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School Systems the Educational Leader
Words: 1548 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 99256004
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From scheduling lunch shifts to arranging for common planning time, my principal has effectively and efficiently managed the set amount of time that we have in a school day. Collaboration between parents and community members is evident as well. We often have parent / child literacy nights. Annually we also hold a rotherhood Dinner that honors community members that have positively influenced the children in our neighborhoods. Throughout New edford, Carney Academy is highly regarded; our reputation precedes us.

Educational Philosophy 6

Knowledge acquired from textbooks and college classes may give me some techniques and standards that effective leaders must know, however they are not going to teach me everything I need to know. Hopefully, my experiences as a successful coach and an employee of an excellent leader will help in building a solid foundation for me to become an effective leader myself.

ibliography

ass, ernard M (1985), Leadership and…

Bibliography

Bass, Bernard M (1985), Leadership and performance beyond expectations, New York: Free Press.

Conger, Jay A. And Rabindra N. Kanungo (1987), Towards a behavioral theory of charismatic leadership in organizational settings. Academy of Management Review 12/4: 637-647.

Burns, John M. (1978), Leadership, New York: Harper and Row

Bernstein, R. Should You Be the Boss? Mar 99, Vol. 108 Issue 6, p33, 3p, 1c

Desired State of School
Words: 857 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73700634
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School Improvements

Performance Outcomes at Dunn Middle School in Trenton

Inner-city schools today are struggling with a litany of challenges that threaten the quality of education and the opportunities available to students. Issues such as high poverty rates, crime-afflicted neighborhoods, racial disparity and limited parental involvement all threaten to stand in the way of bright futures for such students. This is true for the attendees of the Grace A. Dunn Middle School in Trenton, which is working to overcome the obstacles typical of such resource-strapped urban schools. The discussion here outlines some of the areas of Dunn Middle School that require improvement and offers some suggestions on how to achieve this improvement.

Performance:

Reviewing the Dunn Middle School performance outcomes, all evidence suggests that the school is in need of sweeping improvements. Under the thumb of mandatory state-proficiency tests, Dunn Middle School has struggled to yield any positive outcomes. The…

Works Cited:

Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO). (2008). ISLLC Standards. Coe.fgcu.edu.

Jennings, D.A. (2012). Schools in Need of Improvement in New Jersey. Statewide Parents Action Network.

NJ School Performance Report. (2013). Grace A. Dunn Middle School. State of New Jersey.

Observations About School Relationships
Words: 1425 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 25854288
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School Observation: Springfield Gardens Middle School

The focus of this school observation is PS 59, Springfield Gardens Middle School in New York City. The observation was conducted in three separate settings: a math class, the cafeteria, and the school's main office. The goal of the observation was to gain insight on the relationships between different stakeholders in the school community, including teachers, students, staff, administration, and parents, and how these relationships influence the connectedness of the school environment. The assumption is that school connectedness as summarized by Blum (2004), can be measured by the presence or absence of factors such as positive student-faculty rapport, high academic expectations, and publically displayed efforts to strengthen school culture and safety. The observations of the school, thus, considered school connectedness as evidenced by student-teacher rapport, exhibition of student work, teaching methods, and classroom comportment, and interaction between staff members. In addition, student body and…

References

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2004). School "Connectedness: Improving Student's Lives." Baltimore, Maryland. Blum, R.

New York City Department of Education. (2010) "I.S. 059 Springfield Gardens: Progress Report, 2009-2010." NYC Department of Education, New York, New York. Retrieved from  http://schools.nyc.gov/OA/SchoolReports/2009-10/Progress_Report_Overview_2010_EMS_Q059.pdf . 24, Feb. 2011.

New York City Department of Education. (2010) "I.S. 059 Springfield Gardens: Learning Environment Survey Report: 2009-2010." NYC Department of Education, New York, New York. Retrieved from  http://schools.nyc.gov/OA/SchoolReports/2009-10/Survey_2010_Q059.pdf . 24,Feb. 2011.

Analyzing School Advisory Programs Annotated Bibliography
Words: 1517 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 18228586
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SCHOOL ADVISORY PROGRAMS: Annotated Bibliography

Van Ryzin, M. (2010). Secondary school advisors as mentors and secondary attachment figures. Journal of Community Psychology, 38(2), 131-154.

his study assessed if students in two tiny secondary schools would actually nominate their advisor as part of their attachment hierarchy. he forty percent which nominated their advisor to be a secondary figure of attachment testified even more involvement in school and showed better gains in terms of adjustment and achievement in than those that did not. In accordance to the author, this particular finding could help in the development and refining of new theories regarding the factors which contribute to the success of mentoring relationships, together with the processes that aid in the growth and development of these relationships.

Johnson, B. (2013.) Linchpins or lost time: Creating effective advisories. Horace, 25 (2-3)

his study tested the theory that secondary school advisories are somewhat insidious around…

This article investigates the effect of a universal social-emotional program of learning, the Fast Track PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies) program and teacher consultation, incorporated within the Fast Track selective prevention model. Measures examined educator and peer reports of violence, hyperactive-disruptive conducts, as well as social skills. Starting in the first grade and all through three consecutive years, teachers acquired training and support, and incorporated the PATHS program in their classrooms. The study investigated the major impacts of intervention and ways in which the child's traits and the environment in the school influenced results. The study concluded that properly-implemented multiyear social-emotional programs of learning could actually have important preventive impacts on the population-level aggression rates, social competency, as well as academic involvement in the elementary school years.

10. Durlak, J.A., Weissberg, R.P., Dymnicki, A.B., Taylor, R.D. & Schellinger, K.B. (2011). The impact of enhancing students' social and emotional learning: a meta-analysis of school-based universal interventions. Child Dev. 82(1): 405-32. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01564.x.

This particular article presents results from a meta-analysis of 213 school-based, worldwide social and economic learning (SEL) programs entailing 270,034 kindergartens through high school learners. In comparison to controls, social and economic learning participants illustrated considerably better social and emotional skills, outlooks, manners, as well as academic performance which reflected an eleven percent point gain in success. School teaching personnel successfully carried out SEL programs. The utilization of four suggested practices for developing skills together with the presence of execution issues moderated the outcomes of the program. The findings of this study actually add to the growing experimental evidence-based outcome on the positive impact of social and emotional learning programs. Teachers, policy makers, and the general public are capable of contributing to healthy development of kids by encouraging the integration of evidence-based social and economic learning (SEL) programming into the standard educational practice.

Culture of the Barons Mrs
Words: 933 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93172692
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Not meeting them is not only a sin according to the tenets of the religion, but it also causes damage to the spouse with whom a partnership was made and the children that are a result of that partnership.

More precisely, failing to live up to familial obligations is a sin because it causes damage to the spouse and children. Jewish daily life, as Mrs. Baron explains, is built around a constant devotion to God. Cooking, eating, sleeping, waking, bathing, and almost every other common task of everyday life is associated with some ritualistic elements and/or prayer to remind each person that every bit of good done is in service to God. Making sure your family is cared for in the best manner possible is part of this, and this explains the different roles that exist in her family. She acknowledges that the roles have changed somewhat since her grandparents…

Culture in This Briefing New Employee Human
Words: 2541 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73785062
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Culture

In this briefing new employee human resources, we will be considering cultural management issues in the tourist industry and how they impact upon our business. Our company, Beach Bum Ltd. is a travel consultancy Agency which was recently hired to provide a critical analysis on whether or not sustainable tours can attract American ecological tourists to travel to countries such as Tanzania and Namibia. We are a culturally eclectic group of advisors specialising in all aspects of tourism. Cultural sensitivity is not only our watchword, but our bottomline. Please do not feel overwhelmed by all of this information. Some of you may feel as though you are back in college. est assured, the difference between profit and bankruptcy in our business is the ability to sell in that person's culture. People like to feel important and an acknowledgement of their importance is not just being nice. It is also…

Reference: Managing an International Workforce . San Francisco: Pfeiffer. p65-67.

Hofstede, G, and Hofstede, GJ (2004). Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind. 2nd ed. New York: New York. P16-17.

Kwintessential.co.uk. (2011). Intercultural Training and the Expatriate Assignment. Available:  http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/cultural-services/articles/expatriate-intercultural-training.html . Last accessed 24 Nov 2011.

Thomas, D (2003). Readings and cases in international management: a cross-cultural perspective . Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications. p17-18.

Wang, X and Wall, G. (2002). Cultural Tourism: an Assessment of Marketing Strategies in Dalian, Nanjing and Hainan, China. Available: lin.ca/Uploads/cclr11/CCLR11-163.pdf. Last accessed 24 Nov 2011.

School Personnel Functions
Words: 1020 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 89114714
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School Personnel Functions

Personnel functions and their relationship to moving an instructional agenda forward

Ultimately, a school's reputation lies in the hands of its teachers. Hiring, training, and retaining highly effective personnel to give instruction in the classroom must be the cornerstone of any effort to improve education at a school. Without good teachers to impart instruction, the best textbooks, goals, and procedures will not be meaningful. Teaching, however, is a skill as well as a gift, and the administration can strive to support teachers with specific programming efforts.

Hiring and assignments

The first step in creating a more effective educational environment is hiring new teachers that support the mission and values of the school. Given that teachers are likely to be a part of the educational environment for some time, it is essential that teachers are 'on board' with the principal's agenda. ecruiting top candidates from high-quality colleges and…

References

Crowther, F. (1997). Teachers as leaders - an exploratory framework. The International Journal

of Educational Management, 11(1), 6-13. Retrieved from  http://search.proquest.com/docview/229204018?accountid=10901 

Gordon, R., Kane, T.J., & Staiger, D.O. (2006). Identifying effective teachers using performance on the job. The Hamilton Project Policy Brief no. 2006-01. Brookings Institution. Retrieved from  http://search.proquest.com/docview/62008957?accountid=10901 ;

Olsen, B., & Sexton, D. (2009). Threat rigidity, school reform, and how teachers view their work inside current education policy contexts. American Educational Research Journal, 46(1),

Cultures Take a Day in
Words: 2213 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5684038
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2. Someone kicks a dog.

esponse: The person should go back and check if the dog is okay! This person may either drunk or extremely cruel and hates dogs. In any case, it is wrong to kick a harmless dog.

3. A woman carries a heavy jug of water on her head while her husband walks in front of her carrying nothing.

esponse: He should stop and help her with the jug of water. Her husband is not being a gentleman. He is not being a very good husband if he makes his wife carry heavy items and walks ahead of her though he not carrying anything, himself.

4. A male guest helps a female host carry dirty dishes into the kitchen.

esponse: The male guest should be thanked by the hostess because he is being courteous and polite by helping her carry out the dirty dishes.

5. A young…

References

Holloway, Kris (20 July, 2006). "A Morning of Weighing Babies," Monique and the Mango Rains: Two Years with a Midwife in Mali. Long Grove, Illinois: Waveland Press.

Holloway, Kris (20 July, 2006). "The Death of Old Woman Kelema," Monique and the Mango Rains: Two Years with a Midwife in Mali. Long Grove, Illinois: Waveland Press.

Holtz, Carol and Grisdale, Suzanne (2007). "Chapter 16: Global Health in Reproduction and Infants." Global Health Care: Issues and Policies. Boston, Massachusetts: Jones & Bartlett Publishers

Koehler, Fred. "One Step at a Time," Crossing Cultures with the Peace Corps. Retrieved from:  http://www.peacecorps.gov/wws/stories/stories.cfm?psid=15  (12 November 2009).

Culture Capital and Its Impact Summary and
Words: 449 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 77265984
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Culture Capital and Its Impact

Summary and response

The article deals with the concept of cultural capital and tries to weigh the validity of the claim that cultural capital affects students academic performance in the light of some recent researches and author' own research. The article is highly informative and offers an insight into the various socio-cultural factors that affect one's educational performance and success in practical life. It has often been argued that certain discriminatory factors influence the academic performance of students of lower class due to which the social division remains static and the gap widens instead of narrowing with the passage of time. However this article reveals that instead of discriminatory factors, culture capital is believed to be the asset that determines the academic performance of various social groups. The author presents findings from various important studies in this area and introduces us to concepts that are…

Culture and Marketing Strategy
Words: 911 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 17427450
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Culture and Marketing Strategy

About the print ad from http://theinspirationroom.com/daily/2013/johnnie-walker-from-the-future/

The print ad is about a certain brand of alcoholic drink that is endorsed by a professional athlete. The athlete takes a sip from a glass of whisky and begins walking. This in a way appears to suggest that consumers of this particular brand of whisky can cover long distances after taking this whiskey. Information pertaining to alcoholic content and how the brand is matured are not clearly visible on the ad. The only visible thing is the image of the person who has endorsed the brand making some strides.

Assumptions made by the authors of the ad

The authors of the ad try to make the ad to be more appealing to the motives and desires of the consumers. They give form to people's deep-lying desires. They assume that they will best arrest the consumer's attention by tugging consumer's…

References List

Altstiel, T & Grow, J. (2006). Advertising Strategy: Creative Tactics From the Outside/In. CA:

Sage.

Petracca, M. & Sorapure, M. (1998). Common Culture: Reading and Writing about American

Popular Culture. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall.

Culture and Health Care the
Words: 2819 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 81797871
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6% of the respondents stated that this was what they did. This number however is not reflected in lower numbers for life style disease and so it must be given greater scrutiny at another time (See table below).

Fruit and vegetable consumption by ethnicity

Lifestyle diseases

There are a number of diseases and health conditions that have been linked to life style behaviors and belief systems. The prevalence of these diseases demonstate that while persons may report a certain behavior emperical evidence suggests that another behavior may be taking place. This may occur principally because respondents may over estimate what they do on a daily basis since they are not taking active records of their behaviors.

On several indicators African-Americans have higher rates of the disease and death as a consequency than White populations. The data for diabetes shows that African-Americans are twice as likely to report having diabetes than…

References

A religious portrait of African-Americans (2009) Retrieved from  http://pewforum.org/A-Religious-Portrait-of-African-Americans.aspx 

Department of health and senior services New Jersey. (2011).

 http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/dataindex.htm 

Dowd, K. (1996). Dietary patterns and physical activity among New Jersey adults. Center for health Statistics 1(3):1-4.

Schools Have Been Looking for
Words: 1286 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 63973265
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Another common use is in the generation of written work. Students can learn to revise and edit using a computer word processing program. Again, this supports the use of computers to learn keyboarding just as we teach manuscript and cursive writing: the keyboard is merely a third way to record information and generate data. Students can also learn to use spreadsheets and databases (Fouts, 2000), which can give them the tools to use computers in another way: to organize information, present it in a new way, or even to generate new information. For instance, even first graders can use a simple spread sheet to count how many red, blue, green and yellow m & m's are in a package, combine the information, average them, and with one or two keystrokes, produce a bar chart. In this way, computers can make higher levels of information available to students.

CHANGES in EDUCATION…

Bibliography

Fouts, Jeffrey T. 2000. "Research on Computers and Education:

Past, Present and Future." Prepared for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Selwyn, Neil. 2000. "Researching computers and education ®¢ glimpses of the wider picture." Computers & Education Vol. 3, pp. 93-101

School for Scandal Title How
Words: 3054 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 39731888
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The lack of self-respect in particular characters in the play, like Lady Sneerwell and Joseph, sends the message that some people have higher priorities than self-respect. Lady Sneerwell's deep desire to gain Charles to marry her leads her to a chain of unrespectable acts of intrigues and backbiting, in the process, conspiring with equally dubious characters like Joseph and Snake who also follow selfish and destructive agendas of their own. Forming a derogatory School for Scandal all alone speaks against self-respect as against all of those perpetuating that School. While it seems outwardly pleasurable to prey on other people's mistakes, misfortunes and weaknesses, perpetrators of scandals and hypocrisy do not gain the superiority they want among themselves. Lady Sneerwell, Sir and Lady ackbite, Mrs. Candour and Joseph may share a common objective of destroying relationships and reputation but this destructiveness does not build them up in the real sense, but…

Bibliography

Cordner, Michael, editor. The School for Scandal by Richard Brinsley Sheridan. Oxford World Classics: Oxford University, 1998.  http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0192825674/026-9 

Creasey, Beverley, reviewer. Charming "School for Scandal." The Theater Mirror, 2000. http://www.theatermirror.com/sfsbtber.htm

Lipfest, David. The School for Scandal. CurtanUp Review, 2004. http://www.curtainup.com/school.html

Matthews, Julia. The School for Scandal Notes. The Fine Print, 1998.  http://www.gashakespeare.org/plays/1997/scandl-notes.html

School to Work Transition of
Words: 1594 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 71477576
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Parental consent will also be sought for an individual to be a participant in the project. It is expected that 110 persons would participate in the project; this will be the final number after the initial screening has taken place and the unsuitable candidates removed from the initial listing.

Data collection

The data will be collected using questionnaires which will be administered at the beginning of the program to establish a baseline position. Then a similar questionnaire will be administered at the end of the project so that values can be compared and variation in responses observed.

Action steps and time frame

I. Clarification of concepts (Two weeks)

II. Development of data collection instruments (Two weeks)

III. Training of personnel (One week)

IV. Identification of schools and contact with schools (One Week)

V. eception and Orientation of participants (One day)

VI. Development of baseline assessment (One day)

VII. Conduct of…

References

Lu, W., Daleiden, E., & Lu, S. (2007) Threat Perception Bias and Anxiety Among

Chinese School Children and Adolescents. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent

Psychology 36(4):568-580.

Mueser, Kim T. et al. (2008). A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder in severe mental illness. Journal of Consulting and Clinical

School Counseling in a Multicultural Society
Words: 3075 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 13196920
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School Counseling in a Multicultural Society: An Overview

More and more diversity is becoming the buzzword in society at large and within educational facilities across the nation. As the population in the United States continues to become increasingly diversified and representative of individuals from varying ethnic, socioeconomic and racial backgrounds, educators are realizing an increased need for attention to the specific needs of diverse student populations.

The need for multicultural competencies development among school counseling professionals has recently been acknowledged by the American Psychological Association (1992) and the American Counseling Association (1995) whose ethnical standards dictate that school counselors should achieve a certain level of multicultural competence prior to embarking on a professional career in student counseling.

Despite the acknowledgment of a need for increased awareness and training to ensure a positive student/counselor relationship, there is little evidence that much is being done in the way of establishing a core…

References:

American Counseling Association. (1995). Code of ethics and standards of practice [Brochure]. Alexandria, VA: Author.

American Psychological Association. (1992). Ethical principles of psychologist and code of conduct. American Psychologist, 47, 1597-1611

Arredondo, P., Cheatham, H., Mio, J.S., Sue, D. & Trimble, J.E. (1999). Key words in multicultural interventions: A dictionary. Westport: Greenwood Press.

Atkinson, D.R., Morten, G., & Sue, D.W. (1998). Counseling American minorities: A

School Counseling - Singapore School Counseling in
Words: 590 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 14465944
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School Counseling - Singapore

School Counseling in Singapore

In the article entitled, "Training school counselors in Singapore: first impressions of a multicultural challenge," authors ivera et. al. explored the history and current situation of school counseling in Singapore. In the article, the authors expressed the need to evaluate the kind and quality of training on school counseling in the country, which requires a culture-specific approach rather than implementing curricula and theoretical frameworks developed in the context and experience of 'western countries' such as the United States and European countries.

In determining this need and evaluating the current scenario in the Singaporean setting, ivera et al. conducted an in-depth qualitative article review of two (significant) studies conducted on school counseling, specifically in the Asia/Singaporean contexts. These studies were identified as follows: (1) E. Tan's (2002) exploration of school guidance counseling in Singapore, focusing on its history and eventual development into a…

Reference

Rivera, E., S, Nash, B. Wah, and S. Ibrahim. (2008). "Training school counselors in Singapore: first impressions of a multicultural challenge." Journal of Counseling and Development, Vol. 86, No. 2.

School Climate and the Role
Words: 842 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 23020935
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The researcher suggests further knowledge in this area may heighten "principals' awareness of the need for keeping an open climate and good communication" (p. 339). Unfortunately, Halawah like many other researchers before him fails to describe what constitutes "good" or "open" communication. One of the primary problems that exists in the multi-faceted workplace as described by Halawah is an inability to communicate in an efficient and concise manner. Teachers and principals must not only communicate amongst each other, but most also work directly with students to ensure students have an opportunity to realize their personal goals and objectives while also recognizing their role in school, at home and in the community. A school climate that embraces culture and community is more likely to realize success than one that does not.

Discussion/Conclusion

School climate is an important element of education. As noted in this article school climate includes the community that…

Reference:

Halawah, I. (2005) the relationship between effective communication of high school principal and school climate. Education, 126(2): 334.

School Climate

Schools and Parents Effective Staff
Words: 3287 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 81939847
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And when the parent comes to an event held in the classroom, it makes good sense to have interpreters available, and "invite the extended family," which of course is a very welcoming act of kindness and good judgment. The other parent in this list of "types" is the "Busy Parent," who is a person with a work schedule that is hard to get a hold of, or plan meetings for. Get the cell phone number of parents like this, and the email addresses, and "continue to send home their children's work on a regular basis, including writing samples, artwork, and test copies" - and even consider taking digital photos of class activities and attaching those pictures to emails that go to parents.

On a more serious note, the literature on school administration duties as far as training staff to be parent-active and family-friendly offers an article called "here's the Ministry…

Works Cited

Beaudoin, Nelson. (2006). Giving Stakeholders a Voice. Educational Leadership, 63(8), 74-75.

Flannery, Mary Ellen. (2005). A field guide to parents: famed for its vast appetite for information

And ability to protect its offspring, the parent genus has nonetheless eluded scientific study.

Until now. NEA Today, 24(2), 36-38.

Culture and Diversity Issues in
Words: 2845 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 13936527
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Silence too is an important part of communication in Singapore. It is customary to pause before answering a question, to indicate that the person has given the question the appropriate thought and consideration that is needed. Westerners habit of responding quickly to a question, to Singaporeans, often indicates thoughtlessness and rude behavior. Their demeanor is typically calm, and Westerners more aggressive style is often seen as off putting ("Singapore: Language," 2009). Authority is to be respected for both employees of an organization, in Singapore, and when dealing with other organizations (Tse, 2008), and communication content and tone should represent this respect. Business etiquette is also different in Singapore than in many Western countries.

Cultural Business Etiquette in Singapore:

Business is more formal in Singapore than non-Asian organizations are often used to. There are strict rules of protocol, with a clear chain of command, which is expected to be kept on…

References

Choy, W. 1 Jul 2007, "Globalisation and workforce diversity: HRM implications for multinational corporations in Singapore," Singapore Management Review,  http://www.allbusiness.com/public-administration/national-security-international/4509815-1.html .

Edewor, P. & Aluko, P. May 2007, "Diversity management, challenges and opportunities in multicultural organizations," International Journal of Diversity in Organisation, Communities & Nations vol. 6, no. 6, pp. 189-195.

Hofstede, G. Feb 1993, "Cultural constraints in management theories," Executive, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 81-94.

Ismail, R. & Shaw, B. Feb 2006, "Singapore's Malay-Muslim minority: Social identification in a post 9/11 world," Asian Ethnicity vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 37-51.

Culture of Poverty What Cultural
Words: 1626 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96712551
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The phrase that was popular in 1965, when Johnson got his legislation passed, was "Cultural deprivation"; that phrase, and the culture of poverty became what Stein calls "central constructs" around a policy that hopefully would help children that were "shackled by the chains of disadvantage which bind them to a life of hopelessness and misery" (Stein, 2004, xiv).

Schools were a "promising site for government intervention" because the field of education could "…interrupt the otherwise intractable poverty culture," Stein continued, reviewing the federal government's attempt to end poverty. By funding programs to help low income students, the government set out to "…impart middle-class norms, and break the chains of poverty and disadvantage," for poor students, blacks, Latinos, immigrants and others who were seen as "victims of cultural deprivation," Stein continues on page xv. But the problem with the government's intervention was that the "very characterizations of 'disadvantaged youth'…functioned in ways…

Works Cited

Cuthrell, Kristen, Stapleton, Joy, and Ledford, Carolyn. "Examining the Culture of Poverty:

Promising Practices." Preventing School Failure. 54.2 (104-110).

Harrison, Brigid Callahan. Power and Society: An Introduction to the Social Sciences. Florence,

KY: Cengage Learning, 2010.

School of Engineering and Design
Words: 15360 Length: 56 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 38518716
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The last century has seen an increase in the level of international purchases which has been supported by the developments in transportation and technology. Goods can move faster than before with developments in logistics. The negotiation and forming contracts for purchase with companies and communicate with potential suppliers in distant countries is also easier than in the past with the internet and tools such as video conferencing and emails. This facilitates the use of international suppliers. However, other firms may choose local suppliers believing strategy will best suit their needs. Local suppliers may be able to provide where there is an increase in the transparency of the supply chain, less exposure to risks such as interruption and exchange rate risks and proximity may allow closer collaborative relationships to develop. Both procurement strategies are viable, to assess the advantages associated with each approach the procurement from international and local suppliers can…

REFERENCES

'Automotive and Auto Parts Industry in Turkey.' (2012). Turkish Ministry of Economy. [online] available:  http://blog.tcp.gov.tr/?p=2632 .

"Automotive Industry Trends Affecting Component Suppliers.' (2005). International Labour Review, vol. 144, no. 1, pp. 130-133.

Borrus, M., Ernst, D. & Haggard, S. (2001). International Production Networks in Asia: Rivalry or Riches. London: Routledge.

Burton, S., & Steane, P. (2004). Surviving Your Thesis. New York: Routledge.

Culture the Cultural Effects of
Words: 1457 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 76544247
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He realizes that Magnus' rage is not simply conservative, but has a nationalist and liberal ethos behind it, however misguided the man's anger may occasionally seem to Owen.

But even at the beginning of Act III, as Owen is beginning to soften, his strategies of going back to the original names of places, before local shortening and slang, suggest to the viewer or reader that such a strategy may be no more effective than keeping things as they are -- the play suggests that there is no perfect translation, no way to perfectly preserve a pristine Irish past, as Magnus wishes to do, nor to create an Irish future in English, without some sacrifice of power to the linguistic tyranny of England. Owen begins his translation project seeing the initial resistance he experiences as part of the Irish people's almost instinctive fear of change, rather than an exhibition of true…

Desired State of School
Words: 680 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52496827
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Dunn School

No public school in the United States is so perfectly administered that is cannot be improved. Dunn School in Trenton, New Jersey, is certainly not close to being perfect but there are signs that the school is improving. A school improvement plan has been approved and enabled and it includes: a) effective instruction; b) promotion of a positive school climate and culture; and c) effective community and family empowerment. The last two goals could become pivotal to the future of the school, if they are approached with solid background thought and good communication between the school leadership, the community, and families.

Promoting a positive school environment & involving the community

According to the ISLLC Standards #1 and #2 emphasize the need to create a "widely shared vision for learning" and to develop a "school culture and instructional program" that promotes learning while helping the staff become more professional.…

Works Cited

ISLLC Standards. (2012). School Leadership Briefing / Ideas, Insights, and Inspiration for Professional Growth. Retrieved November 5, 2013, from http://www.schoolbriefing.com.

U.S. Department of Education. (2011). Social-Emotional Environment. Retrieved November

5, 2013, from http://www.edu.gov.

Collaborative Leadership in Schools Leadership
Words: 5063 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 98201826
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Brandt (2003) offers ten ways to determine if a school indeed meets the criteria of a learning organization. The first characteristic of a learning organization is that it encourages adaptive behavior in response to differing circumstances. The second is that the learning organization has challenging, but achievable objectives and goals. The third is that members of the organization can accurately identify the organizations' stages of development (Brandt, 2003).

The learning organization can collect, process, and act upon information that fits their purposes (Brandt, 2003). Learning organizations have the knowledge base for creating new ideas. The learning organization has the ability to grow and adapt. They are dynamic and in a constant process of evolution. Learning organizations frequently exchange information with external sources (Brandt, 2003). This happens in educational workshops, in-services, and conferences.

Another feature of the learning organization is that is seeks feedback on their products and services (Brandt, 2003).…

References

Anderson, J. (2008). Principals' Role and Public Primary Schools' Effectiveness in Four Latin American Cities. The Elementary School Journal. 109 (1): 36-60.

Beasley, E. (2008). New leadership model for business fits schools too. Statesman Journal. August 26, 2008. Retrieved October 18, 2008 at  http://www.statesmanjournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080826/Business01/808260315/1040/Business 

Berenstein, L. (2006). Team Teaching with Academic Core Curricula Teachers: Using Aviation Concepts. Department of Aviation Technologies. Southern Illinois University. 43 (2): 1- 19. Retrieved October 19, 2008 at  http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JITE/v43n2/pdf/berentsen.pdf 

Brandt, R. (2003). Is this school a learning organization? 10 ways to tell. Journal of Staff Development. Winter 2003. 24 (1). Retrieved October 19, 2008 at  http://www.nsdc.org/library/publications/jsd/brandt241.cfm

Decisions by School Superintendents Improper Attitude and
Words: 7657 Length: 24 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31703614
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Decisions by School Superintendents

Improper Attitude and Unprofessional Conduct of Teachers

To educate a person in mind and not in morals is to educate a menace to society - President Theodore oosevelt.

That teaching is at one and the same time an intellectual as well as a moral endeavor, is an idea that is well entrenched in the minds of men since centuries past. The sayings of great teachers of ancient times bear ample testimony to this premise, which continues to hold sway across nations and vastly differing civilizations over the years.

In the sense that it takes care of the general well being of young students entrusted to the care of an educational institution and ensures that they are treated fairly and accorded the respect they are due as persons, teaching is most certainly a moral activity. It is concerned with building and maintaining relationships of trust with pupils…

References

Anderson, D.S., & Biddle, B.J. (Eds.) (1991). Knowledge for Policy: Improving Education through Research. New York: The Falmer Press.

Ave, M. (2002, April 24). Jesuit High teacher fired amid misconduct claim. Retrieved December 19, 2002 at  http://www.sptimes.com/2002/04/24/TampaBay/Jesuit_High_teacher_f.shtml .

Barth, R.S. (1990). Improving schools from within. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

Benson, P. (1997). All Kids Are Our Kids: What Communities Must Do To Raise Caring and Responsible Children and Adolescents. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Round School vs A Regular
Words: 10557 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 76655571
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Students in these kinds of schools do not attend school longer, but they do not have a summer break that is longer than any of the other breaks that they take during the school year.

esearch done by McMillen (2001) indicated that there were 106 schools in the state of North Carolina that operated on the year-round school calendar for third through eighth grades during the 1997-1998 school year. McMillen (2001) then conducted an analysis of the academic achievements of these students and compared them to the academic achievements of students in the same grades that attended schools where the traditional calendar was still used.

Data for the study came from a database of statewide testing in which 95% of the public schools in the state participate. In order to determine the academic achievements of the students, McMillen (2001) looked at achievement test scores and demographic information that was collected…

References. Retrieved April 17, 2008, at  http://www.ericdigests.org 

Painesville City School District. (2008). Year Round Education. Retrieved February 20, 2008, at http://www.painevillecityschools.org

Polite, V.C. (1999). Combating educational neglect in suburbia: African-American males and mathematics. In V.C. Polite & J.E. Davis (Eds.), African-American males in school and society: Practices and policies for effective education (pp. 97-107). New York: Teachers College Press.

Poplin, M., & Weeres, J. (1992). Voices from the inside: A report on schooling from inside the classroom. Claremont, CA: Claremont Graduate School, Institute for Education in Transformation.

Pothering, S.L. (1998). The decision-making processes of higher education undergraduate academic program development in a public liberal arts institution. (Doctoral Dissertation, University of South Caroline, 1998). UMI Dissertation Services.

Leadership in International Schools
Words: 29649 Length: 108 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 20990082
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Leadeship Skills Impact Intenational Education

CHALLENGES OF INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

Pactical Cicumstances of Intenational schools

THE IMPORTANCE OF LEADERSHIP IN EDUCATION

What is Effective Leadeship fo Today's Schools?

Challenges of Intecultual Communication

Challenges of Diffeing Cultual Values

Impotance of the Team

Leadeship Style

LEADERSHIP THEORIES

Cuent Leadeship Reseach

Tansfomational Leadeship

Skills-Authoity

Contingency Theoies

APPLYING LEADERSHIP IN AN INTERNATIONAL SETTING

Wagne's "Buy-in" vs. Owneship

Undestanding the Ugent Need fo Change

Reseach confims what teaches, students, paents and supeintendents have long known: the individual school is the key unit fo educational impovement, and within the school the pincipal has a stong influence upon the natue of the school, the conditions unde which students lean, and upon what and how much they lean. Despite this ageement about the cental ole of the pincipal, thee is little eseach concening the chaacteistics of pincipals associated with effective leadeship and with pupil accomplishment, and even less insight…

reference:

http://mason.gmu.edu/~lshafer/schoolsetting.html].

Allen, K.E., Bordas, J., Robinson Hickman, G., Matusek, L.R., & Whitmire, K.J. (1998). Leadership in the twenty-first century. Rethinking Leadership Working Papers. Academy of Leadership Press. http://www.academy.umd.edu/scholarship/casl/klspdocs/21stcen.html

Bennis, W.G. (1997). "The secrets of great groups." Leader to Leader, No.3. The Peter F. Drucker Foundation for Nonprofit Management. http://www.pfdf.org/leaderbooks/L2L/winter97/bennis.html

Crowther, F., Kaagan, S., et. al. (2002). Developing Teacher Leaders. Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press.

Theoretical Understanding of School Climate and Culture
Words: 950 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Chapter Paper #: 88317153
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School Cultural Theory

Any environments where human beings reside, there is an existing culture. The total time that the community members, teachers, and students spend in school environments develop cultural elements have a direct influence on how they act and function in their respective positions.

Developing a system of cultural awareness in schools is critical in activating teachers and school stakeholders to engage in growth promoting activities. Teachers in school settings make up the main components of a school organizational network. It is important noting that schools are forms of organizations that uphold a shared culture. Milner and Browitt (2013) in their study of organizational cultures argue that any organization strives to find a meaningful purpose together as a group that has a shared goal. They further discussed the organizational systems develop individual structures and behavioral patterns with actual means of accomplishing the processes. Organizations create the necessary tools for…

References

Agger, B. (2014). Cultural Studies as Critical Theory. Routledge.

Hudson, K., Ben-Ary, G., Lawson, M., & Hodgetts, S. (2013). The Dynamics of Collaborative Resistance: Negotiating the Methodological Incongruities of Art, Cultural Theory, Science and Design. Proceedings of the 19th International Symposium on Electronic Art, ISEA2013, Sydney.

Milner, A., & Browitt, J. (2013). Contemporary Cultural Theory: An Introduction. Routledge.

Public Schools and Drug Use
Words: 985 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 97583234
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Public school culture is fairly similar even amidst ethnically and geographically diverse schools. For example, there is prohibition of classroom prayer. Students and school staff must maintain a professional and platonic relationship at all times. Any student or school staff engaging in illegal behaviors must be reported. These are just some things that every public school must do or else face potential legal problems. That being said, the culture in the school can be split up into subcultures where the differences can clearly be seen.

Cultural context has always been an important area to examine. Organizations often have their own sub-culture demonstrated by the ones working there. An example is corporate culture. Each company has its own corporate culture and corporate cultures often develop as an ethos generated and maintained by images, ritual, symbols, and social processes. "ituals are often embedded in the formal structure of the organization, as in…

References

Mavrofides, T., Kameas, A., Papageorgiou, D., & Los, A. (2011). On the Entropy of Social Systems: A Revision of the Concepts of Entropy and Energy in the Social Context. Syst. Res., 28(4), 353-368.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/sres.1084 

Mele, C., Pels, J., & Polese, F. (2010). A Brief Review of Systems Theories and Their Managerial Applications. Service Science, 2(1-2), 126-135.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/serv.2.1_2.126 

Morgan, G. (2006). Images of Organization (2nd ed.). SAGE Publications.

two main aspects of'school context
Words: 855 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: A2 Coursework Paper #: 79275208
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school context' as discussed in the oyd reference

Schools represent complex organisms having several components. For achieving school improvement, understanding these components' interrelations is essential. Attempts at improving schooling for the at-risk student population necessitate taking the school context into consideration. oyd (n.d.) states that the ecology, which forms the first aspect, encompasses a school's inorganic components (i.e., non-living things that affect individuals within the school setting; e.g., resources at hand, school size, rules, and policies).

Culture constitutes another aspect of a school setting/context. It may be described as an expression aiming to capture social institutions' (including schools') informal side. Schein (1985) outlines numerous culture-related meanings apparent in literature on the subject:

• Perceived behavior regularities in human interactions, including language employed and practices linked to deportment and respect.

• Norms developing within work groups; for instance, the principle "fair day's wage for a fair day's work" developed during the…

Bibliography

Boyd, V. (n.d.). School context: Bridge or barrier to change? Southwest Educational Development Laboratory. Retrieved December 2016 from  http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED370216.pdf 

Purkey, S.C. & Smith, M.S. (1983). Effective schools: A review. The Elementary School Journal, 83(4), pp. 427-452.

Schein, E.H. (1985). Organizational culture and leadership. San Francisco: Jossey Bass.

Sarason, S.B. (1982). Culture of the school and the problem of change, 2nd edition. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Attendance Policy in an Alternative School
Words: 8552 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 1590486
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Program Attendance Policy Proposal and Analysis

As we are nearing the end of the third school year of the P.A.S.S. program it is beneficial to evaluate the standards and practices which have been set forth through the past three years and determine the efficacy of them. In accordance with the Pennsylvania Standards for Elementary and secondary education school principals (January 2001), data driven assessment of the policies is due. The need for implementation of best practices, be they new or accepted older models is especially great given the proven success of the P.A.S.S. program which has resulted in the proposal for expansion of enrolment and services to meet a greater demand within the local district.

The establishment of best practices for the future is the goal of the current assessment. Since its inception the P.A.S.S. program has used a program completion option strategy with at-risk students attending classes at Howell…

References

ERIC Raising School Attendance. Education Digest, Feb2002, 67.6, pgs.54-57.

ERIC Urban Policies and Programs To Reduce Truancy. ERIC/CUE Digest 129.

ERIC Jay DeKalb Student Truancy. ERIC/CUE Digest 125.

ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management and Linn-Benton Education Service

Group Designing for People Concerned About Bullying in a School
Words: 3650 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 79386353
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Designing a Group

A Group for Individuals Concerned about School ullying Incidents

What population is the group designed to serve?

The group is ultimately designed to serve students of a school where bullying has occurred, and the entire school students, staff, and administrators. Local community members, such as physicians and health professionals would also be welcome; individuals who are professional counselors may have useful contributions. As well, it will serve the students' families, friends, and the community. Each of these individuals has something to contribute in a group dialogue about bullying, from a different perspective. The largest issue to be faced at the onset is empowering individuals, such as students, to speak frankly in the presence of not only their peers, but also in the presence of perceived authority figures.

Parental involvement is important so that the parent can assist with issues that their child may have had concerning bullying;…

Bibliography

Anti-bullying procedures for primary and post-primary schools. (2013). Retrieved from:  https://www.education.ie/en/Publications/Policy-Reports/Anti-Bullying-Procedures-for-Primary-and-Post-Primary-Schools.pdf .

Berlin, R., & Ruscitti, D. (2011). Best Practices in Bullying Prevention and Intervention. Illinois: The County of Du Page.

Burns, J.H. (2015). Retrieved from Bully Proof Classroom:  http://bullyproofclassroom.com/great-anti-bullying-activities 

Developing an Evaluation Plan (n.d.): Retrieved from:  http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/evaluate/evaluation/evaluation-plan/main

Culture of My Workplace a
Words: 1021 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31395265
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Many of these misgivings turned out to be untrue, and teachers found they could monitor the students using the computers with little difficulty. Now, it would seem unusual to find a schoolroom without at least one computer, but then, it was different, and change was met with resistance and even alarm by some of the teachers.

More recently, there has been an increased interest in the community to change kindergarten to a full-day instead of a half-day concept. Many of the staff and the teachers are not happy about this concept, and do not want their classrooms to change from half-day to full-day. They cite a variety of arguments, noting that these young students are too young for a full day of instruction, to their own resistance to working with 5-year-olds to a full day. Because there is also some resistance from the community, the teachers are also using this…

References

Rossman, G.B. "Change and Effectiveness in Schools -- a Cultural Perspective."

Culture Refers to the Accumulated
Words: 4685 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87152746
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In histoy, in most of the Indian families, the inheitance of the estates of the family is left to the lineage of males in the family. Though since the yea 1956, the law in India has always teated females and males as equals in mattes of inheitance whee thee is no legal will witten. Cuently, Indians have become wise and ae using legal wills fo the inheitance and succession of popety. The usage of legal wills at of the yea 2004 stands at about 20%.

The ate of divoce in India is extemely low. It stands at 1% as compaed to 40% which is expeienced in the U.S. These statistics of divoce do not, howeve, give a complete pictue of the divoce situation in India. This is because many maiages that end up being split do so without a fomal divoce. Thee is a eseach gap in the scientific studies…

references. [Article]. Journal of Food Science, 69(4), SNQ191-SNQ192. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2621.2004.tb06362.x

Johnson, H. (2007). 'Happy Diwali!' Performance, Multicultural Soundscapes and Intervention in Aotearoa/New Zealand. [Article]. Ethnomusicology Forum, 16(1), 71-94. doi: 10.1080/17411910701276526

Kurien, P.A. (2006). Multiculturalism and "American" Religion: The Case of Hindu Indian-Americans. Social Forces, 85(2), 723-741.

Mandair, a. (2007). Interdictions: Language, Religion & the (dis)Orders of Indian Identity. [Article]. Social Identities, 13(3), 337-361. doi: 10.1080/13504630701363978

Mintz, S.W., & Bois, C.M.D. (2002). The Anthropology of Food and Eating. Annual Review of Anthropology, 31(ArticleType: research-article / Full publication date: 2002 / Copyright © 2002 Annual Reviews), 99-119.

Culture Is Defined by the Pattern of
Words: 1030 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Admission Essay Paper #: 49176547
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Culture is defined by the pattern of collective thoughts and behavior that people living in social groups learn, create and share. Characteristics within culture distinguish different groups from each other and highlight key differences between the human world and the animal kingdom. Anthropology emerged as a field of academic study of human culture in order to understand the diversity of the practices and values of different human populations.

With the advent of advanced technology, communication, and media capabilities, widespread globalization has emerged, resulting in an apparent decrease in the difference between cultures throughout the world. The results of this globalization may be observed in the homogeneity of certain aspects of pop culture, mostly due to media such as television and the internet. Although younger generations of people in different countries on different continents appear to behave similarly in a lot of respects, the question should be addressed as to whether…

Culture There Are'so Many
Words: 1263 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86849342
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This research focuses on the public housing neighborhood of Bezirganbahce. Like the first, this article shows how Turkish society "marks the areas populated by the urban poor as dangerous, a breeding ground for illegal activities, and areas of social decay or social ill," (Candan & Kolluoglu 2008 p 38). Those lower ranking social classes and ethnic subgroups are often excluded from the daily existence of mainstream Turkish culture and forced to life a marginalized life in a segregated area that isolates lower socioeconomic classes from the rest of society. The urban poor that reside in the neighborhood are excluded from an external source, and thus left to fend for themselves. In this marginalized space, the residents of this neighborhood have actually created a culture that is all their own outside of the boundaries of typical Turkish life. Like as shown in Yilmaz (2008), this neighborhood is seen as having to…

References

Candan, Ayfur Bartu & Kolluoglu, Biray. (2008). Emerging spaces of neoliberalism: A gated town and a public housing project in Istanbul. New Perspectives on Turkey, 39(2008), 4-46.

Yilmaz, Bediz. (2008). Entrapped in multidimensional exclusion: The perpetuation of poverty among conflict-induced migrants in an Istanbul neighborhood. New Perspectives on Turkey, 38(2008), 205-234.

School That Are Related to All the
Words: 864 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88350669
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school that are related to all the students and have a general effect on the entire organization. The focus of the research pertinent to this investigation deals with the Hispanic female population in my school. Within this group there are some specific issues that could definitely benefit from a widespread application of a thoughtful universal design for learning (UDL) plan. At the heart of the learning problems with this specific demographic is the differing culture and communication methods that come into conflict with the student and her environment. The transition from Spanish to English is dramatic in many cases and the curriculum and school system design does not necessarily align itself with the a path to simple and easy learning. The environment has taken this problem into consideration and has addressed this communication gaps in some ways but there is much room for improvement. English as a second language (ESL)…

References

Sahin, Y (2003). Empowering ESL Students with Universal Design. University of Maryland, Paper 2003. Retrieved from  http://www.edtechpolicy.org/StudentWork/yesmin/www.glue.umd.edu/~ysahin/EDUC477/Empowering%20ESL%20students%20with%20UD.htm 

Strehorn, K. (2001). The Application of Universal Instructional Design to ESL Teaching. The Internet TESL Journal, 7(3), March 2001. Retrieved from  http://iteslj.org/Techniques/Strehorn-UID.html

Culture and Morality In Other
Words: 5560 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92689784
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Such differences may lead us to question whether there are any universal moral principles or whether morality is merely a matter of "cultural taste" (Velasquez, Andre, Shanks and Meyer: 1).

If there is no transcendent ethical or moral standard, then cultural relativists argue that culture becomes the ethical norm for determining whether an action is right or wrong. This ethical system is known as cultural relativism. Cultural relativism is the view that all ethical truth is relative to a specific culture. hatever a cultural group approves is considered right within that culture. Conversely, whatever a cultural group condemns is wrong (Relativism: 2).

The key to the doctrine of "cultural relativism" is that right and wrong can only be judged relative to a specified society. There is no ultimate standard of right and wrong by which to judge culture. Proponents of cultural relativism believe this cultural diversity proves that culture alone…

Works Cited

Anderson, Kerby. "Cultural Relativism." (2004):1-5.

Accessed 1 April 2012.

www.probe.org

"Argument by Morality: Axiological Argument." 2002. Accessed 7 April 2012.

Culture vs Real Culture and
Words: 617 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11950905
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The very notion of 'Asian-American' is a false construction, given the distinctive cultures that exist within the region. Moreover, some recent Asian immigrants, such as those from Cambodia or Vietnam, may have more impoverished economic circumstances than individuals from more affluent Asian nations.

Culture is not a static thing: it is constantly in flux, and fuses with other cultures. A second-generation immigrant may passionately identify with certain aspects of his parent's culture, but may also incorporate elements of America into his identity. Every time there is an encounter with another culture, both representatives from each culture will change. A good example of this can be seen in religion: even though the religion of Christianity was imposed upon African-Americans, African-American religious traditions have reconfigured this religion into something positive and uplifting that can serve as a vehicle of political and spiritual mobilization.

The temptation, when viewing a new culture, is to…

Culture and Leadership and Culture
Words: 1215 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 24787698
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There are different styles and measurements that have been used by this model in reflecting on the relationship between culture and leadership. The model proposes and stands by the fact that transformational leadership is a building that is established with the use of an appropriate avenue of culture. The model states and supports the fact that it becomes highly possible to have a genuine basement. This is a basement in which all the possible avenues of performances and attributes are giving to the generalized states of establishing and leading people. Culture can be dominant in some situations. Nonetheless, the establishment and building of culture is because there are many attributes of change and management that will call for the establishment and maintenance of a good cultural background at any given time. According to studies, transformational leadership styles are more effective than transactional leadership styles, and transactional leadership styles are more…

References

Harvard business review on breakthrough leadership. (2001). Boston: Harvard Business

School Press.

Hodgetts, Richard M., Luthans, Fred, & Doh, Jonathan P. (2005). International Management:

Culture, Strategy, and Behavior W / Olc Card Mp. Irwin Professional Pub.

Culture Affects the Way Students Learn Mathematics
Words: 1825 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 423849
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culture affects the way students learn mathematics, and how different cultures learn differently. Students in Korea and Japan learn differently than students in the United States for a number of reasons. Statistically, Asian students seem to do better at mathematics than American children do, and they way they learn their mathematics at an early age may be on reason this is so.

Identification and Investigation

US students often show lower test scores in understanding mathematics, while Asian students consistently score higher. There are many reasons for this, from different cultures to different methods of instruction. For example, one researcher found that Japanese children think of numbers differently, and see their relationships in depth. She writes, "She discovered part of the reason was the way they named their numbers. Following ten, they say, "ten 1, ten 2, ten 3" for 11, 12, 13, and say "2-ten, 2-ten 1, 2-ten 2" for…

References

Bharucha, J. (2008). America can teach Asia a lot about science, technology, and math.

Chronicle of Higher Education; Vol. 54 Issue 20, pA33-A34.

Cotter, J. (2009). Right start mathematics. Retrieved 13 Nov. 2009 from the Abacus.com Web site:  http://www.alabacus.com/Downloads/RightStart%20Mathematics.pdf . 1-5.

Editors. (2000). How Japanese students learn math. Christian Science Monitor; Vol. 92 Issue 127, p17.

Schools Kill Creativity The Memoirs
Words: 764 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 84134113
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The idea is that imposing a concentration of coursework in reading, writing and arithmetic will make us more competitive with the world and better prepared for the future. According to Robinson, what the policymakers have failed to take into account is that the world is changing faster than ever in our history. He believes that the best hope for the future is to develop a new paradigm of human capacity to meet a new era of human existence. e need to create environments where every person is inspired to grow creatively in order to meet the challenges that lie ahead.

Edward de Bono (2005) notes that not only is the amount of information students learn during the time they are at school very limited, much of the knowledge they acquire while at school is quickly outdated. On the other hand, access to all kinds of information has become incredibly easy.…

Works Cited

Brautigan, Richard. "The Memoirs of Jesse James." Rommel Drives Deep into Egypt. New York: Dell, 1970.

de Bono, Edward. "Creativity at School: Is it even Possible?" Learning and Thinking. April, 2005. Teaching Expertise. 16 September 2010.

Geist, Eugene and Jennifer Hohn. "Encouraging Creativity in the Face of Administrative Convenience: How our Schools Discouage Divergent Thinking." Education. Vol. 130, Issue 1 (Fall 2009): 141-150. 15 September 2010.

Robinson, Ken. Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything. New York: Viking Penguin, Penguin Group USA, 2009.

School Crime Including the Characteristics
Words: 2347 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 8865251
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Several areas, if poorly designed, can lead to violent and criminal behavior, including parking lots, isolated spots on campus, locker rooms, and corridors. Often, violent behavior occurs in these areas when adults are not present (Astor, Meyer, and Behre, 1999, p. 3). Designing schools with more open areas, more planned classrooms, and a more defined perimeter can create a safer, less violent campus by creating a more functional and enjoyable educational experience. Thus, older, poorly designed schools often attract more violent behavior.

Location can also be a risk factor in certain schools, although that is not always the case. Another researcher notes, "Some urban schools are located [...] in slum neighborhoods where drug sellers routinely kill one another, as well as innocent bystanders, on the streets surrounding the school" (Toby, 1994, p.169). Children growing up in violence prone neighborhoods such as these may simply accept violence as a way of…

References

Astor, R.A. Meyer, H.A. And Behre, W.J. (1999). Unowned places and times: Maps and interviews about violence in high schools. American Educational Research Journal, Vol. 36, No. 1, 3-42.

Crowe, T.D. (1990). Designing safer schools. School Safety. 43-47.

Jenkins, P.H.(1997). School delinquency and the school social bond. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, Vol. 34 No. 3, 337-367.

May, D.C. (September 1999). Scared kids, unattached kids, or peer pressure: Why do students carry firearms to school? Youth & Society, Vol. 31 No. 1, 100-127.

School of Athens an Illustration
Words: 699 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93218813
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e can consider 'The School of Athens' as a 'visualization of knowledge.'" in addition to Plato and Aristotle, Euclid and Pythagoras are present among others. Lahanas even suggests that the painting may be a reproduction of Plato's Academy. This concept would emphasize a commitment to learning, as well as an interest in antiquity and classical learning. The architecture depicted is a "modification of Bramante's first design for St. Peter (Lahanas).

The combination of classical scholars, emphasis on learning, and suggestion of St. Peter's draws together all of the relevant characteristics of the Renaissance. First, Raphael most obviously alludes to the Renaissance's interest in antiquity with the identifiable Greek scholars. That two of the most prominent classical philosophers are prominent, suggesting not only their importance, but also the importance of the classical period. In addition, the situation in which the philosophers are located places an emphasis on the importance of learning…

Works Cited

Guisepi, R.A. (nd). The Renaissance. Retrieved December 30, 2008, at http://history- world.org/renaissance.htm

Lahanas, Michael. (nd). School of Athens, "Who is Who?" Puzzle. Retrieved December 30, 2008, at  http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/SchoolAthens.htm

School Movement Influences on Cotemporary
Words: 993 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43677149
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ather than forming the one, who happens to live in America, into a citizen of this nation, the objective of the 21st century is to make him a citizen of the world. And it is arguable, too, whether the focus is on knowledge as power as it was in Mann's days; focus may have changed to knowledge of technology and business as per power as evidenced by the increasing number of dropouts and increasing stress of corporations and need to make money. Individualism was rubbed into conformism in the attempt to make one patriotic American citizen. It is thought that today we are more individualistic, but the reality may be that Adam Smith may merely have taken center place today, and contemporary conformism centers around money.

Other differences include the shift from nation to individual. In Mann's days the individual existed for the purpose of a common end, and, accordingly,…

Reference

Spring, J. The American School

Culture on Learning Styles Multiculturalism
Words: 5049 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 583446
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Following are Hofstede's four categories and what they measure:

Power Distance (PD) is the "extent to which the less powerful members of institutions and organizations within a country expect and accept that power is distributed unequally" (Hofstede 1998) with a small PD meaning more equality in the society, and a large PD meaning less.

Individualism (ID) defines whether the society expects people to look after themselves or not. Its opposite is Collectivism, which Hofstede (1998) defines as "the extent to which people in a society from birth onwards are integrated into strong, cohesive in-groups, which throughout people's lifetime continue to protect them in exchange for unquestioning loyalty."

Masculinity (MA) defines the degree of distinction of gender roles. High MA means men are supposed to be "assertive, tough, and focused on material success; women are supposed to be more modest, tender, and concerned with the quality of life" (Hofstede 1998). Its…

References

Al-Mekhalfi, A.G. (2001). Instructional media for teachers' preparation. International Journal of Instructional Media, 28(2), 191. Retrieved January 31, 2005, from Questia database,  http://www.questia.com .

Arab World (2005). Geert Hofstede Cultural Dimensions. Retrieved January 29, 2005 at  http://www.geert-hofstede.com/hofstede_arab_world.shtml 

Australia. (2005) Geert Hofstede Cultural Dimensions. Retrieved January 29, 2005 at  http://www.geert-hofstede.com/hofstede_australia.shtml 

Bilimoria, P. (1995). Introduction to the Special Issue: Comparative and Asian philosophy in Australia and New Zealand. Philosophy East & West, 45(3), 151-169.

Culture and the Evolutionary Process of Human Beings
Words: 3353 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 67181596
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Acheology

THE ROLE OF CULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT IN THE EVOLUTION OF HUMANITY

Undestanding the evolution of humanity has been one of the most citical quests fo most individuals in the cuent society. The intesection between envionmental influences and cultue ceates an aea of social inteest with a focus on human evolution. Empiical eseach shows that the society plays a significant ole in shaping the evolution of human beings as evidenced by psychological analysis of human evolution. The extaodinay coopeative natue of human beings aises moe questions on the peceived changes of human behavio and inteaction ove time (Hawkes, Paine, & School, 2006). Among the factos that dive human beings to stive to undestand thei evolution, include paleoanthopology esults that povide unique infomation that povides significant evidence to the aspects of human evolution postulated to have occued millions of yeas ago. Results fom fossil studies such as inceasing bain size and…

references: Evolutionary hypotheses tested in 37 cultures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 12(01), 1 -- 14.

Croll, E., & Parkin, D. (2002). Bush Base, Forest Farm: Culture, Environment, and Development. Routledge.

Darlington, P.J. (1978). Altruism: Its characteristics and evolution. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 75(1), 385 -- 389.

Eagly, A.H., & Wood, W. (1999). The origins of sex differences in human behavior: Evolved dispositions vs. social roles. American Psychologist, 54(6), 408 -- 423.

Foley, R. (1995). The adaptive legacy of human evolution: A search for the environment of evolutionary adaptedness. Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews, 4(6), 194 -- 203

School Are We in Education
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It is also helping everyone to see their roles and the way they can make a difference by improving quality. Over the course of time, this motivates educators to do more, as they see that administrators are practicing the same policies. (Boyd, 2002) (Brower, 2005)

Whether your current school leader is conventional, congenial, or collegial?

The school leader is someone who is embracing conventional and collegial techniques. This is because, she gives everyone a certain amount of independence in determining how they will reach out to students and meet various curriculum requirements. Yet, she also has everyone participate in an open discussion about how to improve quality and the techniques they are utilizing. This involves having staff members monitor, observe and critique each other in a friendly -- non-confrontational manner. (Cram, 2000) (Boyd, 2002) (Brower, 2005)

To enhance these ideas, the principle handles herself in a professional manner. This means…

References

Boyd, P. (2002). Educational Leadership. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC CLIO

Brower, R. (2005). Transformational Leadership. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Cram, H. (2000). Leading and Learning in Schools. New York, NY: Routledge.

Culture and Electronic Media
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American pop culture has been cultivated and molded by mass media. The recent iteration of mass media, electronic media, has a profound and significant influence on the daily lives, thoughts, perceptions and desires of every single person in the United States, whether people are aware of this influence, or not. The potential for media to influence people has been the subject of much debate since the earliest forms of mass media; newspaper, radio, and television have all contributed to our individual and collective psyche in America. This paper will discuss the roles that music, radio, television, and the motion pictures have played in the development of American popular culture as well as discuss some of the trends propagated by the electronic media and will provide a personal perspective on the relationship between media representations and consumerism, the human body and justice, law, and order.

Bagdikian (2000, pg. 185) notes that…

References:

Bagdikian, B. (2000) The Media Monopoly, Sixth Edition. Beacon Press.

Bhattacharya, P. (July, 2003) Back to the future: Urbanization, globalization and consumerism. Boloji.com. Retrieved from  http://www.boloji.com/opinion/0051i.htm 

Zoubkov, P., Johnson, S., Young, N., Fletcher, H. & Thomas, B. (2004) Global Bits: Corporate influence in the media. Global Education Center, 3, 87-93 Retrieved from http://www.globaled.org.nz

Culture and Morality
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Morality, Culture, And Environment

The ideas behind morality are very different based on the culture, society, and environment in which that morality is seen. Because of that, there are questions regarding exactly what morality is, and how it can be addressed or understood. In short, what is moral to one person may not seem moral to another. Society as a whole generally determines what is acceptable within that society, but once a person leaves that society and goes to another, there may be very different thoughts and feelings about morality in the new society to which the person has moved (Blackburn, 2001). That can be true from country to country, but a person does not have to leave his or her home country to find differing views of morality. Especially in the United States, where there are so many different types of people and regions seem to have very different…

References

Blackburn, S. (2001). Ethics: A very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Harris, S. (2010). The moral landscape: How science can determine human values. New York: Free Press.

Stanford University (2011). The definition of morality. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Stanford University.

Superson, A. (2009). The moral skeptic. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Culture of Taiwan Sense of
Words: 1879 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 37564171
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Vegetarian food is easily found in Buddhist restaurants in big cities of Taiwan. Many people enjoy vegetarian food due to health or religious reasons since there is a strong connection between Buddhist religion and vegetarian food. Still only a very small portion of the entire population is totally vegetarian.

ecreational System

ecreation is important in Taiwanese society and it has become more vital since Taiwanese started getting higher income in 1980s (Moiz, Wu, p. 107). They enjoy life the way any modern society would like going to the movies, enjoying karaoke, meeting family and friends and spending time in the parks. Eating out is also one activity Taiwanese enjoy and shopping malls are normally immensely crowded on the weekends. The night markets in Taipei see huge crowds where all kind of exotic stuff is sold.

3. CONCLUSION

Taiwan is a growing nation which has made its mark on the world…

Reed, Barbara Edith. Davison, Gary Marvin. [1998] . Culture and Customs of Taiwan. Greenwood Press

Camenson, Blythe. [2007] Opportunities in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. Mc-Graw Hill.

Kelly, Robert. [2007] Taiwan (Country Guide). Lonely Planet. 7th edition.

Culture on Communication Then Explain Two Ways
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culture on communication. Then explain two ways misunderstandings might occur among cultures with different communication styles. Finally, propose two solutions to enhance cross-cultural communication.

ommunication: The influence of culture on communication

Although the urge to communicate using a common language may seem to be a universal impulse, the ways in which communication takes place is highly dependent upon an individual's cultural context. For example, within an Asian cultural context, the level of hierarchy, social distance, and expectation of obedience is different between parents and children than in a Westernized cultural context. This can often cause conflict for Asian adolescents reared in the United States who are still 'acculturated' to Asian norms by first-generation parents at home (Rhee, hang & Rhee 2003: 750). While the relationship of a child to a parent exists in all cultures, the expectations attached to that relationship are far from universal in nature and scope. Acculturation…

Communication (both verbal and non-verbal) is key to understanding a culture. Language, gestures, expressions, and other symbols for interaction, help to explain the differences between cultures and help one understand the attitudes, values, and beliefs of a certain culture. Language, including each word, utterance, and distance between conversations, are all influenced by culture.

Language and culture are closely intertwined. Language affects culture while culture affects language. Cross-cultural research has examined miscommunication and why it happens. Two umbrella explanations for miscommunication are via the interpersonal underpinnings of politeness and indirectness (Fiske, Gilbert, & Lindzey, 2001). Scollon and Scollon (1981) found that Athabaskans (indigenous peoples of North America-Alaska), " tend to assume greater distance when interacting with unacquainted individuals than do English-speaking Americans" (Fiske, Gilbert, & Lindzey, p. 1402, 2001). Thus, Athabaskans prefer more distance and more negative politeness strategies while Americans refer more positive approach-based politeness strategies. This could result in a misunderstanding when group members interact. Another communication difference ties more specifically into language. Speakers of English tend to refer to themselves via pronouns when reporting their actions (i.e. "I went to the store") while speaks of other languages (namely Japanese) often do not do this at all (i.e. "Went to the store"). Using pronouns is a linguistic practice that tends to be used in more individualistic cultures like America, where the emphasis is on the person. Conversely, not using pronouns is related to more collectivistic cultures where the target of the sentence is decontextualized (Kashima & Kashima, 2003). Related to this is another cross-cultural difference of linguistic abstractness. South Korean speakers are more likely to use verbs when they speak whereas English speakers are more likely to use adjectives, to describe a variety of social objects (Kashima, Kashima, Kim, and Gelfand, 2006). There are many other cross-cultural differences in communication that may or may affect the way we understand others.

Enhancing cross-cultural communication requires understanding a culture's background, roots, traditions, and values, amongst other factors. Knowing whether a culture is individualistic or collectivistic is hugely significant, and would really explain the differences between at least the two examples seen here. Studying the social construction of meaning to a culture requires a lot of work, but allows us to understanding a culture's language and means of communicating, at least verbally. Knowledge of expressions and gestures and other kinesics of a culture can help to understand the nonverbal communication produced by a culture. There is no other ways to decreasing misunderstandings without knowledge of the origin of the misunderstanding itself. This requires complete comprehension of the culture in all its facets. Without that ability, one will struggle to understand and accept the verbal and nonverbal communication styles used by different groups of people. If you don't grow up with it, it is foreign to you and can often seem negative, or wrong. However if looked at from the other lens, the other group feels

Culture Essay
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This essay examines the meaning of culture and provides several possible titles and topics that may be used as starting points for developing a paper on culture. It discusses the definition of culture, how culture is developed, and how cultures change. It shows how cultural identity and cultural differences are formed and how culture diversity is a fact of life. It also explains why in spite of diverse cultures commonly existing in one group there is usually a dominant culture that comes to the fore and is promoted by the leaders of the group. The essay closes with recommendations for other ways in which a paper on culture can be written.

Culture is the heart and soul of a society, group or organization: it is the manifestation of what a particular set of people thinks, feels, believes in, and holds as ideal. It is the communication of what a people…

Culture Shock Coping in Diverse and Cultural Environments
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Adjustment to a new environment or culture with unfamiliar people is often marred by significant challenges, one of which is culture shock. Culture shock is the confusion and anxiety that arises when one is exposed to unfamiliar social surroundings that are noticeably different from their own (Anjalin, Mazumdar, & Whiteside, 2017). Students, expatriates, and business people who move from one culture to another are at risk of experiencing culture shock, and need to cope with the same to enhance their performance. This text outlines some of the coping strategies that an expatriate moving to a foreign country could adapt to manage culture shock.
The Scenario
An expatriate has received a promotion that requires him and his family to transfer to another country to run operations in that country. The country is not only third-world, but has different cultural norms and speaks a different language. It would be prudent to identify…

References
Anjalin, U., Mazumdar, A., & Whiteside, E. (2017). Asian Students’ Experience of Culture Shock and Coping Strategies. Journal of Education and Social Development, 1(1), 7-13.
Chen, M. (2019). The Impact of Expatriates’ Cross-Cultural Adjustment on Work Stress and Job Involvement in the High-Tech Industry. Frontiers in Psychology, 10(1), doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02228
Kim, J., Suh, W., Kim, S., & Gopalan, H. (2012). Coping Strategies to Manage Acculturative Stress: Meaningful Activity, Participation, Social Support, and Positive Emotion among Korean Immigrant Adolescents in the USA. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Health and Well-Being, 7(1), doi: 10.3402/qhw.v7i0.18870
Rempel, J. N. (2011). Coping Strategies for culture Shock as Indicators of Cultural Identity. Anthro Journal. Retrieved from  https://anthrojournal.binghamton.edu/wp-contentuploads/2011/05/COPING-STRATEGIES-FOR-CULTURE-SHOCK.pdf 
Smith, A. (2019). Helping Expatriate Employees Deal with Culture Shock. Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from  https://www.shrm.org/hr-today/news/hr-magazine/summer2019/pages/helping-expatriate-employees-deal-with-culture-shock.aspx 

Culture and Identity in Everyday Use
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.....characters come into conflict with the culture in which they live.

What interests you most about this prompt and why?

This prompt interests me because I like stories about conflict -- stories in which characters clash with their surroundings. It is very easy to connect with stories like this, as I often feel like separate from much of what goes on around me. Stories of culture are also very interesting because they are full of history and people, stories and humanity -- and I am very interested in the human experience, what it means to be human, what it is that makes us who we are, why we think certain things, how things change, how ideas clash, how cultures come into conflict with one another. There is a lot to explore with this prompt.

What text will you write about? Why?

"Everyday Use" by Alice Walker: I thought this story…

School Would Involve Knowing How
Words: 912 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Application Essay Paper #: 26351389
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I said to my friend that it was not so much what happened on 9/11. What concerned me more was the world we would wake up in on Sept 12, 2001. Certainly, our country and the world will never be the same. This gave a different focus to my military career in the hopes of making sure that a 9/11 event would never happen again. With modern war, the home front is as important as overseas. We must be vigilant and studies in such an area as homeland security studies are vital. While this may not be my entire focus, it occupies a healthy portion.

In your fourth question, you ask what my experience is and/or aptitude for completing academic work at a distance. Frankly, I have many friends and family members that have received degrees online. Their main issue (especially with younger people) in dealing with the online academic…

Schools or Modes of Thought Regarding Methods
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schools or modes of thought regarding methods for interpreting text. These are "traditional interpretation" and "modern interpretation." Please provide a brief explanation of each and which you personally ascribe to and why. Then explain how the mode of your choice would be applies to interpretation of the Ten Commandments.

Traditional interpretation is intended to decide the explicit meaning of something, or to define the truth. For example, interpreting something as true in the traditional meaning would be the same as knowing something is true. Modern interpretation, on the other hand, is subjective and many interpretations or understandings of something can coexist without paradox; a modern interpretation does not imply the whole and absolute truth.

I personally ascribe to a modern interpretation style. The reason for this is because I am not only a reader, I am also an artist. When I create, I personally put many layers of meaning into…

Culture Bias in Intelligence Assessments
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Culturally Biased Intelligence Assessment

Intelligence assessments have existed since the early twentieth century and have continued to be a topic of debate. We all know full well that intelligence assessment is critical to the type if academic success that we achieve in life. One of the primary tools used to assess intelligence is the IQ test. However, the intelligence quotient test has been under scrutiny for decades because it is believed to harbor culturally biased precepts.

The purpose of this discussion is to explore the cultural bias' that exist in intelligence quotient testing. We will begin with a literary review which will start by explaining the definition of cultural bias in testing and the historical implications. We will explain the origins of the IQ test and the reasons why the cultural bias exist. Our discussion will then focus on how cultural bias in intelligence assessment has produced historical implications.

We…

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Educators Should Require Evidence. (1999). Phi Delta Kappan, 81(2), 132.

Enriching the Focus on ethnicity and race. (1998). APA Monitor. VOLUME 29, NUMBER 3 - March 1998 www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=95784671

Alexander, K.L. (1997). Public Schools and the Public Good. Social Forces, 76(1), 1-30.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=86928340