Roman Empire Essays (Examples)

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Roman Slavery the Slaves of

Words: 376 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67079455

This allowed the landowner to have more land worked by more people for less since it was not his responsibility to provide for these people as he would have to in order to maintain a slave, now would they have to invest in the initial purchase of such laborers as he would a slave. Once this trend started many farmers preferred not to invest into slavery because they saw it as a declining market. Naturally the slaves themselves were considered eligible for liquidation of assets, so if a farmer were to invest a large sum to purchase a slave and yet not have the potential to sell this same slave for a higher price (because of the skills and training they had received while working in their household) at a later date then this would logically be seen as a bad investment. Eventually the laws of supply and demand took…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kagan, Donald, Steven Osmet, and Frank Turner. The Western Heritage. New Jersey: Prentice

Hall, 2006.
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Roman History Turning Points of

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98755760



2. What were the military, social, and economic events that led to the Gracchan land reforms (discuss one event each of military, social, and economic)? How did the Gracchi attempt to resolve these problems (discuss three)? How effective were they?

When Tiberius Gracchus was elected tribune, the social structures that had nourished the Republic as it developed from an independent city-state were already breaking down. The consolidation of public land under the emerging latifundia system had turned roughly 7% of the population (Last, 1932a, p. 9) into indigents as displaced peasant farmers flooded Rome and other cities, only to find demand for their labor limited at best. Meanwhile, the army was starving for recruits as the traditional citizen military class proved too small to police the vast Roman frontier and quell slave revolts closer to home. Finally, relations with the Italian and even the Latin allies had become increasingly strained.…… [Read More]

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Roman History Rome v Carthage

Words: 2986 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39014777



After this, there could have been very little perceived threat left; not only were the Carthaginian's surrendering rather peacefully, but they were even giving up their means of waging war effectively. The giving up of weapons in an age when manufacture and shipping -- the two methods by which any commodity, military or otherwise, can be obtained -- took an extended period of time meant that the Carthaginians were showing themselves to desire peace not only in the short-term, but as a general social principle.

Their submission to the Romans, then, should have been the end of the war. If the reason behind Rome's military invasion of the Carthaginian territory was the possible threat the area presented to Rome, then its disarmament would have solved that problem. The Romans refused to let the issue go, however, demanding that the entire city of Carthage be destroyed right to the ground.

It…… [Read More]

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Roman World Ancient Romans Paid

Words: 616 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17078294



Ancient Romans wanted to compensate for their lack of experience in the world of medicine through their dedication to keeping healthy by promoting hygiene and physical exercise. Surprisingly, the technological progress experienced by Ancient Rome did not seem to be of any importance to its people, as they were only attracted to keeping their health through any means possible. The fact that hygiene and physical exercise were interconnected when regarding people in Ancient Rome and their desire to keep healthy can be observed by looking at the way gymnasiums were built next to public baths.

Aqueducts were yet another technological advancement in Ancient Rome, but in spite of their greatness and of the fact that they provided people with fresh water and with an ingenious method of irrigating crops, most Romans were satisfied with exploiting them, and not with analyzing how they worked. There were numerous techniques Romans used with…… [Read More]

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Roman View of Christianity

Words: 3297 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99361988

Roman view of Christianity

Early Christianity did not develop in isolation, but within a complex landscape already occupied by belief systems, social networks, systems of identity, and political institutions, and it is essential not to regard it 'as somehow independent, as if the church were an entity existing apart from Christians living in particular times and places. Such a treatment neglects how the history of Christianity was influenced and shaped by its cultural environment.'

Foremost among the factors making up that environment was the Roman Empire, itself an amalgam of peoples, creeds and societies. The relationship between Christianity and pagan Rome was a complex and evolving one. This paper will examine Roman hostility to Christianity during this period, and aspects of Roman criticism of Christian belief.

In the earliest period of the Christian church's existence within the Roman Empire, Christians were commonly referred to as troublemakers, offending against Roman order…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Henry Chadwick, Early Christian Thought and the Classical Tradition: Studies in Justin, Clement, and Origen (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984).

Robert Doran, Birth of a Worldview: Early Christianity in its Jewish and Pagan Context (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1995).

Mark J. Edwards, et al., eds., Apologetics in the Roman Empire: Pagans, Jews, and Christians (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999).

John Helgeland, 'Christians and the Roman Army A.D. 173-337', Church History, vol. 43, no. 2 (June 1974).
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Roman in the Context of

Words: 2320 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38723858

And an owner could set his slave free as a reward for that slave's noble service, transforming this piece of property into a human being with a touch of the hands and a few words.

Plautus depicts the absurdity of this legal reality with a humorous edge, but his humor has a great deal of societal bite. Plautus' most famous play, which provides the plot of "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum," is entitled "Pseudolous." The main character and incidentally the main character in Stephen Sondhiem's musical. Pseudolous means false or "trickster" and Pseudolous is indeed a mendacious individual. However, Pseudolous is also part of a mendacious Roman society, a society which denies him rewards equal with his intelligence and his cunning and rewards the falsely pious can't of the young man's father he is attempting to help.

Plautus deals with this issue even more explicitly…… [Read More]

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Roman World

Words: 724 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34743438

oman World

ome, whose beginning can be traced in 753 B.C., is the capital city of Italy. Initially, kings ruled the city; however, the last king, Tarquin the Proud, was overthrown. ome, then, became a republic for the next four hundred years. During this time, the republic was ruled by a Senate. The people to do different jobs in the senate were called Senators (Buckleitner, 58). However, not everyone was allowed to vote in these elections: women, slaves, and poor people were not allowed to vote. Those oman people who were not slaves were called 'citizens'.

In 55 B.C. The oman general Julius Caesar conquered France (At the time the country was called Gaul, and the omans called it Gallia). The Gauls fought hard against the omans and had been helped by Britain. Caesar was disappointed by their assistance and attempted to invade Britain, first in 55 B.C. And then…… [Read More]

References

Buckleitner, Warren. Ancient History: Lives and Times in Ancient Egypt, Greece, and the Roman Empire. School Library Journal, Vol. 50, No. 2, (2004): 58.

Dowling, Melissa Barden. A Time to Regender: The Transformation of Roman Time. KronoScope, Vol. 3, No. 2, (2003): 169-184.

Dyck, Ludwig Heinrich. CAESAR'S First Great Campaigns. Military History, Vol. 20 No. 6, (2004): 50-56.

Purcell, Nicholas. The Way We Used To Eat: Diet, Community, And History At Rome. American Journal of Philology, Vol. 124, No.3, (2003): 330-358.
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Roman Emperor Caracalla Was Born

Words: 2073 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49891052

The public library in the baths of Caracalla was no exception to this (DeLaine, 1997).

Inside the bathing area itself, there were several components (DeLaine, 1997). One of these was a 183X79-foot cold room located under three 108-foot high groin vaults. There was also a double pool which was tepid, and a 115-foot diameter hot room (DeLaine, 1997). There were also two separate gyms where people could box and wrestle with one another. There was also a standard swimming pool in the north end of the complex. It was a roofless structure and had mirrors made of bronze mounted over it (DeLaine, 1997). This helped to direct sunlight into the area surrounding the pool for both beauty and warmth. The whole building was on a platform that was raised up twenty feet off of the ground. This was done in order to allow for the furnaces underneath the building and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Birley, Anthony R. (1988). Septimius Severus: The African Emperor, 2nd ed. Yale: New Haven Connecticut.

Chastagnol, Andre. (1994). Historie Auguste. Robert Laffont: Paris.

DeLaine, Janet. (1997) the Baths of Caracalla. Portsmouth, Rhode Island

Meckler, Michael. (1994). Caracalla and his late-antique biographer: A historical commentary on the Vita Caracalli in the Historia Augusta. University of Michigan.
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Romans and Christianity

Words: 700 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69125689

Persecution of the Early Church (pick a specific outbreak caused by a Roman emperor, the reasons for the outbreak, and the results).

The article that was written by De Ste. Croix (1963) is talking about how Christians were persecuted after the Great Fire of Rome in July 64 AD. At the time, Nero believed that they were responsible for these events in order to challenge the Emperor Nero's leadership. He was paranoid and felt that Christians were a threat to his rule. As he believed, that they intentionally started the fire to draw attention to his incompetence and encourage others to embrace their faith. This meant abandoning state sponsored religions and engaging in acts of disobedience. While at the same time, they wanted to challenge many of the large public works projects and the polices of the government. However, De Ste. Croix thinks that Nero did not use the fire…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brakke, David. "Cannon Formation and Social Conflict." Harvard Theological Review. 87, no.4 (October 1994): 395 -- 419.

De Ste. Croix, GE. "Why were the Early Christians Persecuted?" Past and Present. 26, no.2 (November 1963): 6- 38.

Moltmann, Jurgen. "Political Theology." Theology Today. 28, no. 1 (April 1971): 6-23.
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Roman Catholicism Orthodoxy

Words: 433 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20071978

Protestant Christianity

Throughout the period after the fall of the Western Roman Empire, there was a split between the Christian Church along East-West lines. In the East, Orthodox Christianity became the dominant form while in the West, Roman Catholicism ruled. But in the 15th century the Western Christian Church suffered a series of uprisings against Roman Catholic supremacy which resulted in a split of the Western Church called the Protestant Reformation. "Religions of the World: Protestant Christianity," narrated by Sir Ben Kingsley, explains the causes and results of the Protestant Reformation.

Beginning with Martin Luther, there was a series of protests over what many called abuses of the Catholic Church, leading to groups refusing to accept the authority of the Pope and the establishment of new Protestant Churches. The two main issues were the Protestant belief in the supremacy of scripture and the belief that salvation did not have to…… [Read More]

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Ancient Roman Religion

Words: 3936 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33196915

Roman Religion

Although the ancient Roman religion might seem a far cry from today';s contemporary context, in reality Roman religion continues to inform and shape Western culture to this day (the celebration of Christmas being one example). While there are a number of literary sources which provide contemporary scholars with information about Roman religions, both in terms of belief and practice, this religions information is encoded into the landscape and physical space of Rome itself, from the layout of its forums to the sculptures which adorn its altars. y examining three such sources in detail, the Ara Pacis, the Forum of Augustus, and the grove of the Arval rothers, one will be able to understand how Roman religion permeated Roman social and political identity and organizations, and furthermore, how these concurrent strains of identity-formation and power relations etched themselves into the very physical objects left behind to be discovered and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ando, Clifford. The Matter of the Gods: Religion and the Roman Empire. Berkeley: University

of California Press, 2008.

Beard, Mary, John North, and Simon Price. Religions of Rome, Volume 1: A History. Cambridge:

Cambridge University Press, 1998.
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Roman Emperor Citizens One Year

Words: 730 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68604367

The rule of law is essential to commerce, and commerce is essential to wealth. To longer shall local chieftains and would-be kings rule over the Empire - they are all subject to me, no different from anybody else.

A call upon the soldiers. Military might is the key to our success, in establishing rule of law and expanding our borders. Your support is required for this endeavor and for it you will be rewarded handsomely. I call upon the administrators. You are the ones who will do my work, and ensure that our country is filled with peace and prosperity. I call upon the merchants and the traders. My reforms will give you the opportunity to become wealthy beyond belief. Support me, go forth and trade. Bring us the goods of the orient.

My subjects, all I ask of you is for your help. I need your support. Be peaceful,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dhammika, Ven. S. (1994). The Edicts of King Ashoka. Colorado State University.

Retrieved November 2, 2008 at  http://www.cs.colostate.edu/~malaiya/ashoka.html 

No author. (2008). Qin Dynasty. TravelGuideChina.com. Retrieved November 2, 2008 at http://www.travelchinaguide.com/intro/history/qin
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Roman Culture

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74625553

Roman Culture

Spartacus

The 1960 film Spartacus claims to tell the story of the famous slave revolt, also known as the Gladiator War, which terrorized Rome for years and can be pinpointed as one of the most influential causes of the eventual destruction of the Roman Republic and its descent into imperialism and tyranny. One must say "claims to be," rather than "is," in this case because the film is wildly inaccurate historically. The creators of this work were, of course, aware of its lack of historical authenticity, which is partly attributed to the artistic necessity of condensing four years of political upheaval and constant warfare into less than four hours. Indeed, condensation of time is the biggest historical inaccuracy here -- for example, many main Roman characters are rather indiscriminately condensed in time, such as Gracchus who appears to be a combination of two Gracchus brothers active fifty years…… [Read More]

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Roman Theatre History Theatre Has

Words: 1668 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 776966

Their plays were similar to the Greeks and many of them were just translated versions. Theatre was an instrument used by the administration to keep the public from devoting much time to the political affairs. Thus any mentioning on stage regarding the political situation or activities would have serious consequences for the author for writing it and the actor for agreeing to perform it. In addition it also served as a purpose to get away from everyday life and worries. It was a part of their life and civilization. As time passed by the theatre evolved but women were not allowed to take part in it for a very long time. With the establishment of churches and the influence of popes, women faced yet another problem in getting accepted as being part of the society. oman theatre was a major influence on the later European theatre and they learnt much…… [Read More]

References

1) Giulia De Dominicis - Article Title: The Roman Theatres in the Age of Pius VI. Journal Title: Theatre History Studies. Publication Year: 2001. Page Number: 81.

2) Live Hov - Article Title: The 'Women' of the Roman Stage: As Goethe Saw Them. Journal Title: Theatre History Studies. Publication Year: 2001. Page Number: 61.

3) Garret Fagan - Article Title R.C. Beacham. Power into Pageantry: Spectacle Entertainments of Early Imperial Rome. Journal Title: Comparative Drama. Volume: 35. Issue: 3. Publication Year: 2001. Page Number: 465+.

4) The Columbia Encyclopedia - Encyclopedia Article Title: Drama, Western. Encyclopedia Title: The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. Publisher: Columbia University Press. Place of Publication: New York. Publication Year: 2004.
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Persecution of Early Christians Under the Roman

Words: 6839 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3738537

persecution of early Christians under the oman Empire is a matter of great interest and intrigue to many, even today; as is the matter of distinction and distrust between early Jews and Christians. Furthermore, the ironically similar behavior of orthodox Christians towards heretics rouses the curiosity of many scholars. This paper will discuss the effect of Christianity on omans and their perceptions towards Christians, Christian perceptions and treatment of Jews. The relationship between orthodox Christians and heretics will also be discussed.

ome before Christianity

The empire of ome, at the time of Christ's birth, was one of the two greatest kingdoms and was steadily continuing to flourish and expand, even then. Soon, it covered most of what we now know as Western Europe. The conquered land began from Spain in the west and ended in Syria in the east, while the great countries of England, France and Greece, and the…… [Read More]

References

Badnewsaboutchristianity.com (n.d.). Christian Persecution of Heretics - Bad News About Christianity. [online] Retrieved from:  http://www.badnewsaboutchristianity.com/gbc_heretics.htm#_edn4  [Accessed: 10 Dec 2012].

Bainton, R.H. (1960). Early Christianity. Princeton, N.J: Van Nostrand.

Fitzgerald, T. (1998). The Orthodox Church. Westport, CT: Praeger Publisher.

Hackl, . (2012). Israel Considers Drafting Its Arab Citizens . Christian Science Monitor, August 1.
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Christianity the Roman Way Rome Exerted Tremendous

Words: 2900 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72036816

Christianity

THE ROMAN WAY

Rome exerted tremendous pressure on its colonies to conform, and do things in the Roman Way. When in Rome, one does as the Romans do. The Via Romana is a road referring to the Roman way. Rome conquered Alexander's vast empire and then imposed the Imperium (the imperial right to rule) upon the world. Religio-Romana refers to the Roman religion of paganism and polytheism. Roman religion. Romans are to practice Rome's religion without changing it. The Roman practices will be executed as they have always been since the beginning of Roman civilizations. This includes worshipping the Roman emperor as god. The political connection between Rome's religion and the people impose the belief and practice: Roman religion is the truth. Mos Maiorum refers to the living traditions. People are to live their lives according to Roman traditions. This is the daily life of Romans extant in the…… [Read More]

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Art Roman Islamic and Early

Words: 2205 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14381201



The artworks prevalent during the early Middle Ages in many ways stand between these two extremes. The art of this period was one that was both religiously inclined but also celebrated the human form and human nature that was to become so prominent in the enaissance. In many ways much of early Medieval art was similar to the abstract and decorative art that we find in Islamic examples. An example that has been chosen to represent this early period of European art is the Gerona Bible Master from Bologna, Italy,

Figure 3.

(Source: http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/m/middleages.html)

This decorative example displays intricate artwork that emphasizes and enhances the Biblical context. The text or lyrics on the page refers to hymnal and religious phrases of praise, such as "Let us rejoice" (Art: Middle Ages). Note the way that the decorative images add depth to the aesthetics of the script and the manuscript as a…… [Read More]

References

Art and architecture of the Early Middle Ages. Retrieved from  http://www.artandpopularculture.com/Middle_Ages 

Art: Middle Ages. Retrieved from  http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/m/middleages.html 

Middle Ages. Retrieved from  http://www.answers.com/topic/middle-ages 

Roman art. Retrieved from  http://www.artchive.com/artchive/R/roman.html  Siddiqui E.
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Mediterranean Empires the World Has

Words: 643 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69990850



Around the year of 1200 B.C. all off the three important Mediterranean civilizations had stopped from their remarkable advance and collapsed with no actual information regarding to the reason for their ending. Archeological findings show that all three nations had been preparing for war during the period and that an enemy that is unknown to this day had defeated all Mediterranean empires.

Consequent to the collapse of some of the greatest empires in the world, the Greek empire had been surfacing as a nation of great potential and wisdom which gave birth to several of the world's philosophers.

The Roman Empire had appeared differently from the previous empires that surrounded the Mediterranean Sea. Rome had not began their society independently, but it had managed to defeat their superiors, the Etruscans, after more than two centuries in which the Etruscans ruled over Rome and other communities from within the Latin League.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Sinopoli, Carla. "The Archeology of Empires." 159-180.

Smiley, Francis. "The Rise of Mediterranean Empires in the First Millennium B.C." 1-9.
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Wealthy Roman a Villa a Retreat Stresses

Words: 1748 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97155

wealthy Roman, a villa a retreat stresses public life? I asked role villa life a wealthy Roman a definite conclusion. as a villa a retreat, a number roles. I appeal evidence drawn Roman literature, Horace Pliny, Younger.

The Roman Villa

Romans considered villas to be more than just locations where they could live on a daily basis, as these buildings served a series of other purposes. City life imposed a great deal of stress on the wealthy and intellectual members of the Roman community and thus they needed a place where they could escape colloquial duties. City streets were dirty, unwelcoming, and filmed with violence, as they practically contrasted villas and their surrounding environments. In order for a villa to satisfy its inhabitant to its maximum potential, it had to be in accordance with his personal desires, both inside and outside. Also, the scenery where the villa was located needed…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Melmoth, William, "Elegant epistles, or, a copious collection of familiar and amusing letters: selected for the improvement of young persons, and for general entertainment, from Cicero, Pliny ... And many others," Printed for Charles Dilly, 1790, New York Public Library.

Rykwert, Joseph and Schezen, Roberto From Ancient to Modern, New York: Abrams Books, 2000

"Sketches of the domestic manners and institutions of the romans," Printed for Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy, 1821, Complutense University, Madrid.
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Ancient Roman Civilization and the Gladiator Games

Words: 2517 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65998199

Introduction

In ancient Rome, the gladiator games were a popular form of entertainment—but they were also much more than this and served multiple purposes within the Roman civilization. The games were used both by Roman authorities and by the slaves of Rome (the gladiators) as a tool, wielded for a different aim respectively. The Roman religious and the politicians used the games as well for their own ends. While the combats that took place in the arenas dazzled audiences, the violence and spectacle was really but one aspect of the contests, and an examination of the underlying social, political, religious and economic subtexts of the gladiator games reveals much about the nature of ancient Roman society. This paper will identify the four main purposes of the gladiatorial games in ancient Rome—the expression of political influence, the expression of religion, a means of emphasizing the Empire’s power, and grounds for slaves…… [Read More]

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Hapsburg Empire in the Half Century Before

Words: 1956 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19521802

Hapsburg Empire in the Half entury before World War I

At the outbreak of World War I, The Hapsburg Empire was one of the last vestiges of Holy Roman Empire to be found in Europe. The eventual defeat of the Austrian Haspburgs culminated a demise that began in the half century before the war started.

The reason for the longevity of the Hapsburg Empire rested in its ability to form advantageous political alliances whether they be through marriage- Maria Theresa and Joseph II, religion- acceptance of Protestants ending discrimination against Jews or militaristic- alliance w / Germany, in nature. During the half century before the World War, The Haspburgs created some allegiances that would prove to be faulty.

During the rimean War (1853-1856) the Haspburgs flirted with siding with the France and England against Russia if Russia did not leave Romania. Russia withdrew but not without hard feelings towards the…… [Read More]

Conflicting National Interests

 http://www.hyperhistory.com/online_n2/civil_n2/histscript6_n2/wwstart.html 

Military Casualties of W.W.I  http://www.firstworldwar.com/features/casualties.htm
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History of the Habsburg Empire 1273-1700 the Historical

Words: 916 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59441436

History of the Habsburg Empire,1273-1700

The historical work of Jean Berenger titled, "A History of the Habsburg Empire, 1273-1700," is beneficial in understanding the Habsburg Dynasty of this time period. hile there has been many works that have also been helpful when completing studies on this topic, Berenger's work is a successful addition to previously published research.

Berenger is a respected professor of history. His writings display a vast knowledge of the most recent as well as the older literature on Habsburg history. His knowledge is not limited to just the French and Austrain works, but he is also in command of the most recent English fellow. In this work, Berenger undertook an enormous task of explicitly explaining the colorful tapestry that is woven of the individual nations of the monarchy. He didn't take any stand for only one side, but equally gives information concerning all involved.

Berenger explains the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berenger, Jean. (1997). A History of the Habsburg Empire, 1700-1918. London: Longman.
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Ancient Roman History the Objective

Words: 717 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1078821

" (New Standard Encyclopedia, 1986) There were two classes of people in ancient Rome, specifically those who were the patricians, or landowners and the plebeians who were poor farmers and those who worked in the city as well as those who had gained citizenship.

III. BEST RESENTATIVE of the GOOD SIDE of ROME

The emperor Marcus Aurelius who is remembered for his excellent form of a working government is stated to have passed away during the year of 180 a.D. during a war with the tribes of the Danube River, who were viscous tribes. The government was broke and the countrymen of Rome were sick from the plagues that had been infecting the land. The son of Marcus Aurelius, Commodus was spoiled and loved pleasure. Under the rule of Commodus, the government was poorly run and the result is that Rome is stated to have fallen into decay.

IV. RULE…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Charlemagne (2006) Lucid Cafe Website. Online available at  http://www.lucidcafe.com/library/96apr/charlemagne.html .

Rome (1986) New Standard Encyclopedia. Standard Educational Corporation Chicago, Illinois.

Durrant, Will (nd) a Story of Civilization. Online available at http://www.chronique.com/Library/MedHistory/charlemagne.htm

Ancient Roman History
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Byzantine Empire Cultural and Construction

Words: 3480 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15522864



One of the most brilliant contributions of the Byzantium is its contribution to modern music and the development of what the world has come to appreciate as the foundations of classical music. The Byzantine "medieval" (Lang, 1997), in fact, the Byzantium influence is considered to be critical to the development of the Greek music and the relative genius behind Greek music (Lang, 1997)

The quoted sovereign melody (Lang, 1997) is the oft punctuated contribution to the sovereign nature of today's music throughout the world. The Byzantium facilitated the sovereign method of music ostensibly from what would be the earlier influences to the Byzantine Empire. Lang continues to point to such influence as having its origins in the Orient (Lang, 1997).

Sports were a major part of the Byzantine Empire and are representative of the development of competition within the Roman Empire and subsequently to the importance of sporting events within…… [Read More]

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The Roman Colosseum an Engineering Masterpiece

Words: 3695 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28772408

Engineering the oman Colosseum

While the Colosseum stands, ome shall stand; when the Colosseum falls, ome shall fall; when ome falls, the world shall fall. -- The Venerable Bede quoting an Ancient Anglo-Saxon Peasant Prophecy

Perhaps the most enduring symbol of the greatness of the oman Empire can be seen today in the ruins of the Colosseum. This massive amphitheatre is situated in the middle of modern ome near the oman Forum and has become an iconic representation of the oman Empire at its zenith. Although estimates vary, analysts believe that at least 50,000 and perhaps as many as 80,000 spectators were accommodated in its capacious dimensions and the Colosseum has become the benchmark by which all subsequent stadia have been judged. Flush with the treasures and riches of Jerusalem, the builders of the Colosseum spared no expense in its design and construction, but despite its impressive seating capacity and…… [Read More]

References

Barbi, Gulomar, "The Colosseum," The World and I, 22(9) (2007, September), 37-40.

Burn, Robert, Roman Literature in Relation to Roman Art, London: MacMillan, 1888.

"Colosseum building materials," The Colosseum [online] available: http://www.the-colosseum.net/architecture / materials_en.htm.

"Description of the Colosseum," The Colosseum [online] available http://www.the-colosseum.net / architecture/descriptio_en.htm.
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Constantine the Great Was the First Roman

Words: 639 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11899150

Constantine the Great was the first Roman emperor to convert to Christianity and to make Christianity the official religion of Rome. This makes him one of the most important figures in estern history, and in fact, world history. Prior to Constantine's conversion, Christians were widely persecuted throughout the Roman Empire (Herbermann and Grupp). Making Christianity the official religion of Rome led to the downfall of the Roman Empire and the birth of the new Holy Roman Empire. Because of Constantine's conversion, Christianity became a dominant religious, political, and economic world power.

Constantine was born in Naissus, a city in the Moesia Superior region of the Roman Empire. Moesia Superior is modern day Serbia, and Naissus is the modern-day town of Nis. Constantine the Great's father was the Emperor Constantius. Constantine's mother Helena was a commoner but was later named as a Christian saint. Immediately after the death of his father…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gill, N.S. "Constantine the Great." About.com. Retrieved online: http://ancienthistory.about.com/cs/people/p/constantine.htm

Herbermann, Charles, and Georg Grupp. "Constantine the Great." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 4. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1908. 18 Feb. 2013

Pohlsander, Hans A. "Constantine I (306-337 A.D.)." De Imperatoribus Romanus. Retrieved online:  http://www.roman-emperors.org/conniei.htm
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What problems did the acquisition of empire generate for Rome

Words: 631 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: Array

With power comes responsibility, and with great power comes great responsibility. The acquisition of empire generated great responsibility for Rome, and as well as they entrenched the empire in history, the relatively rapid downfall of Rome signals the inability of the empire to anticipate what needed to be done to manage such a vast amount of territory with as culturally diverse a subject population. Although Rome attempted to monitor territorial acquisitions via a central governing authority, the increasing pragmatic need for decentralization of power led to several problems.

During the beginnings of the Roman empirical era, the annexation of new territorial acquisitions only meant vaster accumulations of wealth. Therefore, it seemed as if there would be no problems with Roman imperialism. Whether from natural or human resources, Rome stood to gain much and lose little from its exploits. A false sense of invincibility might have been the first real problem…… [Read More]

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Conquest of the Inca Empire

Words: 1589 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47307694

Pizarro

Francisco Pizarro: The Conqueror of the Inca Empire

The Inca Empire was a vast tract of territories that stretched up and down the western seaboard of South America. It was connected by roads through the Andes Mountains to the capital of Cuzco in Peru. Pizarro and his men made friends with natives in these territories who were tired of the civil war between the ruling brothers of the Inca Empire. ith their help and the help of the in-fighting of the Incas (as well as his own cunning and trickery) Pizzaro was able to gain control of the Emperor, capture him and execute him and his top general. In this manner Pizarro gained control of the capital of the Empire. But control of the vast fortune made his friend Almagro jealous and Almagro attempted to seize the fortune by laying siege to Cuzco after an exploration southward ended in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hemming, J. The Conquest of the Incas. NY: Harcourt Brace, 1970. Print.

Leon, P. The Discovery and Conquest of Peru. Durham: Duke University, 1998. Print.

Prescott, William H. The History of the Conquest of Peru. NY: Dover Publications,

2005. Print.
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Empires in Early Centuries

Words: 1549 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22002534

Byzantine Empire in the Eastern Mediterranean that extended from Syria, Egypt up to and across North Africa is seen to have made significant contact with the emerging Islamic world in the period from seventh and ninth Centuries. The seventh century saw the vast territories in these regions being ruled by the Byzantine Empire from Constantinople, the now Istanbul. These Southern provinces or territories were greatly influenced by the Greco-oman traditions and formed the home of Coptic, Orthodox and Syriac Christians and Jewish communities. These regions were critical to the wealth and the power of the empire. Great centers for pilgrimage saw large numbers of faithful visit the place coming from as far off as Yemen towards the East and Scandinavia towards the West. There were also major trade routes that extended all the way to India in the South that saw ferrying of silk and ivories into the region, commerce…… [Read More]

References

Cunningham & Reich, (n.d.: Pp 162). Byzantium.

Rosenberg K., (2012). Ornate Links Tethering Cultures in Flux. Retrieved June 6, 2014 from http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/16/arts/design/byzantium-and-islam-age-of-transition-at-the-met.html?_r=1&

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, (2012). Byzantium and Islam Age of Transition. Retrieved June 6, 2014 from  http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2012/byzantium-and-islam
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Carthage Empire the Origin of the Carthaginian

Words: 1224 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23588394

Carthage Empire

The origin of the Carthaginian Empire can be traced back to 814 C, North Africa where Carthage was situated towards the east of Lake Tunis where we can locate Tunisia today. Carthage was basically founded by Phoenician settlers which came from Tyre city which is now known as Sur in Lebanon. Queen Dido was credited with being the founder of this city and since the establishment of this empire; there are numerous myths that can be traced back to the association with Romans and Greeks, essentially their literature (owman).

Success of the Carthage Empire

The Carthage city was famous for trade and that proved to be the means of their survival and helped the Carthaginians gain massive amounts of power and spreading the trade routes and networking all along the Mediterranean. In the early 6th century C, Hanno, a famous Carthaginian explorer went on his trip sailing till…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bagnall, Nigel. The Punic Wars: Rome, Carthage, and the struggle for the mediterranean. Hutchinson Publishers, 2005.

Bowman, David. The Carthaginian Empire. Bluewood Publishing Limited, 2010.

Durham, David Anthony. Pride of the Carthage. Anchor Publishers, 2006.

Goldsworthy, Adrian. The Punic Wars. Cassell Publishers, 2001.
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Form Part of a Book

Words: 670 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89480479

Roman Law Concerning the Jews

Time Period: Circa early 300s AD

Location: Roman Empire, Mediterranean Era, Realm of Constantine

Constantine was Roman Emperor from 306 to 337 AD. As a reformer, he enacted a number of laws to restructure the empire and solidify power. He was the first Christian Emperor and moved his residence to Byzantium/Constantinople. His Edict of Milan degreed religious tolerance throughout the Roman Empire, but also a number of laws and rules that specifically affected Jews during the time. cholars now think that the idea of religious tolerance was primarily pointed at tolerance of Christianity by Romans.

The Jews and Rome: Constantine's Christianity resulted in his being the first Roman Empire to severely limit the rights of the Jews in the Empire. As Christianity grew in power in the Empire, more and more civil authorities tried to reduce Jewish privilege. Many scholars believe that the important significance…… [Read More]

Sources Used and Consulted:

Cohen, S. (2009). Legitimization Under Constantine. Frontline. Retrieved from:

 http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/religion/why/legitimization.html 

Hallo, W., et al. (1984). Civilization and the Jews: Source Reader. Westport, CT:

Praeger.
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The Cannonization of Early Christian Church

Words: 1000 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59008431

oman eligions

Christianity has obviously made its make on mankind. However, the early Christians, coming from different religions, cults, and worldviews before the emperor Constantine converted the empire, would have experienced this transitions at varying levels from revolutionary to marginally different. This analysis proposes that a member of the oman society such as the Vestal Virgins saw a dramatic and revolutionary change in their daily lives. However, by contrast, not all members would have perceived the transformation as dramatically. For example, a devotee of the cult of the sun might have found rituals such as Christmas entirely familiar and consistent with previously held beliefs. This analysis proposes that although the introduction of Christianity was a dramatic change for the whole of oman, the differences were not felt by all demographics equally.

Discussion

Of all the different groups that would have taken a welcoming to the conversion to Christianity in the…… [Read More]

References

Kahlos, M. (2012). Pagan-Christian Debates Over the Interpretation of Texts in Late Antiquity. The Classical World, 525-545.

Nothaft, C. (2012). The Origins of the Christmas Date: Some Recent Trends in Historical Research. Church History, 903-911.

Parker, H. (2004). Why Were the Vestals Virgins? Or the Chastity of Women and the Safety of the Roman State. American Journal of Philology, 563-601.

Pedroni, L. (2011). The Sun without Rays and the Eclipse of 272. Journal of Late Antiquity, 116-123.
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Comparison of Rome and Athens

Words: 1861 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54289158

Roman Empire and the Athenian Empire were alike in many ways. oth developed a culture based on the same mythology in order to unite their people in belief (the Romans Latinized the Greek gods and goddesses but the narratives remained largely the same). Individuals like Socrates in Athens or the early Christians in Rome were persecuted for teaching a faith that opposed the native mythology (Haaren, 2010). oth empires expanded their influence through war: the Romans conquered lands as far away as England, while the Athenians kept mainly to Greece but did repel invaders (like the Persians) and war against other city-states (as in the Peloponnesian Wars) in order to secure their own routes, borders and dominance in the region (Rome similarly destroyed Carthage multiple times so as to maintain its dominance). oth Rome and Athens were culturally and militarily suited to dominate, and this paper will describe how both…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Haaren, J. (2010). Famous Men of Greece. NY: ReadaClassic.

This classic work by Haaren is certainly a scholarly source, as Haaren was a highly respected classics professor and president of the department of pedagogy at Brooklyn Institute. His Famous Men series has been used by educators for decades to inform students about the history of the ancient civilizations. In this book, Haaren describes the lives and times of various important Grecian figures, including Pericles and Socrates. I plan on using this source to provide information on Athens and what it achieved during its height of empire as well as how it achieved it.

Homer. (2004). The Iliad. NY: Cambridge University Press.

Homer's epic poem is a classic of literature that has been respected, admired, taught and read for centuries. It provides insight into the Grecian mind as well as how the Greeks used mythology in their own lives. I plan to use this source in order to support the argument that Athens used culture to maintain its empire -- by building temples to the gods and goddesses, by celebrating art (drama), and by memorializing the heroic deeds of its ancestors.
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What Bacchus Meant to the Romans at Vesuvius

Words: 2054 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17462738

Initiation ites of the Cult of Bacchus

The wall painting of The Initiation ites of the Cult of Bacchus at the Villa of the Mysteries in Pompeii (c. 60 BC) is a work of oman art that exemplifies the oman culture in the time just before Christ -- rich, ornate, elaborate, bordering on decadence, yet with still enough refinement to see a nobility and purpose in the spiritual life. Here, in the villa of a wealthy oman's vacation home near Mt. Vesuvius (which would fatally erupt just a century later, burying under ash and avalanche the wealthy in their very lap of luxury) can be seen the Greek influence on the oman culture.

The mural depicts a number of scenes in the ite of the Cult of Bacchus across three walls within a room of the Villa, near which was a wine press, used to make wine from the local…… [Read More]

References

Dembskey, E. J. (2009). Aqua Appia. The Aqueducts of Ancient Rome. Retrieved from  http://www.romanaqueducts.info/aquasite/romappia/ >

Dionysian Mysteries. (n.d.). Hellenica. Retrieved from http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/LX/DionysianMysteries.html

Jackson, J. (n.d.). Villa of the Mysteries, Pompeii. Retrieved from http://www.art-and-

archaeology.com/timelines/rome/empire/vm/villaofthemysteries.html
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Analyzing Biblical Worldview Romans 1 8 Teaching

Words: 1456 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24197532

iblical Worldview: Romans 1-8 Teaching

My analysis of Romans chapter 1-8 will cover the following areas of interest; culture, the natural world, human relationships, and human identity. Paul was inspired to write the book of Romans by the fault line, an obvious crack in the Roman society and culture which Paul adopted in framing his letter to the Romans. My view of the world is that, the sins the Romans committed since the days of Paul have not stopped even today (Ecclesiastes 1:9). I think we can learn an important lesson from Paul's letter to the Romans in that, Rome at that time was suffering severe moral decadence and the society we have today has been ravaged by total moral decay just like Rome. In my opinion, the society generally is not likely to change and that every individual needs some kind of divine intervention and revelation and salvation to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

BibleGateway Romans 1-8"BibleGateway Romans 1-8." Biblegateway.com. Accessed April 14, 2016 from  https://www.biblegateway.com/ .

Jackson, Christopher. "Worldview essay on romans chapters 1-8."2014. Accessed April 14, 2016  https://wordofGod1968.wordpress.com/2014/09/13/worldview-essay-on-romans-chapters-1-8/ 

Piper, John. "The Mighty and Merciful Message of Romans 1-8." 2002. Accessed April 14, 2016 http://www.desiringGod.org/messages/the-mighty-and-merciful-message-of-romans-1-8

Turner, Eddie. "A Christian's worldview from Romans 1-8." 2015. Accessed April 14, 2016  http://www.palestineherald.com/community/a-christian-s-worldview-from-romans/article_1070760e-8426-11e5-994f-2b27b8170b1b.html
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Christianity and Its Place in the Greco Roman World

Words: 2445 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29257233

Narrative of an Episode From My Travels With Paul

As a traveling companion of Paul, I have seen a number of marvels and the way in which the Christian faith of the Apostle challenges the boundaries between cultures and societies. For example, in Greece, I have seen Paul mix and mingle with Jews, with those baptized by John (and then baptized in the spirit of Christ by Paul),[footnoteRef:1] with Romans, and with every other possible number and variety of inhabitant in the islands. Paul could relate to many because his mission and view were such that he saw himself connected to everyone, even the living and the dead. I mention these latter because even a tombstone of a young girl, depicting her innocence as she holds a dove, could elicit from Paul such reverence and appreciation and praise that you would think he had personally known that girl.[footnoteRef:2] In such…… [Read More]

Bibliography

The Bear Hunt. A Mosaic at Getty Villa.

"Marble Relief with a Young Girl Holding Doves." Getty. Web. 20 Apr 2016.

New Testament. BibleHub. Web. 20 Apr 2016.

Roman Mosaics Across the Empire. Getty. Web. 20 Apr 2016.
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New World Empires Aztec Empire

Words: 1744 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73663994

Aztec Empire

The Aztecs, who referred to themselves as Mexica, were a powerful tribe of people speaking the Nahuatl language. They founded one of the biggest empires in Central America which is believed to have lasted from the 1300s to the 1500s. One of the most renowned cities of the Aztec empire was Tenochtitlan; this city was located in the middle of a lake where the present-day capital of Mexico, Mexico City, now stands (Johnson, 2015).

The Aztec empire was begun in the Valley of Mexico. When the Aztecs came upon the valley, they found that other tribes were already there. These tribes had occupied the best land for agriculture in the region. The Aztecs moved on to the swampy and less attractive lands on the shores of Lake Texcoco. Despite not having much to begin with, the Aztec were not bothered. The Aztecs were not only a very ingenious…… [Read More]

References

ATWOOD, R. (2014). Under Mexico City. Archaeology, 67(4), 26.

Berdan, F.F. (1988). "Principals of Regional and Long-Distance Trade in the Aztec Empire," in J. Kathryn Josserand and Karen Dakin (Editors), Smoke and Mist: Mesoamerican Studies in Memory of Thelma D. Sullivan, part ii, pp. 639-656, British Archaeological Reports, International Series vol. 42, British Archaeological Reports, Oxford.

Deal, T.E. And Kennedy, A.A. (1982). Corporate Cultures: The Rites and Rituals of Corporate Life, Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company.

Duran, D. (1967). Historia de Las lndias de Nueva Espana, 2 vols (ed A.M. Garibay K.). Mexico City: Pornia.
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The Russian Empire Through the Eyes of the West

Words: 2091 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36898135

Fellowship Proposal: ussian Studies, Sovietology, and Orientalism

The motivation for this proposal is based on personal interest in the former ussian Empire. The proposed dissertation that will result from this research will consist of an introduction that will discuss the importance of this study, followed by three main chapters, and a conclusion that provides a summary of the research and important findings concerning the issues of interest. Each of the chapters will cover a specific historical period characterized by a different set of American views, studies, and assumptions about Central Asia prior to the end of the Cold War period. Ending the proposed dissertation with the early Cold War era is also apt because it was a pivotal moment in the formal establishment of Central Asian Studies, albeit as a sub-discipline within ussian and Soviet studies.

Prior to the collapse of the Soviet Union, Central Asia was comprised of five…… [Read More]

References

Baldwin, Kate A., Beyond the Color Line and the Iron Curtain: Reading Encounters between Black and Red, 1922-1963. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2002.

Bookwalter, John, Siberia and Central Asia. New York: Frederick A. Stokes Co., 1899.

Carew, Joy Gleason, Blacks, Reds, and Russians Sojourners in Search of the Soviet Promise. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 2008.

Davis, Raymond and Andrew Steiger, Soviet Asia, Democracy's First Line of Defense. New York: the Dial Press, 1942.
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Karim Snoussi Christoph Korner Roman

Words: 2005 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65963980

The architects are not simply referencing a general Neoclassical style but evoking specific elements of Roman architectural style that suggested wealth and success.

The Los Angeles Stock Exchange on Spring St. (which no longer houses the stock exchange) includes the neoclassical elements of symmetry and alternating bands of vertical and horizontal elements. It also features three bas-relief panels carved into the granite over the central entrance that reflect Roman and Greek styles of decoration on public buildings. These bas-reliefs, like the carvings on the Continental Building are meant to summon up a certain kind of wealth and triumph, in this case the capitalist economy. Buildings in the Classical world would not have had to be so direct in broadcasting their function and stature. But the architects of this neoclassical building understood that a 20th-century clientele needed more explicit cues (Hickey). Classical buildings shared a common vocabulary that had been lost…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brain, David. Discipline and style. Theory and society 18: 807-868, 1989.

Carlihan, Jean Paul. The Ecole des Beaux-Arts: Modes and Manners. New York: Association

of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, 1979.

Christ, Karl. The Romans. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984.
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The Carthage and Roman Wars

Words: 920 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62052006

Second Punic War

The Punic wars, a total of three wars were violent clashes that took place between ome and Carthage and spanned across a timeline of almost a Century starting from 264 BC and ending in 146 BC with the destruction of Carthage. During this time, ome had established itself as the dominant power across the Italian Peninsula while Carthage was a powerful city state that was in Northern Africa had developed itself into a strong maritime power in the world at the time. In the context of this discussion however, the second Punic war will be the area of focus and in particular the causes of the war.

In the years leading to 237 BC, ome had taken over the control of Sardinia and Corsica. However, Carthage managed to establish another base of influence in Spain in 237 BC with the leadership of general Hamilcar Barca and after…… [Read More]

Reference

Morey W.C., (1901). Outline of Roman History: The Second Punic War (BC 218-201). Retrieved April 3, 2016 from http://www.forumromanum.org/history/morey15.html

Tufts University, (n.d). Polybius Histories: First Cause of the Second Punic War. Retrieved April 3, 2016 from http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.01.0234%3Abook%3D3%3Achapter%3D9
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Rise and Fall of the

Words: 1390 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81953602

Some of the issues that made Liu a favorite of many were the fact that he lowered taxes, he reduced the demand for labor from the state and the origin being from the peasants.

Liu appointed rich land owners as governors because of the distrust he had against merchants, he as well appointed officials that were loyal to him ensuring that he controlled all the powers within the dynasty. Liu died in 195 B.C and left a stable Han dynasty. Though there were power struggles within the dynasty after the death of Liu, they were resolved by capable leadership. The rule of Jingdi, Wendi and Wudi were predominantly peaceful, prosperous for peasants, expansion of China, art and trade thrived as well under Confucianism. The expansion saw northern Vietnam, Korean peninsula come under the Han dynasty. Trade routes to Asia were open including the famous Silk oad.

However, the wars of…… [Read More]

References

Cultural China, (2012). The Collapse of the Han Dynasty.  http://history.cultural-china.com/en/183History6001.html 

Rit Nosotro, (2010). The Decline of the Han Dynasty and the Roman Empire. http://www.hyperhistory.net/apwh/essays/comp/cw07hanromecollapse33100120.htm

Socyberty, (2009). The Fall of the Roman and Han Empires. http://socyberty.com/history/the-fall-of-the-roman-and-han-empires/
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Rise of the Papacy

Words: 1754 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99978703

Papacy

The Rise of the Papacy

The Middle Ages, so called because of their position between the ancient and the modern eras, are often termed medieval or even dark. This period of time is marked by a dearth of non-church art, and by the domination of the Roman Catholic Church over all of Europe and parts of Africa and Asia. This was a far-reaching kingdom that was financed by the kings of subject countries, and was ruled by a variety of men. This was also a time when the people bowed under the weight of the growing Catholic oppression that regarded all religions but their own as sacrilegious and the Catholic Church as sacrosanct. This paper looks at the church's rise to power during and after the demise of the Roman Empire, how that rise affected the people of Europe, and what the apex of that power looked like..

Rise…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Leuba, Jean-Louis. "Papacy, Protestantism and Ecumenism." The Ecumenical Review 46.4 (1994): 467-475.

Logan, F. Donald. A History of the Church in the Middle Ages. London: Routledge, 2002.

Moorhead, John. "Bede on the Papacy." Journal of Ecclesiastical History 60.2 (2009): 217-232.

Power, Amanda. "Franciscan Advice to the Papacy in the Middle Ages." History Compass 5.5 (2007): 1550-1575.