Social Justice Essays (Examples)

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Justice as Retribution

Words: 3724 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50803222

Justice as Retribution

Every individual in the globe has a perception towards crime, justice, criminals, and many other aspects in relation to criminals. On hearing the term "criminal," every individual reacts differently. There are those who feel that a criminal deserves to die, others feel they should rot in prison and many other divergent views. However, does it ever occur that a criminal can be a criminal, through a legal process although they did not take part in the crime? This is a serious issue, which requires critical reasoning before going around judging or calling other people criminals. To the main point, retribution is the main topic or the subject matter for this paper. In the criminal context, the term retribution suggests revenge. This revenge, which the court delivers, is unseen by the common people. However, a critical scrutiny suggests that the legal process is also a tool to deliver…… [Read More]

Works cited

Allen, Rob, "Justice Reinvestment: Making sense of the costs of imprisonment." Criminal

Justice Matters, 71.1 (2008): 41-42.Print

Antony, A Vass. Alternatives to Prison: Punishment, Custody and the Community. London:

Sage, 1990. Print.
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Justice One of the Most Consistent Problems

Words: 2891 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32264363

Justice

One of the most consistent problems facing the criminal justice system is the influence of institutional culture on the administration of justice, both at the level of the police and the courts. While there are of course written guidelines and laws dictating the actions and decision-making process of both the police and the courts, in practice there is a substantial amount of leeway when it comes to dealing with specific situations. As a result, the particular institutional culture of a department or court can go a long way towards informing an individual's actions in regards to a specific case, for good or ill (Morris, Leung, Ames, & Lickel 1999, p. 781-782). On the one hand, the institutional culture might encourage accountability and transparency, and so police and the judiciary would likely feel compelled to act within the bounds of established legal and ethical frameworks. If, on the other hand,…… [Read More]

References

Part A

Bainbridge, J. 2006, "Lawyers, Justice and the State: The Sliding Signifier of Law in Popular

Culture," Griffith Law Review, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 153-176.

Caldeira, G.A. & Gibson, J.L. 1995, "The legitimacy of the Court of Justice in the European
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Social Change Leadership and Advocacy for Ces and Human Services and Fostering Change

Words: 711 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82244241

Social Justice

Improving social justice for women has been identified as one of the building blocks of social change. Population control, education, and the eradication of domestic violence are all interlinked. "UNICEF estimates that worldwide, some 117 million school-aged children do not attend school, 62 million of them girls. Attendance rates are lowest in sub-Saharan Africa, where only 57% of girls are in school, and just 15% of these go on to secondary school" (About us, 2011, Women's global education fund). Women's education is not simply a feminist issue. Higher rates of female education are linked to lower birth rates and better health outcomes for children as well as women.

Women who are educated are more empowered to take control over family planning and have more resources to take care of the children they do have. "Educated mothers limit their families," says Dr. Yasmin aashid, a leader in obstetrics and…… [Read More]

References

About us. (2011). Women's Global Education Project.

Retrieved August 23, 2011 at http://www.womensglobal.org/About%20Us/about.html

Domestic violence. (2011). American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

Retrieved August 23, 2011 at http://www.acog.org/publications/patient_education/bp083.cfm
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Social Policies in the Workplace

Words: 1644 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32828938

Social work history displays that the desire of social justice is both a task and a myth for employees and their immediate predecessors in organizations. This study provides a critical analysis of Janet Finn's and Maxine Jacobson's work titled "Just Practice." The great focus is on the first and the third chapter where their contributions and critical omissions are identified. Finn and Jacobson have worked hard to illustrate the historical development of social work, which was largely premised on charity for the poor (Finn, & Jacobson, 2003). In both chapters, they have elaborated in length on how social work came into being. Ideally, social work history revolves around the industrial revolution and the way the rise of capitalism created a gap between the rich and the poor. In the first chapter, the role of Charity Organization Societies and Settlement House Movement as the pioneers of social work has been elucidated…… [Read More]

References

Barusch, A.S. (2009). Foundations of social policy: Social justice in human perspective. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Finn, J.L., & Jacobson, M. (2003). Just practice: a social justice approach to social work. Peosta, Iowa: Eddie Bowers Pub. Co..

Leiby, J. (1978). A history of social welfare and social work in the United States. New York: Columbia University Press.

Lundy, C., & Lundy, C. (2011). Social work, social justice, & human rights: A structural approach to practice. North York, Ont: University of Toronto Press.
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Social Catholic Catholics Capitalism and

Words: 1077 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62627052



Vatican II

Vatican II, officially known as the Second Vatican Council, was a meeting of many leaders of the Catholic Church to discuss both theological and social issues pertaining to the Church in the modern era. Convened by Pope John XXIII in the 1960s and continued by his successor Paul VI, the main goal of the Second Vatican Council was to establish the Church's role and meaning in the modern world, which it recognized as fundamentally changed from the role of the Church in previous eras. Many different topics of concern were examined during the many phases of Vatican II, and the Council produced a number of documents on these varying subjects that help to define Church doctrine and perspectives on the modern world. When it comes to the social thought and action of the Catholic Church following Vatican II, one of the most important documents produced by the Council…… [Read More]

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Social Work and Political Advocacy

Words: 661 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19012823

Social workers often have commitments to specific policies, laws, or funding of programs that are vital to the population they serve or an issue that they strongly support. Such commitments often lead social workers to become involved in political issues and the campaigns of specific candidates. Being a social worker, such campaign experiences, the outcomes of your efforts, and how effective you felt you were may affect your view of the political process and the likelihood of becoming involved in similar campaigns in the future. Social workers' involvement in political advocacy is usually influenced by the impact of politics on social work practice. Through advocacy and lobbying in the political arena, social workers seek to promote changes in legislation and policy to enhance social conditions and promote social justice towards meeting basic human needs. In essence, social workers' participation in political advocacy is geared towards protecting individuals' rights and enhancing…… [Read More]

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Social Philosophy

Words: 2053 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19656090

Social Philosophy

Concluding in Political moderation, in "A Theory of Justice," and in later works, John awls explains a comprehensive, as well as influential theory, which is on the subject of, presenting a theory of justice in concurrence with the liberal-democratic passion that relates to the rights and freedoms of individuals in society. It entails that the rights of the individuals ought to be moderated by various types of clauses, making certain that no social or natural eventualities are overlooked. The theory declares that no inborn benefits of political authority, substance riches or natural capability should irreversibly or overpoweringly establish life chances. Furthermore, more distinctively, these morally subjective issues should not establish the value of political liberties to moral persons (1).

In 1971, awls's explains his first articulation of his theory of justice which highlights on individual abilities that he entitles the "Original Position" and in addition, a model of…… [Read More]

References

1). Macedo, Stephen. April 1995. Liberal Civic Education and Religious Fundamentalism: the Case of God v. John Rawls. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Pp.468 -496.

2). Carter, Stephen. 1987. Evolutionism and Treating Religion as a Hobby. Duke Law Journal.

3). Rawls, John. 1993. Political Liberalism. New York: Columbia University Press.

4). Kenneth Baynes. 1992. The Normative Grounds of Social Criticism: Kant, Rawls, Habermas, Albany. Suny Press.
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Social Movements Social Reformers Recognized

Words: 2359 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43531425

King called upon Black churches to challenge the status quo and to change the pervasively oppressive social order. acism, economic and labor exploitation and war were named by King as the three greatest evils of American society and they needed to be fully eradicated to resolve social disparity.

King's idea of integration was complex; he struggled to eliminate or reduce poverty by linking political power, wealth, and poverty...."King's unfinished search for more radical reforms in America may have been the central reason he was killed."..."Martin Luther King and Malcolm X were both assassinated," Allen (1983: 322) writes, "at precisely the point at which they began working actively and consciously against the racism and exploitation generated by the American capitalist system..." (Jalata, 2003, p. 67)

The value of understanding the issue of class had been one that was a significant aspect of social reform research, since the post war period. One…… [Read More]

References

Curran, L. (2003). The Culture of Race, Class, and Poverty: The Emergence of a Cultural Discourse in Early Cold War Social Work. Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare, 30(3), 15.

Hon, L.C. (1997). To Redeem the Soul of America: Public Relations and the Civil Rights Movement. Journal of Public Relations Research, 9(3), 163-212.

Howe, B., & Pidwell, R. (2002). Poverty Research and Social Policy. Australian Journal of Social Issues, 37(2), 113.

Jalata, a. (2003). Comparing the African-American and Oromo Movements in the Global Context. Social Justice, 30(1), 67.
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Social Biases A Continuing Societal

Words: 1559 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29182202

(2004) Intent and Ordinary Bias: Unintended Thought and Social Motivation Create Casual Prejudice. Social Justice esearch, Vol. 17 Issue 2, p117-127, 11p. etrieved July 7, 2009 from EBSCO online database http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=s8h&AN=13079636&loginpage=Login.asp&site=ehost-live&scope=site

Henry, P.J. And Hardin, C. (2006). The Contact Hypothesis evisited. Status Bias in the eduction of Implicit Prejudice in the United States and Lebanon. Association of Psychological Science. Vol.1-7 -- Number 10. etrieved July 7, 2009 from EBSCO online database http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rst&AN=23000285&loginpage=Login.asp&site=ehost-live&scope=site

Mandel, I. (2009). Cultural Prejudice & Discrimination. esearch Starters Sociology, 2009, p1-6, 6p. etrieved July 7, 2009 from EBSCO online database http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rst&AN=36267911&loginpage=Login.asp&site=ehost-live&scope=site

Pearson, A., Dovidio, J., & Pratto, F. (2007).acial Prejudice, Intergroup Hate, and Blatant and Subtle Bias of Whites toward Blacks in Legal Decision Making in the United States. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 2007, Vol. 7 Issue 2, p145-158, 14p. etrieved July 8, 2009 from EBSCO online database Full Text http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=s8h&AN=27747337&loginpage=Login.asp&site=ehost-live&scope=site

amasubramanian, S. &…… [Read More]

References:

Faxed material

Fiske, S. (2004) Intent and Ordinary Bias: Unintended Thought and Social Motivation Create Casual Prejudice. Social Justice Research, Vol. 17 Issue 2, p117-127, 11p. Retrieved July 7, 2009 from EBSCO online database http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=s8h&AN=13079636&loginpage=Login.asp&site=ehost-live&scope=site

Henry, P.J. And Hardin, C. (2006). The Contact Hypothesis Revisited. Status Bias in the Reduction of Implicit Prejudice in the United States and Lebanon. Association of Psychological Science. Vol.1-7 -- Number 10. Retrieved July 7, 2009 from EBSCO online database http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rst&AN=23000285&loginpage=Login.asp&site=ehost-live&scope=site

Mandel, I. (2009). Cultural Prejudice & Discrimination. Research Starters Sociology, 2009, p1-6, 6p. Retrieved July 7, 2009 from EBSCO online database http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rst&AN=36267911&loginpage=Login.asp&site=ehost-live&scope=site
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Social Anthropology Economic Systems Generally

Words: 635 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26547026

Animism is the concentration of those foundational powers within high-status members of social groups and is most common with clans and tribes. Monotheism evolved in the same manner whereas polytheism is more common within larger and more intellectually and economically sophisticated societies.

4. Kinship:

The concept of family varies considerably among different types of societies. Kinship societies are unique in the degree to which the concept of family encompasses horizontal relations as well as vertical relations. The study of terminology is important precisely because similar phrases such as "family" and "kin" have such different connotations in different societies. Whereas kinship societies are typically endogamous, larger human societies are almost always exogamous and subscribe to strong cultural taboos prohibiting incest. Within kinship societies, endogamous rules apply only to vertical and immediate horizontal relations.

5. Applied Anthropology:

Academic anthropology refers to the empirical study of human societies and to anthropological research. Generally,…… [Read More]

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Social Movements and the Public

Words: 637 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50321959

Women's health, sexuality, motherhood, and other issues became of real importance. They were talked about instead of just hushed. Both men and women benefited from the women's movement. Society, however, was the major benefactor, as women's perspectives were able to influence everything from government to entertainment.

The continuation of the women's movement would have a similarly strong impact. This movement would encourage the complete equality of men and women in the home, instead of just in the workplace. The impact of this would be great on the American family. For the first time, many American children would be raised to understand that supporting a family, maintaining a house, and caring for a family is the job of both men and women. This would lead to the eradication of stereotypes. Furthermore, the continuation of the women's movement must address the inequality in contributions from women to many disciplines before the women's…… [Read More]

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Justice for All the Concept

Words: 1770 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53766042

In this way, members of the public most in need of legal aid are provided with counsel that can help them achieve justice instead of losing their life savings on services that nevertheless results in failure. The IOLTA Comparability Rule therefore serves an important function in terms of legal justice that truly extends to all citizens of the country.

In conclusion, it has been seen above, that the definition of the justice concept is often in conflict depending upon the viewpoint from which it is considered. At the bottom line is the fact that American citizens should not be forced to allow those in political or financial power to victimize or discriminate against them. Justice in conflict is served only if due consideration is given to all parties and all sides involved. Despite the often problematic issues involved, the phrase "justice for all" is one of the cornerstones of American…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bednar, Joseph (2007, Apr 2). Justice for All. BusinessWest. Database: FindArticles.com. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa5286/is_200704/ai_n21235376

The Daily Record, Baltimore. (2007, Oct. 9). Comparable rates on IOLTA: A step toward justice for all. Database: FindArticles.com:

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4183/is_20071009/ai_n21052018

Wildman, Sarah. (2004, Dec. 21). George W. Bush has a very clear position on what makes good judges. The Advocate. Database: FindArticles.com: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1589/is_2004_Dec_21/ai_n8706676
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Social Order and Justice An

Words: 751 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68777862

Tzu argues that strategy is important in that a successful general or leader can and will adapt to changing conditions on the battlefield, and that the art of war is more about adaptability and the risks and opportunities that come with the constant and dynamic nature of warfare than it is about careful planning and preparation. This is not to say that the latter two actions are useless, by Tzu sees more value in flexibility and cunning than he does in immobility and inflexibility.

Both works illustrate how personal and social justice differ from each other. They also point out that personal order is often a concept that lacks true definition, at least as time goes by. A successful person, whether in war or in their family life, learns to adapt to changing situations and scenarios, putting aside social order and justice in favor of a much more relevant, functional…… [Read More]

References

Sophecles. (458 BC). Electra.

Tzu, Sun. (5th century BC). The Art of War.
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Justice and Fairness Rawls' First

Words: 2190 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54599159

It would strive to minimize the pay and quality-of-life differential between the wealthiest individuals and the poorest, although it would permit whatever differential justified by the greater good served by certain professional commitments and responsibilities.

Rawls' ideas if incorporated into society would not compel any person to contribute to the greater good any more than he or she desired; they would simply impose mechanisms for distributing resources and potential rewards in the most socially beneficial and equitable manner. Industries that produce socially beneficial products and services that contribute to the greater good would be permitted to profit more from those endeavors than superfluous industries; physicians would be entitled to sufficient compensation and benefits to ensure against any shortage of physicians in society; and police officers and firefighters would earn more than professional athletes, although closer to several times the average wage in society instead of the equivalent of hundreds or…… [Read More]

"Many social decisions are, of course, of an administrative nature. Certainly this is so when it is a matter of social utility in what one may call its ordinary sense: that is, when it is a question of the efficient design of social institutions for the use of common means to achieve common ends" (Rawls, 1958 p187).

Rawls' ideas would seem to comport perfectly with the essential purpose of public administration services. In principle, the entire structure of modern administrative services in society is precisely to improve society and contribute to the public good much more efficiently and effectively than individual citizens could ever hope to, even in a collaborative effort. Granted, to a certain extent, Rawls' ideas could be seen as excessively constraining individual initiative and creativity; however, in the realm of public administration of social services and justice, they would greatly increase the quality of life and contribute to the greater good. Instead of the poorly motivated, apathetic attitudes frequently associated with civil service employment, Rawls' ideas would reward civil servants sufficiently to guarantee much greater commitment to their responsibilities.

Generally, modern public administration and civil service exemplify the very concepts emphasized by Rawls except that the pay differential between civil servants and employment in many areas of the private sector greatly detract from the communal spirit and cooperation that Rawls hoped to promote through his ideas. Ultimately, while some of the specific mechanisms suggested by Rawls' ideas may be impractical to impose on a free society, their general purpose is likely achievable to some degree simply by increasing awareness of some of the conceptual arguments.
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Justice Has Been Explained by

Words: 893 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6773329



Rawls sets out to propose a new theory, which he does by formulating two principles and "to show that the two principles of justice provide a better understanding of the claims of freedom and equality in a democratic society than the first principles associated with the traditional doctrines of utilitarianism, with perfectionism, or with institutionalism" (Rawls, Political Liberalism 292).

Nozick suggests an entitlement theory of justice that might seem to reflect the categorical imperative but which actually counters Kant's theory of property. John Rawls offered a revision of Kantian theory so it could be used as a grounding in ethical theory. Nozick also shows a strong commitment to prepolitical individual rights. He also recognizes that there are forces, including past injustices, which shape our holdings in society in various ways, raising the question of what ought to be done to rectify these injustices:

The general outlines of the theory of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Nozick, Robert. Anarchy, State, and Utopia. New York: Basic Books, 1974.

Nozick, Robert. "The Entitlement Theory." In Morality and Moral Controversies, John Arthur (ed.), 253-259. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1996.

Olen Jeffrey and Vincent Barry. Applying Ethics. Boston: Wadsworth Publishing, 1996.

Rawls, John. Political Liberalism. New York: Columbia University Press, 1996.
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Social Democracy Pamphleteering Has a

Words: 1968 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27797329

Northrop Frye recognized this fact but believed that the satire missed its mark:

It completely misses the point as satire on the ussian development of Marxism, and as expressing the disillusionment which many men of good-will feel about ussia. The reason for that disillusionment would be much better expressed as the corruption of expediency by principle (Frye 1987, p. 10).

What links 1984 and Animal Farm most directly is that both are anti-utopian in nature, for Orwell had developed a certainty that government in a utopian society would always be corrupted and would lose sight of its principles because of expediency.

Animal Farm was written during World War II. There is evidence that he was planning a novel that would become 1984 even before he wrote Animal Farm, and there is a relationship between the two books that is not often noted:

The form each book took was very different,…… [Read More]

References

Brander, L. (1954). George Orwell. New York: Longmans, Green and Co.

Crick, B. (1986). The making of Animal Farm. In Critical Essays on George Orwell, B. Oldsey and J. Browne (eds.). Boston: G.K. Hall.

Frye, N. (1987). In George Orwell, H. Bloom (ed.). New York: Chelsea House.

Green, T.H. (1995). Liberal legislation and freedom of contract. In Sources of the Western Tradition, M. Perry, J.R. Peden, and T.H. Von Laue (eds.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
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Social Work Describe Some of

Words: 3444 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54628484

Social workers try to help people make the most of their environment, their relationships, and any struggles they might have with money or family. A lot of social workers deal with people who face life-threatening circumstances, such as criminal activity or substance abuse. Other issues that social workers try to tackle are inadequate housing, unemployment, illness, disability, or difficulties around childbirth (Social Work Professions: Summary of the Social Worker Fields, 2010).

There are various social work specializations, but the larger categories include child, family, and school social workers, who provide social services and assistance to children and their families; medical and public health social workers who provide support for people with illnesses, such as Alzheimer's disease, cancer, or AIDS; mental health and substance abuse social workers who deal with people who struggle with psychological issues; and social workers who deal with the intricacies of social policy and planning (Social Work…… [Read More]

References

Social Work Practice. (n.d.). Retrieved August 31, 2010, from Web site:

 http://www.naswdc.org/practice/standards/NASWHealthCareStandards.pdf 

Social Work Professions: Summary of the Social Worker Fields. (2010). Retrieved August 31,

2010, from Education Portal Web site: http://education-
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Social Problem and Human Services

Words: 993 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90968914

Social Problem Related to Human Services

Social justice implies citizens’ equal entitlement to the self-same services and rights. In this paper, the inequalities in providing various human services to different societal groups in the nation will be addressed.

Beginning with education, a fundamental human service, it is a highly concerning fact that the nation’s educational system continually fails unwanted, abused and neglected children. Also, foster children totally at society’s mercy for survival are largely ignored. As children don’t have any avenue for voicing their views and demands, and cannot finance political campaigns, protest for improved services, or lobby elected representatives in order for being heard, it is the responsibility of society’s adults to speak for this faction of society. Attempts at organizing an effective child welfare system can be traced back to the late nineteenth century, when the nation’s contemporary system of foster care was established and Charles Loring Brace…… [Read More]

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Social Work Scenario Mrs Ozdemir

Words: 1419 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73555634

al., 2009).

Part 5 -- Use of reframing

eframing refers to the manner in which something is said, or the actions one takes in introducing certain elements to clients -- perhaps a new way of looking at an old problem, of themselves, of a clinical issue. In the case of Mrs. O., we would ask that she look to the expansion of her universe through developing language abilities, or helping to find her translation assistance. The reframing stage would also be indicating that her cultural privacy issues about the effects of her medical problems might be contributing to her pain and suffering over them. Instead, reframing the issue would allow us to find a way to solve the problem, while still slowly moving within Mrs. O's comfort zone. eframing, in fact, is applicable when the fixed attitude constitutes a fundamental part of the issue -- in this case, a cultural…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Coady, N. And Lehman, P. (2008). Theoretical Perspectives for Direct Social Work Practice.

New York: Springer.

Cournoyer, B.R. (2008). The Social Work Skills Workbook. Belmont, CA: Thompson

Higher Education.
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Social Work Has Gone Through

Words: 1054 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60055987



One of the primary concerns was multicultural relationships -- the recognition that ethics were relative to specific cultures and that each culture had to be understood according to its own functions, has to be respected for what it is, and had to be addressed in light of its cultural history and practices so that its people could best be helped. Social work had come a long way from attempting to squeeze all citizens of America in the model of the 'perfect American' as it had done in the 1920s. Nowadays, it is well-recognized that immigrants have many problems that deter them from receiving the rights that all Americans should receive optimal beneficial medical care and healthy living accommodations. Suffering from handicapped language skills and ignorance about the ways of their new land, immigrants are often exploited by an unjust and insensitive system as well as by willful individuals. This is…… [Read More]

Reference

Chesney, A.P., Chavira, J.A., Hall, R.P., & Gary, H.E. (1982). Barriers to medical care of Mexican-Americans: the role of social class, acculturation, and social isolation. Med. Care 20, 883 -- 91

Raemer, F. (1998) The evolution of social work ethics Nat. Assoc. Of Social Workers.
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Social Implications of the Industrial

Words: 2180 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83223618



On the other hand, one lesson of the Industrial Revolution is that human suffering and exploitation can never be used as a coin with which to pay for material progress or wealth. Likewise, the Industrial Revolution teaches that neither the welfare of the contemporary wealthy and fortunate, nor even the future well-being of subsequent generations is ever justified as the fruits of the suffering of other human beings.

In retrospect, the progression from agrarian to industrial economies need not have required the degree of suffering with which it was, unfortunately, associated, particularly in the nineteenth century. The best evidence for this proposition seems to be the efforts, most of which were successful, on the part of Bismark, in Germany, while workers suffered greater hardships, by comparison, in the rest of the newly industrialized world. Greed and callousness, is, unfortunately, characteristic of many elements of human life, which was not necessarily…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Burchell, S.D. (1968) Age of Progress.

Time Life: UK

Faissler, M., Hayes, C. (1966) Modern Times: Mainstreams of Civilization.

Macmillan: New York
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Justice Model Has Replaced the

Words: 1162 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51103376

I do not believe that this occurred because people became less concerned about the welfare of prisoners, or that America had simply become 'hardened' to the idea of trying to help people. I believe it merely came out of a frustration on the part of Americans who were desperate for an alternative that actually worked. Every night on the news, people are bombarded with story after story about criminal behaviors and growing crime rates, so it is entirely understandable that American's would throw their arms up in exasperation, and say 'let's try something else!' Frustration has always been a powerful catalyst for change, and the criminal justice system is no exception. But is this frustration the most powerful reason behind the replacement of the medical model with the justice model? Or is there something else that needs to be considered? Perhaps it was the war on drugs that drove this…… [Read More]

References

Barlow, D.E. & Barlow, M.H. (1993) Cultural diversity training in criminal justice: a progressive or conservative reform? Social Justice, 20 (3/4), 69-84.

Robinson, M.B. & Scherlen, R.G. (2007) Lies, damned lies, and drug war statistics: a critical analysis of claims made by the office of National Drug Control Policy. SUNY Press.

Sparks, R. (1996). Prison Histories: reform, repression and rehabilitation in E. McLaughlin and J. Muncie (eds) Controlling Crime, London: Sage for the Open University

Williams, V.L. (1996) Dictionary of American penology. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.
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Justice in Social Work Social

Words: 1782 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75981104

" (Shiele, 2006) All of these are important yet they do not address the use of "the worldviews and cultural values of people of color as theoretical bases for new social work practice models" (Shiele, 2006) but instead hold the beliefs that: (1) that only White people - especially White men - have the ability and skill to develop theories and social work practice models; (2) that people of color, specifically African-Americans, lack the ability and skill to develop theories and social work practice models; (3) that the precepts of European-American culture are the primary, if not the only, precepts through which social problems can be analyzed and solved; and/or (4) that culture, and the internalization of culture by the theorist, has little or no effect on theory - that theory or theorizing is mostly or completely an objective activity." (Shiele, 2006)

ibliography

Sohng, S. (2004). A brief overview of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Sohng, S. (2004). A brief overview of contemporary theories of social justice. Justice lecture notes October 04, pp. 1-13.

Rawls. J. (1997). Justice and Equity, in L. Pojman & R. Westmoreland (Eds), Equality: Selected Readings (pp.183-190). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Reisch, M. (2002). Defining social justice in a socially unjust world. Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 83, 343-354.

Isbister, J. (2001). Capitalism and justice, Chapter 1 and 2 (pp. 3-29). Bloomfield, CT: Kumarian Press.
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Social Equity Leadership Conference

Words: 5893 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74643599

Social equity is a key issue of public administration and forms the basic theme of the 2013 "Social Equity Leadership Conference," in June. This white paper discusses the key goals of the conference based on the conference issue for social equity as global engagement and local responsibility. These are the issue facing social equity among domestic and global public leaders in public and private agencies in the education, immigration, transportation, environmental, policing and corrections sectors. A review of theories on public administration identifies that public leadership networking, collaboration, and cooperation with leaders and agencies is necessary. This is associated with public leadership practices like public policy development, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation, social equity, and public advocacy.

Introduction

Conference Theme:

Globally Engaged, Locally esponsible: New Challenges for Social Equity

Emerging Issues in Social Equity and Leadership Covered in the Conference:

1. Education

2. Policing and corrections

3. At risk communities, which…… [Read More]

References

Brian, A.E., & Adam, J.N. (2010). Building the reservoir to nowhere: The role of agencies in advocacy coalitions. Policy Studies Journal, 38(4), 653-678.

Buss, T.F. & Morse, R.S. (2008). Innovations in Public Leadership Development. Armonk, New York; M.E. Sharpe, Inc.

Candler, G., & Dumont, G. (2010). The price of citizenship: Civic responsibility as the missing dimension of public administration theory. Public Administration Quarterly, 34(2), 169-201.

Cichocki, D., Laberschek, M., & Rusanowska, M. (2011). Analysis of strategy of culture development in krakow 2010-2014 as an example of public policy implementation. Zarzadzanie Publiczne, 13(1), 103-115.
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Justice Political Philosopher John Rawls Looks at

Words: 996 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56843888

Justice, political philosopher John Rawls looks at the idea of social justice and the individual rights of the individual by redefining the last 200+ years of the American experience. In general, he looks at the manner in which the Founding Fathers were correct by basing their views on previous social contract theorists like Locke and Rousseau. For example, there is a clear linkage between John Locke and Rawls that validates the ideas of liberalism within American society. In fact, Rawls notes that the American Experience extended the concept of justice far beyond hat any of the Enlightenment philosophers ever hoped (Rawls, 1957).

Rawls (1921-2002), an American philosopher who focused on moral and political philosophy, believed that the principles of justice are the models that rational individuals who are free would choose as basic ways to cooperate within their society. He called this position the original position, in that it was…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kamm, F. (2007). Intricate Ethics: Rights, Responsibilities and Permissible Harm. New York: Oxford University Press.

Rawls, J. (1957). Justice as Fairness. Philosophical Review. 54 (22): 653-62.

Rawls, J. (1999). A Theory of Justice. Boston, MA: Harvard University Press.

Rawls, J. (2001). A Theory of Justice. New York: Oxford University Press.
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Social Work Beyond U S Borders Whilst it

Words: 1580 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22364281

social work beyond U.. Borders?

Whilst it is true that each country and region may have its own concept of justice and ways of doing things, and that the Western concepts of justice and its norms, are inapplicable to a different country, nevertheless there are some human rights issues that transcend countries and boundaries. These human rights issues can only be recognized if one takes a transcendental stance compared to a narrow stance. It is by recognizing existence of these human rights issues that America can transcend its national limited perspective and involve itself too in a social work pose that effects international concerns and involves itself with concerns and obligations that transcend borders.

In another way, also, the U.. is never separate from social work issues that occur outside its perimeters. Immigrants from other countries seek refuge in the U.. On a continuous basis. Even immigrants who do not…… [Read More]

Sources

Childs, JB Red Clay, Blue HILLS, in honor of my ancestors.

 http://www.mcc.osu.edu/posts/documents/racism-jbchilds.pdf 

Universal declaration of human rights pdf.