles/Baystate/Quality/Disease
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Care Needs Concerns and Treatment

Words: 4512 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58816657



Furthermore, one of the pillars of collaborative care that will need to be firmly established is the fostering of clear dialogue and a means for strong communication within the care management planning. For instance, there needs to be a clear decision and communication of all tests ordered and when the test results will be available. One of the most important aspects of this collaborative care will be the nursing interventions which can have significant impact on the patient's health and stabilization (Allen, 2010). In fact, strategic nursing care can even minimize readmission rates of Margaret and other patients with comparable conditions (Chen et al., 2012).

Prioritize the Nursing Care Needs of Margaret

The prioritization of nursing interventions is essential, and the way in which a nurse determines this priority is going to be something unique and distinct. "Trials reviewed demonstrated a beneficial impact of nursing interventions for secondary prevention in…… [Read More]

References

Adler, H.M. (n.d.). Toward a biopsychosocial understanding of the patient -- physician relationship: An emerging dialogue. (2007). J Gen Intern Med,22(2), 280 -- 285.

Afilala, J. (n.d.). Frailty in patients with cardiovascular disease: Why, when, and how to measure. (2011). Curr Cardiovasc Risk Rep, 5(5), 467 -- 472.

Allen, J.K. (2010). Randomized trials of nursing interventions for secondary prevention in patients with coronary artery disease and heart failure: Systematic review.

Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing,25(3), 207-220.
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Staff Nurses' Perceptions of the Advantages and

Words: 3292 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9449893

Staff Nurses' Perceptions of the Advantages and Disadvantages of apid esponse Teams

apid esponse Teams (T) are critically important in hospital settings to reduce the failure to resuscitate patients however, there are questions as to the perceptions of nurses concerning Ts.

The significance of this study is the knowledge that will be added to the existing base of knowledge on the perceptions of nurses of Ts.

The work of Heintz and Schreiner (2007) entitled "Improving Patient Safety Through the Use of apid esponse Teams" states in relation to the perceptions of nurses to rapid response teams that staff nurses "… may be fearful that T members will criticize their clinical judgment." In a separate work entitled "apid esponse Teams: educing Codes and aising Morale" it is reported that many hospital nurses like the idea of a apid esponse Team and in fact "an addition to their significant value as a…… [Read More]

References

Johal, Jagdeep (2008) Staff Nurses' Perceptions of Rapid Response Teams in Acute Care Hospitals. Queens Research & Learning Repository. Retrieved from:  http://qspace.library.queensu.ca/handle/1974/1503 

Heintz, Anne and Schreiner, Mary Ann (2007) Improving Patient Safety Through the Use of Rapid Response Teams" Dateline. Vol. 6, No. 1. Online available at: http://www.mlmic.com/portal/Files/Dateline/DatelineSpring07_6.pdf

Tee, A., et al. (2008) Bench-to-Bedside Review: The MET Syndrome -- the Challenges of Researching and Adopting Medical Emergency Teams. Critical Care 23 Jan 2008.

Rapid Response Teams: Reducing Codes and Raising Morale. Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Online Retrieved from: http://www.ihi.org/IHI/Topics/CriticalCare/IntensiveCare/ImprovementStories/FSRapidResponseTeamsReducingCodesandRaisingMorale.htm
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Human Resource Strategy Recommendations of Company Chosen

Words: 3683 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8254989

Human esource Development Initiatives for the Department of Veterans Affairs

As the nation's largest healthcare provider and second-largest federal agency, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is responsible for administering a multi-billion dollar budget in support of the nation's heroic veterans. The VA fulfills its mandate to care for veterans and their families through a nationwide network of medical centers, outpatient facilities, Vet Centers and domiciliaries that provide the entire spectrum of medical, surgical and rehabilitation healthcare services. Given the importance of its mandate and scope of its budget, the VA is well situated to take advantage of a wide range of human resource initiatives that can save money, improve organizational performance and the quality of healthcare provided to the country's veteran population. This study defines five such human resources initiatives and describes how they can be applied to achieve these goals. A summary of the recommendations and their potential…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, C.H. (1984). Job design: Employee satisfaction and performance in retail stores.

Journal of Small Business Management, 22, 9.

Benevides, A.D. & David, A.A. (2010). Local government wellness programs: A viable option to decrease healthcare costs and improve productivity. Public Personnel Management,

39(4), 291-293..
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Psychiatry Electroconvulsive Therapy Electroconvulsive Therapy

Words: 4067 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34718744

Evidence has been cited suggesting that ECT is particularly efficacious with psychotic depression. Experimental research and reviews of the literature tend to conclude that ECT is either equal or superior to antidepressant medication in the treatment of severe depression. In one study both depressed men and women were helped by ECT, but women tended to improve more with ECT than with imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant. Men tended to improve more with imipramine. Both men and women improved more with ECT than with phenalzine, a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI). It has been suggested that MAOIs and serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSIs) may be less clinically effective than heterocyclic antidepressants for severe depression. Thus, ECT's favorable comparison with imipramine is a strong endorsement.

Adverse Effects

The side effect of ECT that has received the most attention is memory loss. ECT results in two kinds of memory loss. The first involves quick forgetting of…… [Read More]

References

Breggin, P.R. (n.d.). Electroshock: Scientific, ethical, and political issues. Retrieved from http://www.sntp.net/ect/breggin1.htm

Electroconvulsive therapy. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.minddisorders.com/Del-

Fi/Electroconvulsive-therapy.html

Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). (2011). Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/electroconvulsive-therapy/MY00129
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Ford Motors Company

Words: 1654 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45665335

Marketing Plan for Ford Motors Company

The logic is really very simple -- when a model is supposed to be for women, it has to be designed by women.

It is clear that cars are now being purchased in USA for both men and women, and many times, women have their own cars. This fact had been realized as early as 1956 when there was a model called Dodge La Femme for women to drive and probably that was the reason why it failed. (Women and SUVs) There was a difference in the thinking of men who designed the car and women who were supposed to drive it.

The market for cars among women is large and it had been 20% of the new vehicles during 1984 and this has gone up to 28% in 1990. The decisions are taken by them in 80% of the cases of purchase. (Women…… [Read More]

References

Concept cars for women. 4 March, 2004. Retrieved from http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/4B81525E-DCB6-4BBB-8B67-82DAD22E03E4.htm Accessed on 18 July, 2005

Kile, Heather. Women and SUVs. Retrieved from http://fubini.swarthmore.edu/~WS30/HKFinalProject.html Accessed on 18 July, 2005

Ten Cars Women Love. Retrieved from http://cars.msn.co.uk/CarNews/carswomenlove/?MSID=af118d01110c47c484a9a1ae4f5e590b Accessed on 18 July, 2005

Women and minority automobile buyers. Road and Travel Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.roadandtravel.com/businessandcareer/careers/minoritycarbuy.htm
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Human Resources -- Performance Improvement

Words: 1545 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94240363

21). Non-training and development-related actions should be required (Schraeder & Jordan, 2011, p. 6) and should include MMPI testing specifically for XX and generally for all RNs. Employee-development actions will include employee seminars and workshops around developing greater awareness, compassion and acceptance of personal accountability. Based on XX's very low score, I anticipate XX's only slight improvement due to imposed consequences for failing to learn proper policy and procedure; however, those gains will be only slight and probably insufficient (Schraeder & Jordan, 2011, p. 9). Given the hospital's very low score and static categorization, its ability to implement the development action plan will probably be signficantly hampered by the hospital's static approach to health care (Silverman, Pogson, & Cober, 2005, pp. 143-4). The collective effect of XX's well-deserved "unaware" categorization and the hospital's "static" categorization will probably result in small, inadequate changes on XX's part over a long period of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brocato, R. (2003). Coaching for improvement: An essential role for team leaders and managers. Journal for Quality and Participation, 26(1), 17-22. Retrieved August 11, 2013, from the TUI Library.

Schraeder, M., & Jordan, M. (2011). Managing performance: A practical perspective on managing employee performance. Journal for Quality and Participation, 34(2), 4-10. Retrieved August 11, 2013, from the TUI Library.

Silverman, S.B., Pogson, C.E., & Cober, A.B. (2005). When employees at work don't get it: A model for enhancing individual employee change in response to performance feedback. Academy of Management Executive (1993-2005), 135-147. Retrieved August 11, 2013, from the TUI Library.
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How Are Computers Used by Nurses

Words: 1893 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67760637

Computers Used by Nurses

The area of interest in nursing informatics are nursing information, nursing data and nursing knowledge. The present state of knowledge related to these phenomena proposes four implications for the development of systems to assist nursing. First, research suggests that experience and knowledge is linked to the quality of nursing assessment, diagnosis or clinical inference, and planning of nursing care, and also that knowledge is task-specific Information technology can provide access to a variety of information resources, such as knowledge bases and decision support systems, to enhance the level of knowledge of the nurse decision-maker. Second, organized patient assessment forms with linkages to knowledge bases of diagnoses have the capability to improve the quality of the patient check up and the accuracy of the diagnosis. Third, studies on planning care have demonstrated the complexity of the task when a number of options are potentially appropriate Model-based decision…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cornell University. 2012. Retrieved from Medical calculators:  http://www-users.med.cornell.edu/~spon/picu/calc/medcalc.htm 

Evidence-based medicine_BMJ Journals. Evidence_based Medicine for primary care and internal Medicine . 2012

Nursing Informatics for BSN Nursing students. (n.d.). Retrieved from Data Analysis Nursing Informatics:  http://www.nursing-informatics.com/kwantlen/nrsg4120.html 

Online journal of nursing informatics. (n.d.). Online journal of nursing informatics .
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Mock Code Blue Staff Assessment a Hospital-Based

Words: 581 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37006886

Mock Code Blue taff Assessment

A hospital-based code team should consist of the following medical professionals:

Emergency Department Physician - a board certified emergency physician oversees the code blue process.

Team Coordinator - A registered nurse from the Cardiovascular Medical Intensive Care Unit (CVICU) acts as Team Coordinator. This person is certified in advanced cardiac life support (ACL), and is responsible for the patient's care during a code blue.

Recorder - The recorder is an ACL certified registered nurse from the Cardiovascular Care Center (CVCC). This team member monitors the patient throughout the process and documents the time and details of each action taken.

Medication Nurse - The medication nurse comes from the Neuro Intensive Care Unit and is also ACL certified. This individual establishes an IV and administers medications necessary to restore a patient's vital functions.

Other Professionals - In addition to the core team described above, a pharmacist,…… [Read More]

Sources:

AHA Guideline Update. 2005. American Hospital Association. 2005. 8 Jan 2012.

URL: http://www.rwjuhems.org/G2005%20Code%20Blue%20Update%

20 narrated%201%20handout.pdf

SafeWise. 2007. Code Blue Sample Procedures. SafeWise Consulting, LLC.
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Duty to Treat

Words: 2350 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68550476

goal of their ethical calling, physicians, nurses and other health care workers are obliged to treat the sick and potentially infectious patients and, in so doing, they are to take some personal risk (Murray 2003). This was the bottom line of the assessment and stand made by Dr. Henry Masur and his colleagues at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID), particularly during the outbreak of dread global SARS in Canada and Hong Kong last year. They also referred to other epidemics, such as the HIV / AIDS.

Masur emphasized that this primary goal and obligation is voluntary and sets the medical profession apart from other professions, precisely because of the involvement of some personal risk in fulfilling that obligation. esides physicians, medical professionals are nurses, dentists and health workers. Records of the first SARS outbreaks in Toronto and Hong Kong showed that a huge 50% of those…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Katz, Laura L. And Marshall B. Paul. When a Physician May Refuse to Treat a Patient. Physician's News Digest, 2000. http://www.physiciansnews.com/law.202.html

Levin, Aaron. Doctors Willing But Not Ready to Treat Deadly Bio-terror Agents. Health Behavior News Service: Center for the Advancement of Health, 2003. http://www.cfah.org/ubns/news/bioterror09-17-03.cfm

Murray, Terry. Health Care Staff Have a Duty to Treat. The Medical Post: Rogers Media, 2003. http://www.medicalpost.com/mpcontent/article.jsp.jsessionid=NJCJNDCEAGHH?content=20020515_09

Schulman, David I. The Dentist, HIV and the Law: Duty to Treat, Need to Understand. Dental Treatment Consideration, 2000. http://www.hivdent.org/dtcblaa082001.htm
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Individualized Innovations and Technology in Healthcare

Words: 4367 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88476501

Personal Healthcare Technology

Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center and the Sunrise Children's Hospital

The Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center, which includes the Sunrise Children's Hospital, is an approximately 55-year-old facility located in Southern Nevada; it serves the greater Las Vegas area and the surrounding communities. The Sunrise Health and Medical Center is proud of its quality initiatives to ensure patient safety and comfort, including direct approaches to pharmaceutical safety such as safe medication dosing via smart pump technology, and bar coding on medications. As well, the Sunrise Health and Medical Center does not discriminate with respect to HIV / AIDS or in any manner related to employment, program participation, admission and/or treatment.

Sunrise has been rated as the most popular area hospital for 15 years in patient surveys. As well, Sunrise Health and Medical Center has developed community outreach programs for health education in a variety of areas, often based…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Appari, A., & Johnson, M.E. (2010). Information security and privacy in healthcare: Current state of research. International Journal of Internet and Enterprise Management, 6 (4), 279-314. Retrieved from http://www.ists.dartmouth.edu/library/501.pdf

Ayanian, J.Z., & Weissman, J.S. (2002). Teaching hospitals and quality of care: A review of the literature. The Milbank Quaterly, 80(3), 569-593. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2690120/pdf/milq0080-0569.pdf

Baker, J.J., & Baker R.W. (2000). Health care finance: Basic tools for nonfinancial managers. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen

Byington, R., Keene, R., Masini, D. (2006). The impact of federal and state funding levels on strategic decisions and how those decisions affect patient care. The Internet Journal of Healthcare Administration. (4)2. Retrieved from https://ispub.com/IJHCA/4/2/5827
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Improvement of Human Resource Management in a

Words: 1085 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9946421

Improvement of Human esource Management in a espiratory Care Center

When individuals play as a team they tend to achieve greater clinical and organizational outcomes in a healthcare institution like the respiratory care center. Clinical and financial improvements have been reported in cases where there has been teamwork between the healthcare team. Whenever there is an organizational breakdown, the departments in any organization can conspire to sabotage each other and this hampers the progress of any care giving institution (Hoff 2004).

Overall patient care is achieved whenever there is total cooperation and teamwork between the workers, this is because each worker works with only one sole aim and that is to meet the needs of the patient. In such a case the main goal is to achieve an improved respiratory care. Teamwork exist in two levels in any respiratory care center, the first instance is when there is cooperation between…… [Read More]

References

Baker, D.P. (2005). "Medical Team Training Programs in Respiratory Care." In Advances in Patient Safety: From Research to Implementation (Vols. 3).

Gagnon, D.1 (1998) National Consultation on Health Services and Policy Issues: Summary Report. Ottawa: American Health Services Research Foundation.

Hoff, T.L. (2004) "Quality provision of respiratory care." Medical Research and Review 98(1): Vol 3.
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Nursing Admin Controlling

Words: 1736 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67238323

Nursing Administration -- Controlling

Nursing Admin-Controlling

Situation analysis

The FOCUS model requires the nursing administrator to find out what the main problem is, obtain information about this problem, communicate effectively with the nurses and patient, understand the needs of the nurses and the patient, and finally summarize these findings for the patient and nurses Dlugacz, 2009.

In this scenario, the process to be improved is responsiveness and willingness of the nurses to help the patient's situation.

Using the FOCUS model, the nursing leader should identify and clearly define the problem. To do this, they must recognize the role of the patient and the nurses in the situation and prioritize the potential improvements in the process Kreitner, 2008.

They also need to draft this problem statement in a clear way. The problem statement for this scenario is that the nurses feel inadequate in responding to the situation where the patient needs…… [Read More]

References

Dlugacz, Y.D. (2009). Value-Based Health Care: Linking Finance and Quality. New York: Wiley.

Kleespies, P.M., & Association, A.P. (2009). Behavioral Emergencies: An Evidence-Based Resource for Evaluating and Managing Risk of Suicide, Violence, and Victimization. Washington, D.C., DC: American Psychological Association.

Kreitner, R. (2008). Management. Mason, OH: Houghton Mifflin Company.

Zun, L.S., Chepenik, L.G., & Mallory, M.N.S. (2013). Behavioral Emergencies for the Emergency Physician. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.
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Roles of a Clinical Dietician

Words: 1533 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46564906

In an acute care setting, such Veterans Affairs, this objective is executed by educating patients about how to maintain a healthy diet and lifestyle after the leave the facility, while in a long-term care setting-such as Cobble Hill-this objective is executed on a daily basis by providing nutritious meals for elderly residents. And finally, in an ambulatory, out-patient care setting-such as Atlantic -- the clinical nutritionist works to support patients in maintaining a diet that addresses their personal healthcare needs, while still living independently within a larger community. Perhaps the most significant similarity between facilities is the notion of nutrition as merely one component of a comprehensive care program; hence the necessity of a clinical nutritional to work in conjunction with a full medical, administrative, and social support staff. The apparent goal of such an approach is to promote multiple aspects of health and well-being among patients, regardless setting or…… [Read More]

References

Cite Health. (2010). Long Island College Hospital. Retrieved December 19, 2010 from http://citehealth.com/dialysis-centers/new-york/cities/brooklyn/long-island-college-hospital

Cobble Hill Health Center. (2010). Resident Services. Retrieved December 19, 2010 from http://www.cobblehill.org/services

United States Department of Veterans Affairs. (2010). Patient Information. Retrieved December,

19, 2010 from http://www.brooklyn.va.gov/patients/index.asp
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Healing Touch Annotated Bib Bardia A et al

Words: 1673 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8043171

Healing Touch Annotated Bib

Bardia, A., et.al. (2006). Efficacy of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies in elieving Cancer Pain: A Systematic eview. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 24 (34): 457-64.

Anecdotal evidence abounds regarding the use of complementary and alternative medicine therapies when dealing with issues of pain. One of the clear issues is that there is a lack of rigorous and well-developed scholarly literature on the subject. In this study, 18 trials were reviewed totaling 1,499 patients. Seven trials reported significant benefits using CAM, seven reported intermediate or short-term benefits, and four studies reported no benefits. The researchers conclude that there are a number of variables and a number of types of CAM, all which require more methodologically sound studies in order to determine actual efficacy of individual interventions.

Jones, T., Glover, L. (2012). Exploring the Psychological Processes Underlying Touch:

Lessons From the Alexander Technique. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy. EPub:…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Bardia, A., et.al. (2006). Efficacy of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies in Relieving Cancer Pain: A Systematic Review. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 24 (34): 457-64.

Jones, T., Glover, L. (2012). Exploring the Psychological Processes Underlying Touch:

Lessons From the Alexander Technique. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy. EPub: doi 10.1002/cpp.1824.

Kelly, A., et.al. (2004). Therapeutic Touch, Quiet Time, and Dialogue: Perceptions of Women With Breast Cancer. Oncology Nursing Forum. 31 (3): 625-31.
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Nurses Do to Support Their

Words: 701 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84028178

Even in areas where there is little to no technology, there are always health care initiatives that can be implemented in order to engender proper health.

The lack of familiarity with the landscape can be addressed through cultural immersion. Nurses need to integrate within the culture that they treat, familiarizing themselves with the common maladies and understanding the environmental factors that cause them. Nurses need to become part of the community, and if they show that they are committed to the local landscape, they will be more likely to engender commitment from the native population as well.

One strategy for advocating health care at the global level is for nurses to immerse themselves in communities in the developing world. After living amongst the native people, nurses would acquire a first-hand perspective of the health issues facing the people, and by having to respond to the environmental pressures themselves, they would…… [Read More]

References

Chen, P.W. (2012, July 26). What we can learn from third-world health care. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/26/what-we-can-learn-from-third-world-health-care/

Peters, DH, et al. (2008). Poverty and access to health care in developing countries. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1136, 161-171
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Globalization and Innovations in Telecommunications

Words: 18188 Length: 66 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2190458



Chapter 2:

Review of Related Literature

Chapter Introduction

This chapter provides a review of the literature concerning hypnosis, Eastern Meditation, Chi Kung, and Nei Kung and how these methods are used to treat various ailments and improve physical and mental functioning. A summary of the review concludes the chapter.

Hypnosis

In his study, "Cognitive Hypnotherapy in the Management of Pain," Dowd (2001) reports that, "Several theories have een proposed to account for the effect of hypnosis. State theories assume that the hypnotic trance is qualitatively different from all other human experiences. From this perspective, trance capacity is supposedly a fairly stale trait that exhiits sustantial individual differences. Nonstate theories, often referred to as social learning, social psychological or cognitive-ehavioral theories of hypnosis propose that hypnotic phenomena are related to social and psychological characteristics such as hope, motivation, expectancy, elief in the therapist, desire to please the therapist, a positive initial…… [Read More]

bibliography. (2010). http://science.jrank.org / pages/7857/Meditation-Eastern.html.

Many religious traditions have practices that could possibly be labeled meditation. In Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, these practices are usually associated with prayer, contemplation, or recitation of sacred texts. In the religious traditions of the Native Americans, Australian aboriginals, Siberian peoples, and many others, what could be identified as meditation techniques are incorporated within the larger rubric of shamanism. It is, however, in the religions of Asia that meditation has been most developed as a religious method.

Meditation has played an important role in the ancient yogic traditions of Hinduism and also in more recent Hindu-based new religious movements such as Maharishi Mahesh Yogi's Transcendental Meditation program. But it is most especially in the monastic or "elite" forms of the various traditions of Buddhism (Theravada, Tibetan/Vajrayana, and Ch'an/Zen) that meditation techniques have taken center stage and have been developed to the highest degree of sophistication and complexity.

Short-Term Effects of Meditation vs. Relaxation on Cognitive Functioning. Contributors: Gillian King - author, Jeffrey Coney - author. Journal Title: Journal of Transpersonal Psychology. Volume: 38. Issue: 2. Publication Year: 2006. Page Number: 200+.

Authors cite the lack of relevant studies concerning the effect, if any, of meditation on short-term improvements in cognitive performance. The results of this study clearly showed that meditation, per se, does not produce a short-term improvement in cognitive performance compared to other relaxation techniques.
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Mission Viejo Healthcare

Words: 3473 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97092115

Healthcare Administration Mission Viejo Executive Summary

Over the last several years, the healthcare delivery environment has been continually evolving. This is because consumers are demanding efficient ways for receiving a variety of services. That is focused on reducing costs and enhancing quality. The result is that the entire system is continually changing to keep up with them. In the case of Golden Age Hospital (GAH), they are reaching a crossroads with rising number of seniors locally and nationally. This is in response to the rising demographic and many local facilities feeling overwhelmed. The new location can be utilized as an integrated business model that will achieve these larger objectives. In the long-term, this will make them more competitive and able to respond to changes in the way industry is operating. Those who are able to do this will see their employee turnover rates decrease and they can enhance the care…… [Read More]

References

Community Profile. (2014). City of Aliso Viejo. Retrieved from: http://www.cityofalisoviejo.com/wp-content/uploads/ApdxC_Community_Profile.pdf

Mission Viejo, California. (2015). U.S. Census. Retrieved from: http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0648256.html

Rising Demand for Long-Term Care. (2014). CBO. Retrieved from: http://www.cbo.gov/publication/44363

Cuellara, A. (2006). Strategic integration of hospitals and physicians. Journal of Health Economics, 25 (1), 1-28.
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Role of Genetics in Ataxia

Words: 2716 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22182658



The most frequent symptom is difficulty in walking or gait ataxia (Unicorn Self-Help Committee 2000), which spreads slowly to the arms and the trunk. Foot deformities, such as clubfoot, flexion of the toes or foot inversion are other early signs. In time, muscles weaken and waste, especially the muscles in the feet, lower legs and hands and, at this time, deformities s begin to show. Other symptoms are the loss of tendon reflexes especially in the knees and ankles, the gradual disappearance of sensation in the extremities, dysarthria or slowness of speech or slurring, easy fatigue, rapid and involuntary movements of the eyes, scoliosis, chest pain, shortness of breath, palpitations, heart enlargement, myocardial fibrosis, tachycardia, heart block and heart failure. Studies showed that about 20% of FA patients also develop carbohydrate intolerance and 10%, of diabetes mellitus, while others lose their hearing or eyesight.

In most cases, the patient gets…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adler, Tina. Single Gene Causes Ataxia, Cancer Risk - Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated Gene Causes Fetal Disorder or Increased Risk of Cancer. Science News: Science Service, Inc., 1995. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1200/is_n25_v147/ai_7142442

Barrett, Julia. Ataxia-Telangiectasia. Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine, Gale Research, 1999. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_g2601/ai_2601000157

Bird, Thomas D. Hereditary Ataxia Overview. Gene Reviews: National Human Genome Research Institute, 2005. http://www.geneclinics.org/profiles/ataxia/details.html

Robinson, Richard. Friedreich's Ataxia. Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine: Gale Research, 1999. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_g2601/is_0005/ai_2601000562
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Routine Oral Care Positioning to

Words: 2436 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77539372

(Schleder, 2003)

Elevating heads of beds for patients on mechanical ventilation

Along with the recommendations for removal of plaque, there is also a guideline made by CDC that for proper treatment to "elevate at an angle of 30 to 45 degrees the head of the bed of a patient at high risk for aspiration." The benefits elevation of the head of the bed is on the theory that then gravity will reduce the possibilities of regurgitation that exists in an overly distended stomach. The recommendation by CDC also clearly states that the patients should not be lying flat unless there is some clinical need for that. At the same time, some medical authorities feel that this is likely to make the patients uncomfortable, though the recommendation is from CDC. This makes them reduce the angle of laying the patients bed at a lower angle than the angle specified by CDC.…… [Read More]

References

Afessa, Bekele. (May, 2004) "From pro and con debate to evidence-based practice: ventilator- associated pneumonia" CHEST. Retrieved at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0984/is_5_125/ai_n6094553. Accessed on 20 July, 2005

Caffery, Lisa. "Preventing Ventilator associated Pneumonia" Retrieved from www.genesisheart.com/clinical_staff/ventilator_pneumonia.pdf+elevating+patient's+beds+for+ventilator+acquired+pneumonia&hl=en" http://www.genesisheart.com/clinical_staff/ventilator_pneumonia.pdf. Accessed on 20 July, 2005

Chulay, Marianne. (1 March, 2005) "VAP Prevention: The latest guidelines" Retrieved at http://rnweb.com/rnweb/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=149672Accessed on 20 July, 2005

Geyer, Sherree. "Breathing easy" Retrieved from www.matmanmag.com/matmanmag/jsp/articledisplay.jsp?dcrpath=AHA/PubsNewsArticleGen/data/0407MMH_FEA_Cover_Story&domain=MATMANMAG
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Computer Charting's Effect on Nursing

Words: 1392 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22430819

(Andrews, 1985)

The study found that computer charting was well accepted by therapists. "Charge capture was reduced from a four-step manual process to a single-step computer documentation of the procedure. Computer charting was more complete and informative. Productivity increased 18%, although it remains unclear to what degree the computer was responsible." (Andrews, 1985)

In conclusion, the study determined that computer charting streamlined the process of documentation and allowed more beneficial use of clinical information. (Andrews, 1985)

In other words, the study fell in line with the later Cunningham study in that they both noted that computer involvement in various stages of health care provision via computer charting truly benefits the health care provider and the patient. In addition, it streamlines costs and eliminates costly errors.

College health systems benefit especially from computer charting, according to Carol Mulvihill, R.N.,C., CQ Editor and Director of Health Services, University of Pittsburgh at radford.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Andrews, RD, et al. 1985. Computer charting: an evaluation of a respiratory care computer system. Respir Care. 1985 Aug;30(8):695-707.

Cunningham, S, et al. 1996. Comparison of nurse and computer charting of physiological variables in an intensive care unit. Int J. Clin Monit Comput. 1996 Nov;13(4):235-41.

Medinotes: 2005. Charting Plus. www.medinotes.com

Mulvihill, Carol. 1997. Advantages of computerized charting in college health. University of Pittsburgh: CQ.
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Pulmonary Rehab Program Chronic Lung

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13434437

he most common progressive chronic lung situations that would require the rehabilitation include interstitial lung disease, chest wall disease, bronchiectasis, and pre and post thoracic surgery. he fourth category of patients to offered pulmonary rehabilitation is those with recent exacerbation of COPD requiring hospitalization, without the anticipated recovery path, and whose functional baseline has changed significantly ("Service Specification," 2012).

he Problem:

Chronic lung diseases have developed to become one of the most common respiratory illnesses across the country. As the diseases have become one of the major reasons for hospitalizations of patients, they usually affect individuals at the age of 35 years and above despite of the fact that these individuals are usually not diagnosed until they are 50 years and above. he growth and rapid increase of chronic diseases is attributed to the tendency of many people with the disease not to get medical assistance. While the conditions continue…… [Read More]

The most common progressive respiratory disease is the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), which is a name that is also used to refer to a collection of lung diseases ("Introduction," 2012). The other common chronic lung diseases include emphysema, chronic bronchitis, chest wall disease, interstitial lung disease, chronic asthma, and obstructive airways disease. These chronic lung diseases usually involve a combination of three major factors i.e. airway diseases, lung circulation diseases, and lung tissue diseases. As the name suggests, the airway diseases affect the airways or tubes that transport oxygen and other gases to and from the lungs. In contrast, the lung tissues diseases affect the lung tissue structure through inflammation or scarring of the tissue. Lung circulation diseases affect the blood vessels in the lungs through scarring, clotting, or inflammation of these vessels. As a result, these diseases contribute to difficulties of the lungs to receive oxygen and release carbon dioxide. The severity of chronic lung diseases is basically dependent on the combination of these three conditions. However, most of the chronic lung diseases are attributed to the narrowing or blockage of the airways. For instance, emphysema, COPD, and chronic bronchitis are conditions that inhibit the ability of the tubes or airways to carry oxygen and other gases to and from the lungs. Generally, patients with chronic lung diseases such as COPD always have difficulties breathing because of airflow obstruction or narrowing of the airways.

As previously mentioned, these diseases account for a huge number of hospital emergency room visits and hospitalizations, although they are largely preventable. Despite being preventable, these diseases have become some of the major causes of death and key factors in the ever-increasing huge human and economic burden because of the tendency of patients to ignore their symptoms ('Emergency Department Support Fund Application," n.d). The major symptoms of these diseases include rising breathlessness, frequent chest infections, and constant cough with phlegm ("Introduction," 2012). The tendency to ignore these symptoms contributes to the many incidents of recidivism to acute care facilities.

The main cause of chronic lung diseases, especially chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is smoking. An individual enhances the risk of developing these diseases when he/she smokes more and for long periods of time. Smoking results in scarring that increases the risk of chronic lung diseases, through irritating or inflaming the lungs. The inflammation in turn results in permanent lung changes over many years. During this period, the walls of the tubes or airways thicken as more mucus is generated. In addition to making the lungs lose their normal elasticity, the damage or harm to the delicate walls of the air sacs in the lungs results in the development of emphysema. Moreover, the smaller airways or tubes become narrowed or scarred. The combination of these permanent changes to the lungs contributes to symptoms of cough, breathlessness, and phlegm linked to chronic obstructive pulmonary
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Cognitive Deficits in Amyotrophic Sclerosis

Words: 2919 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59314852

, 2010).

In addition, small frequent feeds, and a large amount of fluid is provided to maintain the nutritional needs of the patient and prevent dehydration. The r suctioning of secretions proves necessary in preventing aspiration of secretions. The loss of voluntary muscle's activity increases the risks of accumulation of secretions hence, the need for regular suctioning. Bulbar involvement often results in communication complications such as dysarthria and muscle paralysis of the muscles of the face, throat, and tongue. As such, it requires the provision of management strategies such as augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) techniques and other forms of speech therapy that improves the communication abilities of patients with ALS. Pseudobulbar effects that often accompany those brought by the frontotemporal lobe degeneration often require the administration of antidepressants. The antidepressants manage mood disorder that presents through disproportionate crying, and inappropriate response to the external stimuli. Maximizing patients' comfort and…… [Read More]

References

Brettschneider, J., Libon, D.J., Toledo, J.B., Xie, S.X., McCluskey, L., Elman, L., & #8230;

Trojanowski, J.Q. (2012). Microglial activation and TDP-43 pathology correlate with executive dysfunction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Acta Neuropathologica, 123(3),

395 -- 407. doi:10.1007/s00401-011-0932-x

Crespi, C., Cerami, C., Dodich, a., Canessa, N., Arpone, M., Iannaccone, S., & #8230; Cappa, S.F. (2014). Microstructural white matter correlates of emotion recognition impairment in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Cortex, 53, 1 -- 8
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The Palm Gardens Center for

Words: 1379 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11281726


All these professionals work together in order to establish a
rehabilitation plan that works best for each individual. The component
members of the team are subject to change in accordance with each
individual's needs and requirements. Also, the center holds
interdisciplinary conferences.
The Palm Gardens Center does not use volunteers in its activity. The
reason behind this choice relies on the fact that this center is a for
profit organization. All the individuals employed here are paid. Most of
them work full time, but there are also part time employees.
In management's opinion, it is not a good idea to use volunteers,
because people that are not financially motivated tend to not perform their
tasks as good as they are supposed to. Basically, if one wants something
done properly, the activity in cause must be remunerated in accordance.
The Palm Gardens Center is very involved in the life of the…… [Read More]

Reference list:
1. Mission (2005). The Palm Gardens Center. Retrieved March 25,
2009 from http://www.palmgardenscenter.com/.
2. Staffing Information (2009). UCompareHealthCare. Retrieved
March 25, 2009 from
http://www.ucomparehealthcare.com/nhs/newyork/palmgardenscen
terfornursingandrehab.html.
3. Palm Gardens Nursing Home, Brooklyn, NY (2009). Hospital Data,
Hospitals and Nursing Homes Profiles. Retrieved March 25, 2009
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Contingency Management Alcohol & Marijuana

Words: 11354 Length: 41 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27822679

" (1995)

The authors state: "The amphetamines occasioned dose-related increases in d- amphetamine-appropriate responding, whereas hydromorphone did not. Amphetamines also occasioned dose-related increases in reports of the drug being most like "speed," whereas hydromorphone did not. However, both amphetamines and hydromorphone occasioned dose-related increases in reports of drug liking and in three scales of the ARCI. Thus, some self-report measures were well correlated with responding on the drug-appropriate lever and some were not. Lamb and Henningfield (1994) suggest that self-reports are complexly controlled by both the private event and the subject's history of experience with the drug. Some of the self-reports they observed (e.g., feels like speed) are probably occasioned by a relatively narrow range of stimuli because in the subject's experience with drug administration, these reports have been more selectively reinforced by the verbal community relative to other reports (e.g., drug liking). They also suggest that these results imply…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Budney, Alan J. et al. (2006) Clinical Trial of Abstinence-Based Vouchers and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Cannabis Dependence. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 2006. Vol.. 74 No. 2. 2006 American Psychological Association.

McRae, a.; Budney, a.; & Brady, K. (2002) Treatment of Marijuana Dependence: A Review of the Literature. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 24 (2003)

Pathways of Addiction: Opportunities in Drug Abuse Research (1996) Institute of Medicine (IOM)

Kamon, J; Budney, a. & Stanger, C. (2005)a Contingency Management Intervention for Adolescent Marijuana Abuse and Conduct Problems. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. 44(6):513-521, June 2005.
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Animal Assisted Therapy Animals When

Words: 2537 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31991308

69). Petting a dog lowered blood pressure and respiratory rate -- even if the dog was somebody else's. Pet owners that have heart surgery recover faster and stand a better chance of full recovery. Touching a warm furry animal gives them relief.

Moreover, pet ownership is a predictor of survival after hospitalization for any serious illness (Gunter & Furnham, 1999).

Demello (1999) found that the "mere presence of an animal" could lower blood pressure and that the effect persisted even after the animal was gone. Visual contact with an animal, although it helped, was not as good as touching. Heart rates decreased significantly in a three-minute period of physical contact with the animal (Demello, 1999).

A story in Time magazine (2001) tells how a brain-injured man needed help to get back his sense of balance. Ginger, an Australian shepherd, liked to fetch, so physical therapy for this man was to…… [Read More]

References

Brodie, S., Biley, F.C., and Shewring, M. (2002). An exploration of the potential risks associated with using pet therapy in healthcare settings. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 11 (4), 444-456.

Demello, L. (1999). The effect of the presence of a companion-animal on physiological changes following the termination of cognitive stressors. Psychology & Health, 14 (5), 859.

Gunter, B. And Furnham, a. (1999). Are pets good for our physical well-being? In Pets and People: The Psychology of Pet Ownership, Chapter 5, 6. London: Wherr Publishing, 66-81/

Hooker, S.D., Freeman, L.H., and Stewart, P. (2002). Pet therapy research: A historical review. Holistic Nursing Practice, 16 (5), 17-23.
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Massages Have Been Shown to

Words: 450 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11146973

In some instances this will mean lying prone on a massage table, or using an ergonomically design massage chair.

Relax your mind and let yourself drift close to a state of sleep and deep relaxation. Try not to talk or move unnecessarily in order to adjust your mind to a new mindset.

Communicate with your masseuse so that they will adjust pressure according to your needs. Become accustomed to their touch and relax under their guidance.

Listen to soothing music or light therapeutic candles to further establish the mood of the session.

These above guidelines will ensure that you have optimize your experience while getting a massage. The most important rule of thumb to remember is to follow the guidance of your massage therapist!

There are some easy steps to follow after a massage that will help you release your muscle strains and extend the lasting benefits of your massage.…… [Read More]

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SWOT of Rehabcare Inc

Words: 694 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94979977

ehab Care

Founded in 1982, the ehabCare Group Inc. is a private company that provides physical and cognitive rehabilitation program management services to approximately 1200 hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, outpatient facilities, and other long-term care facilities in the United States. The company also has a Program Management Services division that provides rehabilitation services and skilled nursing for acute conditions, a Hospital division that primarily functions in rehabilitation hospitals, and an Other Healthcare Services division that provides strategic and financial consulting services. The company's headquarters is in Louisville, Kentucky. Below is a SWOT analysis of the company:

Strengths

High quality of care.

Licensed therapists / highly skilled workforce.

Large distribution and sales networks. Experienced business units.

Weaknesses

Little investments in research and development.

Extremely competitive market.

Patient census subject to issues with the economy.

Opportunities

New markets.

New products and services.

Threats

Price changes in services.

Issues with the economy.

Changing…… [Read More]

References

Joynt, K.E., & Jha, A.K. (2012). Thirty-day readmissions -- truth and consequences. New England Journal of Medicine, 366(15), 1366-1369.

Needham, D.M., Dinglas, V.D., Morris, P.E., Jackson, J.C., Hough, C.L., Mendez-Tellez

A., ... & Hopkins, R.O. (2013). Physical and cognitive performance of patients with acute lung injury 1 year after initial trophic vs. full enteral feeding. EDEN trial follow-up. American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, 188(5), 567-576.

RehabCare (2014). About us. Rehabcare.com. Retrieved on November 19, 2014 from http://www.rehabcare.com/about-us/.
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Psychology Testing Psychometric Emotional Intelligence

Words: 12427 Length: 45 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79715879



As emotionally intelligent employees are reportedly more content, conscientious and committed in the workplace, businesses and organizations are repeatedly advised to recruit and retain these individuals. Abraham (2006), nevertheless, reports that the strongest findings emerging from her study was.".. The effect of job control on emotional intelligence." She contends that emotionally intelligent employees will not just naturally thrive in their workplace; that the work environment needs to provide independence in decision making for employees to succeed.

Aims and Objectives

Aim

To explore concepts encapsulated in and related to EQ testing, through intensive research and appropriate assessment of collected data.

esearch for this project proposes to increase understanding of EQ testing, as well as, complementary components.

Each objective presented in this proposal reflects an area of interest which will be expounded upon. As Objective 5, however, mirrors a primary consideration, plans are to include numerous samplings of related studies.

1.2 Objective…… [Read More]

References

Abraham, Rebecca. "The Role of Job Control as a Moderator of Emotional Dissonance and Emotional Intelligence -- Outcome Relationships.(Statistical Data Included)," the Journal of Psychology, March 1, 2000.

Bar-on, Reuven Ph.D (2005). "The World's First Scientific Measure of Emotional Intelligence."(2006). PEN Psychodiagnostics [26 September 2006]. http://www.eqiq.nl/eqivol.htm.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5008598359

Before You Start Your Fruit and Fibre Diet You Should Speak to This Man. (2005, February 9). Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), p. 12.
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Nursing Case Studies Thomas and

Words: 2380 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69474902



Cae plan

Nusing poblem 1: May's pain must be contained so she does not injue heself.

Because childen cannot always expess thei sensations of pain, thei pain may go unnoticed until it becomes sevee and fightening.

Nusing poblem 2: Vomiting and the possibility of choking.

Anxiety and pain can cause childen to vomit, making teatment of pain and administeing pope nutition difficult.

Nusing poblem 3: May is attempting to emove he oxygen mask.

A lack of knowledge on the pat of the child as to why cetain teatments ae administeed can esult in noncompliance.

Nusing poblem 4: The need fo social suppot when May's mothe is not pesent.

The unfamiliaity of the hospital envionment is exacebated by May's lack of paental cae.

Expected outcomes

Diagnosis 1: Pain management

Outcome: The FLACC: a behavioual scale fo scoing postopeative pain in young childen that can be helpful in detemining how to teat…… [Read More]

references

Almond, C. (1998). Children are not little adults. Australian Nursing Journal, 6(3), 27 -- 30.

Bruce, E., & Franck, L. (2000). Self-administered nitrous oxide (Entonox () for the management of procedural pain. Paediatric Nursing, 12(7), 15 -- 19.

Manworren R. & Hynan L.S (2003) Clinical validation of FLACC: preverbal patient pain scale. Paediatric Nursing 29(2):140-146.

McInerney, M. (2000). Paediatric pain. Pulse Information Sheet of Royal College of Nursing,
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Abnormal and Child Psychology -

Words: 3058 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25227202

(the National Institute of Mental Health, 2008) Though we are able to identify some external factors, like drug use, and development problems in the womb, mainly it is the genes which determine the occurrence of this disease. We may say that it is a biological disorder. The persons suffering by this disease are largely affected by programs on TV, games, bad environments food intake and similar occurrences. It is Genes that have control over the chemicals in the neurotransmitters and the affected child has these chemical output out of balance. The scans conducted reveal that these defects can be noted in the areas of the brain that deals with psycho motor reflexes. This imbalance creates and distorts the functions of the person in changing focus of thought, organization of things and methods, planning out things, memory, and emotion and reasoning and differentiating between the two. They have impairments of speech…… [Read More]

References

Adler, Lenard. (2007) "Scattered Minds: Hope and Help for Adults with Attention Deficit..."

Perigee.

American Academy of Child Adolescent Psychiatry. (2008) "Child and Adolescent Mental

Illness and Drug Abuse Statistics" Retrieved 27 February, 2008 at http://www.aacap.org/cs/root/resources_for_families/child_and_adolescent_mental_illness_statistics
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Nursing and Issue of Falls Are Responsible

Words: 1482 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97600896

Nursing and Issue of Falls

Falls are responsible for considerable morbidity, immobility, and mortality among older persons, especially those living in nursing homes. Falls can occur in a home, community, long-term rehabilitation, or acute care Setting (Laurence Z.. et.al, 1994). The risk of falls can be related mostly to mobility status, exposure to hazardous environments and risk-taking behaviors such as climbing ladders for seniors living in the community setting. Factors for a fall in hospitalized adults are greatly influenced by acute illness that often has a marked, albeit temporary, impact on physical and cognitive function compounded by care provided in unfamiliar surroundings in the long-term care setting, the risk factors for falls are influenced by impaired cognition, wandering or impulsive behavior, use of psychotropic medications, incontinence and urgency, lack of Exercise, unsafe environments, and low staffing levels. Patient falls are serious problems

In acute care hospitals and are used as…… [Read More]

References

Anuradha Thirumalai, (1998). Nursing Compliance with Standard Fall Prevention

Protocol Among Acute Care Hospital Nurses. Retrieved September 26, 2012 from http://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1191&context=thesesdissertations&sei-redir=1&referer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.co.ke%2Furl%3Fsa%3Dt%26rct%3Dj%26q%3Dnursing%2520compliance%2520with%2520standard%2520fall%2520preventionprotocol%2520among%2520acute%2520care%2520hospital%2520nurses%26source%3Dweb%26cd%3D1%26ved%3D0CCAQFjAA%26url%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fdigitalscholarship.unlv.edu%252Fcgi%252Fviewcontent.cgi%253Farticle%253D1191%2526context%253Dthesesdissertations%26ei%3Dg-NiUPW8CuLB0QW_r4DgAw%26usg%3DAFQjCNE6__5zNu8vjRxc-jIFBXbBfKVIng#search=%22nursing%20compliance%20standard%20fall%20preventionprotocol%20among%20acute%20care%20hospital%20nurses%22

Dykes, P.C., Carroll, D.L., Hurley, A.C., Benoit, A., & Middleton, B. (2009). Why do patients in acute care hospitals fall? Can falls be prevented? Journal of Nursing Administration, 39(6), 299-304. doi:10.1097/NNA.0b013e3181a7788a

Laurence Z. Rubenstein, Karen R. Josephson & Alan S. Robbins, (1994). Falls in the Nursing
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Quality of Life Among Tawau Hospital Sufering

Words: 8383 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85112392

Quality of Life Among Tawau Hospital Sufering From

Knee Osteoarthritis With Physiotherapy

Qualitative study of How Quality of Life of Tawau Hospital Staff

Suffering from Knee Osteoarthritis have been improved at Physiotherapy Unit.

To investigate how the Quality of Life among Tawau Hospital staff suffering from Osteoarthritis (knees) have been improved using Physiotherapy intervention.

The study employs qualitative techniques to collect data. The sample population is selected from people and Tawau Hospital staff visiting the physiotherapy unit. Approximately 100 sample valid questionnaires are collected and the data collected are used for the research findings. The study evaluates the extent the physiotherapy intervention has been able to improve the quality of life of participants. The physiotherapy intervention include physical exercise, and massage. The study measures the outcome of physiotherapy intervention using VAS (visual analogue scale). The reduction of pain has been used to measure the improvement of quality of life index…… [Read More]

References

Aoki, Y. Sugiura, S. Nakagawa, K et al. (2012).Evaluation of Nonspecific Low Back Pain Using a New Detailed Visual Analogue Scale for Patients in Motion, Standing, and Sitting: Characterizing Nonspecific Low Back Pain in Elderly Patients. Pain Research and Treatment.

Baba, D. Indah, D.D.D. Rasdan, I.A. (2010). Work Posture and Back Pain Evaluation in a Malaysian Food Manufacturing Company. American Journal of Applied Sciences 7 (4):, 473-479.

Breedveld, F.C. (2004). Osteoarthritis -- the Impact of a Serious Disease. Rheumatology. 43(Suppl. 1):i4 -- i8

Brigham and Women's Hospital (2009). Standard of Care: _Osteoarthritis of the Knee. Department of Rehabilitation Services.UK.
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Albert Hofmann and the Discovery

Words: 4426 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14497555

To that end, throughout the course of his life "he remained convinced that the drug had the potential to counter the psychological problems induced by 'materialism, alienation from nature through industrialisation and increasing urbanisation, lack of satisfaction in professional employment in a mechanised, lifeless working world, ennui and purposelessness in wealthy, saturated society, and lack of a religious, nurturing, and meaningful philosophical foundation of life'." (Telegraph, 1) To Hofmann's view, many of the psychological problems associated with the detachment imposed by modernity could be addressed by guided use of a substance that caused reflection, insight and self-awareness otherwise largely inaccessible.

It was through what was for Hofmann an unwanted combination of premature commercialization and the proliferation which this allowed into the underground market that would cause LSD to earn its dubious reputation and its relationship to recreational rather than psychiatric users. Accordingly, Sandoz would immediately jump on the opportunity to…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Hofmann, A. (1979). LSD-My Problem Child. MAPS.

Hofmann, A.; Wasson, R.G.; Ruck, C.A.P.; Smith, H. & Webster, P. (2008). The Road to Eleusis: Unveiling the Secrete of the Mysteries: 30th Anniversary. North Atlantic Books.

Hofmann Foundation (HF). (1999). The Albert Hofmann Foundation. Hofmann.org.

Nosowitz, D. (2009). LSD Creator Albert Hofmann to Steve Jobs: 'How Was LSD Useful To You?" Gizmodo. Online at  http://gizmodo.com/5310549/lsd-creator-albert-hofmann-to-steve-jobs-how-was-lsd-useful-to-you
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Johnson & Johnson's Marketing Mix

Words: 2971 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79906587

Specifically focused on products for each phase of a persons' life, this business segment is the most mainstream in terms of promotional strategies. Skin Care, OTC and Nutritionals have successfully given JNJ a permanent marketing strategy for selling to women in the 25-34 and 25-45 segments, two of the fastest growing demographic markets for these products.

Product Strategy

The biggest challenge for JNJ is the ability to quickly develop and launch products across all of their business units. This is the most challenging task internally for the entire company to coordinate on, specifically in the area of pharmaceuticals where Federal Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines and the need for compliance are very high.

The costs of producing a new drug can be well over $800M according to AM esearch (2004). An analysis of each phase of the development of a new drug is shown in the following graphic from PhMA (2005).…… [Read More]

References

AMR Research (2006) - Pharmaceutical and Life Sciences Industry Overview. AMR Research Alert. Monday June 5, 2006. Hussain Moorai and Roddy Martin.

Credit Suisse (2006) - Johnson and Johnson Research Brief. January 24, 2007.New York, NY.

Life Science Analytics (2007) - Life Science Analytics Johnson & Johnson Pipeline Report. January 3, 2007. Boston, MA

PhRMA (2005) - Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) Conference Proceedings. Accessed from the Internet on February 10, 2007 at  http://www.phrma.org/innovation/
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Watson Theory of Nursing Background

Words: 2441 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5258418

His assistance and support was both scientifically sound and, more importantly, spiritually supportive and extremely respectful of and responsive to my philosophical beliefs and my personal psychological orientation and inclination.

Based substantially on his valuable input, I made the decision to transfer my father to hospice. The hospice doctor also demonstrated carative nursing in his sensitive response to my sister's concerns that placing our father in hospice and directing that medical intervention efforts be withheld was tantamount to just allowing him to die prematurely. He explained to her the clinical significant objective scientific basis upon which it was clear that even the most aggressive medical intervention would be unable to prolong his life for more than a few weeks and that the relative value of those extra three weeks from his perspective were just not worth the amount of discomfort and confusion just to slightly prolong the same inevitable end…… [Read More]

References

Delaune, S. And Ladner, P. (2002), Fundamental of Nursing, Standard and Practice. New York: Thomson.

Fawcett, J. (2005). Analysis and Evaluation of Conceptual Models of Nursing, St. Louis,

MO: Mosby.

Finfgeld-Connett, D. "Meta-synthesis of caring in nursing." Journal of Clinical Nursing,
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Community Plan of Action

Words: 1506 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50943212

Community Plan of Action

There are many responsibilities that have to be met to satisfy the needs for personal satisfaction, and this may need changes in work schedules and adjustments. The objective here is to judge the possibilities of obtaining satisfaction from three different types of activities that can be conducted -- helping pregnant teenagers, teaching the methods of care to individuals who have recently found out that they are diabetics, and helping the elderly get on with their daily lives. The first of these is the problem of teenage pregnancy, and the best method to help such teenage children in not getting pregnant. Once they are pregnant, then a lot of other social questions come up and the most important of that is that we should not interfere in the personal lives of people. For teenagers not to get pregnant, they require close monitoring. (Teen Pregnancy Prevention)

For this…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Lauerman, John. F. "The Prescription Paradox" Brown Alumni Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.brown.edu/Administration/Brown_Alumni_Magazine/99/3-99/features/paradox.html Accessed 10 September, 2005

"Medications and Older People" (September-October, 1997) FDA Consumer Magazine.

Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/1997/697_old.html

Accessed 10 September, 2005
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Role of Diet in Weight

Words: 2900 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 196412

By educating patients on early warning signs of hepatotoxicity, this rare but potentially fatal consequence could be detected early to allow appropriate intervention." (Wright and Vandenberg, 2007) it is extremely critical to understand the nature of psychiatric nursing in today's clinical environment.

IV. ROLE of NURSE PRACIIONER in RANSIION

Specifically stated in the work of Kathryn R. Puskar entitled; "he Nurse Practitioner Role in Psychiatric Nursing" published in the Online Journal of Issues in Nursing is: "Commercialization of psychiatric care is underway. Psychiatric inpatient admissions have decreased, admissions to general hospitals have decreased, while outpatient admissions are increasing. Academic centers are purchasing smaller hospitals as affiliates; satellite clinics and networks of services are being established. Physicians in solo practice are merging into group practices. New health care professional roles must be restructured and "cross trained" to maintain competitiveness by offering flexible, cost-saving effective care. his is the background environment in…… [Read More]

To improve participation in outpatient programs, social workers can identify and address client barriers to keeping appointments, such as inadequate transportation, non-cooperative employers or family members, limited financial or child care resources, or even poor client motivation. Pairing newly diagnosed patients with "diabetic sponsors" -- individuals who are experienced and successful at managing their diabetes -- also may enhance attendance. Rather than relying on clients to come to clinics, social workers may need to bring the clinics to clients by organizing diabetic health fairs, outreach, or training programs in work settings, church facilities, or community centers. It is related that: "For people with Type 2 diabetes, Medical Nutritional Therapy (MNT) is often the "first-line therapy of choice" (Lipkin, 1999). The goal of MNT is to maintain near-normal glucose levels by matching dietary consumption with actual caloric (energy) needs, necessitating that the right foods in correct proportions be eaten at prescribed times for many MNT may include a secondary goal -- weight loss. Nutritional self-management or compliance with a prescribed diet can be handicapped by many of the same factors that impede self-care knowledge and skill mastery. In MNT, food assumes an almost medicinal quality, and many may resist altering long-held consumption patterns, inasmuch as food plays a part in their cultural heritage or serves as a source of pleasure; therefore, dietary changes are interpreted as loss of either function. For some patients, making these lifestyle changes may require assistance with concrete resources. As resource brokers, social workers can assess needs and link clients with community agencies for nutritional assistance, fitness training, additional diabetic education (professionals or material), medical care, health insurance, insulin and glucose monitoring supplies, prescription assistance, transportation, and counseling or support groups" (Lipkin, 1999)

VII. RESOURCE-BROKERING and COLLABORATION AMONG PROFESSIONALS

The social worker is also experienced in 'resource brokering' and as related by Lipkins (1999): "As a therapist, the social worker may practice independently or in conjunction with other professionals (such as psychiatrists and psychologists) to treat more serious mental health issues inhibiting the management of diabetes. In this role a social work practitioner may screen and treat illnesses with high rates of comorbidity among diabetes patients, such as major depression or eating and anxiety disorders. The social worker also may ensure the management of preexisting chronic mental illnesses like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and alcohol or substance abuse." (Lipkin, 1999) the social worker also has the capacity to: "...coordinate a comprehensive assessment, treatment plan, and intervention, striving for an optimal level of collaboration among professionals, patients, and families. Financially, social work case management can effectively and efficiently use community resources, creating an optimal environment that promotes glycemic control to delay complications and reduce hospitalizations."
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Team Communication

Words: 2456 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74915879

Team Communication

An interdisciplinary team is formed from a group of health care providers belonging to different fields of health sciences; they work together as a team to bring the best possible outcome for patient. The efficiency of this team is achieved by following three basic steps that include communication, coordination and sharing of responsibilities. In order to provide quality care in primary health care system, the hospitals need to get closely integrated with the whole health service system (Ilyas, 2006).

Who makes up the membership of the interdisciplinary team in this agency?

Members of the interdisciplinary team vary according to the age and the degree of disability of an individual. Main aim of such team is to provide support to the patient in the best possible manner. The interdisciplinary team members of Hospitals at Ontario, includes Physicians, Nurses, Midwife, Dietitian, Pharmacist, Psychologist, Podiatrist, Physiotherapist, Chiropractor and Occupational Therapist. In…… [Read More]

References

Grech, H. (2012, October 28).Communication Skills in Health Professionals. Map-n.net. Retrieved on January 10, 2013 from  http://map-n.net/pastevents/violence%20and%20aggression/Prof.%20Helen%20Grech%20-%20Communication%20Skills%20in%20Health%20Care%20Professionals.pdf 

Ilyas, M .(2006).Public health and Community Medicine. Karachi:Time Publisher.

Ontario (2005, July 5). Guide to Interdisciplinary Team Role and Responsibilities.Health.gov.on.ca. Retrieved on January 10, 2013, from  http://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/pro/programs/fht/docs/fht_inter_team.pdf 

Salgado, C.D., Farr, B.M., Hall, K.K. And Hayden, F.G. (2002, March).Influenza in Acute Hospital setting. Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 2(3),145-55
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Genitourinary Disorders Healthcare Plan and Management

Words: 2366 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41801097

Healthcare Plan for the Management of Genitourinary Disorders

Objective of this paper is to carry out a care plan for the patient, aged 60 years, who is suffering from genitourinary disorder. The study carries out the case evaluation and identifies the symptoms of the patient complication. The study also provides a comprehensive healthcare plan used for the treatment of the patients.

Case Study Evaluation

HPI (History of Present Illness).

Evaluation of the case study reveals that the patient is a Hispanic male, aged 60 years of age and complains of a decline of urinary flow. While the patient has experienced the symptom for more than two years, however, the symptom has increased significantly for the past two weeks. Although, the patient has not been diagnosed in the past, however, he faces difficulties in achieving a free flow of urine that interferes in his daily activities. The gradual worsening of the…… [Read More]

Reference

Benedetti, F. (2008). Placebo Effects: Understanding the Mechanisms in Health and Disease. Oxford Scholarship Online.

Bluie, T. Campbell, D.B. Fuchs, G.J. et al. (2010). Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders in Individuals With ASDs: A Consensus Report. Pediatrics. 125( 1): S1-S18;

Finnegan-John, J. & Thomas, V.J. (2013). The Psychosocial Experience of Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease and Its Impact on Quality of Life: Findings from a Needs Assessment to Shape a Service. Journal of Renal Care. 40(1): 74-81.

Jaarsma. T. (2005). Inter-professional team approach to Patients with Heart Failure. Heart. 91(6): 832-838.