South American Essays (Examples)

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American War for Independence Wars Are Fought

Words: 602 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19743910

American ar for Independence

ars are fought for many reasons, but freedom from oppression is by far the noblest. The Colonial States of America were British ruled until the year 1776, when the Declaration of Independence called for a complete withdrawal of the King's forces from the American colonies. (Decl. Of Indep. Entire.) The American ar for Independence was a revolutionary war by every definition of the word; the ruling British Empire was cast off permanently, the separation and equality of the various states was guaranteed, and sufficient support for the Constitution and the Bill of Rights completed the newly created United States of America.

The drafting of the Declaration of Independence created a precedent for freedom that the United States had been waiting for decades, and it addressed directly the oppressions beset upon the American colonies by King George III. The Articles of Confederation were a result of the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Articles of Conf. 2.

Articles of Conf. 3.

Decl. Of Indep. Entire.

Knight, F. (2000). Retrieved from http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/ahr/105.1/ah000103.html
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American System Henry Clay Gave His Famous

Words: 711 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68304687

American System

Henry Clay gave his famous speech in support of the American System to the House of Representatives in 1824, although Alexander Hamilton had used the same term decades before. It rested "on the idea of harmonizing all the segments of the economy for their mutual benefit and of doing so by active support from an intervening national government" (Baxter 27). Clay's conversion to this policy was surprising since Hamilton had been a member of the Federalist Party while Henry Clay was supposedly a Democratic Republican and a Jeffersonian, opposed to Federal plans for government aid to industry, a national bank, protective tariffs and federal funding for highways, canals, railroads and other internal improvements. After the ar of 1812, however, the first political party system had come to an end and the Federalists were discredited by their opposition to the war and threats of secession in New England. During…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Baxter, Maurice G. Henry Clay and the American System. University Press of Kentucky, 2004.

Hounshell, David A. From the American System to Mass Production, 1800-1932. Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984.
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American Expansion American Territorial Expansion The Louisiana

Words: 950 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48885937

American Expansion

American Territorial Expansion: The Louisiana Purchase

American territorial expansion was the top priority of ashington DC for every decade of the 19th century, including the Civil ar years. The new territory all came to Americans through treaties or conquest, and thus promoted the isolationist "Manifest Destiny" prerogative of strengthening the American continent. The earliest and largest territorial expansion of the 19th century was the Louisiana Purchase, doubling the size of the American states. The Louisiana Purchase was made with the short-term bolstering of Thomas Jefferson's government in the near-term, yet with deep concerns for the security of the new land and how and who should settle the land in the long-term.

The Louisiana Purchase was not a decision taken lightly by then President Thomas Jefferson, who felt that it would be difficult for the young America to take full possession of the territory, and thus sign the country…… [Read More]

Work Cited

1803, and the United States. "Louisiana Purchase." Gateway New Orleans: N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Jan. 2012. .

Jefferson, Thomas. "Treaty with France (Louisiana Purchase). 1909-14. American Historical Documents, 1000-1904. The Harvard Classics." Bartleby.com: Great Books Online -- Quotes, Poems, Novels, Classics and hundreds more. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Jan. 2012. .

"Louisiana: European Explorations and the Louisiana Purchase - The Louisiana Purchase (American Memory from the Library of Congress)." American Memory from the Library of Congress - Home Page. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Jan. 2012. .

"The Louisiana Purchase -- Thomas Jefferson's Monticello." Thomas Jefferson's Monticello. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Jan. 2012. .
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American Indian Movement

Words: 2030 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81369738

American Indian Movement

The poorest people in America are the American Indians and it is also a fact that Indian reservations have unique laws that has made it a nation by itself within the United States. The modern movements focus on the American Indian reservations being empowered by self-determination. This is important for the economic, social and cultural improvement of the American Indians. It was with the Nixon administration that the welfare of the tribes became the focus of the government. The subsequent administrations encouraged the Indians to adapt to a policy of political and economic self-determination. Today many reservations have become economic hubs with tax and regulation havens for investment. Thus as of now the Mescalero and White Mountain Apaches "have become premier private managers of multiple-use forest resource economies." (Legters; Lyden, 1994)

However it must be stated that only during the eagan administration that there were major reports…… [Read More]

References

Bolt, Christine. (1990) "American Indian Policy and American Reform: Case Studies of the Campaign to Assimilate the American Indians" Routledge. Pages: 250, 298

http://books.google.co.in/books?id=75UVAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA298&dq=american+indian+movement&hl=en&sa=X&ei=nj2IT92qCsWJrAeW-anrCg&ved=0CDMQ6AEwADge#v=onepage&q=american%20indian%20movement&f=false

Fritz, Henry E. (1963) "The Movement for Indian Assimilation, 1860-1890." University of Pennsylvania Press: Philadelphia. Page Number: 15, 34, 56,138

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=3054897
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American West United States Became One of

Words: 3016 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96829384

American est

United States became one of the most industrialized nations and sought to grow its industries at an alarming rate. For this purpose, the western part of United States, which had not yet been discovered, was subjected to massive development, economic growth, formation of industries and allowing settlers to move towards the west. Railroads played a significant role in contributing towards the development and urbanization of America's est. The goal of this paper is to analyze the impact of railroads on America's est in the lights of broad and diverse academic resources.

Railroads in America est

Railroads had been developed in United States during the nineteenth century and start of twentieth century. They owe their existence to Industrial Revolution. During the nineteenth century, Industrial Revolution promoted technological and industrial development and thus, laid down the foundations of railroads in United States. During this time, United States became one of…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Bain, David Haward. Empire Express; Building the first Transcontinental Railroad. Viking Penguin. 1999.

Banerjee, A.E.D. a. N.Q. "The Railroad to Success: The Effect of Infrastructureon Economic Growth," Providence, Brown University. 2006.

Beebe, Lucius. The Central Pacific & The Southern Pacific Railroads: Centennial Edition. Howell-North. 1999.

Bianculli, A.J. The American Railroad in the 19th Century: Locomotives. University of Delaware, Newark. 2001.
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Americans Are Reminded Incessantly These Days That

Words: 1507 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48516272

Americans are reminded incessantly these days that slavery was a terrible thing. In today's politically correct society, some blacks are challenging reparations for slavery because their remote ancestors were slaves. Slavery is routinely used to bash the South, although the slave trade began in the North, and slavery was once used in every state in the Union. Today's historians assure people of America that the War for Southern Independence was fought first and foremost if not exclusively over slavery, and that by winning that war, the North put an end to the peculiar institution once and for all. However, in today's modern society, if people are legally bound to hand a certain percentage of their income (the fruits of their labors) over to federal, state and local governments, then from the legal standpoint they only have some percentage ownership of their person and labor which could be considered a form…… [Read More]

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American Independence and National Unity

Words: 359 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26209846

American Independence, National Unity

rief thematic history of the U.S. from 1760 to 1815

In describing U.S. history from 1760 to 1815, I would have to title it as "The United States: The Formative Years." From the ritish indifference to her New World colonies, and the War for Independence; to the events before the Civil War, the United States formative years were ones of triumph, struggle and unity.

During 1763, up until 1775, the United States and ritain feuded over 'taxation without representation'. Like a child, the colonies had to break free from the mother country and find themselves and their independence, which they did in 1776 (U.S. History Timeline).

Thomas Payne said in his political pamphlet 'Common Sense' that "There is something exceedingly ridiculous in the composition of monarchy; it first excludes a man from the means of information, yet empowers him to act in cases where the highest…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Payne, Thomas. Common Sense. Online. www.earlyamerica.com.8 December 2002.

US History Timeline.

Online. www.csuchico.edu/AmericanHistory.8 December 2002.
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American Democracy

Words: 1874 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30222095

American Democracy

A nation wherein the masses elect representatives to the government, thus ensuring the law is shaped by public opinion (so long as this opinion is Constitutional) is considered a republic. This was the aim of America's Founding Fathers. Democracy closely resembles a epublic; however, a key point of distinction between the two is the representatives. The founders were worried about citizens' criticism that they were assuming too much control themselves and hence, there was a need to prove to citizens that it wasn't the President, but the law, that governed the nation. Following the very ineffective attempt at enforcing the Articles of Confederation, the founders ultimately found success with the Constitution -- American history's most famous text -- which ensured federal power was limited to only matters included within the Constitution. Without the Constitution, the U.S. would be an absolute democracy with all citizens doing whatever they felt…… [Read More]

References

Adams, J. O. (2008). Why Our Founders Feared a Democracy. Retrieved from American Traditions:  http://www.americantraditions.org/Articles/Why%20Our%20Founders%20Feared%20a%20Democracy.htm 

Appelbaum, Y. (2015, October). America's Fragile Constitution. Retrieved from The Atlantic: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/10/our-fragile-constitution/403237/

Pease, H. (2010, June 25). The Founding Fathers Rejected Democracy. Retrieved from Liberty Under fire:  http://libertyunderfire.org/2010/06/the-founding-fathers-rejected-democracy/ 

Wandrei, K. (2016). What Features of the U.S. Constitution Had Distrust of a Democracy? Retrieved from Synonym: http://classroom.synonym.com/features-constitution-distrust-democracy-20581.html
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South African Perspective on AFRICOM

Words: 2147 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90337307

South African Perspective on United States Africa Command

As the United States continues its drawdown of troops in the Middle East and reevaluates its prosecution of the global war on terrorism following the recent elimination of key Al-Qaeda leaders, most especially Osama bin Laden, it is important to assess the impact of these events on American military forces elsewhere, especially in sub-Saharan Africa in general and South Africa in particular. The so-called BIC (Brazil, ussia, India and China), with China taking the lead, are taking an increasingly active interest in developing improved trade and political ties with sub-Saharan African nations, and misperceptions of American global hegemonic intentions may interfere with the legitimate goals of the U.S. military in establishing improved relations with these countries. To help identify key challenges and potential solutions, this paper reviews the relevant literature to describe current U.S. military strategy in South Africa to provide salient…… [Read More]

References

"AFRICOM." (2011). (2011). GlobalSecurity.org. [online] available: http://www.globalsecurity.

org/military/agency/dod/africom.htm.

Gilbert, L. D,. Uzodike, U.O. & Isike, C. (2009). "The United States Africa Command: Security

for Whom?" The Journal of Pan African Studies 2(9): 264-266.
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South and the North of the 19th Century

Words: 1198 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77865771

South and the North of the 19th Century

Dear Trevor,

As I write this, I can hear faint yells and cheers through my window. Somewhere, the city of Charleston still celebrates. You'll have heard why by the time my letter arrives. Secession. It was no secret that it would happen when Lincoln, that great ape, was elected. As many years as we've been on the receiving end of Yankee insults and "compromises," I wonder why we took so long.

You and I have talked about our peculiar institution, and I know you disapprove, but then, you have not been around Negroes. They are not our equals. They need us to care for them and direct them, and we need them to work the fields and keep our farms and plantations running. There is no immorality, no terrible sin. Merely an advantageous arrangement for both sides. But the Yankees don't see…… [Read More]

References

Catton, B. (1961). The coming fury, volume one. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co.

Naden, C.J. & Blue, R. (2000). Why fight? The causes of the American Civil War. Austin, TX: Steck-Vaughn Publishers.
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American Civil Right Movement Compare and Contrast

Words: 1837 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56064499

American Civil ight Movement

Compare and contrast the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) on the basis of their leadership, philosophy, and tactics.

Philosophy

Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) was a civil rights organization that was initiated by African-Americans in 1957 (Fairclough, 2001). The movement was primarily aimed at ending the segregation and discrimination against the black African population in the U.S. The core philosophy of SCLC revolved around to seek civil rights and economic justice for the people of Southern States having majority of African-Americans.

Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) actually aimed achieving same objectives as those of SCLC but through non-violent sit-in and defiance of segregated dining and lunch services. The core philosophy of SNCC was also eliminating segregation but the mission statement was narrower compared to SCLC.

Leadership

The most prominent leader of SCLC was Martin Luther King, Jr. Other prominent…… [Read More]

References

Dyson, M.E. (2009). April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Death and how it Changed America. Basic Books.

Fairclough, A. (2001). To Redeem the Soul of America: The Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Martin Luther King, Jr. University of Georgia Press.

Johnson & Johnson (2013). Annual Report & Proxy Statements: J&J. Retrieved from: [http://files.shareholder.com/downloads/JNJ/2770950354x0x644760/85FD0CFF-2305-4A02-8294-2E47D0F31850/JNJ2012annualreport.pdf]

Sundquist, J.L. (1968). Politics and Policy: The Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson Years. Brookings Institution Press.
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American Life Is All About the Fight

Words: 1371 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17087246

American life is all about the fight towards becoming upwardly mobile and making life better. Ellen oster by Kaye Gibbons and the Narrative of the Life of rederick Douglass, an American Slave written by himself tell the story of struggle and hardship that leads to change and reflection. These two stories although differing in setting and protagonists, share the same level of pain that are universal regardless of race, gender, and age.

Both protagonists are bound by the chains of their existence. The differences are based on age and racial inequality. In terms of style and content, because the two novels were written during different time periods, they will have differences, especially in perspective since Douglass wrote it about himself where as Kaye Gibbons wrote about a made up character. In this essay these differences will be explained along with the universal themes that bring the two together.

Ellen oster…… [Read More]

Freedom is something both the protagonists of the two stories crave and need. Ellen needs to be free of her abusive father and finds it through his death and Douglass wants to be free of slavery and finds it through his escape. These pursuits not only illustrate the universal need for liberty and the pursuit of pleasure, but the human need to exist and exist well. It is through books such as these, that people can begin to understand things on a deeper level and realize the struggles everyone goes through at one point in their lives.

In conclusion the readings of Ellen Foster and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave illustrate the plight and struggle of people in different times and periods. Ellen had to deal with poverty and abuse in 1970's American south and Douglass had to deal with existing during the period of American slavery. To compare the stories, one had to look at the subject matter. They were very different protagonists, one a black man, another a white girl, but they both determined to succeed and prevail against all odds and obstacles.

In regards to differences, the writing styles were the opposite of each other. One sought to create depth and mystery, the other to analyse and explain. Douglass wanted people to understand the plight of African-Americans were as Gibbons wanted to create a rich and deep character. Two great stories, two great characters, and one universal themese of suffering is what this essay offers.
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American History Slave Revolts Although

Words: 6354 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54831518

Alexander Hamilton carried on an affair with the wife of "a notorious political schemer," Maria Reynolds. Andrew Jackson married Rachel Jackson before her divorce from Lewis Robards was finalized and therefore was accused of marrying a married woman. Jackson's opponent in 1828, John Quincy Adams, was in turn accused of "corrupt bargaining" during his term. Jackson also championed Margaret O'Neill Timberlake, who married his secretary of war, John Eaton. "Peggy O'Neill" was considered a woman of "questionable virtue," and as a result Martin Van Buren became Jackson's successor in the presidency. After the death of Jackson and Eaton, Peggy married a 19-year-old dance teacher (which raised eyebrows, as she was 59), who embezzled her money and ran off to Europe with her 17-year-old granddaughter.

Other scandals concerned Richard Mentor Johnson, who ran for vice president in 1836 with Martin Van Buren. He supposedly shot Tecumseh during the ar of 1812,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ferling, John. Adams vs. Jefferson: the tumultuous election of 1800. New York: Oxford University Press. 2004.
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American Flag After the Terrorist

Words: 642 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78127813



When it is flown at half-staff because of a death or series of deaths, it should be first hoisted to the top of the pole for an instant and then lowered to halfway. The flag should be again raised to the peak before it is lowered for the day. "Half-staff" means lowering the flag to one-half the distance between the top and bottom of the staff. Crepe streamers may be affixed to spear heads or flagstaffs in a parade only by order of the President of the United States.

Here's one of the procedures least followed: When the flag is displayed in a way besides being flown from a staff, it should be displayed flat, whether indoors or out. When shown either horizontally or vertically against a wall, the union should be uppermost and to the flag's own right, that is, to the observer's left. When displayed in a window…… [Read More]

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American Express in Asia Assessing

Words: 1812 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59555675

The biggest challenge however over the long-tern is the lack of acceptance of foreign cards by Chinese merchants. There are an estimated 20 million businesses in China, and of these, 414,000 accept credit cards, and of those, 150,000 accept foreign credit cards (Worthington, 2003). At the infrastructure level this fact illustrates how pervasive the sociological factors that limit debt continue to influence the Chinese culture specifically and the Asian culture overall. As with every Asian culture, there is tremendous pride in not losing "face" or stature in ones' community. As a result, cash is king in the more conservative cities and regions of the country. The generation of 25 to 40-year-olds will change this, however it may take a generation or more to significantly increase American Express credit card use in Asia and China as a result.

eferences

Bayot, J (2004, March 30). American Express to Issue Cards in China.…… [Read More]

References

Bayot, J (2004, March 30). American Express to Issue Cards in China. New York Times,

Retrieved June 8, 2009, from http://www.nytimes.com/2004/03/30/business/american-express-to-issue-cards-in-china.html

Owen Brown. (2004, December 9). China Banks Add Credit Cards With Help From AmEx and Visa. Wall Street Journal (Eastern Edition), p. C.2.

David A Von Emloh, Emmanuel V Pitsilis, Jeffrey Wong. (2003). Credit cards come to China. The McKinsey Quarterly: Special Edition,20-23.
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South This Report Is About

Words: 1398 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35057427



Some of the biggest incentives for manufactures are the outrageously low tax bases in southern states. "When taxes are paid, southern levies are lower than most Northern states. GM's Hamtramck, MIG, plant, for instance, has one of the highest property tax mileages in the United States at 88 mills." (Corbett, 2002) Taxes are some much lower than in say Michigan or New Jersey and southern state officials are very open to negotiations to land the new factories and the plethora of jobs. In other words, land values are low and government incentives are extraordinary so the automobiles industry would be crazy to not migrate south for those reasons alone. "Furthermore, utilities costs are lower. After the products have been assembled, the South's location is superior to the Midwest or the East Coast for delivery." (Corbett, 2002) but there are other incentives.

Not only is the land for the new facilities…… [Read More]

References

Corbett, Brian (2002). Southern hospitality. Ward's Auto World, August.

Business
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South African The Rise Fall

Words: 3742 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93278598

This was largely because the resistance was split along racial lines. For instance, the Afrikaans National Council wanted freedom from foreign oppression without taking into consideration the needs and demands of the Colored. Similarly, the Non-European Liberation League, another group that opposed the current practices, were the proponents of the issues of immediate concern to Colored but African people. This lack of unity proved decisive, taking into consideration the immediate rise to power of the Nationalistic Party in 1948 and the subsequent inability to immediately react to the measures that would be taken in the following years.

The South African society, following the war was left without a well-defined national identity because of the continuous struggle to face the conquering forces of the Dutch and the ritish. Consequently, the rise to power of a nationalistic party can be seen as predictable, taking into consideration the general trend existing in the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Goldin, Ian. Making race, the politics and economics of colored identity in South Africa. London: Longman. 1987.

Heribert, Adam, and Kogila Moodley. South Africa without apartheid. Dismantling racial domination. Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1986.

Hofmayer, I., Building a nation from words: Afrikaans language, literature and ethnic identity. University of London, MA thesis, 1983.

Nowak, Michael, and Luca Antonio Ricci. Post Apartheid South Africa: the first ten years. Washington: International Monetary Fund. 2005.
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American History in Their Considerations

Words: 953 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3825697



Webster appears to be in agreement with Calhoun regarding the North's part in damaging the relationship between the North and the South. According to Webster however, the main culprit in this dynamic is the rhetoric of the abolition societies. While the author acknowledges that these societies include mostly honorable and just people who believe in their cause, he also holds that their rhetoric has become unacceptably emotional and their tactics, such as spreading anti-slavery literature to the South, essentially dishonorable. According to the author, such tactics ironically lead only to strengthen the Southern cause and increase enmity and violence.

Resolution

William Henry Seward believes that the abolishment of slavery is inevitable as the economy and humanitarian institutions grow. According to this author, the institution is simply an "accidental" institution that came into being as a result of a combination of certain factors at a certain time. As times are changing,…… [Read More]

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American History -- 1950s Precis

Words: 581 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61564416

The middle class as a social sector and movement in the society is a benefit because of its ability to mobilize and incite action among people, both socially and legally -- as Daniel explicated, "...explored a legal path to equal rights." The middle class was also a detriment for the civil rights cause because most of the middle class people are white Americans, an ironic situation considering that these very people fought for equal rights in their society. Because of their predominantly white American membership, the middle class impeded on the development of the civil rights movement; however, as far as social mobility is concerned, the middle class had significantly contributed to the development of a more egalitarian society in America -- at least, primarily among white Americans.

Linking the development of the middle class sector in America inevitably brings the issue of civil rights movement into focus. It can…… [Read More]

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American Preference to Local Government and Americans Traditional Distrust of Centralized Government

Words: 3968 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76038063

American Mistrust of Centralized Government

This is a paper written in APA style that examines the traditional preference that Americans have for local government, the traditional distrust they have of centralized government, and the reasons behind these phenomena.

Local Government: A Traditional American Preference

There is a strong traditional preference for local government over centralized government in this country. This preference goes back all the way to the beginnings of our nation and can be plainly seen in the debates between the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists over the ratification of the Constitution. It can still be seen going strong today in the never-ending cry of politicians to put an end to "big government." There is an obvious distrust for centralized government in this country, and our political history and current political climate proves this time and time again. Yet what are the reasons for this preference for local government and…… [Read More]

References

Articles of Confederation. Philadelphia, PA. 1782.

Colonial Charters." (2000). Kuyper Institute. Retrieved on December 3, 2003 at http://capo.org/Charters.html.

Colonial Government." (2000). USGenNet. Retrieved on December 3, 2003 at http://www.usgennet.org/usa/topic/colonial/book/chap10_5.html.

Colonial Government." (2001). USA History. Retrieved on December 3, 2003 at  http://www.usahistory.info/colonial/government.html .
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American Involvement in Vietnam There Were a

Words: 1239 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43866905

American Involvement in Vietnam

There were a number of reasons for America's involvement in the Vietnam War, and none of them are easy or give the entire picture of the situation. The War was so contentious and so costly to young American's fighting overseas that it continues to cause contention and argument even today. The remnants of Vietnam, the Vietnam Vets homeless and aged, are a constant reminder that sometimes intervention does not pay. That Vietnam was a mistake seems to be the common view now, but at the time it seemed as if it was inevitable that America become involved, or watch Southeast Asia turn into a long, wandering arm of Soviet influence.

Indeed, there were Soviet links in North Vietnam, so some of the worry was certainly founded. The Soviets were funding the North Koreans, and supplying them with most of their military might, from MIG fighters to…… [Read More]

References

Attarian, John. "Rethinking the Vietnam War." World and I July 2000: 288.

Campagna, Anthony S. The Economic Consequences of the Vietnam War. New York: Praeger, 1991.

Jasper, William F. "Seven Myths about the Vietnam War: Three Decades after Pulling out of Southeast Asia, America Remains Hostage to a Relentless Barrage of Distortion, Myths, and Outright Lies about the Vietnam War." The New American 25 Mar. 2002: 23+.

Jernigan, Pat. "Olga Gruhzit-Hoyt. A Time Remembered: American Women in the Vietnam War." Minerva: Quarterly Report on Women and the Military (2001): 83+.
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American Media Representation of Islam

Words: 3949 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4285978

" (Iyengar, 2001) Lastly, the manner of presentation of a news story "significantly affects its ability to set the public agenda." (Behr and Iyengark 1985; Dearing and Rogers, 1996) Concluded is that: "In the current regime, American politics is almost exclusively a mediated experience. The role of the citizen ahs evolved from occasional foot soldier and activist to spectators. Those who seek public office invest heavily in efforts to shape news coverage of their candidacy. The returns from this investment provide them with leverage over public opinion, by setting the public agenda or by projecting a general impression of competent leadership..." (Iyengar, 2001)

The report published by the "ediaatters for America' website entitled: "According to aher, CBS's "Free Speech" is a isnomer" states that Bill aher, HBO's Real Time with Bill aher show host states that "CBS rejected his request to comment on religion for his planned "Free Speech" segment…… [Read More]

Miles, M.B., & Huberman, a.M. (1984). Qualitative data analysis, a sourcebook of new methods. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Miller, W.L., & Crabtree, B.F. (1992). Primary care research: A multimethod typology and qualitative road map. In B.F. Crabtree & W.L. Miller (Eds.), Doing qualitative research. Research methods for primary care (Vol. 3). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

The American Media Representation of Islam & Terrorism Post 9-11
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American Idiot Popular Music and Social Change

Words: 645 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21369700

American Idiot

Popular Music and Social Change in the Present: Green Day's 'American Idiot' (2004)

Following the catalyzing events of September 11th, 2001, the United States would find itself deeply divided over the issues of terrorism, war and presidential politics. At the heart of this frequently impassioned and vitriolic debate would be the U.S.-led invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq as well as a far-reaching culture clash between two distinction American populations. The 2004 album by pop-punk trio Green Day, American Idiot, would be crafted with the intent of exploring these divisions. In the title track, Green Day would author an anthem that would become omnipresent in pop culture as the U.S. used falsified information to justify its invasion of Iraq.

"American Idiot" would serve both as a harsh critique of the war, of the presidency of George . Bush and of the violent, materialistic culture being fomented in the U.S.…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Geek Stink Breath (GSB). (2012). American Idiot Song Meaning. Geekstinkbreath.net.

Wiebe, C. (2007). Walkn' With Green Day. Center for Parent/Youth Understanding.
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American History

Words: 1626 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19013391

American History

The underside of affluence

The period is in the early years of the twentieth century. America is now experiencing economic and political expansion as it became the model of an imperial superpower for all nations, both in the Western and Eastern regions. Economic growth spurred as a result of the industrial revolution, while political structures strengthened due to the numerous successful conquests of the Americans to colonize nations in the Asian and southern American regions.

However, despite the affluence that American society had experienced during this period, a considerable half of the American population is suffering from poverty. With the rise of urbanization, many people flocked to the cities in search of a high-paying job and steady source of income as factory workers. However, the rapid incidence of migration to the cities made them crowded with people, hence, living conditions began to deteriorate, which includes the lack of…… [Read More]

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American Ethnic Culture

Words: 3266 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12368146

American Ethnic Culture

What is an American?

It is clear that Progressive era Americans from different backgrounds differentially defined precisely what being an American actually meant. Stephen Meyer wrote in the work entitled "Efforts at Americanization in the Industrial Workplace 1914-1921 that Americanization

"…involved the social and cultural assimilation of immigrants into the mainstream of American life…" but that the process was of the nature that was comprised of "a unique and distinctly American method for the resolution of a key industrial problem -- the problem of work-discipline and of the adjustment of new workers to the factory environment." (p.323)

The Americanization campaign is stated by Meyer to have been one that was "voluntary, benevolent and educational." (p.323) However, the programs emerged from within the factories and had negative connotations as well. It was not so much an issue of the diversity represented by the national or ethnic cultures but…… [Read More]

References

Gjerde, J. (1998) Major Problems in American Immigration and Ethnic History, 1998.

Takaki, R. (2008) A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America, 2008

Meyer, Stephen (nd) "Efforts at Americanization in the Industrial Workplace, 1914-1921"

Gerstle, Gary (2000) American Freedom, American Coercion: Immigrant Journeys in the Promised Land. Social Compass 47(1), 2000, 63-76. Online available at: http://www.pineforge.com/healeystudy5/articles/Ch2/Americanfreedom, Americancoercion.pdf
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American Government and Politics the Impact of

Words: 624 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25347462

American Government and Politics

The Impact of Politics on People, Communities, and the World

I have not personally been affected by American politics in ways that I can think of, possibly because I am not an American citizen. However, I understand that, in principle, political decisions can have extremely important affects on individuals. For example, if the Republicans win the presidential election and win back control of the enate and retain control of the House of Representatives, they could actually succeed in outlawing abortion and even many common forms of birth control. Politics also affects local and national communities because the decisions made in Washington determine what federal money is available to states for crucial functions such as education and health care programs. Because the United tates is the most influential nation in the world, political decisions in this country can affect all of the other nations in the world…… [Read More]

Sources Consulted

Edwards, G., Wattenberg, M., and Lineberry, R. (2007). Government in America: People,

Politics, and Policy. New York: Longman.

Grunwald, M. "The Party of No." Time, Vol. 180, No. 10 (2012): 42 -- 46.
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American History and Culture Contributes

Words: 2472 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36047997

Nevertheless, there have been many decisions over the years that have tended to weaken the intent of the Framers. In 2001, in Zelman v. Simmons Harris the Supreme Court ruled that school voucher programs did not violate the establishment clause of the First Amendment. The decision represented a blow to the essentially secular nature of the American state and system. By allowing public money to be given to religious schools, the Supreme Court was permitting the violation of a more than two hundred year old principle. In reaching its decision, the Supreme Court chose to accept the argument that giving money to schools was not a case of advancing religion but rather one of who should have power over education - the state or individual parents.

Personal freedom was now being re-defined as something that included the right to government assistance if the government provided assistance in similar situations. Persons…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bolick, Clint. "School Choice: Sunshine Replaces the Cloud." Cato Supreme Court Review 2001-2002. Ed. Robert a. Levy, James L. Swanson, and Timothy Lynch. Washington, DC: Cato Institute, 2002. 149-169.

Censer, Jack. "7 France, 1750-89." Press, Politics and the Public Sphere in Europe and North America, 1760-1820. Ed. Hannah Barker and Simon Burrows. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 159-178.

Champlin, Dell P., and Janet T. Knoedler. "American Prosperity and the "Race to the Bottom: " Why Won't the Media Ask the Right Questions?" Journal of Economic Issues 42.1 (2008): 133+.

Milner, Murray. Freaks, Geeks, and Cool Kids: American Teenagers, Schools, and the Culture of Consumption. New York: Routledge, 2004.
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American History War and Peace

Words: 876 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71210415

As was the nature of the Cold ar, the United States responded by quashing new governments that were likely to lead to communism, even where this constituted an undemocratic or even brutal instituted government (Kort 80).

Democratically elected officials from Brazil, Guyana, and Uruguay were overthrown by internal revolutionaries who were funded and trained by American forces (Parenti 44). These and other leaders and governments in Latin America were targeted by American forced as having communist leanings. Foreign policy followed, with more than two decades of the Cold ar focusing not only on the major publicized events of Korea and the Soviet Union, but on many small, third world countries. These small nations were poised to become players in the larger Cold ar struggle depending on where their allegiance and governments ended up after declaring their independence. ith the Soviet Union attempting to exert force and pressure on the United…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Eisenhower, Dwight D. Inaugural Address. Washington, D.C. 20 Jan. 1953.

Geertz, Clifford. "What Was the Third World Revolution?" Dissent 52.1 (2005): 35-45.

Freidel, Frank. Roosevelt. New York: Little Brown and Company, 1990.

Kort, Michael G. The Cold War. Brookfield, CT: Millbrook Press, 1994.
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American Revolution Slavery in the United Stated

Words: 1499 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59313942

American Revolution

Slavery in the United Stated lasted as an endorsed organization until the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1865. In 1619 twenty Africans were brought by a Dutch soldier and sold to the English colony of Jamestown, Virginia as indentured servants.

This would be the first of many visits up and down the American eastern seaboard. At this time, most slaves were being purchased by white men, though some Native Americans and free blacks were also detained. Slavery was spread to the areas where there was a high-quality soil for large plantations of important crops, such as cotton, sugar, coffee and most prominently tobacco. Even though the endorsed practice of enslaving blacks occurred in all of the original thirteen colonies, more than half of all African-Americans lived in Virginia and Maryland. The three highest-ranking North American zones of importation throughout most of the…… [Read More]

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American Religious History Defining Fundamentalism and Liberalism

Words: 2705 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82017601

American Religious History

Defining fundamentalism and liberalism in Christianity is hardly an exact science, especially because prior to about 1920 there was not even a term for fundamentalism as it exists today. hile present-day fundamentalists often claim descent from the Puritans and Calvinists of the 17th and 18th Centuries, Puritans were not really fundamentalists in the modern sense. They were not in conflict with 20th Century-style liberals and supporters of evolution and Higher Criticism because those did not yet exist. As George McKenna put it "if there were no liberalism there would be no fundamentalism" to react against it (McKenna 231). Today, about one-third of Americans define themselves as evangelical Protestants, and all Republican Party politicians have to make appeals to the Christian Right (Hankins 1). In 1976 there were at least fifty million 'born again' evangelical Protestants in the United States, and today their numbers may be as high…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Carpenter, Joel A. Revive Us Again: The Reawakening of American Fundamentalism. Oxford University Press, 1997.

Gilkey, Langdon. On Niebuhr: A Theological Study. University of Chicago Press, 2002.

Hankins, Barry. American Evangelicals: A Contemporary History of a Mainstream Religious Movement. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2008.

Longfield, Bradley J. The Presbyterian Controversy: Fundamentalists, Modernists and Modernity. Oxford University Press, 1991.
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American Social Thought on Women's Rights

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26207473

American Social hought on Women's Rights

his paper compares and contrasts the arguments in favor of women's rights made by three pioneering American feminists: Judith Sargent Murray, Sarah Grimke, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. his analysis reveals the centrality of religious argumentation to the feminism of all three. Murray and Grimke were both converts to varieties of evangelical Protestantism who drew considerable intellectual and emotional nourishment from strands of Christianity, which encouraged, or at least did not discourage, their personal development. Unlike Murray and Grimke, however, Stanton did not convert to evangelicalism. Instead, she launched upon a secularizing trajectory that took her beyond Christianity to Comtean Positivism and rationalism. Unlike Murray and Grimke, moreover, she acknowledged the problems inherent in any attempt to square Christianity with feminism. However, she never rejected the Bible completely, and she is appropriately viewed with respect today as a pioneer of feminist biblical criticism. he paper…… [Read More]

This was a striking argument that made the development of female intellectual potential inseparable from the worship of God. But while this is certainly useful as an argument for elevating the standard of female education, it falls far short of a cry for female emancipation.

Religion's relationship to feminism is more thoroughly explored in Sarah Moore Grimke's more ambitious Letters on the Equality of the Sexes, and the Condition of Woman (1838). What had changed in the fifty years since Murray's entitled "On the Equality of the Sexes" was published was that the battle for the liberation of women's intellectual abilities appeared to have been won. By the 1830s, well-educated women existed. But the shift that was occurring at the time - precipitated by the antislavery movement - was toward the use of female abilities to intervene in debates of social importance. Like other feminist antislavery advocates, Sarah Grimke gained notoriety as an outspoken female advocate of the antislavery cause. In 1838, Grimke, who had converted to Quakerism around 1818 - apparently because it was compatible with her passionate commitment to antislavery (Lerner 8) - found herself vilified by the press and rebuked by the Congregationalist ministerial association of Massachusetts for her participation in an abolitionist lecture tour of New England in 1837-38.

What was controversial, however, was not so much her antipathy to slavery - although the Congregationalist clergy had long sought to stifle criticism of slavery - than the idea that a woman should dare to speak out publicly on a matter of such importance (Behnke 20; Lerner 19). Grimke responded to her critics by publishing a work, which forcefully defended her right to speak. Addressed to Mary S. Parker, president of the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society, Grimke's Letters dwelt at length on the Bible, which was the ultimately source of the conservative view that women were commanded by God to restrict their endeavors to the domestic sphere. Grimke shared Murray's conviction that the meaning of scripture had been 'perverted' in the interests of men. Almost everything that has been written about 'the sphere of woman,' she argued, 'has been the result of a misconception of the simple truths revealed in the Scriptures.' She cited, in particular, erroneous translations, and professed a low opinion of the 1611 King James Bible (221). In an examination of the creation narrative, she discerned no grounds to believe that God had created woman as an inferior creature. Both genders
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American Society the Aspects of

Words: 619 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45749340

This means that their money ends up being spent on useless things rather than being saved, or used to buy homes or other assets that could actually provide financial security. In addition, the current official system -- taxes, the workings of the government, and politicians and lobbyists which have become unofficially official -- is set up to protect the interests of big business and the very wealthy, with tax breaks, access to government, and the ability (meaning time and money, which are really the same thing in these scenarios) to affect change through the courts and legislation.

The best way to solve these problems is to educate people on wise ways to use their money, and to make the laws clearer and more readily accessible, so that people who can't afford to take weeks off of work to pursue legal issues or pay teams of lawyers to figure out how…… [Read More]

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American History Important Changes From 1810 to

Words: 874 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51975527

American History: Important Changes From 1810 to 1830

The period of time from 1810 to 1830 was a major time of social, economic and political change in America. The most important of these changes are those whose impact can still be seen today. Three of the most important changes were the growth of manufacturing, the focus on the individual rather than the community and the acceptance of democracy.

The growth of manufacturing changed the nature of America forever, with manufacturing becoming more important than farming for the first time. Tocqueville (XIX) reflects on the focus America put on manufacturing saying, "No people in the world have made such rapid progress in trade and manufactures as the Americans." This rapid progress led to the industrial revolution and eventually the society we have today, with capitalism and manufacturing the basis society is built upon. As Tocqueville (XIX) argues, "Democracy not only swells…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Tocqueville, A. "Chapter XV: Unlimited Power of the Majority in the United States, and its Consequences." Democracy in America. Retrieved October 21, 2002. URL:  http://xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/DETOC/1_ch15.htm 

Tocqueville, A. "Chapter XIX: What Causes Almost All Americans to Follow Industrial Callings." Democracy in America. Retrieved October 21, 2002. URL:  http://xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/DETOC/ch2_19.htm 

Tocqueville, A. "Chapter XIII: How the Principle of Equality Naturally Divides the Americans into a Multitude of Small Private Circles." Democracy in America. Retrieved October 21, 2002. URL:  http://xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/DETOC/ch3_13.htm 

Tocqueville, A. "Chapter I: Equality Naturally Gives Men a Taste for Free Institutions." Democracy in America. Retrieved October 21, 2002. URL:  http://xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/DETOC/ch4_01.htm
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American Mothers Living in Poverty

Words: 2216 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80713309

American Mother's Living In Poverty

Welfare reform in the United States has been hailed as a great success, reducing the number of people on the welfare rolls from 4.4 million in 1996 to 2.1 million in 2001. But these figures hide the suffering of the multitude of American women who are living on or below the national poverty line. In this paper we will challenge the argument that the welfare reform initiative is 'working' and suggest instead that according to credible sources women are in fact penalized by the very system that has been put in place to 'help' them.

The United States Census bureau shows how the 'poverty threshold" is calculated each year. This figure is a dollar amount that the department has determined is what is required for a number of people living together. The two main characteristics of the threshold formula are the size of a family…… [Read More]

References

For Crying Out Loud: Women's Poverty in the United States. Eds. Diane Dujon and Ann Withorn. Boston: South End Press, 1996.

Hays, Sharon. Flat Broke with Children: Women in the Age of Welfare Reform. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Katz, Michael. The Undeserving Poor: From the War on Poverty to the War on Welfare. New York: Pantheon Books, 1989.
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American History

Words: 696 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37725339

American History

Northwest Passage- 1492-1600 when Europeans encountered the new world

After the Portuguese and Spanish took control of the South's sea pathways, the English and French began seeking a northwestern route to Asia. However, by the 17th century, they lost hope of ever making their way across North America's northern part after many generations of sailors failed to find a way. Nevertheless, early 15th and 16th century explorations and colonization increased knowledge regarding the world by a significant amount. Cornelius Wytfliet, the cartographer from Flanders created a world map that continued to depict the mythical "Straits of Anian" -- a province in China connecting the Atlantic and the legendary Northwest Passage, which finds mention in the edition of traveler, Marco Polo's work dated 1559. European powers' endeavors to make their homes in the Americas succeeded, ultimately, in the 17th century, when the English and the French successfully contested the…… [Read More]

References

Concepcion Saenz-Cambra. (2012). The Atlantic World, 1492 -- 1600. Concepcion.

David W. Galenson. (1984). The Rise and Fall of Indentured Servitude in the Americas: An Economic Analysis. Economic History Association, 1-26.

weli, R. v. (2008). Slave Trading and Slavery in the Dutch Colonial Empi. In Rik van weli. New West Indian Guide.
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American Cuisine America Has Long

Words: 773 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13587390

To this day we see population clusters in major Northeast cities, which almost invariably will have a Little Italy or Little China. These Old orld cooking traditions survived and impacted American cuisine.

Similarly, the Midwest and est, both rich agricultural areas, developed their cuisine around what was available. There were abundant crops and cattle, so we see a strong influence of beef, poultry and vegetables in Midwest cuisine (Gugino, 2006). In short, a meat-and-potatoes culture developed with a heavy presence of steak and chicken dishes. and, really, this is not a tremendous departure from Native American cuisine, as these earlier inhabitants of the Plains consumed diets rich in meats and vegetables.

Culture and geography also play key roles in Southern cuisine. The Creole and Cajun people of the south are descendents of Spanish, French and Portugese colonists and the foods of these nationalities are rich in spice and flavor, as…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gugino, Sam. The World of Food. Wine Spectator, Sept. 2006. Vol. 31. No. 8.

Olver, Lynne. Food Timeline: International Cuisine. 2000. Retrieved September 7, 2006 at  http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodfaq6.html .

Stradley, Linda. American Recipes & History by Region. 2004. Retrieved September 7, 2006 at  http://whatscookingamerica.net/AmericanRegionalFoods/RegionalAmericanIndex.htm .
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American Dialects Geography in Linguistic

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34607933

Thus, when it comes to vowels, this short comparison led me to believe the southern dialect uses longer, more rounded, looser vowels than the inland North dialect.

Consonant sounds also differ between the two regions; or perhaps it is more accurate to note that consonants are used in different ways in the southern and inland northern areas of the United States. Take, for instance, the word "white." While I pronounce this word with a defined, voiced [j] sound at the end, the southern speaker allows it to conclude by lengthening the [a] vowel, as in father. This difference leads to southern words sounding softer and more rounded than the hard, tight edges of Northern words. Although there is a great deal of bias regarding the Southern dialect in the United States today, with some saying it sounds uneducated, listening to the features alone reveal it as a beautiful, if different,…… [Read More]

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American History the Greatest Change

Words: 949 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59402187

Even after the Emancipation Proclamation, the Supreme Court held that separate but equal was a legitimate stance under American law, essentially codifying human beings into different racial categories like a caste system, until Brown v. Board of Education in 1954. In short, America was a nation founded upon a paradox. It idealized freedom and personal choice, yet it also was based upon a system that did not allow a substantial percentage of the population to exercise that freedom and enjoy in their liberties.

The Civil Rights movement was so radical, because it demanded that the promise of American freedom finally be truly realized and granted to Black Americans, which America was unwilling to do, until African-Americans demanded their rights through this eloquent and articulate protest movement. Sadly, the damage of hundreds of years of slavery had taken their psychological and economic toll upon some Black Americans. One of the saddest…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Major Problems in American History Since 1945. Third Edition.

New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.
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American History Although the Early

Words: 857 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75111246



British reactions to the colonies wavered throughout the colonial era, from the policy of salutary neglect to the tightened controls of King George III. The Crown faced a dilemma: to allow the colonies to develop thriving commercial enterprises in the hopes of a trickle-down benefit for Great Britain; or to tighten the leash on the colonial governments to demand more regular tax revenues. In light of the thriving colonial economies in Massachusetts, Virginia, and Maryland, King George III opted for the latter, imposing tariffs on the colonies. Britain's policies toward the New World colonies remained, therefore, primarily economic: the Stamp and Sugar Acts exemplify the Crown's interest not so much in the development of colonial culture as in the colonial economy.

Friction between English settlers and Native Americans also impacted the development of colonial life and of Crown policies. Infiltration into lands inhabited by the indigenous Americans led to numerous…… [Read More]

References

An Outline of American History." Embassy of the United States, Stockholm. Retrieved Sept 12, 2006 at http://stockholm.usembassy.gov/usis/history/chapter2.html

Colonial Settlement, 1600s-1763." The Library of Congress. Retrieved Sept 12, 2006 at http://memory.loc.gov/learn/features/timeline/colonial/indians/indians.html

From Revolution to Reconstruction." Retrieved Sept 12, 2006 at http://www.let.rug.nl/usa/H/1994/ch1_p9.htm
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American Holocaust 57-95 Life in

Words: 707 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88341030

The traditional view of these 15th century explorers is that they were brave sailors who braved the risks and difficulties of oceanic travel and who "discovered" new lands in distant places. In truth, they were horribly brutal, homicidal tyrants who actually were responsible for more atrocities than the worst modern-day examples of dictators and perpetrators of crimes against humanity.

The human carnage committed by Columbus and his armies and by those of Cortes in the century following their arrival in the Americas dwarfs even those committed by the Nazis during World War Two. The sheer numbers of people they enslaved, brutalized, and murdered amounts to many times the six million Jews killed by the Nazis. In fact, if one combines the number of native people murdered (and very cruelly, senselessly, and unnecessarily brutally) by Columbus and Cortes and their contemporaries. Columbus accounted for the deaths of at least 8 million…… [Read More]

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South Australia Ambulance Service Organizational Behaviour Case

Words: 5163 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58704794

South Australia Ambulance Service

Organizational Behaviour Case Analysis

Who

ay Main should develop a system which empowers the culture of organization along with the shift towards automation and excellent customer service.

Has to do what

The leadership of South Australia Ambulance Service is required to do the following:

To set a strategic direction for SAAS this would be compatible to the new strategic plan.

Meet the service expectations of the clients by focusing more on efficient customer services.

Empower the service delivery personnel fully and hold them accountable for every action.

The expectations of donators and community should be aligned.

Make SAAS compatible to respond to mass casualties.

Workforce retention should be increased.

Emergency sector and healthcare should be integrated to respond efficiently to any casualty.

Interventions should be prioritized.

The impact of any change should be evaluated on the patient as patients' life is more important. (Daniels 2009)

The…… [Read More]

References

Steven McShane, Sandra Steen, (2008). Canadian Organizational Behaviour, Seventh Edition. McGraw-Hill Ryerson Higher Education; Canadian edition

Abernathy, W.B. (2006). Designing and managing an organization-wide incentive pay system. Memphis, TN: Abernathy & Associates.

Abernathy, W.B. (2006). The sin of wages: Where the conventional pay system has led us and how to find a way out. Memphis, TN: PerfSys Press.

Alvero, A.M., Bucklin, B.R., and Austin, J. An objective review of the effectiveness and essential characteristics of performance feedback in organizational settings. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management vol. 21 (2001). pp. 3 -- 29
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American Tax System vs Other Countries the

Words: 1778 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70830428

American Tax System vs. Other Countries

The federal government first imposed an individual income tax in 1862 as an emergency means of financing the Civil ar. It also established the Bureau of Internal Revenue, predecessor of the Internal Revenue Service. Tax rates were 3% on income from $600 to $10,000 and 5% on income above $10,000. Later in the war the maximum rate increased to 10% of income." (Encarta)

My how times have changed. This paper will compare the tax systems of four different countries to the American tax system. The four countries that have been chosen are South Africa, Mexico, Hong Kong, and New Zealand..

First lets attempt to briefly (if that were possible) explain the American tax system.

The American Tax System

America has a progressive tax system meaning the greatest tax burden is on people who have the most income. The American tax system can be described…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Corporate Service Center. "Federal Tax Rates." http://www.corporateservicecenter.com/Corp/federal_tax_rates.htm. April16, 2002

Film New Zealand. "New Zealand's tax Environment." Jan. 2002 http://www.filmnz.com/filmnz/Content/Production/Development/Taxation/Taxation.html

Flags of the World.  http://www.crwflags.com/fotw/flags/mx.html . April17, 2001

Henry, Aaron. "The South African Tax System: A Nation is Microcosm." Dec. 6,1999:
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American Terrorism for Many People

Words: 14357 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86656733



The USA Patriot Act: This was a law that was passed after September 11th. It is giving the police and intelligence officials the power to go after terrorists organizations easier. As it lifted various Constitutional protections when investigating these offenses.

Counter Terrorism: These are the activities that: federal, state and local officials are taking to prevent future terrorist attacks.

Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD): These are weapons designed to inflict large amounts of casualties. These include: chemical, radiological, biological and nuclear.

These different terms are important, because they will help to avoid confusion and will focus the reader on understanding the overall scope of the problem.

Limitations of the Study

The limitations of the study are that the information we are presenting, could be pointing out a number of different problems. Yet, beneath the surface they are failing to identify possible changes that could have already been implemented by federal…… [Read More]

Bibliography

39% Say Government. (2011). Rasmussen Reports. Retrieved from:  http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/general_politics/march_2011/39_say_government_not_focusing_enough_on_threat_of_domestic_islamic_terrorism 

Al Shabaab American Recruits. (2010). ADL. Retrieved from: http://www.adl.org/main_Terrorism/al_shabaab_american_recruits.htm

Comparative Analysis. (2011). Business Dictionary. Retrieved from:  http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/comparative-analysis.html 

Jose Padilla. (2009). New York Times. Retrieved from: http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/jose_padilla/index.html
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American History During the 1940s America Had

Words: 1426 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68012031

American History

During the 1940s, America had just experienced the onslaught of World War II. After massive fighting against the Axis power nations (Germany, Italy, and Japan), America, along with its allies in the war, was able to conclude the conflict by deciding to drop the atomic bomb in Japan. The war ended with the Axis power conceding defeat, and America went on to rehabilitate its nation after the war. The rehabilitation of America as a nation weary of possible atrocities among nations in the world is twofold. After the war, America experienced a resurgence in economic growth, primarily brought about by the development of new technologies that spurred the country's commercial market. Furthermore, the growth of new technologies and manufacturing industry in America encouraged social mobility, enabling the middle class society to increase in number, narrowing the gap between the rich and the poor. Thus, the technological revolution and…… [Read More]

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American Era Between 1870 and 1920

Words: 1747 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83432908

American History Between 1870 and 1920

The years between 1870 and 1920 had been the period of astonishing changes because of the political, social and military upheaval that occurred during the period. Typically, the United States had witnessed several changes that affected the American way of life during the period. For example, period of 1877 -1900 had witnessed the rise of the industrial revolution. The years between 1870 and 1920 were the period of momentous and dynamic changes in the American history because they set in motion the industrial and socio- economic development that shaped the country for several generations which include industrialization, labor strike, westward expansion, immigration, urbanization, and integration of millions of freed American Americans.

The objective of this paper is to explore the fundamental changes that occur between 1870 and 1920 and the impacts on the American life. The paper also explores different labor strikes and massacres…… [Read More]

It is essential to realize that strike had played a major role in the economic, social and political life of the United States during the period. In 1880s, workers in the United States fought equally with their peers in Europe. Unlike the strikes in Europe, the United States recorded the bloodiest fatalities in the American labor history. The outcome of the strikes had influenced the life of workers because during the process, workers had been able to win increase for wages, and improved working condition that led to the increase of workers standard of living.

Conclusion

The study explores the American history between 1870 and 1920 revealing that the period has witnessed a fundamental change in the American history. The period marked the time of American industrial revolution, rise of mechanized agriculture and economic boom. In this period, the United States also witnessed the influx of immigrants from different part of the world that the country had ever experienced. People from all over the world immigrated into the United States to search for the economic opportunities. Despite the significant economic and political benefits that the country has experienced during the period, the United States also recorded several bloody labor strikes leading to the loss of thousands of workers. For example Pullman strike led to the loss of life of many workers. However, the strikes had led to the fundamental changes in the American labor relations.
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American Pie and Cultural Significance

Words: 1503 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96695079

Semiotically, however, the term evolved in the region to symbolize a characteristic aspect of shared cultural attitudes related very directly to the motivation for the murder of the civil rights activists.

Finally, the 1970s counterculture heavily emphasized illicit recreational drug use:

The birds flew off with the fallout shelter Eight miles high and falling fast Again linking the 1950s with the 1970s, the semiotic relevance of high very likely corresponds to the so-called high of hallucinogenic experiences associated with LSD use whereas the fallout shelter evokes a symbol quite unique to American society of the Cold War era of paranoia of unprovoked Communist attack. EFEENCES

Gerrig, , Zimbardo, P. (2005) Psychology and Life. 17th Edition.

New York: Allyn & Bacon.

Henslin, J.M. (2002) Essentials of Sociology: A Down-to-Earth Approach. Boston: Allyn and Bacon

Macionis, J.J. (2003) Sociology 9th Ed. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

O'Brien, P. (1999) American Pie: The analysis…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Gerrig, R, Zimbardo, P. (2005) Psychology and Life. 17th Edition.

New York: Allyn & Bacon.

Henslin, J.M. (2002) Essentials of Sociology: A Down-to-Earth Approach. Boston: Allyn and Bacon

Macionis, J.J. (2003) Sociology 9th Ed. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
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American History -- Journal in the September

Words: 649 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97007881

American History -- journal

In the September 2000 issue of the highly-prestigious history journal American Heritage, the main topic of discussion has to do with "ales From the Cold War," a period in American history following World War II when the U.S. And the Soviet Union were engaged in detente and threats related to the use of nuclear weapons.

he first article, "he Day We Shot Down the U-2" by Sergei Khrushchev, the son of Premier Nikita Khrushchev, makes it clear that the U-2 incident of May 1, 1960 involving U.S. pilot Gary Powers was far more complicated than has previously been realized. Khrushchev states that "In the 1950's, years of deep freeze in the Cold War caused politician and ordinary people on both sides to be gripped by the same fear," being "whether Moscow or Washington would seize the opportunity to deal the first, and possibly the last, nuclear…… [Read More]

The second article, "Aircraft 53-1876A Has Lost a Device" By Clark Rumrill, focuses on how the U.S. Air Force came to drop by mistake an A-bomb on the state of South Carolina in March of 1958 which fortunately did not detonate. Rumrill points out that an Air Force medium bomber accidentally dropped its nuclear weapon "in the woods behind the home of the Gregg family" and that the "high explosive trigger in the bomb blew up on contact with the ground, leaving a crater 50 feet across and 35 feet deep and injuring three girls" (50). This accident came about when a Captain Kulka noticed that the bomb was lodged in the wrong place in the plain and when he tried to fix the problem the bomb-bay doors opened up and the bomb fell from the plane. Moments later, "the plane was rocked by the shock wave of the blast when the bomb hit the ground" (53).

The third article, "Mr. Smith Goes Underground" by Thomas Mallon, concerns a specially-designed bunker, meant to house the President of the United States and his closest confidants, during a nuclear strike by the Soviet Union. Mallon reminds the reader that this bunker, located in West Virginia and now open to the public for tours, was "the strangest of all Cold War relics and offers a clue to why (the U.S.) won the Cold War" (60). The current tour guide, Marvin Weikle, who helped maintain the facility for many years, always warns the visitors that what they are about to see can be quite startling, due to costing $14 million to construct in the late 1940's. Once the visitors enter the bunker, they "find themselves standing at the end of a 144 yard-long concrete corridor leading into the 112, 544 square-foot former standby capital of the United States" (63).

The last article, "Visiting the Cold War Today" By Phil Patton, describes various landmarks from Berlin, Germany to Washington, D.C. To Area 51 which as of 2000 were being opened to the public. According to Patton, "these days, there are more and more visitors to the monuments of the Cold War" and tours as often overcrowded at the Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station and the Nevada Test Sites. Some of the most conspicuous sites include the Titan Missile Museum in Sahaurita, Arizona, the house on Checkpoint Charlie in Berlin (the dividing line between East and West Germany during the Cold War, a.k.a. The "Iron Curtain), the Allied Museum in Berlin and the Cold War Museum which Gary Powers, the U-2 spy plane pilot, created "to honor his father and all Cold War veterans" (72). As of 2000, this museum included "a U-2, a section of the Berlin Wall, a spy satellite, a fallout shelter and other artifacts" (72).
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American Experience One of the Most Important

Words: 777 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49608193

American Experience

One of the most important aspects in life is effective leadership. In Vietnam, this was problematic and resulted in more adverse consequences for the United States. To fully understand how this can be applied to daily life requires understanding these concepts, the importance of cooperation and the lessons that can be learned from the war. These different elements will offer specific ideas which can be used by everyone to comprehend and evaluate critical challenges.

How does a person determine (strategic thinker) that, and how does a person's daily life (I'm a single working student) and work demonstrate (strategic thinker) that?

As a strategic thinker it is imperative to evaluate all of the different options and determine the best avenue for achieving the primary goals. This means that a number of factors must be considered. At the same time, there needs to be an emphasis on secondary options and…… [Read More]

References

Moss, G. (2010). Vietnam. New York, NY: Prentice Hall.
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American Politics

Words: 1636 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52770778

American Politics

Historically, the significance of the executive branch has increased during periods of war, crisis and economic turmoil, while the legislative branch has assumed greater responsibility during peaceful reprieves and ostensibly stable times. The relation between these two branches is complicated, but the increase of power and prestige of the president during crisis times must be approached in two ways: the president as a more efficient executive administrator of policy, and the president as symbolic leader.

The constitution provides the president with the certain powers that enhance his ability to perform in crisis situations, and, given the increased significance of the media in American politics of the last half-century, the president's role as a symbolic figure is more important than ever.

There is a generally perceived division between the executive and legislative branches: Congress is steeped in bureaucratic and intensely inefficient processes, while the president maintains the ability to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Herring, George. America's Longest War: The United States and Vietnam 1950-1975. New York: McGraw Hill, 1995.

Sandel, Michael Democracy's Discontent: America in Search of a Public Policy. New York: Belknap, 1998.

Tulis, Jeffrey. The Rhetorical Presidency. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1988.
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American Revolution it Could Be

Words: 2259 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77259109

This strategy also permitted the more speedy management of local dealings. Basically the purpose of this strategy was to centralize of colonial affairs; however, it simply solidified the idea that the colonies needed a system of self-governance that was not inclusive of the British government. Because of the behavior of the British government, the English colonies that revolted in 1776 had in common: "representative assemblies and this institutional affinity laid the foundations for the concerted resistance without which the American evolution would have been impossible."

It was under the auspices of the English government's attempt to control the colonists that the idea of American independence began to be viewed as necessary. The colonist felt that they had the right and the wisdom to rule and to develop a governmental structure that would be conducive with meeting the needs and the goals of those living within the colonies. The structure of…… [Read More]

References

Becker, Carl Lotus Schlesinger, Arthur M. The History of Political Parties in the Province of New York, 1760-1776. University of Wisconsin Press: Madison, WI. 1960.

Declaration of Independence. Online Available at http://www.archives.gov/national-archives-experience/charters/declaration_transcript.html

Miller, John C. Origins of the American Revolution. Boston: Little, Brown, 1943.

Priest, Claire. "Currency Policies and Legal Development in Colonial New England." Yale Law Journal 110, no. 8 (2001): 1303.
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American Economy Has for Decades

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78086781



The tragic events of 9/11 revealed a strong economy, capable of regaining from a blast. After it however, the Bush administration fought hard to eliminate terrorism and most of the state funds went to the military; as a result, the United States is now struggling with its highest federal debt. Natural phenomena, such as tornados and hurricanes, have also had negative impact upon the economy.

Effects first effect upon the American population has been that of increased unemployment rate. Agreements of international cooperation, such as NAFTA, have only managed to open the borders to cheap labor force; as a result, American multinationals outsourced their operations to Mexico or other cheap regions, throwing the U.S. citizen into unemployment.

A second effect, at a global scale this time, is that the purchasing power of the American population will decrease significantly. As a result, they will be unable to consume as they were…… [Read More]

References

Beams, N., August 18, 2006, Warnings of a U.S. Recession and Global Slowdown, World Socialist Web Site, http://www.wsws.org/articles/2006/aug2006/usec-a18.shtmllast accessed on July 16, 2008

Roberts, P.C., September 11, 2007, American Economy: R.I.P., Online Journal, last accessed on July 29, 2008

VanAlkemade, R., 2006, What Would Jesus Buy?, Warrior Poets

2008, the World Factbook - United States, Central Intelligence Agency,  https://www.cia.gov/library/ publications/the-world-factbook/geos/us.htmllast accessed on July 29, 2008
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American Political Development America's Political

Words: 1985 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87954252


American politics took another turn with problems that would lead to
the Civil War, as the North and the South each had their own interests.
Tariffs to protect some Northern manufacturing interests greatly angered
the South leading to attempts to nullify acts of the federal government,
ultimately resulting in conflict between the powers of the states and the
federal Union. The result of this conflict led to the Civil War and
American political development became one in which decisions over slave and
free-states were the most prominent. America became increasingly partisan
and the Republican party emerged to compete along with Know Nothings and
Democratic Party. Ultimately the South seceded resulting in a Confederacy
that split from the Union as the debates over slavery reached an all-time
involving all aspects of political life.
The Civil War split America in two and then brought it back together
again. But the new America…… [Read More]

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American History Victory at Yorktown

Words: 1176 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61058562

f they had managed to do great damage to the French forces, the British could have cut off those French troops from helping the Americans, and the war would have gone to the British. He writes, "The failure of the British to attack, and possibly fatally wound, the French at Newport was calamitous in the long run" (Ketchum 36). Thus, the author gives the reader insight into both sides of the battle, including his own analysis of what went wrong and what went right for both sides, making it easier for the reader to understand the background and inner workings of the battle.

n addition, Ketchum clearly understands the inner workings of many of the "cast of characters" of this book. He clearly admires Washington, but he is also very familiar with many other participants, such as Lafayette, Benjamin Franklin, and many others. He introduces them clearly and effectively, and…… [Read More]

In conclusion, Ketchum's book is a detailed and interesting account of a pivotal time in U.S. history. Anyone interested in American history would appreciate this book, and anyone interested in the Revolutionary War should certainly read and/or own it. The book is not so scholarly that it is difficult to understand, and Ketchum's writing style makes it much easier to comprehend and enjoy. In addition, his research is thorough and detailed. This book should be used in classrooms so students can grasp more underlying information about the Revolutionary War and those who participated in it.

References

Ketchum, Richard M. Victory at Yorktown: The Campaign That Won the Revolution. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 2004.
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Challenges to the Traditional Theory of the Great American Interchange

Words: 1472 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9038866

Evolution -- Great American Interchange

The natural Panamanian bridge adjoining early North America with early South America is believed to have occurred 3 -- 4 million years ago. By studying evolutionary changes in animal species in North America, Central America and South America, experts formed the theory of the Great American Interchange, a mutual migration of Northern species to South America and of Southern species to North America. The evolutionary changes that came from these migrations are at least partially attributed to a Great American Biotic exchange. Experts traditionally believe that Northern species that migrated to South America were more successful in surviving and evolving because of prior migrations from greater land masses and easier adaptation to the climate of South America. However, as experts make more and more discoveries in the field, there are questions and controversies about the number of migrations from each continent and migrations from sources…… [Read More]

References

Davies, T Jonathan and Lauren B. Buckley. "Phylogenetic Diversity as a Window into the Evolutionary and Biogeographic Histories of Present-Day Richness Gradients for Mammals." Phiosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 366(1576) (August 2011): 2414-2425. Print.

Forasiepi, Analia M, et al. "Carnivorans at the Great American Biotic Interchange: New Discoveries from the Northern Neotropics." 17 July 2014. www.academia.edu Web site. Web. 18 October 2014.

Jablonski, David and j John, Jr. Sepkoski. "Paleobiology, Community Ecology, and Scales of Ecological Pattern." Ecology, 77(5) (July 1996): 1367. Print.

Jimenez, F Agustin, et al. "Four Events of Host Switching in Aspidoderidae (Nematoda) Involve Convergent Lineages of Mammals." Journal of Parasitology, 98(6) (Dec 2012): 1166-75. Print.
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True Diversity of Hispanic-Americans the

Words: 961 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9671546



Cuban Americans

Cuban Americans have made communities in Florida since the first half of the nineteenth century, but have remained in this country only in small numbers until relatively recently. Still, they have managed to achieve greater success in the United States than many other Hispanic groups by certain measures; Cuban Americans have higher college completion rates and are generally better off economically than most other Hispanic groups. In part due to the history of Cuba and the Communist regime established there -- and the backlash against this regime that caused much of the Cuban migration to this country -- many Cuban Americans also hold more conservative political views than do other Hispanic-Americans.

Central and South Americans

Though comprising a diverse group in and of themselves, Hispanic-Americans hailing from Central and South America make up a small yet growing proportion of the Hispanic-Americans living in the United States. Hispanics from…… [Read More]

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Hispanic-American Diversity An Overview Soy

Words: 1331 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84577545



As with other Hispanic groups, there may be a greater reluctance to seek professional help in dealing with psychological issues because of a belief that the church, rather than Western psychological medicine, should address such problems. The greater economic security of middle-class Cuban immigrants and their children thus has not meant an entirely uncomplicated relationship with the new American homeland.

Puerto ican-Americans

Although it is a small island, the history of Puerto ico has been marked by many influences, spanning from Africa to Spain to Latin America. "There is an essential dichotomy [in] Puerto ico's relationship with the United States. Within American jurisdiction, as reflected by common citizenship, flag, currency and numerous applicable Federal laws, Puerto ico might seem in everything but name a State of the Union. But on the other side you will find a culture and society profoundly different from that in the mainland. It is a…… [Read More]

References

Bachay, Judith & Rafael Montes. (2010). Article 14: The Cuban-American grieving process

Counseling.org. Retrieved September 17, 2010 at  http://www.counseling.org/Resources/Library/VISTAS/vistas04/14.pdf 

The declining economic status of Puerto Ricans. Health Affairs. Retrieved September 17,

2010 at  http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/focus/pdfs/foc102d.pdf
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Mark Sanford Was the Governor of South

Words: 1390 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83950314

Mark Sanford was the governor of South Carolina. He was forced to resign in scandal, but today is trying to resurrect his political career. This paper will outline Sanford's political career, with particular emphasis on the scandal, Sanford's response and where he stands today with respect to his career.

Mark Sanford was elected as the governor of South Carolina and for the early part of his career was a generally unexceptional politician. He went about his job and built a career for himself that eventually landed him as governor of his state. He first came to public light in June of 2009, when he disappeared. News stories at the time highlighted that he was hiking on the Appalachian Trail, which is a long distance trail, a portion of which runs through his state. The Trail is popular, and it is not at all unusual for people to hike portions of…… [Read More]

References:

Carnia, C. (2013). Mark Sanford wins special election for Congress. USA Today. Retrieved October 20, 2013 from  http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2013/05/07/mark-sanford-colbert-busch-congress-election-south-carolina/2140591/ 

Hamby, P. & Keck, K. (2009). South Carolina Gov. Sanford admits extramarital affair. CNN. Retrieved October 20, 2013 from  http://edition.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/06/24/south.carolina.governor/ 

Heil, E. (2013). Mark Sanford's guide to Washington: Argentinian steaks, hikes and a spot to watch the Super Bowl. Washington Post. Retrieved October 20, 2013 from http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/in-the-loop/post/mark-sanfords-guide-to-washington-argentinian-steaks-hiking-and-a-spot-to-watch-the-super-bowl/2013/05/08/57d0d582-b7e8-11e2-92f3-f291801936b8_blog.html

Knowles, D. (2013). Disgraced former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford to announce run for open seat in House of Representatives. New York Daily News. Retrieved October 20, 2013 from  http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/disgraced-mark-sanford-run-house-seat-article-1.1238710
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African-Americans & Hispanic-Americans Are Currently

Words: 2189 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50200951

As the vast majority of African-Americans do not know where their ancestors came from, it is difficult to trace one's roots back to the African continent. At the same time, the United States, while certainly the nation that nearly every African-American would consider to be home, has hardly been hospitable to African-Americans throughout history. Even today, nearly a quarter of all African-American families in the United States live below the poverty line.

Nation plays a more prominent role in Hispanic-American communities, as these communities tend to organize themselves around national heritage. For example, the Puerto ican community in the United States is distinct from the Mexican-American community.

It should be kept in mind, however, that both Hispanic-Americans and African-Americans tend to identify their national heritage with the United States of America - despite their troublesome relationship with their home country over the centuries.

Institutional Networks

Institutional networks continue to play…… [Read More]

References

Boddy-Evans, a. (N.D.) the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. Retrieved December 1, 2007 from African History web site: http://africanhistory.about.com/library/weekly/aa080601a.htm

Davis, R. (N.D.) Surviving Jim Crow. Retrieved December 1, 2007 from the History of Jim Crow web site: http://www.jimcrowhistory.org/history/surviving.htm

Educational Broadcasting Corporation (2002). The Great Migration. Retrieved December

1, 2007 from African-American World web site: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/aaworld/reference/articles/great_migration.html
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Successful Acculturation of Hispanic-Americans to

Words: 2697 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27274623

In both cases, contributing variables such as country of origin, the existence or non-existence of family ties, gender and an immigrant's experience of the immigration process are omitted from the equation. This sector aimed to satisfy this gap by testing the combined effects of acculturation, kin, civic ties, and institutional context on immigrant's distrust of U.S. government, by testing for both acculturation factors (i.e. second-hand experience) and institutional factors (i.e. immediate experience of immigrant).

Three hypothesize were stated. Firstly, that the quantity of kin ties in the USD will influence trust towards the government; the greater the quantity of relations living in the U.S., the more trust experienced. Secondly, that high numbers of civic ties will increase trust in the government, and that the reverse will be true if the majority of one's civic ties reside in Mexico. Thirdly, that negative immediate experience (i.e. institution context) will impel low levels…… [Read More]