Sexism Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Love Got to Do With

Words: 1464 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75779460

The only thing that is missing is the freedom to make that choice, the freedom to do it without pain or sacrifice. But freedom always comes with a price, especially for women. In the process of gaining her choice, Ada loses a finger, loses her piano, and almost loses her life.

We have to also look at history in the film. The Piano seems historically correct because women didn't have the right to choose their mates during this time. Love almost always came at some price. Ada chose to express her love the only way she knew how -- through her piano. But she is not making the right choice, because in the process she is sacrificing herself. She is unable to stand up for what is right because the pain is too great and too lonely to bear.

While I think Hook's view of male supremacy seems somewhat harsh,…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

American Labor Movement History of Labor Movement

Words: 1431 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83699111

American Labor Movement

The "labor question," its origins, components, and whether or not it is still relevant.

The "labor question" is the foundation of the American Labor Movement. Drawing from our classwork and paraphrasing Rosanne Currarino's modern restatement of the "labor question(s)": "hat should constitute full participation in American society? hat standard of living should citizens expect and demand?" (Currarino 112). Concerned with the ideal of an industrial democracy, including a more equitable society with social and financial betterment of working class people, the "labor question" arose during and in response to America's 19th Century (Second) Industrial Revolution. America's Industrial Revolution occurred within the "Gilded Age," named by Mark Twain (Mintz), and lasting roughly from the end of the U.S. Civil ar until the beginning of orld ar I (D.C. Shouter and RAKEN Services). Fueled in part by refined coal and steam power, the American Industrial Revolution transformed America from…… [Read More]

Works Cited

AFL-CIO. Samuel Gompers (1850-1924). 2012. Web. 7 February 2012.

Currarino, Rosanne. The Labor Question in America: Economic Democracy in the Gilded Age. Urbana, Chicago and Springfield, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2011. Print.

D.C. Shouter and RAKEN Services. "The Gilded Age - Industrial Revolution in America." 2011. Raken.com Web site. Web. 7 February 2012.

Dictionary.com, LLC. Xenophobia. 2012. Web. 7 February 2012.
View Full Essay

Othello by William Shakespeare With

Words: 1687 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82659293

He had sent all the servants for a leave with an excuse that it was carnival time, though his intention was to conceal his action (Rawls 54). He managed to convince Fortunato to put on a cloak so that nobody would recognize him on the way and this was another way of concealing the intended action.

Some of the remarks that Fortunate made on the way hurt Montresor making him to justify and accomplish his mission. At one time Fortunato told Montresor that he does not remember Montresor's court of arms. He tried to illustrate as containing a human foot that crushes a serpent with words such as no one that has impunity that can attack. The illustration and the message was a way of showing that Montresor's family was always on revenge mission. Montresor considered it as an insult and triggered his urge to revenge. On the way, they…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Rawls, John. A Theory of Justice. Cambridge, Mass: Belknap Press of Harvard Univ. Press, 1999. Print.

Sandel, Michael J. Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do? New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. Print.
View Full Essay

Children's Literature

Words: 1279 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66144771

Children's Lit

Montano urges a rigorous critical examination of children's literature for racism, linguicism, sexism, and bias. The importance of critical examination is to empower teachers, students, and parents to recognize the root causes of bias, prejudice, and stereotype. The function is not simply to point out obvious instances of racism, linguicism, sexism, and other biases. Moreover, it is not enough to include literature written from multicultural perspectives in classroom syllabi. As Gonzalez & Montano (2008) point out, it is important to recognize bias in all its forms: "The mere inclusion of multicultural literature is not enough to disrupt privilege or injustice. Nor is it enough to ask teachers to deconstruct stereotypes in texts and images if teachers are unaware of the subtle biases that exist therein," (p. 77). Montano calls the process of analysis critical literacy.

The process by which critical literacy can be attained varies but Montano provides…… [Read More]

References

Baum, F. (1900). The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.

Gonzalez, R. & Montano, T. (2008) "Critical analysis of Chicana/o children's literature: Moving from cultural differences to sociopolitical realities," Journal of Praxis in Multicultural Education: Vol. 3: Iss. 1, Article 6. DOI: 10.9741/2161-2978. Available at: http://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/jpme/vol3/iss1/6

Herge. (1930). Tin in the Congo.

Riorden, R. (2007). The Titan's Curse.
View Full Essay

Media Review the Black Swan

Words: 1689 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56412145

Her day's routine and life merely revolved around these characters that cause her to think or act differently. All of these characters have quite an influential pressure on her that the Nina eventually becomes an amalgamation of thoughts. Pretty soon she gives into the evil desires that she cannot distinguish reality from illusions.

Stone and Church (1989) have called adolescence a very vulnerable period. According to them, adolescence is full of continuous feeling of emotional volatility, rebelliousness and intense idealism. It is seen that adolescence needs to develop a tough inside full of security and confidence. Only if they are sure about themselves and their abilities, these adolescents will go on to take the different problems in life. ebellion and intense idealism is quite prominent during this stage. The adolescent wants to do things and hopes to aspire activities that will make him or her better than everybody else. If…… [Read More]

References

Black Swan (2010). [DVD] Darren Aronofsky.

Hall, G. (1904). Adolescence. Englewood Cliffs, N.J: Prentice Hall..

Stangor, C. (2011). Introduction to psychology. Flat World Knowledge.

Stone, L., and Church, J. (1989). Childhood and Adolescence. McGraw-Hill.
View Full Essay

Diversity and Multicultural Education

Words: 1215 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12480421

Diversity

Using Power Point: Understanding Diversity answer the below questions

How could prejudice affect a person's ability to learn and work?

Prejudice could affect the person's self-esteem and self-confidence. Teachers and peers might treat the student differently than they would without the prejudice, even if the prejudice is "positive," such as prejudice toward Asian students in a math class. Prejudice might impede a person's ability to learn and work, because it impacts the reactions of both teachers and students.

How important is the issue of diversity in your daily life?

Diversity is hugely important in my daily life. I do not like being in homogeneous places, because they are not reflective of the world at large. The world is diverse, filled with people with differing points-of-view and backgrounds. My views and outlooks change when I interact with different people, and I like that diversity makes me think more critically and…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Practice Consider How Research and or Practices That

Words: 706 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70821349

Practice

Consider how research and/or practices that are focused on gender issues might be effectively and creatively employed as tools of social change in the service of sexism or homophobia. Also describe ethical implications related to the action purpose.

Throughout the decades, sexism has been a major challenge for women to overcome. Part of the reason for this, is because of various barriers that have been in place to limit any kind opportunities or social advancements for them. This is problematic, because these kinds of restrictions have made it difficult for women to deal with these issues. While at the same time, being able to: move forward and live independent lives. To address these challenges many different practices have been implemented that are designed to tackle the problem head on. To fully understand the effect of these efforts requires: examining the how these kinds of programs are influencing these views…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Forget Chocolate on Valentine's Day. (2011). Reaction Watch. Retrieved from: http://retractionwatch.wordpress.com/2011/04/06/forget-chocolate-on-valentines-day-try-semen-says-surgery-news-editor-retraction-resignation-follow/

Savage, R. (1997). Doctor's Attitudes to Women in Medicine. Journal of Royal College of Practioneers, 27, 363- 365.

Spender, D. (2000). Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women. New York, NY: Taylor and Francis.
View Full Essay

Power and Riches Like Restrictive Chains or

Words: 708 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79229755

power and riches like restrictive chains or are they like keys to freedom and happiness?

There is an old adage that states money does not buy happiness and there is certainly something to that. At the same time, money can prevent unhappiness. hen a person is poor and has no power, this station certainly contributes to their level of unhappiness. Living in poverty forces people into a cycle where they have to work to survive. They lose out on opportunities for education and social advancement. In that sense, poverty is a prison and freedom from poverty is a key to more happiness than one might have otherwise.

How does postfeminism relate to second- and third-wave goals?

Second-wave feminist goals focused on inequalities in pay and power, particularly in passing legislation to protect the equal rights of women (Gamble 2001). Third-wave feminism incorporated the differing viewpoints of women who were also…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gamble, S. (2001). The Routledge Companion to Feminism and Postfeminism. Routledge.

Parra, E.G. (2009). "Cultural distance" among speakers of the same language. Sens Public.

Retrieved from http://sens-public.org/spip.php?article653&lang=fr

Strauss, L. (1953). Natural Right and History. University of Chicago Press: Chicago, IL. 92-95.
View Full Essay

Social Psychology Rosewood the Movie

Words: 3825 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23102082

Rosewood is a film particularly suitable and interesting for the application of social psychology. It concerns the story of a black community in early 20th-century Florida. The community was rather a-typical of the time, since black people were wealthy landowners. The neighboring company town of Sumner on the other hand, was occupied by poor white people, who were jealous of the wealth they observed in Rosewood. This setting provides a backdrop for social psychological analysis concerning ingroups and outgroups, and how racism leads to escalating tension.

Prejudice and Racism

Prejudice, according to rehm, Kassin & Fein (147), can be unintentional. It also means the stereotyping of a certain group of people on the irrational grounds of a perceived threat, exacerbated by the fact that little personal information is available about the target of prejudice. In the film, prejudice against black people is a paradigm of the historical time. The likelihood…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brehm, Sharon S., Kassin, Saul M. And Fein, Stephen. Social Psychology. 5th Edition. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2002.

Singleton, John. Rosewood, 1997.
View Full Essay

Marianne Villanueva and Gilda Cordero-Fernando Write About

Words: 591 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1365935

Marianne Villanueva and Gilda Cordero-Fernando write about their native Philippines through the eyes of daughters. Villanueva's "Lizard" encapsulates a girl's alienation and lack of self-determination. Cordero-Fernando's "Bushouse" provides poignant insight into nearly the opposite dynamic, as the narrator discovers a sense of belonging within the community in spite of sexism, racism, and classism. The point-of-view of a daughter enables a rich, multifaceted, and nuanced perspective on issues related to race, gender, social status, and especially power.

While the two stories share in common a cultural milieu, they differ widely in terms of tone, style, and diction. The last lines of each story provide particularly rich insight into the differential motives of their authors, through the voices of their respective narrators. Wito of Villanueva's "Lizard" ends her story with a negative realization about sexism, racism, and power structures in society. Power is meted out according to sharp patriarchal norms, which are…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Notations for Books or Periodicals

Words: 342 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81377470

5-59).

4. JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hativa, N. (19, Fall). Computer-based drill and practice in arithmetic: Widening the gap between high and low achieving students. American Education Research Journal 35(3) pp. 366-397.

5. CHAPTER IN A BOOK

Sapp, M.E. (19). In the best interest of children: returning play to its pace. In Dimidjian, V.J. (Ed.), Play's pace in public education of young children. (pp49-61).

6. TABLE AND FIGURE

Mean Mood Scores Before and After Physical Aactivity

Figure 1. Record ofweekly truancy behavior

. EDIT

Williams and Jensen (1992) demonstrated the same effect. Neither of the books was available in the library. The team achieved improvement in its scores after undergoing training. The team achieved a 3% improvement in its scores after undergoing training. Successful problem solvers were both more adept at representing the problem and using heuristics.

The participants were introduced to each of the following trainers but were not allowed to…… [Read More]

8. EDIT

Williams and Jensen (1992) demonstrated the same effect. Neither of the books was available in the library. The team achieved improvement in its scores after undergoing training. The team achieved a 38% improvement in its scores after undergoing training. Successful problem solvers were both more adept at representing the problem and using heuristics.

The participants were introduced to each of the following trainers but were not allowed to choose their own trainers. Post tests were administered to the third grade students. Of the schools that participated, twelve were elementary, six were middle schools, and four were high school.
View Full Essay

Culturally Relative Ethics vs Objective

Words: 1858 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14331779



Ca's agument also addesses the limits of the ange of unethical business conduct. Specifically, many unethical business pactices do not necessaily involve deception, pe se. The case of "legally" selling ca keys to ca thieves is an example of that. In fact, thee ae many instances of decidedly unethical deception in business that ae not illegal and that do not involve lying, necessaily. A stong agument could be made that the use of paid celebity endoses of consume poducts is unethical fo at least two easons. Fist, paid celebity endoses do not necessaily use the poducts they ecommend to consumes; they ente contacts to ead scipts and the law pemits those scipts to be vey libeal in tems of liteal accuacy, if not necessaily tuth. Second, the entie concept may be unethical pecisely because it takes advantage of human social psychology to follow o emulate well-known individuals. Simila foms of…… [Read More]

references is not unethical because it produces no harm.

Meanwhile, other types of business deception are as unethical as cheating in poker. Concealing the material truth about a product or about the details of a business arrangement to induce another entity to do something he would not do with full awareness is unethical deception and is analogous to playing with an extra card that is not part of the deck. Examples of that principle would include concealing major repairs to a vehicle offered for sale and a dishonest answer to a direct question asking whether the vehicle had ever suffered major damage.

Carr's argument also addresses the limits of the range of unethical business conduct. Specifically, many unethical business practices do not necessarily involve deception, per se. The case of "legally" selling car keys to car thieves is an example of that. In fact, there are many instances of decidedly unethical deception in business that are not illegal and that do not involve lying, necessarily. A strong argument could be made that the use of paid celebrity endorsers of consumer products is unethical for at least two reasons. First, paid celebrity endorsers do not necessarily use the products they recommend to consumers; they enter contracts to read scripts and the law permits those scripts to be very liberal in terms of literal accuracy, if not necessarily truth. Second, the entire concept may be unethical precisely because it takes advantage of human social psychology to follow or emulate well-known individuals. Similar forms of advertising actually are illegal, such as subliminal messaging, although it is not clear why the latter is any "worse" or more unethical to consumers than the former approach.

In that regard, Carr's comparison of unethical poker strategies that are not part of the game (such as distracting opponents) also have analogs in business. For example, it may not be illegal to bombard a competitor with paperwork for strategic purposes to distract them, but it is unethical just the same as distracting poker opponents. Law firms, and corporate litigants battling opponents with tighter budgets in particular, do this all the time, precisely because they know that it increases the legal work (and the expense associated with it) and can result in a settlement earlier than allowing the opposing party to keep legal fees down. It is unethical but legal and does not involve explicit lies.

Ultimately, lying in business is illegal and unethical in some cases; it is legal but unethical in others; and it is legal and not necessarily unethical in still others. The analogy with legal bluffing in poker, legal but unethical distraction in poker, and outright cheating in poker holds up logically.
View Full Essay

Problem in Society

Words: 941 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43570695

contrary, indications of a definite gender pay gap seem to persist. Wanzenreids (2008), for instance, conducted a large-scale study of 108,628 observations on 26,047 executives and 2,598 firms, between the years 1992 to 2003, and showed that women are working for smaller, less profitable firms than men and that female executives earn 14% less than their male colleagues. More so, the gender pay gap is higher towards the upper end of the pay distribution. As recently as 2002, women who worked more than thirty-five hours per week for fifty-two weeks per year earned only 78% as much as men (Giddens, Duneir, & Applebaum, 2003).

Most sociologists (e.g. Alksnis, Desmarais, & Curtis, 2008) seem to think that sexism is the determining factor for the differnce in gender wage, but it may just be that other, less innocuous, reasons may explain the disparity.

These include (1) self-selection by women into female-dominated industries,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Alksnis, C., Desmarais, S., & Curtis, J. (2008), Workforce segregation and the gender wage gap, Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 38, 1416-1441.

Giddens, A., Duneir, M. & Applebaum, R. (2003) Introduction to Sociology, London: Norton & Co.

Wanzenreid, G. (2004). How feminine is corporate America? J. Econ. Inequal, 6, 185-209.
View Full Essay

Gender-Specific Therapy for Women Prisoners Research Question

Words: 3099 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52728944

Gender-Specific Therapy for Women Prisoners

ESEACH QUESTION AND JUSTIFICATION

On average, women make up about 7% of the total federal and state incarcerated population in the United States. This has increased since the 1980s due to stricter and more severe laws that focus on recreational drug use, a lack of community programs, and fewer treatment centers available for outpatients (Zaitow and Thomas, eds., 2003). According to the National Women's Law Centers, women prisoners report a higher than statistically normal history of domestic violence in their immediate past, and the fastest growing prison population with a disproportionate number of non-Whites forming over 60% of the population. In fact, over 30% of women in prison are serving sentences for murder involving a spouse or partner. The incarceration of women presents far different cultural and sociological issues than those of men -- issues with children, family, sexual politics and more (NWLC, 2012).

The…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Ethical Research Guidelines. (2012). Marketing Research Association. Retrieved from:  http://www.marketingresearch.org/ 

National Women's Law Center. (2012). retrieved from: http://www.nwlc.org/our-issues

Total U.S. Correctional Population. (2010, December 11). Retrieved from Office of Justice Programs: http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/index.cfm?ty=tp&tid=11

Women in the Criminal Justice System. (2012). The Sentencing Project. Retrieved from:
View Full Essay

Cultures Sociology the Historical Development

Words: 898 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39617294

In addition, stratification contributes to cultural determinism, which again, alludes to when a person's position or class within a stratified society determines their culture, what kind of labor they will have the opportunity to have, what quality of education they may have access to, and other aspects (or limitations) of a particular culture.

When social stratification becomes too extreme and tensions within a culture rise too high, there is a distinct possibility for cultural differentiation. This occurs in societies where the tensions and imbalances are apparent and transparent. In many countries, such as the United States, the media helps to minimize class imbalances. The media is often used as an institution that will communicate and distribute the dominant ideology and specific hegemony. Hegemony is a form of social control and ideology is the greater societal structure of which hegemony is a tool or strategy. Hegemony may is often skewed or…… [Read More]

References:

Understanding Race and Ethnic Relations, 4th Edition. Chapter 3 -- Understanding Race and Culture. Print. Provided.
View Full Essay

Historical Figure in Nursing

Words: 1143 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71837833

Nursing

Dear Casey,

I hope all is well with you and your family. It's been a while since I've written; forgive me as I've been busy with school, work and life in general. Over the past few weeks, I've become quite interested in the life and triumphs of Clara Barton, a 19th century nurse, teacher and pioneer who was by my account, a woman way ahead of her time. Clara Barton is a true hero, this letter is to give you a glimpse of her life and successes and how she contributed to nursing as we know it today. During Ms. Bartons' era women were largely shut out of working in certain professions or if they were allowed to work at all -- they were not allowed to climb the ladder to be promoted to other positions. There also lacked an institution that provided aid to those affected by disaster.…… [Read More]

References

Ardalan, C. (2010). Clara Barton's 1898 Battles in Cuba: A Reexamination of Her Nursing Contributions. Florida Atlantic Comparative Studies Journal, 12, 1-20.

Maikell-Thomas, B. "Discovered Historical Documents Uncover The First Official Missing Persons Investigator, Clara Barton" National Association of Investigative Specialists.  http://www.pimall.com/nais/n.barton.html 

Tooker, J. (2007). Antietam: Aspects of Medicine, Nursing and the Civil War. Transactions of the American Clinical and Climatological Association, 118, 215-223.
View Full Essay

Gender in Television

Words: 773 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53121479

Gender Portrayals in Media

Since the advent of the television during the latter part of 1920s, men and women have been portrayed differently in movies, television, radio, music videos, news, and social media. Stereotyping men and women aided in developing sustainability strategies for marketing and advertising efforts. Essentially, it is about appeal and influencing the consumer. Unfortunately, the various mediums are fraught with sexism and racial disparities, which are difficult to overcome since the mediums are controlled by those in power. This level of control may be disguised as marketing techniques for certain target groups. By devising an appealing image for a consumer in which he or she may identify, advertisers establish a connection, thus building loyalty and developing a following. Hence, gender portrayals are fundamental practices to reach a large group of consumers by creating categorical images.

Gender Socializer: Television

Several of the popular radio soap operas made the…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Sexist Language in the Media

Words: 1477 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44820255

Gender and Society

Sexism in the Media: Portrayal of Female Athletes in Media Coverage

Sexist portrayal of men's versus women's athletic events and sporting events has prevailed in the media for some time. Armstrong and Hallmark (1999) note that until very recently, women in profession NCAA Division I women's basketball teams, though popular, had received "virtually no television exposure" during key station segments; women also suffered unfavorable practice times and "hand me down uniforms" (p. 1). Perhaps no other area of media portrayal reveals as much gender inequality as the portrayal of women athletes. This is not because of a lack of interest in female sports necessarily. More and more women are participating in sports formerly considered male only. However the media portrayal or lack of adequate portrayal of women's events has contributed to the perceived lack of enthusiasm and interest in following women's events. The media utilizes sexist attitudes,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Alexander, S. (1994). "Newspaper coverage of athletics as a function of gender." Women's Studies International Forum, 17 (6), 655-662

Armstrong, Richard N; Hallmark, James R. "Gender Equity in Televised Sports: A Comparative Analysis of Men's and Women's NCAA Division I Championship Broadcasts, 1991-1995). Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, Vol. 43, 1999.

Blinde, E.M., Greendorder, S.L., & Shenker, R.J. (1991). "Differential media coverage of men's and women's intercollegiate basketball: Reflection of gender and ideology." Journal of Sport and Social Issues, 15, (2), 98-114

Bryant, J. (1980). "A two-year selective investigation of the female athlete in sport as reported in the paper media." Arena Review, 4, 32-44
View Full Essay

Diversity in Organizations

Words: 972 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93670970

Diversity in Organizations

The Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (ASI) provides a tool to assess the attitudes and expectations of individuals in relation gender stereotypes and to generate a quantifiable score measuring the degree of latent gender hostility based on those scores. More specifically, there are two measures generated by this instrument: the first is a score of hostile sexism that corresponds to negative feelings toward women; the send is benevolent sexism that corresponds to those aspects of attitudes about gender that could be considered positive. The meaning of the hostile sexism measure is obvious and straightforward; however, benevolent sexism is also related to hostility simply because it is a product of differential expectations based on gender. Therefore, even ostensibly positive aspects of gender-oriented attitudinal difference correspond to hostility, especially in connection with deviations from gender-based roles and expectations.

Discussion

Naturally, ASI scores are likely to vary considerably from culture to culture…… [Read More]

References

Healey, J.F. (2009). Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Class: The Sociology of Group

Conflict and Change. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge.

Henslin, J.M. (2008). Essentials of Sociology: A Down-to-Earth Approach. Boston:

Pearson.
View Full Essay

Language's Role in Sustaining Inequality Between the

Words: 3164 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3658115

Language's Role In Sustaining Inequality etween The Sexes

Although it is disputed whether language causes sexism or sexism causes certain language, language does play a part in sexism (Wikipedia). Given that the development of society has gone hand in hand with the development of language, it is unlikely that the causation will ever be determined. However, whether language causes sexism or sexism causes certain language, it is clear that language plays a key role in sustaining inequality between the sexes.

At its most basic, language is a system of symbols used by human beings to communicate with each other. However, language is not simply how humans communicate with one another, but also how humans communicate within themselves. Therefore, if language is sexist, then the actions, and even the thoughts, that it describes are sexist (West). For example, words with gender-based connotations imply that the attributes necessary to perform the duties…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bartlett, K. (1993) Gender and Law: Theory, Doctrine, and Commentary, New York: Little,

Brown & Company (1993).

Feitz, A. (1999) 'Feminist Scholarship: A Classic Oxymoron?', in Enterstageright.com: Enter

Stage Right.  http://www.enterstageright.com/archive/articles/1099femspeak.htm  accessed on January 5, 2005.
View Full Essay

Gendered Experience in the Workplace

Words: 1793 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53086658

"For example, the more women considered prejudice to occur across a variety of contexts, the more they reported depression, anxiety, and decreased self-esteem." (Foster & Dixon, 2002, p.1)

These findings about the limits of group conciousness hint that perhaps, rather than focusing on a generalized female conciousness raising outside of the workplace, focusing on specific managerial objectives of female advancement within specific industries and workplaces might be more beneficial. Change the conciousness of managers, specifically male managers, through diversity workshops and penalizing sexism, rather than focus on changing female's perceptions of their competance alone. Create a sense of 'it's everywhere,' one also runs the risk of creating a sense that 'there is nothing I can do' and of learned helplessness in the hearts of female workers. Even from my own unwitting beneficical experience of sexism, I know how difficult it is to be confrontational as an entry-level employee, when one…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anthis, Kristine. "The role of sexist discrimination in adult women's identity development." Sex Roles: A Journal of Research. November 2002, p.1-4. Retrived from Find Articles at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2294/is_2002_Nov/ai_97728461/pg_1

Mindi D. Foster and Kenneth L. Dion. "The role of hardiness in moderating the relationship between global/specific attributions and actions against discrimination." Sex Roles: A Journal of Research. August 2004, p.1-5. Retrived from Find Articles at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2294/is_3-4_51/ai_n6212699

Renzetti, Claire M. & Daniel Curran, Women, Men, and Society. Fifth Edition. New York: Allyn & Bacon, 2002
View Full Essay

Race Class & Gender Color-Blind

Words: 1805 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32893564

For example, one of the interesting points that grabbed my attention was Dill's discussion of gender relations among African slaves. Slave men and women had a more egalitarian relationship than free white men and women. That is because slave men did not possess the power and authority of free men. So, power is inherently corrupting? At least, this is what Dill's description of gender relations in antebellum America suggest.

I wish, as a professor of sociology, Dill could have made more direct relations with the present (describing history just for the sake of history is the job of historians). I also wish, she could have allotted as much space to the story of Chinese-Americans that she does to White, African-American, and Chicano families. But I still admired this essay because it powerfully tells how society often subjects women to double or triple burdens. In colonial and antebellum America, the society…… [Read More]

References

Andersen, M.L, & Collins, P.H. (2010) Race, Class & Gender: An Anthology, 7th Edition. Wadsworth Publishing.
View Full Essay

Training Women for the Military

Words: 3228 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76933795

In those days prior to 2003, TADOC gave recruits nut-and-bolt basics, then sent the new Soldiers to their units where the real training started....nTo achieve "Soldier" status, recruits now spend 21 days in the field during basic training. The training focus has changed dramatically from what was primarily a standards, discipline and soldierization process to one of intensive combat skills. (Leipold, 2009)nHowever, such changes have tended to come about without any sort controlled, rigorous study. There is nothing wrong about changes that come from within and that grow organically out of the requirements of an organization. However, a controlled experiment offers certain key advantages because it can cast off old attitudes and biases.nI have already described the control group in this experiment. The three experimental groups add different elements to the equation. The first of these experimental groups is actually one that I predict will reduce the overall fitness of…… [Read More]

References\nEvans, M. (2005). Women pay painful price for equal military training. The Times, retrieved 9 February 2010 from http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article434024.ece.\nhttp://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100121052640AAZ1xPL \nhttp://www.military.com/military-fitness/fitness-test-prep/physical-fitness-test-anxiety \nLeipold, J. (2009). Not your father\'s basic, anymore, retrieved 8 February 2010 from \nhttp://usmilitary.about.com/od/armyjoin/a/newarmybasic.-u5p.htm.\nO\'Reilly, K. (1981). Dick and Jane in basic training. Newsweek. \nhttp://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,953209-\n2,00.html#ixzz0fYEyTybe \nRichards, T. (n.d.) What is comprehensive cognitive-behavioral therapy? \nRetrieved 10 \nFebruary 2010 from \nhttp://www.socialanxietyinstitute.org/ccbtherapy.html.\nSegura, L. (2009). Veterans Decry Institutional Sexism in Military, retrieved 11 February 2010 \nfrom http://www.alternet.org/reproductivejustice/79877/.
View Full Essay

Cyberfeminism Digitizing Race and Internet Media

Words: 5587 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5990833

Cyber Feminism, Gender and Technology

Cyberfeminism, Gender and Technology

Feminist movement found on the internet is known as Cyberfeminism. In recent times, the term has gained controversial status. Cyberfeminism, a fundamental issue from the feminist perspective, is mostly ignored by researchers and academics. It concentrates on empowerment of women through the cyberspace. Furthermore, it deals with female enlightenment and concentrates on creating awareness on how the digital technologies can influence the rights and social status of women. The digital technologies act as a medium of re-embodying the issue of racism and gender. Internet is the new medium used to erase the identity of women; that is; women are the erased race. However, the internet has played a significant role in promoting Cyberfeminism by pointing out that several feminist studies and internet activities are done by the online media. It cannot be denied that technology plays an important role in promoting…… [Read More]

Work Cited:

1. Chon, Margaret. Erasing Race? A Critical Race Feminist View of Internet Identity Shifting, 1999.

2. Nakamura, Lisa. Digitizing Race: Visual Cultures of the Internet. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2008.

3. Nakamura, Lisa. Cybertypes: Race, Ethnicity, and Identity on the Internet. London: Routledge, 2002.

4. Wilding, Faith. Where is Feminism in Cyberfeminism?. 28 March 2006. Cyberfeminist International. 4 June 2011.
View Full Essay

Choosing the Sex of an Offspring

Words: 1702 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34832499

Gender of a Baby:

The issue on whether parents should be allowed to choose the sex of their baby has been a major controversial issue in the recent past that has attracted huge debates between proponents and opponents of such practice. This issue has received huge attention because of long-term use of Assisted eproductive Technology (AT) to help pregnant women in the United States and across the globe. This technology basically involves the transfer of fertilized human embryos into a woman's uterus through in vitro fertilization (IVF). Advances in Assisted eproductive Technology have contributed to various innovations such as Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, which enables parents to choose prenatally the sex of their offspring (Bumgarner, 2007, p.1289). This technology enables parents to select the sex of their babies through the use of medical techniques. While it is considered as a major breakthrough in reproductive health, Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been surrounded…… [Read More]

References:

Bumgarner, A. (2007, June 18). A Right to Choose? Sex Selection in the International Context.

Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy, 14(1289), 1289-1309. Retrieved from http://c-fam.org/docLib/20100421_SSAdukelaw.pdf

Bhatia, R. (2010). Constructing Gender from the Inside Out: Sex-Selection Practice in the United

States. Feminist Studies, 36(2), 260-291.
View Full Essay

Women Prior to Taking This

Words: 1948 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26470927

139). When she is "taken for a man," she is "not fat," because of the different gendered social norms related to body size (Bergman, 2009, p. 139). Thinness is also a type of privilege, as is external or socially acceptable beauty. Beauty ideals and norms are also tied in with race, culture, and class. Economic class and social class often determine access to healthy food, which is why low-income people are more likely to be obese and have related problems. Although generally, African-American women have healthier body images than white women, white cultural hegemony has started to infiltrate black culture, especially in what iley (n.d.) calls "bourgeois black families," (p. 358). iley's (n.d.) experiences reveal the interconnectedness, or intersectionality, between race, class, and gender. Just as it is important to recognize different gendered identities for women from different cultural backgrounds, it is also important to acknowledge that not all women…… [Read More]

References

A, Ijeoma. (n.d.). Because you're a girl.

Bergman, S.B. (2009). Part-time fatso. In The Fat Studies Reader. Eds. Ester Rosenblum and Sandra Solvay. NYU Press.

Douglas, S. (2010). Enlightened sexism.

"Examples of Institutional Heterosexism." Appendix 9H
View Full Essay

Interpretation and Analysis

Words: 1677 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11323478

Discrimination and Madness: Examining Motifs in the Short Stories of Faulkner and Gillman

"The Yellow Wallpaper," by Charlotte Perkins Gillman and "A ose for Emily," by William Faulkner, though remarkably different in style and voice, feature stories where women are the main characters. Both of these stories take the reader through a raucous trip through time and sanity leaving the reader constantly guessing. In the midst of these vivid journeys through the narrative, both short stories showcase their female protagonists in fictional worlds where various pertinent social issues fester in the background.

"The Yellow Wallpaper" tells a story written in the first person of a vivacious, imaginative woman who explains that she suffers from a temporary nervous depression colored by a bit of hysteria. Her husband, a doctor, who the narrator tells us is extremely practical, believes she is not sick and rents a colonial mansion for the summer so…… [Read More]

References

Faulkner, William. A Rose for Emily. 1930. In LitWeb the Norton Introduction to Literature Website. Retrieved from http://www.wwnorton.com/college/english/litweb05/workshops/fiction/faulkner1.asp

Gillman Perkins, Charlotte. The Yellow Wallpaper. 1891. In LitWeb the Norton

Introduction to Literature Website. Retrieved from http://www.wwnorton.com/college/english/litweb05/workshops/fiction/gilman1.asp
View Full Essay

True Since We Were Children and We

Words: 2062 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69071477

true since we were children and we were told by adults that "words will never hurt us." A good many of us would most likely have preferred the sticks and stones because physical injuries often heal far more quickly and far more effectively than psychological ones.

And yet, even as we must all acknowledge the basic principle that words can do real harm, many people continue to insist that sexist language is a trivial concern. This paper looks at the reasons why it is important to be careful about the language that we use. It is all too easy for opponents of care in language to toss off concerns about bias as "political correctness." But it is important that the rest of us insist that "political correctness" can be viewed another way: As basic courtesy and civility.

Because language is one of the most powerful forces that there is, anyone…… [Read More]

References

Cameron, D. (1990). The feminist critique of language. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.  http://www.friesian.com/language.htm l

Spender, D. (1985). Man-made language. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

Tannen, D. (1990). You just don't understand. New York: William Morrow.

Spender 14.
View Full Essay

2008 Democratic Presidential Primary --

Words: 7199 Length: 21 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46180969

Meanwhile in the journal Du Bois Review (Parker, et al., 2009, p. 194) the authors point to racism and patriotism as key themes for the 2008 Democratic primary election. "Race was a consistent narrative" used by those opposed to Obama, Parker explains (p. 194). Both Clinton and the Republicans "used racial references" to attack Obama, including the attacks on Obama "for his perceived inability to connect to 'real working Americans'" (p. 194).

The Republican sideshow called "Joe the plumber" attacked Obama with the charge that Obama was "seeking to take money from hardworking 'real Americans' to give it to 'those people'" (p. 194). Clinton questioned Obama's patriotism suggesting that he was not a "real" American. Parker notes that when Governor Dukakis ran for president as a Democrat, he was attacked but no one questioned whether he was "a real American as they did with Obama" (p. 195).

The authors present…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alter, Jonathan. "Leading Democrats to Bill Clinton: Pipe Down." Newsweek. (2008).

Retrieved March 17, 2010, from  http://www.newsweek.com .

Balz, Dan, and Johnson, Hanes. The Battle for American 2008: The Story of an Extraordinary

Election. New York: Viking, 2009.
View Full Essay

Gender and International Relations International

Words: 10127 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58775378

57).

Coker's article (published in a very conservative magazine in England) "reflected unease among some of his colleagues" about that new course at LSEP. Moreover, Coker disputes that fact that there is a female alternative to male behavior and Coker insists that "Whether they love or hate humanity, feminists seem unable to look it in the face" (Smith quoting Coker, p. 58).

If feminists are right about the female nature being more peaceful and "less aggressive" than men, then women pose a "far greater danger than men…" to the world and to international relations Coker continued. It was a less aggressive attitude toward international relations that "prevented us from deterring Hitler," Coker went on, referencing (without naming) Neville Chamberlain, England's Prime Minister who reportedly appeased Hitler rather than take a strong stand against the Third Reich.

On page 58 Steve Smith explains that in cases where feminine concerns are being…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Carpenter, R. Charli, 2005, 'Women, Children, and Other Vulnerable Groups: Gender, Strategic Frames and the Protection of Civilians as a Transnational Issue', International Studies Quarterly, vol. 49, 295-334.

Elshtain, Jean Bethke, 1995, Women and War, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Goldstein, Joshua S., 2003, War and Gender: How Gender Shapes the War System and Vice Versa. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Hooper, Charlotte, 2001, Manly States: Masculinities, International Relations, and Gender Politics. New York: Columbia University Press.
View Full Essay

Sexist Language From Calling a

Words: 637 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47675648



Talking down to a female coworker is like speaking to a child. The tone of voice and language used is filled with kindness and therefore seems innocent. Yet speaking to a coworker like a child is not an innocent act. The method of communication is degrading and assumes that the female is a less advanced human being, a person that needs to be coddled and cared for like a baby. Because women have been taught to expect and accept such tones of voice in daily communications, they might ignore or be ignorant of sexist language.

Making fun of or criticizing females in positions of power is another way that sexism remains present in professional communications. Females in positions of power are held to a double standard that men are not held to. For example, women in positions of power are expected to be stereotypically feminine while at the same time…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Education and Society About Gender

Words: 988 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55468349

Education and Society About Gender

The Perception of Gender Value Among Children

In Myra Sadker's book, Failing at Fairness, gender issues in the classroom are studied to evaluate how sexism is presented and to what extent it impacts female self-esteem. In a study entitled, "Help Me, God. I'm a Girl," the response to the hypothetical consideration of gender change was examined for eleven hundred Michigan children between 1988 and 1990. When asked what life would be like if they experienced a change to the opposite sex, the general conclusion that was drawn found that both girls and boys recognized weaknesses with the female sex as compared to males. This raises concern over the social impact of sexism that appears to exist even at a young age as the value of the female gender is compromised by views that males present the more advantageous sex. Thus, the evidence of sexism among…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Sadker, Myra. "Help Me, God. I'm a Girl." Failing at Fairness. New York: Scribner, 1994.
View Full Essay

Woman The Book 'Aren't I A Woman '

Words: 1793 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74929979

Woman?

The book, 'Aren't I a Woman?' explores the challenges that women faced in the antebellum America. The author has focused to address the challenges of sexuality and racism that affected many women of this age. The author, Deborah Gray is a Professor at Scott University, who has focused her study in examining the issues of justice and social inequality in society. She is interested in this study as she attempts to explain the challenges of sexuality and racism that has affected the women from minority races in the United States. Her focus is to lead the readers of her work to begin understanding the challenges that women have faced from the antebellum America to the current day. Through a better understanding of these issues, better remedies may be developed to help the affected women in the society. Indeed, without an in-depth understanding of the issues of sexuality, and racism,…… [Read More]

Reference

White, Deborah, 1985, Aren't I a Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South. New York:

W.W. Norton and Company. Print
View Full Essay

Personal Awareness of Cultural Bias in Social and Cultural Diversity

Words: 2763 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49030133

Cultural bias implies an emphasized distinction or preferential status that indicates a predilection for one culture, over another. It is often discriminative, and is characterized by an absence of integration in a group, in terms of social principles, codes of conduct, and beliefs. Cultural partisanship introduces the accepted behaviors of one group as superior, and more valued, than those of another lesser-respected cultural group. In my surroundings, most of the residents, and hence, patients are white, making us (Afro-Americans and Asians) minorities, feel different if not isolated. Such deferential factors are responsible for establishing where specific individuals live, and what opportunities are available to them, in the healthcare and educational context (Sue et al., 2009)

Question 2

The presence of cultural bias within the context of healthcare-related recommendations and decision-making gives rise to significant challenges. Well-documented inequalities in health status of different racial and ethnic communities, in addition to nationally-publicized…… [Read More]

Resources and Services Administration (http://www.hrsa.gov/culturalcompetence/)

American Psychiatric Association's Steering Committee to Reduce Disparities in Access to Psychiatric Care (2004) (Natl. Assoc. Social Workers 2007).

These and many more substantive readings from research are listed by the author for assimilating culture-centric education. (Sue, Zane, Nagayama Hall, & Berger, 2009)

Question 7

As a Counselor, I will need to be aware that being culturally aware implies delivering services in a manner consistent with the recipient's culture, through regards to linguistic variation and cultural discussion. I would seek to be more sensitive to unaccultured ethnic minority clients. In addition, I would use discretion in cases where patients of a particular community or ethnicity are prone to certain clinical problems (for which I would study the ethnic group and its history in more depth) and if certain ethnic groups respond poorly to EBT (Evidence-based Treatment). (Sue et al., 2009)
View Full Essay

Ageism it Is a Commonly

Words: 1722 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64363302



here is an increasing number of older people today, with the U.S. Bureau of the Census in 1990 finding that the number of those older than 65 will probably double by 2030. Even now, twenty years later, this trend is continuing. he number of older people is growing. What I find both interesting and surprising is that ageism could still exist. I therefore think a book like this is of absolute importance to build a better society, which will provide everybody, regardless of age, gender, or race, with the opportunity to be as much as they can be and to contribute wherever they feel they are needed. Only in this way can Western society advance not only technologically, but also mentally, emotionally, and spiritually. It is about time that, as a society, we see that there is much to be gained from the wisdom of an older person.

Age is…… [Read More]

These attitudes should involve education and critical thinking. The authors suggest that young people should be educated on the nature of ageism in themselves and others, as well as in how to develop mindful approaches towards others. This is one of the things that makes this book so important to education and sociology today. Indeed, educational programs that encourage critical thinking and non-prejudiced attitudes can usefully include this book. Ageism, although in many ways differing from other forms of prejudice, has just as little right to exist in a free and fair society as racism, sexism, and others. For this reason, researchers, academics, and indeed society in general should work together to eradicate all forms of prejudice, including ageism.

There is an increasing number of older people today, with the U.S. Bureau of the Census in 1990 finding that the number of those older than 65 will probably double by 2030. Even now, twenty years later, this trend is continuing. The number of older people is growing. What I find both interesting and surprising is that ageism could still exist. I therefore think a book like this is of absolute importance to build a better society, which will provide everybody, regardless of age, gender, or race, with the opportunity to be as much as they can be and to contribute wherever they feel they are needed. Only in this way can Western society advance not only technologically, but also mentally, emotionally, and spiritually. It is about time that, as a society, we see that there is much to be gained from the wisdom of an older person.

Age is a fact of life. Instead of being prejudiced against the process of ageing itself and against those who are older, we should focus on celebrating every stage of life for the benefits it could bring to ourselves and to those around us. Older people, for example, have a wealth of experience to contribute to society on both a personal, political and professional level. This is reason for celebration rather than fear.
View Full Essay

Administrative Mentoring and the Emergent

Words: 6069 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40428370

Indeed, the heightened emphasis on standardized testing and other practices related to No Child Left Behind has created a condition wherein the principal is found to be largely at the center of an array of very inflexible demands. The result is that the principal's performance evaluation is directly connected to the capacity of the school and its students to comport with the standards created by such legislation. Therefore, principals are increasingly finding it necessary to take a hands-on approach to providing leadership in public schools. The degree to which the experience and insight of the mentor can be instrumental in facilitating this capacity is significant.

As Lave & enger (2005) contend, there is a distinctly beneficial impact to the developing educational leader in exposure to a well-suited mentor. This is true at every level of education, where the challenges that can be disruptive are approached with strategies that have been…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Conway, C.M. (2006). Navigating Through Induction: How a Mentor Can Help. Music Educators Journal, 92(5), 56-60.

Cook, E.P., Heppner, M.J., & O'Brien, K.M. (2005). Multicultural and gender influences in women's career development: An ecological perspective. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 33.

Craig, T. (2008). Spotlight on Mentoring Programmes. Peronnel Today.

Daresh, J. (2001). What is Mentoring and Why Is it So Important. Leaders Helping Leaders.
View Full Essay

Foot Binding Remains One of

Words: 1155 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5735597

Foot binding may have been one of the most powerful reminders of misogyny, as the practice placed irreversible physical limitations on females and restricted their role in society. As if other biological markers like breast size or genitalia were insufficient to denote gender, contorted feet serves a disturbing reminder of how females have been thoroughly subjugated. The practice of binding, remind Steele and Major, meant that women could barely walk. Their movements can of course be controlled and scrutinized; their freedoms overtly limited. That women still wanted their feet bound shows a lack of ability to conceive of a world any different than the one in which they lived. Neo-Confucian values permeated Chinese society and so few women would have been so bold as to question the validity of female inferiority or the morality of foot binding.

Foot binding was "never mandated by any Chinese government" (p. 182). The practice…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Psychological Attitudes Toward Risk Is

Words: 626 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57486549

It is essential that such risks be managed in an appropriate and targeted way.

One way in which to mitigate the risk of problematic interpersonal relationships within the workplace is by means of both formal and informal gatherings. Informal gatherings are beneficial in terms of helping employees to become familiar with each other in a context other than work. Work parties and lunches can for example be used in this way. This kind of informal gathering is perhaps best instituted when there is not a large amount of tension between workers.

For greater tension levels, more formal measures can be taken. Seminars presented by human relations experts can for example help to teach employees the importance of functioning within a diverse environment. Such seminars should be presented in such a way as to not threaten employees or their attitudes, but rather to gradually change their attitudes. Seminars can for example…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Women and Human Rights Summaries

Words: 1705 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14799107

Nonetheless, Lu sees some hope for transgressive representations of Asian women in media, particularly in those films which actively seek to explode stereotypes regarding Asian women not simply by fulfilling the desires of a white, patriarchal society but rather by demonstrating full-fledged, unique characters whose Asian and female identity is only one constituent part of their personality and whose expression is not limited to the roles prescribed for Asian women in American media (24-26).

orks Cited

Lu, Lynn. "Critical Visions: The Representation and Resistance of Asian omen." Dragon

Ladies: Asian-American Feminists Breathe Fire. 1st ed. Cambridge, MA: South End

Press, 1999. 184-189. Print.

Mihesuah, David Abbot. "Feminists, Tribalists, or Activists?" Indigenous American omen:

Decolonization, Empowerment, Activism. 1st ed. Omaha, NE: University of Nebraska

Press, 2003. 115-123. Print.

Smith, Andrea. "Sexual Violence as a Tool of Genocide." Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide. 1st ed. Cambridge, MA: South End Press,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lu, Lynn. "Critical Visions: The Representation and Resistance of Asian Women." Dragon

Ladies: Asian-American Feminists Breathe Fire. 1st ed. Cambridge, MA: South End

Press, 1999. 184-189. Print.

Mihesuah, David Abbot. "Feminists, Tribalists, or Activists?" Indigenous American Women:
View Full Essay

Tyra Banks Is Fat One

Words: 701 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1194521

Far beyond the "ideal" female form in the minds of many, modelling creates a paradigm not only of impossible perfectionism in terms of face and posture, but also in terms of size. As such, modelling is not about being "sexy," but rather about the common misconception that thin is also necessarily beautiful. This tends to be a female-focused paradigm rather than a sexist one, where one might define sexism as a male-imposed paradigm upon the female body.

In this light, I do not believe that the "Tyra Banks is Fat" scandal is so much racially or even sexism-informed as it is informed by the generally human paradigm of enjoying the flaws in a person who was previously assumed to be "perfect." Models are envied, mostly by women, for their lack of body fat. This is an ideal that women tend to strive for, generally encouraged by media images of the…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Black Fem Thought a History

Words: 1983 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15383721



Another distinction central to the Black feminist's thoughts is the alienation she suffers due to the omission of her presence in history. This omission is not only found in traditional examples of history, but also in Eurocentric feminist views of history. The following quotation from Lorde in her letter to Daly shows the frustration and lack of understanding about the reason such an omission is propagated even among those of her same sex. "…why doesn't Mary deal with Afreket as an example? hy are her goddess-images only white, western-european, judeo-christian…here are the warrior-goddesses of the Vodun, the Dohomeian Amazons and the warrior-women of Dan…Mary has made a conscious decision to narrow her scope and to deal only with the ecology of western-european women (Lorde, 1979, p. 94)." The exclusion of African goddesses from Daly's text, which described the historical roots of women's power, is only a slight example of the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

1. Carby, H. (1982) "White Woman Listen! Black Feminism and the Boundaries of Sisterhood" in Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies The Empire Strikes Back: Race and Racism in 70s Britain. London: Hutchinson.

2. hooks, b. (1981) Aint I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism. Boston: South End Press.

3. hooks, b. (1990) Yearning: Race, Gender and Cultural Politics. Boston: South End Press.

4. Lourde, A. (1981) "An Open Letter to Mary Daly" in Moraga C. And Azadula G. This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Colour. Watertown: Persephone Press.
View Full Essay

Personal Privilege Analysis in the

Words: 1596 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3372549



4. I'd like to ask Johnson if the thinks it is possible to ever fully get rid of prejudice.

1. In chapter 5, Johnson begins to lay the groundwork to get rid of the problems -- and complications -- of privilege in earnest. His basic starting point is simple, and seems to make sense. The key to addressing the issue of privilege is to engage both groups, those which have been traditionally dominant or "privileged," as well as those who have been traditionally underprivileged, to attempt to formulate an understanding as to how to get past this invisible barrier. Without work and compromise from both sides, it will be difficult for change to occur. The key is for dominant groups to not take offense at their privileges, and to be able to see it as a problem. Many members of such populations, however, don't see being privileged as a problem,…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Women of Sex Trafficking

Words: 650 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61187700

Sex Trafficking

Written by husband and wife team Kristof and WuDunn, Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide exposes the oppression of women worldwide as the final frontier of human slavery and social injustice. Gender disparity underlies a host of political, social, and economic problems worldwide, according to the authors. Both authors are Pulitzer-prize winning journalists who wrote for The New York Times. The authors bring their journalistic style to Half the Sky by traveling around the world offering first-hand insight into what is arguably the most persistent and problematic social and political issue in all of human history. While the authors are prepared to focus on the sheer immediacy of the issue, most readers understand that these are not modern problems. Sex trafficking, gendercide, and other extreme manifestations of sexism have occurred in multiple cultures throughout human history, which is one reason why they are perpetuated…… [Read More]

References

Kristof, N.D. & WuDunn, C. (2009). Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide. Knopf.
View Full Essay

Kim Case Writes About Ways to Promote

Words: 726 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44593763

Kim Case writes about ways to promote feminism and decrease sexism, primarily through experiential learning for students taking Women's Studies or Gender Studies courses as part of their formal education at an institution of higher learning. Case compares the advocacy, awareness, and promotion of a decrease in sexism and an increase in awareness regarding male privilege with that of the rise of ethnic and cultural awareness as a result of Affirmative Action policies. Through her research, analysis, and study, Case concludes that cultural studies courses decrease pejorative attitudes just as feminism and gender studies decrease sexist behaviors, perceptions, and attitudes. She studies undergraduate students and the various effects they experience as a result of their choice of study with respect to feminism, gender, and women's studies. Case finds that taking courses in areas where there is increased awareness of normative subjecthood in western societies helps students more clearly define aspects…… [Read More]

References:

Case, K.A. (2007). Raising Male Privilege Awareness and Reducing Sexism: An Evaluation of Diversity Courses. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 31, 426 -- 435.
View Full Essay

Organization Can Use to Help Reduce the

Words: 1831 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81512955

organization can use to help reduce the gender wage gap, which is a complex problem in the modern labor force. The comparison begins with a discussion of the background information regarding this problem and its causes. The importance of reducing the gender wage gap in the workforce to the businesses, workers, and the overall economy is also examined. Following this analysis, the article presents negotiation and flexible work schedules as the two major ways that organizations can use to address the problem. Based on the comparison of these measures, flexible work schedules are recommended as the most appropriate strategy to help deal with the issue.

educing Gender Gap in Pay:

The achievement of stronger and sustainable growth through increasing the productivity of labor and human capital requires equal economic opportunities for men and women. In the past few years, this process has largely been affected by gender wage gap regardless…… [Read More]

References:

Bassett, L 2012, 'Closing the Gender Wage Gap would Create "Huge" Economic Stimulus,

Economists Say,' The Huffington Post, viewed 5 May 2013,

Bennett, J 2012, 'How to Attack the Gender Wage Gap? Speak Up,' The New York Times,

viewed 5 May 2013,
View Full Essay

Gender African-American Men Understand the

Words: 1906 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93712317

439).

However, Johnson (n.d.) offers an optimistic view showing how patriarchy may be dismantled even in systems in which it appears to be pervasive, such as the military. In "Unraveling the Gender Knot," Johnson (n.d.) points out that it is a myth that gender disparity is inevitable and immutable. In fact, social systems are malleable and changeable. Change begins with "awareness and training about issues of privilege," according to Johnson (n.d., p. 240). Awareness stems from the willingness of all members of the military to recognize their role in the perpetuation of hegemony. African-American males find themselves in a peculiar position knowing that hegemony is a destructive force for the subjugated, but unwilling to surrender the privileges and powers of being at the upper rungs of the social ladder. As Hinojosa (2010) notes, there are distinct and tangible benefits to men in the military.

Power and identity are both socially…… [Read More]

References

Acker, J. (1992). From sex roles to gendered institutions. Contemporary Sociology 21(5). (Sep., 1992), pp. 565-569.

Fields, J. (2001). Normal queers. Symbolic Interaction 24(2): 165-187.

Hinojosa, R. (2010). Doing hegemony. The Journal of Men's Studies 18(2): 179-194.

Johnson (n.d.). Unraveling the gender knot.
View Full Essay

Women at Work What Causes Lack of Respect in the Workplace

Words: 11362 Length: 34 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95015545

gender roles in the workplace pre-exist much of what we think defines what work really is; not only do they pre-exist the modern working world of offices and factories, but they also seems older than more basic things, like writing and currency. From the world of the Tasaday tribe in the Philippines to that of such fields as genetic engineering and astrophysics, men and women are compelled to function within the workforce in different ways. In the United States, women dominate fields such as nursing, teaching, and clerical positions, while fields like engineering, programming and accounting are thought to be the domain of men. Some positions, such as those of flight attendants and nurses, are considered so intrinsically "female" that many men refuse to enter these fields for fear that others will question their sexual preference. Other more coveted positions, such as that of the CEO of a large company,…… [Read More]

Bibliography.

Last chapter to include a section for reflection-comments on the research process and, explanation of what I have learned while doing research. Research project must have practical impact on an organization. Purely academic studies are not acceptable. Need to establish measurable objectives.

This action research project is the final component in my degree program.

Women at Work: What causes lack respect towards women in the workplace. http://www.marxists.org/reference/subject/philosophy/works/us/friedan.htm

http://www.cfaitc.org/About_the_Foundation/pdf/AgAwarenessArticle.pdf
View Full Essay

Female Gender Bias Inequality

Words: 1622 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28900285

omen in India

Often referred to as the "motherland," the Indian subcontinent boasts millennia-old traditions and culture in which women are symbolically honored and revered. The Hindu pantheon, for instance, consists of a wide range of female deities; motherhood in India is a reverential undertaking. However, beneath this mythological and theoretical facade, women are systematically persecuted in India, denied equal access to the already impoverished health care, educational, and justice systems. Carol Coonrod's report on the status of women in India lists seven major areas of discrimination against women in India: malnutrition, poor health care, lack of education, overwork, being unskilled, blatant mistreatment, and legal powerlessness. However, the problems extend far beyond these categories alone. For example, female infanticide is not uncommon; nor is the practice of satee, either willing or coerced suicide by widows. The message these practices send are clear: women are not as worthy of being born…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Coonrod, Carol S. "Chronic Hunger and the Status of Women in India." June 1998.

Garg, Ashish. "Women in India and Human Rights." 10 Mar 2002. From BolojiClub.com.

Jones, Adam. "Case Study: Female Infanticide." Gendercide Watch.

Mijar, Nayan. "Progress and Problems of Women in India." 10 Mar 2002. From BolojiClub.com.
View Full Essay

Abercrombie & Fitch A& f Case Study

Words: 2139 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89362096

Abercrombie and Fitch: A Case Study

Clothing giant A&F has a not-so-good reputation in the arena of business ethics, and has been sued several times for size discrimination, sexism, and racism. In 2003, the company was taken to court by employees who felt that it had a systematic discrimination policy in place. What exactly did the company miss in its diversity understanding? This text, amongst other things, analyzes the situation and the ethical issues involved.

Abercrombie & Fitch (A&F)

Abercrombie & Filch has been accused of being insensitive on many fronts. For instance, the company has in the past been involved in a tussle with angry parents, who found a sexual phrase on the company's newly-launched line of pre-teen innerwear offensive. In 2003, the company was sued for discriminating against minority groups in its human resource practices (Greenhouse, 2003). Aggrieved employees accused the company of favoring whites for its sales…… [Read More]

References

Appelbaum, P.M. (2002). Contemporary Education Issues: Multicultural and Diversity Education. Santa Barbra, CA: ABC-CLIO

AFjustice. (2014). AFP Justic.com. Retrieved 10 December 2014 from http://www.afjustice.com/

Driscoll, D., Field, S. & Pendry, L. (2007). Diversity training: putting theory into practice. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 80(1), 27-50. (EBSCOHOST Document ID: 24639105).

Greenhouse, S. (2003, June 17). Clothing Chain Accused of Discrimination. The New York Times. Retrieved 10 December 2014 from http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/17/national/17STOR.html
View Full Essay

Race Class Gender and Power

Words: 995 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11948958

Pecola Breedlove's experiences in Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye symbolize the internalization of sexism and racism. On the contrary, Anita Hill's willingness to stand up and speak out against a powerful male official represents the externalization of sexism and racism. Anita Hill lacks the self-hatred embodied by the character of Pecola, but in spite of her confidence and poise, lacks the power or wherewithal to undermine institutionalized sexism. Although Hill had an opportunity to make the personal political, her failure to convince members of the Senate about Clarence Thomas's misconduct highlights the ongoing struggles for all women and especially women of color to reclaim power. When The Bluest Eye was written, the prospects for women of color were even poorer than they were when Anita Hill testified. Yet the outcome of Hill's testimony proves that patriarchy remains entrenched in American society.

A core similarity between Anita Hill's experience and that…… [Read More]

References

Martin, N. (2014). Women key in shaping Black Panther Party. The Clayman Institute. Retrieved online: http://gender.stanford.edu/news/2014/women-key-shaping-black-panther-party

Mock, F. (2013). Anita. [Documentary Film].

Morrison, T. (1970). The Bluest Eye. New York: Vintage.
View Full Essay

Race Class Gender the Intersection

Words: 1596 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4065844



The different "isms" such as sexism, heterosexism, and racism are creating very real schisms -- in our minds, and between people. The chasms of communication that are created by hatred and misunderstanding are socially constructed. They can be socially deconstructed too. Such rifts occur between groups of people and between whole cultures. In some pockets of the United States, social conservatism threatens to erase the social progress made since the Civil ights movements of the 1960s. There are still people in the United States that believe that homosexuality is unnatural, even immoral. The idea that heterosexual marriage is in some way superior to homosexual marriage is rooted in outmoded religious doctrine and not in positive social progress. Within these "isms" are the chasms of misunderstanding that create social strife and inequality. Income disparity, for example, is closely linked with race as well as gender. Women still get paid less than…… [Read More]

References

Brennan, D. Selling sex for visas.

Collins, P.C. "Prisons for Our Bodies; Closets for Our Minds." In Black Sexual Politics. New York: Routledge.

Katz, J.N. The Invention of Heterosexuality. University of Chicago.

Lareau, a. Unequal Childhoods: Class, race, and family life. University of California Press.
View Full Essay

Racial Ideology of Latinas

Words: 11967 Length: 44 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57637272



The novel opens seven years after Gabo's mother, Ximena, was murdered by coyotes -- or paid traffickers -- during an attempt to cross the border. Her mutilated body was found, her organs gone -- sold most likely. Because of the fear surrounding this border town and the lure of the other side, all of the characters become consumed with finding afa. These people are neglected and abused. Like other fiction works on this topic (such as Cisneros's The House on Mango Street), The Guardians (2008) is rich in symbolism and flavored with Mexican aphorisms. The novel also shows the reader how complex and perilous border life is when you're living in between the United States and Mexico.

The book is important when attempting to understand the challenge of the border town life and it is, at the same time, a testament to faith, family bonds, cultural pride, and the human…… [Read More]

Reference:

Giroux, Henry A. (2001). Theory and resistance in education (Critical studies in education and culture series). Praeger; Rev Exp edition.

San Juan (2002) states that the racism of sex in the U.S. is another element of the unequal political and economic relations that exist between the races in the American democracy. Women of color may even be conceived as constituting "a different kind of racial formation" (2002), although the violence inflicted against them as well as with familial servitude and social inferiority, testifies more sharply to the sedimented structures of class and national oppression embedded in both state and civil society (2002).

San Juan (2002) goes on to explore the articulations between sexuality and nationalism. "What demands scrutiny is more precisely how the categories of patriarchy and ethnonationalism contour the parameters of discourse about citizen identities" (2002). How the idea of nation is sexualized and how sex is nationalized, according to San Juan (2002), are topics that may give clues as to how racial conflicts are circumscribed within the force field of national self-identification.

Sexuality, San Juan (2002) suggests, unlike racial judgment is not a pure self-evident category. He states that it manifests its semantic and ethical potency in the field of racial and gendered politics. In the layering and sedimentation of beliefs about sexual liberty and national belonging in the United States, one will see ambiguities and disjunctions analogous to those between sexuality and freedom as well as the persistence of racist ideology.
View Full Essay

Women's Liberation in the 21st

Words: 650 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21811726

Women should feel as if they have the right to exercise their potential in stereotypically masculine and feminine occupations, to realize their full possibilities as human beings. In fact, one of the possible mistakes of the feminist movement of the 1970s was to stress that for women to work in traditionally male occupations was the only path to liberation. Of course, if a woman wishes to become a lawyer or an engineer, she should be free to do so. ut it is also important, to honor the past history of women's accomplishments in the home, and to allow all women to follow their heart's desire. Traditionally feminine roles must also be celebrated. It is because of sexism that occupations such as teaching and nursing are devalued.

Sexism is the result of a failure of imagination, not a reflection of an innate reality. Despite the common "Leave it to eaver" stereotype…… [Read More]

Because the apparent limits upon feminine achievement are largely cultural, not biological, women should not accept the psychological or sociological limits placed upon their achievement. Despite the sexism present in society, women have still been able to shine. Many years ago, it was said that it was impossible for women to run marathons. Now women run marathons almost as swiftly as males. In 2008, a woman was a viable candidate for the Democratic nomination, while in 1984 the female Vice-Presidential candidate was accused of being too soft and emotional to govern the country. Women have not changed, biologically, in the years since the Second Wave of the feminist movement, instead, culture has changed. And culture must continue to change, and women must continue to take the world by surprise.

This does not mean that women have to be the 'same' as men to prove their worth because female liberation means that both male and feminine values are equally important for society to function. Women should feel as if they have the right to exercise their potential in stereotypically masculine and feminine occupations, to realize their full possibilities as human beings. In fact, one of the possible mistakes of the feminist movement of the 1970s was to stress that for women to work in traditionally male occupations was the only path to liberation. Of course, if a woman wishes to become a lawyer or an engineer, she should be free to do so. But it is also important, to honor the past history of women's accomplishments in the home, and to allow all women to follow their heart's desire. Traditionally feminine roles must also be celebrated. It is because of sexism that occupations such as teaching and nursing are devalued.

Sexism is the result of a failure of imagination, not a reflection of an innate reality. Despite the common "Leave it to Beaver" stereotype of the typical nuclear family that depicts the female of the household as retiring, almost extraneous, women have always worked. Immigrant women worked in factories, women worked as secretaries to support themselves; women worked as teachers and nurses and were poorly paid. Women slaved in backbreaking occupations in the home. But when something is seen as women's work, it is seen as less valuable. Also, women are still not given equal salaries and promotional possibilities because of their gender as men with equal qualifications doing the same job. Recognizing that women are equally capable of achievement is recognizing a long-standing historical reality, not an airy dream. Scrupulous attention to historical fact yields the revelation that women have overcome obstacles in a variety of fields, from the arts to the sciences, from Charlotte Bronte to Marie Curie, to Hillary Clinton. And the vital necessity of the caring professions of nursing, mothering, and teaching calls for society to give this work more financial and social cache.
View Full Essay

Sports Race Class Gender the

Words: 2881 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17962225

He got nowhere. "Talking to Barnett was like talking to a wall." Neither Tharp nor Barnett recalls Dave Hnida saying anything about sexual harassment. "If I'd have heard that, I'd have jumped down somebody's throat," Barnett says. "Not one time did I ever see or hear about anybody treating her wrong. I don't believe she was sexually harassed. I don't believe our players would do that. They'd be in too much trouble with me." Barnett says he gave one player a "tongue-lashing" for making a vulgar comment to Katie.

Katie, as a sophomore dropped out of school, despite her historical commitment to her education and her desire to play football. After doing so it is reported by her and her father that she endured several years of deep depression which affected her in every way, and yet she eventually found the courage to move forward, went back to a junior…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Primary Sources

Get This Guy out of Here." The Washington Times, 20 February 2004, C01.

King, Larry, "Interview with Denise Brown; Interview with Katie Hnida." November 28, 2006 CNN Larry King Live: Transcript [online] http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0611/28/lkl.01.html

Mcrorie, Jessica. "High Schools Face Scrutiny, Lawsuits over Gender Equality in Sports Teams." Curriculum Review.
View Full Essay

1980s Commentators Suggested That a

Words: 1853 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81217924

Where women do obtain jobs that are gendered as male, they have to act 'like men' to succeed in them" (p. 508).

Conclusion

From a metaphorical perspective, the research showed that the term "glass ceiling" is used to describe the institutionalized practices that serve to prevent women as a group from gaining access to the senior management levels in the public and private sector. From a feminist perspective, the research also showed that not only is the glass ceiling very real, it remains firmly in place in many segments of society in the West in general and in Australia in particular. While the reasons cited for these disparities in treatment varied, the overriding theme that emerged from the research was that the glass ceiling was installed by males in patriarchal societies who regard their lofty positions as sacrosanct and inviolable by women and use whatever data may be at hand…… [Read More]

References

Coyne, Beulah S., Edward J. Coyne and Monica Lee. 2004. Human Resources, Care Giving, Career Progression, and Gender: A Gender Neutral Glass Ceiling. New York: Routledge.

Greig, Alastair, Frank Lewins and Kevin White. 2003. Inequality in Australia. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Masser, Barbara M. And Dominic Abrams. 2004. "Reinforcing the Glass Ceiling: The Consequences of Hostile Sexism for Female Managerial Candidates." Sex Roles: A Journal of Research 51: 609.

Mcallister, Ian, Steve Dowrick and Riaz Hassan. 2003. The Cambridge Handbook of the Social Sciences in Australia. New York: Cambridge University Press.
View Full Essay

White Oleander and Social Psychology White Oleander

Words: 692 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84910841

White Oleander" and Social Psychology

"White Oleander" and Social Psychological Terms

The movie "White Oleander" was made in 2002, as an adaptation of Janet Fitch's book White Oleanders. It stars Alison Loman as Astrid Magnussen, Michelle Pfeiffer as her mother Ingrid, and Robin Wright and Renee Zellweger as foster mothers Starr and Claire. The movie follows the life of Astrid after her mother is convicted of murder. Astrid passes through several homes, and learns what it means to be both her mother's daughter and her own person. After Ingrid is convicted, Astrid is sent to her first foster home, with Starr. Astrid and Starr's much older boyfriend develop too close a relationship which breaks the family apart. After her first foster family dissolves, Astrid is briefly sent to a group home. Her third home is with Claire Richards, who she learns to love deeply, however the woman is incredibly troubled…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Setting of This Classic Film

Words: 4932 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81729607

Like other symbols of the civil rights movement such as the song "We shall overcome" and peaceful sit-ins, to Kill a Mockingbird quickly assumed a similar position.

As the focus of the movie was on right and wrong, the director of this film, obert Mulligan, provided the American movie viewing public with a strong lesson in justice but he was also able, largely through the character of Atticus Finch, to demonstrate that humanity can still prevail even under difficult circumstances. Mulligan could have soften the message and still have captured the essence of the book upon which the movie was based but, instead, Mulligan made a deliberate statement in the way that he portrayed the characters in the story and how the movie told the story. He took on the ways of the American South where the beliefs of men, despite their moral depravity, ruled their actions instead of the…… [Read More]

Referenced several times in the movie, the mockingbird is a symbol of harmlessness in that its only function is to make music for others. It has no real enemies and should be except from harm. As Atticus warns his children, "it is sin to kill a mockingbird."

In the movie Boo and Tom Robinson are similar to the mockingbird in that they are harmless individuals who would never intentionally hurt anyone, yet, both are harmed seriously in the movie and those who are hurting them is like shooting a mockingbird. The mockingbird symbolizes the good in life but, as the conviction and death of Tom Robinson demonstrates, evil has the power to overcome the mockingbird's goodness.

Another powerful symbol or image in the movie is the genuine goodness of the black community. The Maycomb black community is pictured in the movie as a group of simple, honest, and hardworking individuals who are barely eking out an existence but still manage to be happy. In spite of their poverty, they appear to possess a high measure of self-respect and pride in themselves. When Atticus decides to represent Tom Robinson, one of their own, the black community showers him with gratitude by supplying his family with fresh produce and baked goods to the point that the Finch home is overcrowding with such items and when Scout and Jem appear in the local black church they are treated with the highest degree of respect and deference.

The wholesomeness of the black community is contrasted with the poor whites in the Maycomb community who are depicted as being poor not because of their race but because of their inherent laziness and lack of ambition. Their living conditions are deplorable; their dress is filthy; they are rude; and, they ignore and abuse their children. Yet, in spite of their poorness and depravity they still look down at the blacks and consider themselves superior to them. These whites consider themselves superior not because of the quality of their character but because of the color of their skin.

The timing of the release of the movie is highly significant. The civil rights movement that was initiated to combat the very concerns addressed by the movie was fully active and this movie was a voice for the injustice that was occurring at the time. Because many of the injustices that were depicted in the movie remain relevant even today, the movie still has staying power nearly fifty years after its initial release. In 1962, the movie stood as a reminder of the effects of racial ignorance and it remains as such.
View Full Essay

Morgan Why Is Misogyny Expressed in Rap

Words: 811 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82028861

Morgan, why is misogyny expressed in rap music? In what ways do you support her point-of-view, in what ways do you disagree? Be specific. Give examples from research, experience AND the readings to support your points.

The controversial 'hip-hop' feminist Joan Morgan states that: "we are all winners when space exists for brothers to honestly state and explore the roots of their pain, and subsequently their misogyny, sans judgment" (Morgan 9). However, she also writes that it is vital and essential to view both black men and women as 'winners' when oppression is lifted from female shoulders. The solution is not banning rap music, rather it is to understand that rap is an expression of the pain felt by African-Americans and the mask that men wear to hide their frustrations (Morgan 74). She states that black women must love black men "for who they are," not who they want them…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Morgan, Joan. When chickenheads come home to roost. Simon & Schuster 2000.

"Misogyny and Women of Color." Independent Lens. PBS. 20 Feb 2007. [24 Apr 2012]

   http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/hiphop/gender.htm   

Wilson, Jocelyn. "What will be hip-hop's legacy?" The Root. 19 Apr 2011. [24 Apr 2012]
View Full Essay

Gender Relations Issues -- 500

Words: 746 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79561128

Unfortunately, ordinary experience is enough to demonstrate how often that dynamic encourages deceptive behavior by men in the pursuit of sex. Put simply, most of the time that women are receptive to sexuality with a particular male partner, they would be at least potentially interested in more of a relationship with that particular man; otherwise, they are much less likely to become sexual with him. The same is not as often true about men: they do not necessarily restrict their sexual conquests to women with whom they might consider a relationship.

Possibly the most damaging aspect of gender-based differential sexual morality is that it promotes a psychological stigma that results in a conscious distinction between so called "nice" girls who are sexually conservative and "loose" girls who ignore or expressly reject social rules about women and casual sex. Purely from an objective observation of the narcissism of males in this…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Myth by Muriel Rukeyser Is a Poem

Words: 400 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58489116

Myth" by Muriel Rukeyser is a poem that discusses the issue of sexism in Sophocles' "Oedipus the King." The poem starts with a continuation of Oedipus suffering as a blind man after he had blinded himself upon learning the he had killed his father Laius and marrying his mother Jocasta. Rukeyser used Oedipus' story as her way of emphasizing the treatment of women during those times, that is, as an object of possession or commodity. In Sophocles' famous play, Oedipus' mother, Jocasta, is clearly portrayed as a woman who has been 'handed down' to Oedipus after her husband's death; Oedipus' triumph in Thebes made him the leader of that kingdom, and made Jocasta his wife as his 'reward' for conquering Thebes. True enough, what happened after Oedipus became the King of Thebes and his marriage to Jocasta was his ultimate downfall. Rukeyser points out one critical mistake on Oedipus' part…… [Read More]