Schizophrenia Essays (Examples)

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Schizophrenia Psychosis and Lifespan D
Schizophrenia and Psychosis and Lifespan Development

Schizophrenia and Psychosis Matrix

Disorder

Major DSM-IV-T Categories

Classifications

Subclassifications

Schizophrenia and Psychosis

Symptoms

Positive (Type I): represent excesses or distortions from normal functioning

Delusions

Bizarre

Nonbizarre

Hallucinations

Auditory

Visual

Disorganized Speech

Loose Association

Neologisms

Clang Associations

Echolalia/Echopraxia

Word Salad

Grossly disorganized behavior

Catatonic: motoric

Waxy Flexibility

Negative (Type II): the absence of functioning

Apathy

Affective Flattening

Withdrawal

Anhedonia

Avolition

Poor Concentration

Poverty of speech

Alogia

Schizophrenia and Psychosis

Diagnostic Types

Paranoid

Delusions and Hallucinations

Disorganized

Disorganized speech

Disorganized behavior

Withdrawal

Affective flattening

Catatonic

Grossly disorganized behavior

Disorganized speech

Catatonic

Echolalia/Echopraxia

Undifferentiated

Active symptoms that do not fit other diagnostic types

esidual

No Type I symptoms but some negative symptoms

Schizoaffective Disorder

Bipolar Type

Symptoms of mood disorder and schizophrenia

Depressive Type

Brief psychotic disorder

Type I Symptoms

Last less than one month

Delusional disorder

Type I Symptoms

Delusions

Nonbizarre

Shared delusional disorder

Type I

Shared delusions

Lifespan Development Matrix

Major DSM-IV-T Categories

Classifications

Infancy/Childhood/Adolescence

Mental retardation

Mild, moderate, severe, and profound

Learning disorders

eading disorder

Mathematics disorder

Disorder of written expression

Motor skill disorders

Developmental coordination disorder

Communication disorders

Expressive language disorder

Mixed receptive-expressive language disorder

Phonological disorder

Stuttering

Pervasive developmental disorders

Autistic disorder

ett's disorder

Childhood disintegrative disorder

Asperger's disorder

Attention deficit and disruptive behavior disorder

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Conduct disorder

Oppositional defiant disorder

Feeding deficit and disruptive behavior disorder

Pica (eating nonfood substances)

umination disorder (regurgitation)

Tic disorders

Tourette's disorder

Chronic motor….

Schizophrenia
When people think of what it means to 'go crazy,' quite often the common image that comes to mind is that of someone with schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is a serious mental health disorder that can be physically, socially, and personally destabilizing. "Schizophrenia affects men and women equally. It occurs at similar rates in all ethnic groups around the world. Symptoms such as hallucinations and delusions usually start between ages 16 and 30. Men tend to experience symptoms a little earlier than women. Most of the time, people do not get schizophrenia after age 45.Schizophrenia rarely occurs in children, but awareness of childhood-onset schizophrenia is increasing" (Schizophrenia, 2012, NIMH: 2). The disease is fairly rare "about 1% of Americans have this illness," but it is so debilitating the illness warrants further research and attention (Schizophrenia, 2012, NIMH: 2). While symptoms vary with every person, some of the most common include auditory hallucinations….

Schizophrenia is a serious mental disorder, resulting in the patient hearing voices and noise inside his or her mind. Historically, this disorder has been a serious barrier to proper functioning in society. In the past many people were simply locked up in mental institutions because they were a danger to themselves and others. In some cases that is still necessary, but medications and treatments have come a long way. They allow some people with schizophrenia to live relatively normal lives. There are disagreements regarding what, specifically, causes the disease to manifest, although its onset is generally in young adulthood and it tends to run in families. That suggests a genetic component. Treatment generally involves medication, and there is no cure or prevention methods for schizophrenia. Both cultural and biblical issues play into a person's understanding of the disorder and the treatment he or she will receive. Future research must focus….

Schizophrenia in the Elderly: obustness of the esearch Literature
The American psychiatric community has historically ignored the presence of schizophrenia in older adults, especially the elderly, because many researchers and clinicians had attributed the etiology of the disease to organic causes such as dementia (Howard, abins, Seeman, & Jeste, 2000). A substantial body of European studies, however, have revealed that a small percentage of schizophrenia patients experience their first symptoms of psychosis after the age of 60 independent of organic causes. The lack of progress in this area has been attributed to the nomenclature assigned to the different schizophrenia age groups, which remains confusing, with some research groups designating first diagnoses after the age of 40 as late-onset, while others set the age boundary at 55 or 60-years of age. The naming of the disease has also been confusing, with early researchers, such as Kraepelin in 1919, calling the condition paraphrenia….

Schizophrenia does not really have just one single cause. It is a possibility that this disorder could be inherited but not all doctors are sure. A lot of experts suppose that schizophrenia does run in the family. Individuals that may have a close family member with the disease are more likely to advance the disorder than persons who have no kinsfolks with the disease. A lot think that might have some relation to a chemical unbalance of the brain. Some have the notion that neurotransmitters are responsible of the growth of schizophrenia. It is a probable select, even though there is no evidence yet that glutamate and Dopamine disproportions are the cause of schizophrenia. Is schizophrenia produced by a real carnal irregularity in the mind? Numerous studies of individuals with schizophrenia have established irregularities in brain construction for instance enlarged ventricles that are in the brain, and reduced brain scopes….

Schizophrenia as a Functional Disconnection Problem in the Brain
Studies by Schmitt et al. (2011) offer conclusive evidence that schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder. While schizophrenia can be exacerbated by both genetic and environmental factors, the disease has been conclusively linked to developmental disconnectivity of the prefrontal cortex of the brain via neural imaging studies.

Schizophrenia is a brain disorder that directly affects the way an individual talks, acts, and perceives the world. Schizophrenic patients often exhibit a loss of contact with reality and an inability to perceive their environment correctly. These individuals may see and hear things that are not real and these symptoms make it very difficult for patients to live and navigate normal daily tasks. Scientists have studied that onset of schizophrenia, finding that it frequently appears during the teenage to young adult years and is more severe in men than women. In recent years studies have shown that….

50).
Court Case and Trials

Confession of Andrea of drowning all of her five children came on the same day in the presence of her psychiatrist, Dr. Michael Welner. She confessed of locking her family dog so that it could not interfere with the killings or drowning.

The defense lawyer asserted that Andrea was insane while Texas law required that a proof must be given that at the time of crime, the defendant was unaware of the difference between right and wrong (Jason, 2010, p. 98). In March 2002, the court rejected the bargain based on insanity and proved Andrea guilty. The main option was the death penalty but it was clearly rejected by the jury. Thereby Andrea was sentenced to life imprisonment to Texas Department of Criminal Justice being eligible for a parole in the period of forty years.

On 5th of January, 2005, convictions proven on Andrea were reversed by the….


Much of advice to parents of schizophrenics tended to be judgmental, before the environmental and genetic factors of the illness were known: Theories blaming schizophrenogenic or emotionally withdrawn mothers are now almost totally discredited. hat current research attempts to suggest is that "family and environmental stressors -- encompassing very subtle interactions common to many families -- work only in tandem with biological determinants to produce psychosis [and schizophrenia]" (McFarlane 2007). In giving advice to families how to reduce their offspring's stress and tendency to exhibit the disorder, therapists tread a delicate line between advice and blame. Uncontrollable biological genetic and environmental factors and controllable genetic and nurturing factors all seem to play an unclear role in causing the disease to manifest in an individual.

orks Cited

Cocoran, Cheryl, Kristin Cadenhead, & Sophia Vinogradov. (2004). "Schizophrenia

Prevention - Risk Reduction Approaches." Schizophrenia.com. Retrieved 24 Jan 2008. http://www.schizophrenia.com/prev1.htm

Information for Parents: How to Lower Your Child's….


When treatment for schizophrenia or other mental illness does not follow proper protocols, the results can be extreme deviant behaviors, often resulting in violent crimes. Because of the deinstutionlization of the mentally ill, the criminal justice system now increasingly has become the destination of mentally ill and developmentally disabled individuals, especially those who are ethnic minorities (Kupers, 1999). Often, the choice for the justice system is to either treat the offender's mental illness and ignore their criminality, or to ignore their mental illness and punish their criminality. Unfortunately, few states have the facilities or resources to deal with both of these types of problems at the same time. As a result, many mentally ill offenders wind up in the general population of the prison system with little or no psychological treatment.

Christian Worldview

Early Christians had a difficult time recognizing schizophrenia as a mental disorder and not as a demonic possession or….

There is usually a gap of one or two years between the appearance of vague symptoms and the patient's visit to a psychiatric clinic. Neurological examination may reveal a link between schizophrenia and Wilson's disease and Huntington's disease before treatment starts. The disorder has also been associated with left and mixed handedness, some physical abnormalities and mild neurological signs (Frankenburg).
Mental status examination often reveals odd and poorly understood behaviors, such as drinking water to the point of intoxication; staring at oneself in the mirror, gathering and keeping useless items, self-mutilation and disturbed sleep-wake patterns (Frankenburg, 2009). The patient has difficulty coping with change. Other observations gathered during detailed interaction with the patient include odd dressing, undue suspiciousness or social awkwardness, lack of personal hygiene, odd beliefs or delusions, small range of emotional expressions, acknowledged hallucinations or response to un-apparent auditory or visual stimuli, long pauses because of thought blocking,….

Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous disorder and can be characterized by any of the following symptoms: intellectual deterioration, emotional blunting, disorganized speech, disorganized behavior, social isolation, delusions, and/or hallucinations (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2000). In the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-T) schizophrenia has now been divided into five subcategories (APA, 2000). These subtypes are defined based on the presence of positive symptoms (excesses, such as hallucinations and delusions) or negative symptoms (deficits, such as social isolation and poverty of speech) of behavior in the presentation of the disorder.
There is no defined cause for schizophrenia although many have been proposed. First, it is generally acknowledged that schizophrenia is at least in part caused by an imbalance of neurotransmitters. The classical "dopamine hypothesis" of schizophrenia has asserted that there is a hyperactivity in dopaminergic transmission at the dopamine D2 receptor in the projections to the limbic….

Schizophrenia
Often, when people discover that a family member has developed a serious mental illness, such as schizophrenia, they may be in shock, they may be puzzled and frightened by the strange behaviors (Johnson pp). They may be concerned about what will happen, and are generally at a loss for what to do (Johnson pp). This experience is virtually the same for all families everywhere in the world, and everywhere the stress of mental illness is great (Johnson pp). Generally, after examinations are carried out, medication are prescribed and other treatments recommended, and sometimes family members are interviewed, however, after a few days when the patient is released, usually the family has been told nothing about how to cope with the patient or the patient's effects upon the family (Johnson pp).

All too often families who are coping with a brain disorder, such as schizophrenia, in a close relative tend to neglect….

Schizophrenia
Ron Howard's 2001 film biography of the life of John Nash, A Beautiful Mind, delves into the world of a man suffering from schizophrenia. However, the film treats the disease delicately, without offering too many stereotypes or classifications of mental illness. Rather, the audience is aware that behind Nash's genius is a disturbed, albeit "beautiful" mind. Russell Crowe plays Nash, a brilliant mathematician and professor. His doctoral thesis work is hailed by MIT and he begins his teaching assignment there and is also offered a position by the United States government as a cryptographer because of his ability to decipher codes and number patterns quickly. Nash also falls in love with one of his students at MIT, Alicia (Jennifer Connelly) and the couple gets married. Nash's delusions become more and more pronounced and eventually he is diagnosed with schizophrenia and is forced to undergo treatments. The treatments in the film….

Schizophrenia & Delusional Disorders
Case Study of Sally

Of the many psychiatric disorders, schizophrenia and paranoia are two that are perhaps most commonly known to the general public. Whether this is due to the rate of incidence or to the ease of characterizing the disorders in print, dramatizations, or media, is difficult to say. These two disorders are categorically similar and are taxonomically considered to be psychoses. There are three main classes of psychoses: Mood or Affective Disorders, Schizophrenic Disorders, and Paranoid or Delusional Disorders. The DSM-IV_T definitions of Schizophrenia and Paranoia are long and complicated, though somewhat redeemed by the intriguing histories of the discovery and definition of the disorders -- and by the associated lore.

Schizophrenia. The term schizophrenia means split mind and it was first applied to the disorder by Bleuler in 1911, who thought the brains of schizophrenics developed an inability to integrate emotions, thoughts, and contact with reality….

Schizophrenia
What is Schizophrenia?

Schizophrenia is a chronic disorder of the brain that affects the way a person sees the world, and even how they think, and behave towards other people. Schizophrenic persons find it difficult to function normally, and often have serious challenges relating with others, managing emotions, thinking clearly, making conversations, and distinguishing between what is real and what is imagined (Helpguide, 2014; NIMH, 2014). This blurred perception of reality drives such persons to hear or see things that other people cannot see, causing them to retreat from the rest of the world in fear that someone is constantly watching them and is out to harm them (Helpguide, 2014). Well, schizophrenia is widely perceived as a rare condition; however, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) places its prevalence rate at 1 out of every 100 Americans, with men and young adults between the ages of 16 and 30 being….

1. The impact of schizophrenia psychosis on lifespan and overall health
2. The relationship between early intervention and improved outcomes in schizophrenia
3. The role of genetics in the development of schizophrenia and its effects on lifespan
4. The effectiveness of various treatment options for schizophrenia psychosis and their impact on lifespan
5. The stigma surrounding schizophrenia and its influence on access to care and lifespan
6. The connection between co-occurring disorders, such as substance abuse, and lifespan in individuals with schizophrenia
7. The importance of social support and community resources in improving outcomes and longevity for individuals with schizophrenia
8.....

1. The stigma surrounding schizophrenia and its impact on individuals and society.
2. The role of genetics in the development of schizophrenia and potential implications for treatment and prevention.
3. The effectiveness of different treatment approaches for schizophrenia, such as medication, therapy, and lifestyle changes.
4. The relationship between substance abuse and schizophrenia, and the challenges of treating individuals with co-occurring disorders.
5. The impact of schizophrenia on families and caregivers, and the importance of support systems in managing the illness.
6. The portrayal of schizophrenia in popular culture and media, and its effects on public perception and understanding of the disorder.
7. The ethical considerations....

1. The Neurobiological Basis of Schizophrenia: Exploring the Complexities of Brain Abnormalities

- Investigate the structural and functional brain abnormalities associated with schizophrenia, including alterations in neurotransmitter systems, connectivity, and neural circuitry.
- Discuss the role of genetic and environmental factors in shaping these brain abnormalities and their contribution to the development of schizophrenia.
- Explore the potential links between neuroinflammation, immune dysfunction, and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

2. Hallucinations and Delusions: Unraveling the Subjective Experiences in Schizophrenia

- Analyze the phenomenology of hallucinations and delusions, examining their characteristic features, content, and impact on the individual's subjective reality.
- Explore the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these psychotic....

1. The enduring impact of mental illness stigma on individuals' self-esteem and identity
2. How societal attitudes towards mental illness hinder individuals' ability to seek treatment
3. The intersectionality of mental health stigma and its disproportionate impact on marginalized communities
4. The role of media in perpetuating harmful stereotypes and misinformation about mental illness
5. The stigma surrounding mental illness in the workplace and its effects on job security and career advancement
6. The importance of dismantling stigmatizing language and conversations around mental health
7. The long-term psychological effects of internalized stigma on individuals' mental health recovery journey
8. How advocacy and activism can help combat mental....

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4 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Schizophrenia Psychosis and Lifespan D Schizophrenia and

Words: 1755
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

Schizophrenia Psychosis and Lifespan D Schizophrenia and Psychosis and Lifespan Development Schizophrenia and Psychosis Matrix Disorder Major DSM-IV-T Categories Classifications Subclassifications Schizophrenia and Psychosis Symptoms Positive (Type I): represent excesses or distortions from normal functioning Delusions Bizarre Nonbizarre Hallucinations Auditory Visual Disorganized Speech Loose Association Neologisms Clang Associations Echolalia/Echopraxia Word…

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8 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Schizophrenia When People Think of What it

Words: 2517
Length: 8 Pages
Type: Essay

Schizophrenia When people think of what it means to 'go crazy,' quite often the common image that comes to mind is that of someone with schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is a serious…

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6 Pages
Research Paper

Psychology

Schizophrenia History and Causation

Words: 2132
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Schizophrenia is a serious mental disorder, resulting in the patient hearing voices and noise inside his or her mind. Historically, this disorder has been a serious barrier to proper…

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3 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Schizophrenia in the Elderly Robustness of the

Words: 909
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

Schizophrenia in the Elderly: obustness of the esearch Literature The American psychiatric community has historically ignored the presence of schizophrenia in older adults, especially the elderly, because many researchers and…

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7 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Schizophrenia Does Not Really Have Just One

Words: 1916
Length: 7 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Schizophrenia does not really have just one single cause. It is a possibility that this disorder could be inherited but not all doctors are sure. A lot of experts…

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3 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Schizophrenia as a Functional Disconnection Problem in

Words: 742
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

Schizophrenia as a Functional Disconnection Problem in the Brain Studies by Schmitt et al. (2011) offer conclusive evidence that schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder. While schizophrenia can be exacerbated by…

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3 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Schizophrenia and Society Houston Born

Words: 1131
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

50). Court Case and Trials Confession of Andrea of drowning all of her five children came on the same day in the presence of her psychiatrist, Dr. Michael Welner. She…

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6 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Schizophrenia Causation How Genetics Brain

Words: 1841
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Much of advice to parents of schizophrenics tended to be judgmental, before the environmental and genetic factors of the illness were known: Theories blaming schizophrenogenic or emotionally withdrawn mothers…

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9 Pages
Research Paper

Psychology

Schizophrenia Affects Millions of Adults

Words: 2309
Length: 9 Pages
Type: Research Paper

When treatment for schizophrenia or other mental illness does not follow proper protocols, the results can be extreme deviant behaviors, often resulting in violent crimes. Because of the deinstutionlization…

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9 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Schizophrenia Severe Chronic Little Understood

Words: 2509
Length: 9 Pages
Type: Essay

There is usually a gap of one or two years between the appearance of vague symptoms and the patient's visit to a psychiatric clinic. Neurological examination may reveal…

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10 Pages
Research Proposal

Psychology

Schizophrenia in Young Women and Men

Words: 3736
Length: 10 Pages
Type: Research Proposal

Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous disorder and can be characterized by any of the following symptoms: intellectual deterioration, emotional blunting, disorganized speech, disorganized behavior, social isolation, delusions, and/or hallucinations (American…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Schizophrenia Often When People Discover That a

Words: 986
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Schizophrenia Often, when people discover that a family member has developed a serious mental illness, such as schizophrenia, they may be in shock, they may be puzzled and frightened by…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Schizophrenia Ron Howard's 2001 Film Biography of

Words: 892
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Schizophrenia Ron Howard's 2001 film biography of the life of John Nash, A Beautiful Mind, delves into the world of a man suffering from schizophrenia. However, the film treats the…

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4 Pages
Case Study

Psychology

Schizophrenia & Delusional Disorders Case Study of

Words: 1535
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Case Study

Schizophrenia & Delusional Disorders Case Study of Sally Of the many psychiatric disorders, schizophrenia and paranoia are two that are perhaps most commonly known to the general public. Whether this is…

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5 Pages
Research Paper

Psychology

Schizophrenia Signs Symptoms and Possible Treatments

Words: 1494
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Schizophrenia What is Schizophrenia? Schizophrenia is a chronic disorder of the brain that affects the way a person sees the world, and even how they think, and behave towards other people.…

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