Rime Of The Ancient Mariner Essays (Examples)

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Coleridge's Rime of the Ancient

Words: 992 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14098775

Also, after realizing that the killing of the albatross was crime, the Mariner is forced to roam the seas "upon the rotting deck" of the ship where the "dead men lay" (Part IV, lines 19-20). This description is very symbolic, for it means that the Mariner and his crew mates are all doomed to roam the seas as dead men because of the Mariner's killing of the albatross.

Although Coleridge's "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" is superbly written, there are parts that could use some development. Some would say that any attempt to change or alter this poem goes against all the principles of literary license, yet it is clear that Coleridge left plenty of room for perhaps additional characters and situations. For example, as previously mentioned, in Part IV, Coleridge mentions "a saint" which could be developed into St. Elmo, best known for his "St. Elmo's fire" which sometimes…… [Read More]

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Eye Opening Experience the Rime

Words: 1842 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50528583

Apart from taking an authoritative role in the Symposium, many people consider her to be behind the doubts of her existence. She passes her wisdom to Socrates who in turn passes it to his many friends. She distinguishes the difference that existed between good and beautiful in the context of love. She emphasizes the significance of the object of love even in beauty and birth.

Duchess of Malfi by John Webster

The story presents a penetration of the surface of the anarchy of life that does not guarantee a divine moral pattern. Instead, the outcome is a cycle of terror. The Duchess are yet to conquer the horror to realize spiritual victory. My first encounters with the book Duchess of Malfi was through the course CL/EN2051: English Literature Before 1800. The Duchess of Malfi takes place during the 16th Century at the Duchess' palace in Italy. Ferdinand and the Cardinal…… [Read More]

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Beowulf as a Hero Lesson

Words: 8817 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81934961

Your answer should be at least five sentences long.

The Legend of Arthur

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 9 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7A: Honor and Loyalty

1. Consider how Arthur's actions and personality agree with or challenge your definition of honor. Write a few sentences comparing your definition (from Journal 1.6A) with Arthur's actions and personality.

2. Write a brief paragraph explaining the importance or unimportance of loyalty in being honorable.

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 10 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7B: Combining Sentences

Complete the Practice Activity on page 202 of your text. After completing this activity, read over your Essay Assessment or another journal activity you've completed.

* Identify three passages that could be improved by combining two or more sentences with coordinating or subordinating conjunctions. Below the practice activity in your journal, write the original passages and the revised sentences you've created.

* Be sure to…… [Read More]

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Role and Importance of the

Words: 5946 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47971090



Most individuals fail to appreciate life to the fullest because they concentrate on being remembered as some of the greatest humans who ever lives. This makes it difficult for them to enjoy the simple pleasures in life, considering that they waste most of their time trying to put across ideas that are appealing to the masses. While many did not manage to produce ideas that survived more than them, others succeeded and actually produced thinking that remained in society for a long period of time consequent to their death.

Creativity is generally regarded as one of the most important concepts in society, considering that it generally induces intense feelings in individuals. It is responsible for progress and for the fact that humanity managed to produce a series of ideas that dominated society's thinking through time. In order for someone to create a concept that will live longer than him or…… [Read More]

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Travelogues of the Natural World

Words: 764 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43329183

First of all, this action estranges him from the water and from nature, as he will no longer be a wanderer upon the water as a professional sailor, but become the wanderer seen at the beginning of the tale. It also ostracizes him from humanity, as his fellow sailors reject him and eventually die because of his action. Humanity's need to respect the often irrational laws of the natural world, such as not shooting the albatross, are highlighted by these actions, and thus the Romantic need of man to dwell respectfully in nature is also highlighted.

The mariner initially disdains myth and superstition -- to his peril. Thus, the medieval stress upon faith critical to the evolving Romantic Movement comes to the forefront of the poem's theme. However, as he is condemned to a life in death, as highlighted in the poem, and his fellow sailors are animated and begin…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor. "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner." Available online last updated July 1994 in E-text form #151. http://www.eriding.net/amoore/poetry/rime10.txt
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Romantic Poets and Poetry

Words: 1475 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32753446

SYMBOLIC THEMES OF MYSTERY AND THE SUPERNATURAL IN SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDE'S

RIME OF THE ANCIENT MARINER

In Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "Rime of the Ancient Mariner," considered by many scholars as the quintessential masterpiece of English Romantic poetry, the symbolic themes of mystery and the supernatural play a very crucial role in the poem's overall effect which John Hill Spencer sees as Coleridge's "attempt to understand the mystery surrounding the human soul in a universe moved by forces and powers... immanent and transcendent" (157). Yet the Mariner himself appears to be trapped in this supernatural world as a result of ghostly manifestations which emanate from the realms of the unknown.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" was first published in Lyrical Ballads in 1798, a collection of poetry written and published jointly by Coleridge and his good friend William Wordsworth. Yet the text of the poem generally in use today appeared…… [Read More]

Great Britain: Cambridge University Press, 1927.

Nooden, Lars. Animal Symbolism in Celtic Mythology. Internet. November 22, 1992. Accessed February 27, 2003. www-personal.umich.edu.

Spencer, John Hill. A Coleridge Companion. London: Macmillan, 1983
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Coleridge & 18 Thcent Tradition Samuel

Words: 1523 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25263539

His belief that literature is a magical blend of thought and emotion is at the very heart of his greatest works, in which the unreal is often made to seem real.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge effectively freed British (and other) poetry from its 18th century Neo-classical constraints, allowing the poetic (and receptive) imagination to roam free.

orks Cited

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor. Kublai Khan. In The Portable Coleridge, I.A. Richards

Ed.). New York: Penguin, 1987. 157-158.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. In The Portable Coleridge, I.A. Richards

Ed.). New York: Penguin, 1987. 80-105.

Moore, Christopher. "Introduction." Samuel Taylor Coleridge. New York:

Grammercy, 1996. 10.

Nokes, David. Raillery and Rage: A Study of Eighteenth Century Satire. New York: St. Martin's, 1987. 99.

Pope, Alexander, The Rape of the Lock. Representative Poetry Online. Retrieved September 22, 2005, from: http://66.102.7.104/search?q=cache:0gO7fceq2_

AJ:eir.library.utoronto.ca/rpo/display/poem1644.html+text+of+Pope%27s+The+Rape+of+the+Lock&hl=en&lr=&strip=1.html>.

Romanticism." ikipedia. 3 Apr. 2005. Retrieved September 22, 2005, at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanticism.

Samuel Taylor…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor. Kublai Khan. In The Portable Coleridge, I.A. Richards

Ed.). New York: Penguin, 1987. 157-158.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. In The Portable Coleridge, I.A. Richards

Ed.). New York: Penguin, 1987. 80-105.
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Veidemanis a High-School English Teacher

Words: 650 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12014392

Second, it provides an excellent introduction "to a unit on the Romantic Era in English literature" with its spirit in line with Coleridge, Wordsworth, Lord yron and Percy Shelley. Third, the novel is truly "the work of a gifted woman writer who merits study and recognition" (62). One aspect of Shelley's life which is quite extraordinary is that she heard Samuel Taylor Coleridge recite the "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" which clearly influenced Shelley's use of the supernatural in her novel.

Fourth, Veidemanis maintains that the novel's central theme, being "scientific aims pursued in reckless disregard of human consequences," has much significance in today's modern scientific age related to biological and genetic engineering and raises the question "Should limits be placed on scientific endeavor?" A reference to Victor Frankenstein and his "reckless disregard" for the possible consequences of his experiments with the dead and the creation of a human monster.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Veidemanis, Gladys V. "Frankenstein in the Classroom." The English Journal. Vol. 75 no. 7 (November 1986): pp. 61-66. {Available at JSTOR online}.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge the Cliched Image of

Words: 4280 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12835525

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The cliched image of the Romantic poet is of a solitary tortured genius; it is ironic that the work of the poets collectively regarded as the 'Romantic School' is marked by collective and co-operative effort as much as by individual creativity. For none of the great figures of Romantic poetry is this so true as it is for Samuel Taylor Coleridge. The first-rate poetic output of this extraordinary, multi-faceted man lasted only a few years, from approximately 1797 to 1802, and he has even been regarded by some historians and critics as 'merely a channel for the work and ideas of others' (Jasper, 8) rather than as a creative figure in his own right. It is as if his own creative character has become lost in the extraordinary wide-ranging and complex interplay of relationships between poets, thinkers, writers and critics which swirled around him. It is also…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor. Biographia Literaria. Ed. J. Shawcross. London: Oxford University Press, 2 vols., 1954.

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, The Complete Poetical Works. London: Oxford University Press, 1912.

Hill, John Spencer. A Coleridge Companion. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1983.

Holmes, Richard. Coleridge: Early Visions. London: Penguin, 1989.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge During Samuel

Words: 1277 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20006808

" However, refutes Ernest Coleridge, whatever may be said about Coleridge for or against, as an "inventor of harmonies," his self-criticism was the most stern of all. He continually wrote and rewrote his work in order "discover and reveal the hidden springs, the thoughts and passions of the artificer."

One would be wrong to believe that it was only his family that thought his work excellent. Many later critics have been just as positive about his writings. Suther (5) said, for example, that Coleridge's greatness was due to his "dogged refusal to pretend that the problems and paradoxes of human life are any less vast, ineffable, and terrifying than his intuition revealed to him they were." In his efforts to come to terms with life using words such as "tragedy," "sin," "guilt," "redemption," "grace," "eason," "inspiration," and "God," to describe phenomena he was helping others deal with the paradoxes that…… [Read More]

References

Coleridge, E.H. (1912). The Poems of Samuel Taylor Coleridge. London: Henry Frowde.

Jackson, J.R. (1995). Samuel Taylor Coleridge: The Critical Heritage. Volume: 1

London: Routledge.

Suther, M. (1960) the Dark Night of Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Contributors: Marshall New York: Columbia University Press.
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English Romanticism in the 1790s

Words: 3717 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45643615

"O Sylvan ye! thou wanderer thro' the woods, / How often has my spirit turned to thee!" (http://www.uoregon.edu/~rbear/ballads.html) Now, the poet wishes to "transfer" the healing powers of nature that he himself has experienced to his sister. By stating."..Nature never did betray / the heart that loved her" (http://www.uoregon.edu/~rbear/ballads.html) ordsworth assures his sister that she will also find peace in the middle of nature if she believes in the communion with nature. This prediction is an artifice of the poem and is not simple. "ordsworth's ability to look to the future to predict memories of events that are happening in the present is ingenious and complicated. But ordsworth beautifully clarifies this concept by using nature as the ideal link between recollection, foresight, and his relationship with another."(Eilenberg, Susan. Strange power of Speech: ordsworth, Coleridge, and Literary Possession. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992).

Moreover, by imagining the future of his…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. Ed. Beth Newman. Boston: St. Martin's, 1996.

Baudelaire, Charles. Selected Writings on Art and Literature. London:

Penguin, 1992.

Spector, Jack the State of Psychoanalytic Research in Art History. The Art
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Elaborative Rehearsal Journal 3 Elaborative

Words: 379 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89202616



The English literature course was one that I thought would be difficult. I had spent most of my schooling learning to memorize things, and the books and poems I studied in that class were too complex to memorize. Elaborative rehearsal allowed me to understand by relating characters to people I know; by relating the messages in the stories to popular phrases or axioms; and through other similar means. I found that these simple, easy-to-remember things, when accessed, then allowed me to recall all of the rest of the information I had stored about each work. I found I could remember an entire novel simply by remembering a nickname I could give a single character. Hockenbury and Hockenbury claim that elaborative rehearsal is more powerful for storing complex ideas into long-term memory. I did well on that exam, and continued to use those techniques for other exams, each of which I…… [Read More]

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Victor Frankenstein - Thematic Explorer

Words: 922 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87769835

With this confession, Victor is telling Walton that he is a broken man because of his inner desires to explore the unknown and by pretending that like God he has control over his own destiny and that of the creature he created. Thematically, Victor is relating that the pursuit of knowledge can often be a very dangerous affair.

At the point when the creature begins to show some movement upon the laboratory table, Victor realizes that he has made an abomination to nature. Later on, he relates a portion of what he calls his "wildest dreams": "I thought I saw Elizabeth, in the bloom of health... I embraced her, but as I imprinted the first kiss on her lips, they became livid with the hue of death... her features appeared to change, and I thought I held the corpse of my dead mother in my arms; a shroud enveloped her…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Shelley, Mary W. Frankenstein. New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1993.
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British Poetry

Words: 1309 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22043678



"The Sleeping Beauty" by Lord Alfred Tennyson uses several narrative techniques. The first of which can be seen in the second line of the first stanza. "She lying on her couch alone" (). The phrase uses incorrect English to change the tone of the poem. Although the poem does not try to establish a rhyming pattern in the BC in the first stanza with "grown" and "form," the two words sound well together as though they rhyme. The pattern however is ABABCDCD with BC sounding like they should rhyme. All the "slumberous light" uses personification to describe light.

Many of the lines within the first stanza are filled with imagery of this woman: "A braid of pearl" and "rounded curl." She is so beautiful and magnificent that even the smallest things she does are explained or described on a grand scale. She is the epitome of beauty and wears the…… [Read More]

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Metaphysical Poetry Journal Exercise 3 1A

Words: 3452 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67044569

The Lord will lead one to safety always. One can simply believe in something higher to get the meaning of this; it doesn't have to be Jesus. Psalm 127, contrarily is confusing because it states that unless the Lord builds the house, it is built in vain. This seems to be more literal, but I do get the idea. Unless the people building the house are doing it with the love of the Lord in their hearts, or building it for him, then what is the point?

Didactic poetry can be quite comforting as seen in Psalm 23 or it can be much too literal and seen as both confusing and condescending. Psalm 127 isn't very instructive spiritually speaking, unlike Psalm 23.

Updated Proverb: A broken toe can hurt, but a broken heart can kill.

Metaphors: Obscure or Illuminate? Didactic literature with its use of metaphors can sometimes obscure the…… [Read More]

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Percy Bysshe Shelley in Representative

Words: 858 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16915562



Because I was happy upon the heath,

And smiled among the winter's snow,

They clothed me in the clothes of death,

And taught me to sing the notes of woe.

And because I am happy and dance and sing,

They think they have done me no injury,

And are gone to praise God and his priest and king, Who make up a heaven of our misery."

In these two poems, Mark Blake was allegorically relating the importance of God and religion in our lives. In The Little Black Boy, he gives an optimistic perception of God. The poem having the persona of an African child who questions his color and identity learns from his mother that God does not base his love on the color of one's skin. His mother also teaches him that the lives we have here on earth are temporary and but mere preparations of the rewards…… [Read More]

References

Percy Bysshe Shelley. (2006). Retrieved December 13, 2006, from Representative Poetry Online

http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display/displayprose.cfm?prosenum=6

Romanticism. (2006) Retrieved on December 13, 2006, from Encyclopedia Britannica online. http://www.Encyclopediabritannica.com

William Blake poems. (2006). Retrieved December 13, 2006, at http://quotations.about.com/cs/poemlyrics/a/William_Blake.htm
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Literature and Environment

Words: 1264 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26871559

ordsworth

Returning to Nature

They looked toward the wilderness, and behold, the glory of the Lord appeared in the cloud.

-Exodus 16-10

The great Romantic bard illiam ordsworth loved nature. To him, nature was a place to return to, not just in a physical sense, as in a sojourn or expedition, but in an emotional and spiritual sense. Returning to nature meant to revitalize an essential part of one's humanity through the cathartic and transformative powers of nature. To help unpack this concept, this essay will analyze two of ordsworth's poems: "Nutting" and "The orld is Too Much ith Us."

"Nutting" is a Conversation poem, in the Coleridge tradition, between the Narrator and his Maiden (Rumens). Over the course of the poem, he's tells his Maiden about a day he spent gathering nuts in the forest and how, after gathering the nuts, he felt a sense of guilt for needlessly…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cronon, William. Uncommon Ground: Rethinking the Human Place in Nature. New York: W.W. Norton &, 1996. Print.

Rumens, Carol. "The Romantic Poets: Nutting by William Wordsworth." The Guardian.

Guardian News and Media, 28 June 0026. Web. 24 Feb. 2012.

.