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We have over 464 essays for "Stratification"

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Developing a Sampling Plan

Words: 5476 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 16249528

Sampling Plan

Before discussing a sampling plan, there has to be clear and unambiguous definitions of what a sample and sampling are. Despite diversity in the definition of a sample, the best meaning is that a sample could be considered as a subset of a population, with which a researcher would like to use as participants in a given research study (Landreneau & Creek, 2012). According to Deming (1990), sapling is a science, which specifically guides quantitative studies, materials, behavior and the different causes of difference. In other aspects of research such as the qualitative research, sampling could be considered as the art of selecting a part of a population, in a given research area that is a representation of the entire population.

Both the qualitative and quantitative researchers approach their sampling differently. For the quantitative researchers, samples which are selected are those that will give the researcher easy time…… [Read More]

References

Adler, E.S. & Clark, R. (2008). How It Is Done: An Invitation to Social Research. New York: Cengage Learning Publishers.

Babbie, E.R. (2010). The Practice of Social Research. New York: Cengage Learning.

Bartlett, J.E., Kotrlik, J.W. & Higgins, C.C. (2012). Organizational Research: Determining Appropriate Sample Size in Survey Research. Retrieved 28th October, 2012 from  http://www.osra.org/itlpj/bartlettkotrlikhiggins.pdf 

Beri, (2007). Marketing Research. India: Tata McGraw Hill Publishing.
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Individuals Consume to Align Themselves

Words: 1060 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16238439

.. To an active fashion accessory. Most significantly the logo itself growing in size, ballooning from a three quarter inch emblem into a chest-sized marquee."

From the perspective of social stratification and social stratification through branding, today, our main motivation to consume is our desire to be similar to some people and different from others. Consumerism stands rudimentary to social stratification, or vice versus. According to Miller (2013), "Social stratification may be defined as long-standing power, wealth, and status between groups within a single society. These groups are typically separated into classes or castes, but may also extend to ethnic separation." Miller (2013) contends that "placement into a social hierarchy is dependent on an individual's access to valued resources: stratification is a system where groups are treated differently based on their societal roles or social status." Members of society can align with various social status groups or separate themselves from…… [Read More]

References

McLaren, Warren. (2008). Logo no go for Nau. A peek at branding and consumerism . Available:

www.treehugger.com/culture/logo-no-go-for-nau-a-peek-at-branding-and-consumerism.html. Last accessed 12th May 2013.

Miller, Rene. (2013). What is social stratification. Available:

http://www.ehow.com/info_8690268_social-stratification.html. Last accessed May 12, 2013.
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Job or Workplace

Words: 1097 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 4950542

occupation of computer programmer reflects a number of traditional components of society in the United States. Demographically, the profession is largely made up of while males in their late thirties. As such, the profession reflects stratification by race, class, and gender. However, recent changes in the profession, such as outsourcing of programming jobs to India, threaten this perception. At the same time, the degree of publicity such outsourcing has received (when compared to attention paid to job losses incurred by Black Americans) continues to reflect the race stratification in American society.

A computer programmer, by definition, is an individual who creates programs that allow computers to perform specific functions. This includes creating computer programs, and designing and testing logical structures for solving computer problems. In the simplest terms, programmers tell computers how, where, and when to access information. Commonly used computer languages include Java, C++, and COBOL (Bureau of Labor…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2004-

05 Edition, Computer Programmers, on the Internet at  http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos110.htm  (visited October 14, 2004).

Department for Professional Employees. The Professional Computer WorkForce, 2001. 14

October 2004. http://www.dpeaflcio.org/pros/workplace/computer.htm.
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Relationships and Social Lives This Is the

Words: 1491 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69916759

elationships and Social Lives

This is the hierarchical way in which large social groups based on their control over basic resources. A key characteristic of stratification systems is the extent to which the structure is flexible. Slavery, a form of stratification in which people are owned by others, is an extreme type. In a caste system, people's status is determined at birth based on their parents' position in society

The class system, which exists in the United States, is a type of stratification based on ownership of resources and on the type of work people do. Functionalist perspectives on the U.S. class structure view classes as broad groupings of people who share similar levels of privilege based on their roles in the occupational structure. According to the Davis-Moore thesis, positions that are most important within society, requiring the most talent and training, must highly rewarded. Many people define classes as…… [Read More]

References

1. Eichar, Douglas (1989). Occupation and Class Consciousness in America. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press.

2. Gilbert, Dennis (1998). The American Class Structure. New York: Wadsworth Publishing.

3. Thompson, William; Joseph Hickey (2005). Society in Focus. Boston, MA: Pearson.

4. Levine, Rhonda (1998). Social Class and Stratification. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
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Minority Groups

Words: 619 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29049702

acism affecting Native and African-American in the U.S.

The topic that was chosen for this essay is minority groups that have failed to make broad gains in the United States stratification system. The essay delves into the reasoning behind why African and Native Americans struggle despite each groups long residence in America. The Native Americans have been persecuted since the white man came to the United States, which is ironic because some Native American tribes helped the Americans in several battles during the evolutionary war with Great Britain. African-Americans were generally brought to the United States to participate in the slave trade business and thus lived lives as slaves (odriguez, 2007).

The reason the topic about minority groups that have failed to make broad gains in the United States stratification system was picked is because the topic generates a great deal of interest and research ability. Three questions that generate…… [Read More]

References:

Rodriguez, J. (2007). Slavery in the United States: a social, political, and historical encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, Inc.

Stannard, D.E. (1992). American holocaust: the conquest of a new world. New York, NY: Oxford Univesity Press.
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Managerialism in Advanced Industrial Societies According to

Words: 771 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 11054847

Managerialism in Advanced Industrial Societies

According to Weber there are three options of structural power available to the entrepreneur in advanced industrial societies. These include the bureaucracy, charisma and tradition, or feudalism. These three options are discussed below in terms of organizations and elites, rationalization and bureaucratization, stratification, authority, and domination.

Bureaucracy

The bureaucratic option is also referred to as transactional in nature. Bureaucratization occurs as a result of knowledge.

Rationalization in this option occurs in the form of legality, where there is a rational legal hierarchical power; this is built on the basis of rational knowledge. All other aspects is subject to rationalization. Elites are chosen according to their merits based on knowledge, as are stratification, authority and domination.

Legal authority is therefore carried out in terms of issuing rules. The leader also must submit to systematic and impersonal discipline. Rational values and rules are determined by agreement among…… [Read More]

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Inequalities in the Society and Effect on Labor Mobility

Words: 698 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75322404

Social Stratification and Social Mobility

Systems of social stratification

The systems refer to the manner that the society utilizes in ranking individuals in a hierarchy. Undeniably, the classifications suffice the reality that some groups of individuals possess greater wealth, power, and status compared to others. Differences in the groups of individuals describe the nature of social stratification. Social inequality occurs as a significant aspect of the society as it facilitates the smooth operation of the society. For example, high rewards lure and motivate highly talented individuals to perform involving tasks such as brain surgery. On the other, most individuals can perform blue-collar jobs such as cleaning toilets and mowing grass thereby limiting its level of returns.

The open class system allows social interactions between classes that rely on achievements, prevalent in industrialized nations. On the other hand, the closed class system confirms on the social status of individuals and ancestral…… [Read More]

References

Gane, Nicholas (2005). Max Weber as Social Theorist 'Class, Status, Party'. European Journal of Social Theory, 8(2):211-226

Resnikoff, Ned (2014, November 11). Global inequality is a rising concern for elites. Aljazeera America. Retrieved from  http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2014/11/11/global-inequalityisarisingconcernforelites.html
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Community Power Distribution

Words: 1538 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 55565895

Community Power and Social Distribution: A Debate Over Social Stratification and Elitism from Hunter Onwards

Floyd Hunter was a sociologist whom identified himself as part of the early stages of a movement to enact greater systems of localized, community social justice. Such movements were to later grip the American nation during the 1960's. However, as early as the 1950's, Hunter sought to quantitatively and qualitatively measure who had 'political power' in the community of Regional City in the American South over the course of the early 1950's. Hunter stated in his text Community Power Structure that in Atlanta, ostensibly a regional power base of the time, he had 'found' an elite whom formed the core of the local political power nexus, an elite that was not institutional in nature, but personal. In other words, through Hunter's social excavation over the course of his doctorial dissertation, Hunter discovered a hidden elitist…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bachrach, Peter and Morton Baratz, (December 1962). "Two Faces of Power." American Political Science Review. Volume 56. December 1962. Pp.947-952.

Hunter, Floyd. Community Power Structure. (1953). Chapter 4: The Structure of Power in Regional City.

Polsby, Nelson. (1980). Community Power and Political Theory. Second Edition. Chapter 5: Power and Social Stratification: Theory or Ideology?

Stone, Clarence N. (1980). "Systemic Power in Community Decision Making: A Restatement of Stratification Theory." American Political Science Review 74: 976-90
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Health and Disease in Russia

Words: 1020 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 10891412

Between 1995-2002, 99% of all births in ussia were attended by skilled health personnel, while the number of physicians per 100,000 people was 420 between 1990-2003, and the number of people with sustainable access to affordable essential drugs in 1999 was between 50-79% (http://hdr.undp.org/statistics/data/cty/cty_f_US.html)."

Nutrition, Water and Smoking

The United Nations reports that in 2000, 99% of ussia's population had "sustainable access to an improved water source. Between 1999-2001, 4% of the population was undernourished, while between 1995-2002 of all children under the age of 5, 3% were underweight and 13% were under height for their age group. From 1998-2002, 6% of all infants in ussia were born with low birth weight (http://hdr.undp.org/statistics/data/cty/cty_f_US.html)."

One of the leading, preventable health risks is smoking.

In 2000, 10% of all adult ussian women smoked, compared to 63% of all adult men (http://hdr.undp.org/statistics/data/cty/cty_f_US.html)." This illustrates why men may be more likely to suffer from…… [Read More]

References

Lokshin, Michael M. And Ruslan Yemtsov. (26 February, 2001). "Household Strategies for Coping with Poverty and Social Exclusion in Post-Crisis Russia." The World Bank

Group. (accessed 28 February 2005). http://econ.worldbank.org/working_papers/1417/).

UN Development Programme. (accessed 28 February 2005).  http://hdr.undp.org/statistics/data/cty/cty_f_RUS.html ).

WHO. (accessed 28 February 2005).  http://www.who.int/countries/rus/en/ ).
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Separation of the Society Into Different Segments

Words: 931 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 25852397

separation of the society into different segments by the use of castes or classes. Social stratification indicates a hierarchy of social groups and emphasizes social inequality. Social stratification refers to social groups, which are ranked one above another in terms of the power, prestige and wealth, which the members of the group possess. The members of the same group share common interests and have common identity and share a life style, which is similar to some extent, which ultimately distinguishes them from other members of the social strata. The Indian caste system is an example of the system of social stratification.

The system of caste has historically been an Indian concept and was designed to keep different castes of groups of individuals in their designed places in society. Similarly, the class system is a modern day device for use for the same purpose. Since the caste system is an Indian…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Srinivas, M.N. "Social change in modern India" California: University of California Press (1966)

Bougle, C., "The essence and Reality of the Caste System." In D. Gupta, ed., Social Stratification. Delhi: Oxford University Press (1992).

Kocher, Robert L

Political Economy 301: The American Class System; Prerequisite: Healthy Realistic Iconoclasm 300 Fundamental Issues, Part 2 The Laissez Faire City Times, Vol 3, No 13, March 29, 1999
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Structural Inequality & Diversity Root

Words: 5575 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 73975506

" (Dafler, 2005) Dafler relates that for more than thirty years children who were 'half-caste' "were forcibly removed from their families, often grabbed straight from their mother's arms, and transported directly to government and church missions." (Dafler, 2005) This process was termed to be one of assimilation' or 'absorption' towards the end of breeding out of Aboriginal blood in the population. At the time all of this was occurring Dafler relates that: "Many white Australians were convinced that any such hardship was better than the alternative of growing up as a member of an 'inferior' race and culture." (2005) it is plainly stated in a government document thus:

The destiny of the natives of Aboriginal origin, but not of the full blood, lies in their ultimate absorption by the people of the Commonwealth, and [the commission] therefore recommends that all efforts be directed towards this end." (eresford and Omaji, Our…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Dafler, Jeffrey (2005) Social Darwinism and the Language of Racial Oppression: Australia's Stolen Generations ETC.: A Review of General Semantics, Vol. 62, 2005.

Erich Fromm Foreword to a.S. Neill SummerHill (New York, 1960).

Hawkins, Social Darwinism; Shibutani, Tamotsu and Kwan, Kian M. Ethnic Stratification: A Comparative Approach. New York: The Macmillan Company (1965).

Jacques Ellul, the Technological Society (New York, 1967), 436.
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Patients and Their Doctors Research

Words: 1747 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 99275445

To wit, power is a huge influence in any social interaction, and in a study reported by the University of California Press (est, 2008, p. 87), men often interrupt women during conversations because men are generally viewed as the power in any male-female interaction. "Physicians interrupt patients disproportionately" in doctor-patient interactions, est writes, "except when the doctor is a 'lady'; then, "patients interrupt as much or more than physicians, and their interruptions seem to subvert physicians' authority" (est, p. 87). In other words, the stratification of male doctors having the power to interrupt is reversed when a woman is the doctor.

orks Cited

Blumer, Herbert. (1986). Symbolic Interactionism: Perspective and Method. Berkeley:

Breen, Catherine M., Abernethy, Amy P., Abbott, Katherine H., and Tulsky, James a. (2007).

Conflict Associated with Decisions to Limit Life-Sustaining Treatment in Intensive Care

Units. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 16(5), 283-289.

Donovan, Jenny L., and Blake,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Blumer, Herbert. (1986). Symbolic Interactionism: Perspective and Method. Berkeley:

Breen, Catherine M., Abernethy, Amy P., Abbott, Katherine H., and Tulsky, James a. (2007).

Conflict Associated with Decisions to Limit Life-Sustaining Treatment in Intensive Care

Units. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 16(5), 283-289.
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Function of This Study Is

Words: 3518 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 84974468

In other words, when the total number of people characterized by each variable (or stratum) oscillates within the population, to the researcher would choose the size of each sample for each stratum according to the research requirements. uch a choice is prejudiced by the probability of obtaining an adequate number of sampling units from each stratum within the final sample. As a rule, disproportionate stratified samples are used either to compare two or more particular strata or to analyze one stratum intensively (Creswell, 1994). Therefore, when researchers use a disproportionate stratified sample, we have to weight the estimates of the population's parameters by the number of units belonging to each stratum. In this sample, weighting strategies were not performed in the original data.

Once researchers have defined the population of interest, they draw a sample that adequately represents that population. The actual procedure involves selecting a sample from a sampling…… [Read More]

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Racial and Ethnic Differences National Contexts a

Words: 1999 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45324950

acial and Ethnic Differences National Contexts

A sociologist analyze racial ethnic differences national contexts. For, U.S., tend race a . In order develop skill, select analyze a society demonstrating ethnic stratification conflict, including evidence prejudice discrimination.

In sociology, the predominant line of thought has favored new prejudice interpretations, arguing for the continuing relevance of prejudice and discrimination in forming political opinions and in generating discrimination. New prejudice theories have argued that modern prejudice is multidimensional, combining racial and ostensibly nonracial beliefs. Little known to most sociologists, recent psychological research provides a new approach to understanding the sources of racial discrimination that compliments ideas from the new prejudice literature (Livingston, 2002).

esearch has demonstrated that implicit racial attitudes exist even for individuals who score low on measures of explicit racial prejudice and that these implicit beliefs influence judgments and perceptions. This literature provides one way to reconcile differences between continuing high…… [Read More]

References

Brockner, J., & Wiesenfeld, B. (2000). An integrative framework for explaining reactions to decisions: Interactive effects of outcomes and procedures. Psychological Bulletin, 120(1), 189-208.

Census Bureau U.S. (2001). (2001). The Hispanic population: 1990-2000 growth and change., . Washington DC:: Guzmin.

Feather, N.T. (2002). Values and value dilemmas in relation to judgments concerning outcomes of an industrial conflict. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin,, 28(2), 446-459.

Issacharoff, S., Karlan, P.S., & Pildes, R.H. (2002). The law of democracy: Legal structure of the political process (Rev. 2nd ed.). . New York: Foundation Press.
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Karl Marx's View of Class

Words: 1637 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45158276

Cambridge; Cambridge, MA: Polity Press

Devine, F. (ed.) (2004). ethinking class: culture, identities and lifestyles. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan

Joyce, P. (ed.) (1995). Class. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press

eid, I. (1989). Social class differences in Britain: life-chances and life-styles. London: Fontana [Franklin-Wilkins HN400.S6 EI]

ose, D and K. O'eilly (eds.) (1997). Constructing classes: towards a new social classification in the UK. Swindon: ESC/ONS

Wright, E. (1997) Classes. London: Verso

Zbigniew, a. (1972). Karl Marx: economy, class and social revolution. London: Nelson

Cohen, G. (2009) Why not socialism?

Elster, J (1986) an introduction to Marx

Gurley, J. (1976). Challengers to capitalism: Marx, Lenin and Mao

Lee, S. (200). European dictatorships, 1918-1945.

Marx, K. And Engels, F. (2005). The Communist Manifesto

Newman, M. (2005). Socialism: a very short introduction

Schumpeter, J (2010) Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy

Wacquant, L. (2009). Punishing the poor; the neoliberal government of social insecurity… [Read More]

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Philadelphia Crime in the City of Philadelphia

Words: 1317 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43362826

Philadelphia

Crime in the City of Philadelphia

The crime rate in Philadelphia has been a major issue for many years. Philadelphia is known as one of the cities with a highest crime rate in America. Crime is any act committed that breaks the laws, breaking rules that were established by a state or federal authority. New York, Chicago and Los Angeles are cities that are bigger than Philadelphia, with much larger populations, however they have lower crime rates compared to Philadelphia. The Philadelphia Police Department have made many different attempts and tried several strategies in an effort to reduce crime rate in this city. In 2002 the Police Department launched Operation Safe Streets, where police officers were placed on all the known drug infested streets in attempt decrease crime rates (Lawton, Taylor & Luongo, 2005). In this paper I will discuss some of the issues associated with the crime rate…… [Read More]

References

Barlas, F. & Farrie, D. (2006). Perceptions of Neighborhood Safety: Social Disorganization and Racial Differences in the Impact of Neighborhood Characteristics. American Sociological Association.

Census (2010). Philadelphia population by race and ethnicity. Retrieved from  http://www.clrsearch.com/Philadelphia_Demographics/MS/Population-by-Race-and-Ethnicity 

Lawton, B.A., Taylor, R.B. & Luongo, A.J. (2005). Police Officers on Drug Corner in Philadelphia, Drug, Crime and Violent Crime: Intended, Diffusion, and Displacement Impacts. Justice Quarterly. 22 (4) 427-451

Miller, L.L. (2010). The invisible black victim: How American Federalism perpetuates racial inequality in criminal justice. Law and Society Review. 44 (3/4) 805-842
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Minority Groups Why They Have Failed to

Words: 1137 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 36222570

Minority Groups: Why They Have Failed to Make Significant

Gains despite Having Lived in the U.S. For A Longer Time

The fact that minority groups have failed to make it up the ranks in the U.S. stratification system remains a query everyone has to battle with. One cannot stop to imagine how such old groups would fail to make the gains that the ordinary u.s citizens and the recent immigrants. It will be noted that the two major minority groups are African-Americans and Native Americans. The Native Americans, it is their land for all intends and purposes and still they are considered a minority group. For the African-Americans it is still a big headache for those who are studying the reasons why they have failed although there are several factors. Therefore in this topic there will be an in depth look into the reason why these groups have failed to…… [Read More]

References

CERD, Task Force of the U.S. Human Rights Network. (2010-08). "From Civil Rights to Human Rights: Implementing U.S. Obligations under the International Convention on the Elimination of All forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD)." Universal Periodic Review Joint Reports: United States of America, p. 44.

Fegin, J.R. (1984). Racial and Ethnic Relations: Universal Periodic Review Joint Reports: United States of America. Prentice Hall, pp. 10

Netton, Ian, R., Evelyn A. (2006). "From ambiguity to abjection: Iraqi-Americans negotiating race in the United States," pp. 140-143.

Leonard, Karen, Irvine. (July 28, 2007). "American Muslims: South Asian Contributions to the Mix." University of California: Western Knight Center
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Seasons of Life That Are Characteristic of

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 42354102

seasons of life" that are characteristic of Western societies. Name the rites of passage that mark the transitions from one period of life to the next.

Seasons of life: Childhood, Adolescence, Adulthood, Old Age, and Dying.

Rites of Passage: Puberty and struggling to gain independence and learn their own identies in the transition from Child to Adult (some religions have Bar and Bat Mitzvahs or Communion); marriage, maintaining a family, and participating in all aspects of society in Maturity; Status as matriarch or patriarch and declining health mark the passage of Elder to Death.

Over half of all women over 65 are widows, whereas only 13.6% of men over age 65 are widowed. What factors account for these statistics?

Answer: As socialization takes over men become more aggressive, and more individualistic which results in higher rates of accidents, violence, suicide, and hazardous behaviors like smoking and drinking in excess leading…… [Read More]

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Factors Affeting Access to Education

Words: 1606 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76920765

Race, Geography, Gender, Deviance, Oppression, and Social Stratification on Educational

Effects of Race, Geography, Gender, Deviance, Oppression, and Social Stratification on Education

High school dropout cases have occurred as a silent epidemic that has affected the nation. In the U.S., dropout cases have disproportionately affected young people, especially those from low-income families, ethnic minority groups, urban children, and single-parent children that join public schools. Statistics indicates that about 30% of public high school students in the U.S. fail to graduate (Heckman & LaFontaine 15). In this paper, we endeavor to demystify this high school dropout issue, an aspect that affects educational institutions. Identification of the prevalence and risk factors associated with high school dropouts facilitates the understanding of the reasons behind this issue and how best to solve them.

Statistics

Research puts high school graduation rate at 68-71%. The rate at which minority students, including the Native Americans, Blacks, and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brait, Ellen. (2015, Dec 10). "Flotus on the Track: Michelle Obama's Rap Video Hypes Going to College." The Guardian. 10 Dec. 2015. Web. 16 Dec 2015.

Heckman, James. & LaFontaine, Paul. (May 2010). "The American High School Graduation Rate: Trends and Levels." NCBI (2010). doi: 10.1162/rest.2010.12366. Web. 16 Dec 2015

U.S. Department of Education. "Trends in High School Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States: 1972-2009." IES 2012-006 (2011). Web. 16 Dec 2015
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People's Revolution in Egypt on

Words: 1084 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4453393

At which point, they were seen as a neutral between the two different sides. ("Egypt Revolution," 2011)

The protestors played a role in the conflict, by pushing for various changes to take place. This is despite the fact that they were: attacked, some of their key leaders were sent to jail and access the Internet was shut down. Yet, despite these different obstacles the underlying message would spread through the social networking site Facebook. This is when many of the protestors would become united and galvanized under a common cause. Where, this would push them to continue with their demonstrations; until their issues surrounding: the frustrations with the government and lack of opportunity were addressed (starting with the resignation of President Mubarak). This is important, because it shows how the Facebook page would help to: unite the protestors under one common cause and it kept the momentum of the movement…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Egypt Revolution. (2011). Huffington Post. Retrieved from:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/01/30/egypt-revolution-2011_n_816026.html 

Freed Google Executive. (2011). Jerusalem Post. Retrieved from:  http://www.jpost.com/International/Article.aspx?id=207292&R=R4 

Newman, D. (2008).The Architecture of Stratification. Sociology. (pp. 292 -- 316). Los Angeles, CA: Pine Forge.

MLA Format.  http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/
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Sociology Wk-1 DQ-1 One Problem

Words: 1109 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46276957

These problems can hinder the development of a high quality of life for all Americans by creating structural barriers to success. Some important steps would be to increase political participation at the roots level of all underrepresented members of society and to lend a voice to those who currently have little say in the governance of the nation.

Wk-4 DQ-1. The political-economic system is generally set up along the lines of specific economic ideology that helps to define the role of government in the development of American society. The nature of work is in part defined by economic principles as well, for example the prevailing view that low-priced labor is key to competitiveness. This ideology intends to promote maximum economic development but it differs from the reality of work, in which economic distribution fails most Americans while benefiting few.

Wk-4 DQ-2. Some of the major causes of illiteracy are inadequate…… [Read More]

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Gun Control as a Social

Words: 1735 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 8919396



Furthermore, it is suggested that the roots of the problem lie deeper than the superficial debate about gun control. In sociological terms, this problem is to do with the lack of meaning and the breakdown of inherent normative structures. In this sense the debate about gun control should be seen against the underlying background of these sociological issues. Even if a compromise was be reached about whether or not to have gun control, there would still be underlying structural causative features that would need to be addressed and which are the source of this problem in the first place.

eferences

Cukier, V. And Sidel W. 2005.The Global Gun Epidemic: From Saturday Night Specials.

New York: Praeger Publishers.

Deviance and Social Control. etrieved November 21, 2004

(http://216.239.59.104/search?q=cache:_H3h_VLu1H4J:www.sociology.org.uk/devs1.doc+Durkheim%27s+anomie+theory+of+suicide+and+Japan&hl=en) .

Egger, Steven A., et al. 1990.Serial Murder: An Elusive Phenomenon. New York:

Praeger Publishers, 1990.

Lintelman, D. Gun Control. etrieved November 21, 2009…… [Read More]

References

Cukier, V. And Sidel W. 2005.The Global Gun Epidemic: From Saturday Night Specials.

New York: Praeger Publishers.

Deviance and Social Control. Retrieved November 21, 2004

(http://216.239.59.104/search?q=cache:_H3h_VLu1H4J:www.sociology.org.uk/devs1.doc+Durkheim%27s+anomie+theory+of+suicide+and+Japan&hl=en) .
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Positive Effects of Extracurricular Activity

Words: 4686 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 48354620



Objectives

During the proposed study's process, the researcher plans to fulfill the following objectives.

Objective 1: Address each of the proposed study's research questions during literature review:

Examine the effect athletic participation has on student GPAs;

Identify the effect athletic participation has on student DC CAS math scores;

Determine the effect athletic participation has on student DC CAS English eading scores;

Explore the effect music participation has on student GPAs;

Investigate the effect music participation has on student DC CAS math scores;

Discover the effect music participation has on student DC CAS English eading scores.

Objective 2:

Complete study with 150 tenth grade student participants in the first semester of school year 2008-2009.

Objective 3:

Analyze test results and compare with findings from literature reviewed.

One of the Best Investments

Despite current reported budget cuts and constraints in education, high school activity programs continue to constitute one of the best…… [Read More]

References

Baker, Christina. (2008, August). Under-represented college students and extracurricular involvement: the effects of various student organizations on academic performance. Social Psychology of Education, Volume 11 (3). Retrieved January 27, 2009 at http://www.springerlink.com/content/b6432j1361233004/

The case for extracurricular activities. (2008). National Federation of State High School Association. Retrieved January 23, 2009 at  http://richwoodstrack.com/extracurricular_case.htm 

The Columbia World of Quotations. (1996). Columbia University Press, New York. Retrieved January 27, 2009 from www.bartleby.com/66/.

Draper, Michelle. (2008, September 7). Vic: Principals link mental health to academic achievement. (www.highbeam.com/Search.aspx?q=publication:%22AAP+General+News+(Australia)%22&sort=DT&sortdir=DAAP General News (Australia). Retrieved January 28, 2009 from HighBeam Research:  http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P1-156068940.html
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Islamic Cultural Center the Building of an

Words: 782 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20304963

Islamic Cultural Center

The building of an Islamic Cultural centre (ICC) has been a subject of controversy since it was conceived. The Islamic centre is intended to host several Islamic infrastructures like the rooms for Islamic teachings and Madras as well as a worship centre for the Muslims and a section that would be dedicated to the Islamic culture display.

The controversy that ahs surrounded the commencement of the building of the centre has been not so much on the legality of such an entity in the U.S.A. But on the proximity to the ground zero, that is known fro the 9/11 bombings by Islamic extremists. It is considered by many of those who oppose the idea as being too close to the 9/11 site that it would prohibit or injure their ability to commemorate, as one Mr. Brown, a complainant in the supreme court once noted (ABC News, 2011).…… [Read More]

References

ABC News, (2011). Ground Zero Mosque' Clears Legal Hurdle to Build. Retrieved November 14, 2011 from  http://abcnews.go.com/U.S./ground-mosque-wins-legal-battle-build/story?id=14062701#.Tr_8QFKQvKQ 

Allvoices Inc., (2011). Islamic Mosque And Cultural Center Blocks From Ground Zero. Retrieved November 14, 2011 from  http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-news/6499574-islamic-cultural-center-blocks-from-ground-zero 

SBA, (2011). Basic Zoning Laws. Retrieved November 14, 2011 from  http://www.sba.gov/content/basic-zoning-laws
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Marketing Impact of External Influences

Words: 2454 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 93633836

The people who have not yet gone in for the Plasma TV are more or less happy viewing the conventional TV, but want to go up in the value chain and aspire one day to buy a Plasma TV and like to be at par with their aspirational group who has already bought one. (the Psychology of Consumers -Consumer Behavior and Marketing)

Associative reference groups comprise of people who more practically represent the individual who are equal as regards their position in the society, income levels like co-workers, neighbors, members of clubs and organizations. As these people considers them near equals, a purchase by one member within the reference group triggers to think about the purchase by the other members of the society. The purchase of a Plasma TV, by a colleague belonging to a particular organization might instill confidence in the other employee to think about buying a similar…… [Read More]

References

Buying a Plasma TV" (November, 2004) NSW Office of Fair Trading-Department of Commerce. Retrieved at http://www.fairtrading.nsw.gov.au/pdfs/corporate/reportonpurchasingaplasmatv.pdf. Accessed on 18 February, 2005

Cassavoy, Liane. (November 03, 2003) "Should You Buy a TV From a PC Maker?" Retrieved at  http://www.pcworld.com/news/article/0,aid,113009,00.asp . Accessed on 18 February, 2005

Gateway feels lure of consumer electronics" Retrieved at  http://news.com.com/Gateway+feels+lure+of+consumer+electronics/2100-1041_3-1015744.html . Accessed on 18 February, 2005

Gateway Plasma TV to undercut prices" Retrieved at  http://news.com.com/Gateway+plasma+TV+to+undercut+prices/2100-1040_3-964156.html . Accessed on 18 February, 2005
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Sociology the Shifting Definitions of

Words: 3386 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 41556052

eber made appoint of recognizing that, even something so seemingly objective and abstract as the law, was, in reality, a substantive tool in the hands of judges and politicians. Judges are not "automata of paragraphs' (eber) because they are of necessity implicated in the values they are compelled to adjudicate. Substantive judgments and discretionary, extra-juristic evaluations are smuggled in under the camouflage of formal legal rationality." (Baehr 2002) the law, as it was printed on the page, was objective - it always said the same thing. However, it was the various judges, each of whom brought to the bench a unique collection of experiences, who necessarily interpreted those words in different ways. All of this was thus, a completely natural and "scientific" process. Each part of the machine performed as it was supposed to - it just depended on how you assembled the machine.

One sign that is frequently taken…… [Read More]

Works Cited

 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000633200 

Baehr, Peter. 2002. In the Grip of Freedom: Law and Modernity in Max Weber. Canadian Journal of Sociology 27, no. 4: 587+. Database online. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/.Internet. Accessed 4 June 2005.  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=49065068 

1990. The Forms of Power: From Domination to Transformation. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=94050575 

Grusky, David B., ed. 1994. Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5007673311
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Dangers and Advantages Explain the

Words: 595 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71439066

When this happens, the total amounts of social satisfaction will improve. Moreover, the U.S. will be able to reduce the number of people that are living in the lower economic classes by understanding these viewpoints. This is when there will be increased amount of economic mobility, which helps to reduce any kind of class divisions. ("Multi Culturalism in America," 2012)

How would deviance be defined in America through a multicultural perspective?

Deviance would be defined as those groups that are unwilling to embrace different American cultural traditions (over several generations). This is because select nationalities could be focused on embracing their cultural practices and are not learning those of their new country. What would make the situation worse is when future generations do not accept American attributes with their own traditions. ("Multi Culturalism in America," 2012)

For example, a family from another country will automatically practice certain traditions when they…… [Read More]

Reference

Multi-Culturalism in America. (2012). Buzzle.com. Retrieved from:  http://www.buzzle.com/articles/multiculturalism-in-america.html 

Santorum, R. (2012). Multi-Culturalism Threatens America. Town Hall. Retrieved from:  http://townhall.com/columnists/ricksantorum/2011/02/18/multiculturalism_threatens_america
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Population Identified and Described Are Eligibility Criteria

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 40655635

population identified and described? Are eligibility criteria specified? Are the sample selection procedures clearly delineated? Yes. The sample consisted of 350 college students at a Midwestern University. All the students were enrolled in a personal health class as a social science elective.

Do the sample and population specifications support an inference of construct validity with regard to the population construct? Of n=350, 86% were White, 5% African-American, 4% Asian-American, 3% Latino, and 2% Other. This is not representative of the collegiate population in general, nor is it representative of the baseline population breakdown for most of America. However, because the classes are a social science elective, the sample does serve as an adequate representation of a cross-section of this particular Midwestern University.

What type of sampling plan was used? Would an alternative sampling plan have been preferable? Was the sampling plan one that could be expected to yield a representative…… [Read More]

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Sociology -- Sociology of Religion

Words: 1771 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99126995

Finally, the rise of science and technology due to industrialization militated against institutionalized religion (Bruce, 2002, p. 18). As people became more educated and reliant on science and technology in their everyday lives and work lives, religious disagreements with science and led people to abandon institutional religions as unscientific and backward. People knew that science and technology worked; therefore, religious arguments against science and technology tended to be rejected. In sum, the religious and secular teachings of the Protestant Reformation caused people to move toward greater secularization for religious, economic, social and intellectual reasons.

3. Conclusion

The Protestant Reformation significantly contributed to both Capitalism and Secularization in the est. By eliminating or reducing the Roman Catholic Church's underpinnings, including the Sacraments and obedience to Church authorities for salvation, the Reformation caused individuals to search here on earth for signs that they were saved and to rely on themselves rather than…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bruce, S. (2002). God is dead: Secularization in the west - (Religion and spirituality in the modern world). Malden, MA: Blackstone Publishing, Ltd.

Stepan, a.C. (October 2000). Religion, democracy, and the "twin tolerations." Journal of Democracy, 11(4), 37-57.

Weber, M.A. (2003). The Protestant ethic and the spirit of capitalism. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications, Inc.
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Personal Social Class My Parent's Class Position

Words: 1894 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50777628

Personal Social Class

My Parent's Class Position

My parents grew up in poverty in Latin America. Their story is not an unfamiliar one in America. My parents were able to obtain a middle school education, which at that time in Latin America, was a good educational accomplishment. Like most children living in impoverished, lower class families, my parents both had to contribute to the household income. Opportunities for earning extra money were scarce, but my parents were creative and determined; they took what jobs they could find and set themselves up to establish work where there had previously been none. My mother would say that sometimes people just didn't know what work they needed someone else to do -- but if you do some work, and the people like it, they see that it is nice not to have to do the work for themselves. When my grandparents immigrated to…… [Read More]

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Marxist or Neo-Marxist Research Theorist Theory Summary

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70523138

arxist or Neo-arxist Research

Theorist

Theory Summary

Critique of Theory

ax Weber

According to ax Weber the state is a special entity that possesses a monopoly on the legitimate use of violence. Weber believes politics is a required activity of government used in order to influence and control the relative distribution of force and power in the country.

Weber wrote of three main types of authority and political leadership domination that is present in society. These three types are charismatic, traditional and legal domination.

Weber also developed a theory of stratification where he explained and used such ideas as class, status, and party. According to his theory class is determined by an individual's economic situation. The notion of status is similar to prestige and honor. And the main purpose of parties is to gain domination in certain spheres of life. Like Weber, arx saw society as the struggle for class…… [Read More]

Mao Zedong

Marxism identifies only 2 types of production, Two types of production can be used, human and material. These two aspects have interrelation and they depend on each other. However, Mao tried to prove that such an interrelation is not essential. In his opinion both types of production should be included in the economic plan. He also took care and observed the process of population growth. Initially, China's post-1949 leaders were ideologically disposed to view a large population as an asset. Mao said an army of people is invincible. During Mao's rule, from 1949 to 1976, China's population increased from around 550 to over 900 million people. Mao believed that family planning should be integrated as a part of the overall plan for the development of the national economy, and that people should learn how to manage material production and how to manage themselves.

Although
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Computers and Culture Using the Book Technopoly

Words: 2023 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 32089011

computers and culture, using the book "Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology," by Neil Postman, and other resources. Specifically, it will answer the questions: How have computers and computer networks changed human thinking, behavior, and lifestyle? What has been gained? What has been lost? What are the advantages of computers in communication? In education? In entertainment? In the economy? What are the disadvantages in these areas? Is computer technology creating winners and losers, or furthering social stratification? Have we become too dependent on computers? Do computers limit social skills and physical activity to a damaging degree? Why or why not? Computers have changed our national culture and our global culture, and not always for the better. When they were first developed for the mass market, computers were meant to increase productivity and cut down on paper work. Today, computers have permeated every section of our lives, and our culture.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Berg, R. Dreyer. "Our Computational Culture: From Descartes to the Computer." ETC.: A Review of General Semantics 51.2 (1994): 123+.

Marsha Kinder, ed. Kids' Media Culture. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1999.

Perrolle, Judith A. "Information, Technology, and Culture." The Relevance of Culture. Ed. Morris Freilich. New York: Bergin & Garvey Publishers, 1989. 98-114.

Postman, Neil. Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology. New York, Vintage Books, 1992.
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Sociology and Communication

Words: 889 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52414454

Communication and Sociology

Sociology and Poverty

Poverty, in absolute terms, is defined as a lack of the things considered basic for human survival. There are many causes of poverty; sociologists, however, explain the existence of poverty using two major approaches -- the structural-functionalism approach and the conflict approach (Andersen & Taylor, 2007). The structural-functionalism theory postulates that poverty is inevitable and is in fact one of the human processes that are necessary for the stability and continuity of society (Andersen & Taylor, 2007). Just as is the case with inequality and stratification, poverty is beneficial to society because it creates a balance that ensures that the best people occupy the most important positions, and the less worthy remain at the bottom (Andersen & Taylor, 2007). The conflict approach agrees with the argument that poverty is inevitable, but disputes the idea that it is beneficial, arguing that poverty exists only because…… [Read More]

References

Andersen, M. & Taylor, H. (2007). Sociology: Understanding a Diverse Society, Updated (4th ed.). Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning.

Kornblum, W. (2007). Sociology in a Changing World (8th ed.). Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning.

University of Washington. (2014). Presentation Tips. University of Washington. Retrieved 26 July 2014 from  http://www.washington.edu/doit/TeamN/present_tips.html
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Cultures Sociology the Historical Development

Words: 898 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39617294

In addition, stratification contributes to cultural determinism, which again, alludes to when a person's position or class within a stratified society determines their culture, what kind of labor they will have the opportunity to have, what quality of education they may have access to, and other aspects (or limitations) of a particular culture.

When social stratification becomes too extreme and tensions within a culture rise too high, there is a distinct possibility for cultural differentiation. This occurs in societies where the tensions and imbalances are apparent and transparent. In many countries, such as the United States, the media helps to minimize class imbalances. The media is often used as an institution that will communicate and distribute the dominant ideology and specific hegemony. Hegemony is a form of social control and ideology is the greater societal structure of which hegemony is a tool or strategy. Hegemony may is often skewed or…… [Read More]

References:

Understanding Race and Ethnic Relations, 4th Edition. Chapter 3 -- Understanding Race and Culture. Print. Provided.
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The Inequal Economic Classes

Words: 720 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37242544

daily living standards for those living in the high income, middle income, and low income countries. Things like life expectancy, healthcare, housing, and education will be considered in the discussion. The definition of social stratification shall also be looked at.

Social Stratification

Social stratification simply refers to a hierarchy of posts with respect to the economic production that affects the social rewards to individuals occupying these posts. Stratification entails structural inequity patterns, which are linked with membership in all the groups, in addition to the beliefs that encourage inequity. The categories that comprise the societal hierarchy are assessed by social groups, who also wish to establish the manner through which inequities are formed and continue with time (Kendall, 2013).

Compare/Contrast

Low-Income: Approximately 35 countries are presently categorized by the World Bank (2012) as low-income economies. In these particular economies, majority of the citizens are involved in agricultural endeavors, live in…… [Read More]

References

(n.d.). Free Sociology Notes, Sociology Definition, Sociology Study Guide, Meaning Scope Of Sociology, Define Sociology Theory, and Define Sociology, Introduction To Sociology, Sociology Study, Sociology Concept, And Online Sociology Course. Social Stratification, Definition Social Stratification, Class Social Stratification, Define Social Stratification, Mobility Social. Retrieved September 22, 2015, from  http://www.sociologyguide.com/questions/social-stratification.php 

Kendall, D. (2013). Sociology in our Times (10 Ed.). Cengage Learning. Retrieved from  http://online.vitalsource.com/#/books/9781305450387/pages/111567106
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Overrepresentation of Minorities in Special

Words: 4423 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 67221345

Thus, the relation between students is imperative for determining such disorders (Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development, 2007). As with the previous two categories, this is seen as incredibly subjective in the idea that no medical diagnosis or visible physical symptoms are needed to be placed within the category.

Stratification.

Stratification is essentially the ranking of individuals within a hierarchy based on the structures present in a functioning society. Sullivan and Artiles (2011) define stratification as "the patterned and differential distribution of resources, life chances, and costs / benefits among groups of the population" (p 1529). One's rank on this hierarchy determines one's quality of life and opportunities in relation to the structures and the groups these structures serve.

Literature eview

Overrepresentation and Segregation of acial Minorities in Special Education.

According to the research, there are much higher rates of overrepresentation of minorities in what is known as high-incidence categories,…… [Read More]

References

Anyon, Y. (2009). Sociological theories of learning disabilities: Understanding racial disproportionality in special education. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 19(1), 44-57.

Blanchett, Wanda J. (2010). Telling it like it is: The role of race, class & culture in the perpetuation of learning disability as a privileged category for the while middle class. Disability Studies Quarterly, 30(2). Retrieved from  http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/1233/1280 

Blau, Peter M. (1977). A macro social theory of social structure. American Journal of Psychology, 83(1), 26-54.

Burt, Ronald S. (1995). Structural holes: The Social Structure of Competition. Harvard University Press.
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Mortality and Loss Processes in

Words: 3007 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 29018025

" Because of the ability to reproduce in large amounts in a small amount of time, phytoplankton are considered as the first link in the food chain of nearly all marine animals. Phytoplankton provide food for a large variety of organisms, including the microscopic animals (such as the zooplankton), bivalve molluscan shellfish (like mussels, oysters, scallops, and clams), and small fishes (such as anchovies and sardines). To continue the food chain, these group of animals then provide their own kind of food to other group animals like crabs, starfish, fish, marine birds, marine mammals, and humans (Karl, et al., 2001).

Figure 1. Sample food chain involving phytoplankton

Source: (www.planktonfyi.com/images/foodchain.jpg,2006).

Mortality Rate of Phytoplankton

It was recorded that from 1980's to the present, phytoplankton have been continuously increasing in frequency and distribution worldwide. The reason for such continuing increase in biomass is yet to be determined, but scientists have provided several…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alvarez Cobelas, M., J.L. Velasco, a. Rubio, and C. Rojo. (1994). The time course of phytoplankton biomass and related limnological factors in shallow and deep lakes: a multivariate approach. Hydrobiologia 275/276:139-151.

Anya, M. (1996). Phytoplankton biodiversity.(Marine Biodiversity) Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Biomass distribution of phytoplankton" (2006). [Available online] www.astro.temple.edu/~sanders1/balance.gif

Carpenter, S.R., J.F. Kitchell, and J.R. Hodgson. (1985). Cascading trophic interactions and lake productivity. BioScience 35:634-639.
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Upward Mobility Through Sports Stanley Eitzen's Article

Words: 656 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74563496

Upward Mobility Through Sports

Stanley Eitzen's article "Upward Mobility Through Sports" is an analysis of the ability of individuals to raise themselves upward through the social stratification that currently exists in America. Sports are often seen by those on the lower end of the social strata as a means of rising up and becoming economically successful. However, Eitzen points out that the chances of rising socially and economically through a career in professional sports is not likely. This article fits in with the readings from our textbook as they discuss the existence of social stratification and the effects on an individual of their position within that society.

Chapter 7 in our textbook opens with Murray Milner's theories on high school social structure as a means to begin a discussion on social stratification; or the inequalities among individuals and groups within society. This leads to a listing of the three characteristics…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Eitzen, Stanley. "Upward Mobility Through Sports? The myths and realities."

Z Magazine, March 1999. Web. 26 Oct. 2013.

http://www.zcommunications.org/upward-mobility-through-sport-by-d-stanley-eitzen
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Identity Class Has Been an

Words: 2473 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26782061

This construction gave credence to the concept of class consciousness. Class consciousness is really class identity; it is the way entire groups of people conceive themselves as belonging to a whole. This understanding permeates the corpus and unites the initiated into a common group think. This group or class view is reinforced through the economic determinants that are at the foundation of the group's position. These determinants reinforce inequalities and class identities.

The challenge to class as a locus of identity formation; results from the assertion that contemporary society is too layered and complex for class identity to be relevant. The discussion centers not on the existence of inequalities but the explanation of those inequalities. In the postmodern context the inequalities that exist are not anchored in an a priori formulation of class structure. This formulation considers the development of a classless society. This is not to be interpreted as…… [Read More]

References

Becker H.S. (2003).The Politics of Presentation: Goffman and Total Institutions Symbolic

Interaction, 26 (4):659-669.

Bottero, W. (2004). Class Identities and the Identity of Class. Sociology 38 (5): 985-1003.

Burnhill, P., Garner, C., McPherson, a. (1990). Parental Education, Social Class and Entry to Higher Education 1976-86. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series a (Statistics
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The Preservation of Indigenous Mexico

Words: 1569 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63425191

film La Otra Conquista captures the complexity of the process of colonialism, as even after he becomes known as Tomas, Topiltzin never loses his Aztec identity. The brutal use of force against the indigenous people of Mexico could not have alone erased the collective memories, dreams, and experiences of the people who survived. Historians have repeatedly pointed out the all-encompassing, major ways the colonial social systems and institutions transformed life for the indigenous people of Mesoamerica. Even the most "basic institutions" such as "family, marriage, and access to property," the issues that affect daily life as well as long-term survival of individual identity and community, would become "Europeanized."[footnoteef:1] Yet it would be impossible for Indian memory to completely end with the conquests. Collective memory is not so easily erased. Moreover, the indigenous people's customs, values, worldviews, and beliefs sometimes permeate and permanently alter those of the conquistadores. As La Otra…… [Read More]

References

Katz, Friedrich. "Rural Uprisings in Preconquest and Colonial Mexico." In Riot, Rebellion, and Revolution, Princeton University Press, 1988.

Medrano, Ethelia Ruiz. "Indigenous Negotiation to Preserve Land, History, Titles, and Maps: Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries." In Mexico's Indigenous Communities. University Press of Colorado, 2010.

Villella, Peter B. "Pure and Noble Indians, Untainted by Inferior Idolatrous Races." Hispanic-American Historical Review 91, no. 4 (2011): 633-663.
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Race Theory the Issues of Race and

Words: 530 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 88994937

Race Theory

The issues of race and its ramifications are some of the most pressing issues facing American society today, and will continue to challenge us in the decades to come. Of course, issues of race and socio-economic stratification have always been of vast importance, but in America the problems are magnified since the country and its people pride themselves on being a true melting pot, and the reality does not always match the ideals.

One way of examining race is the functionalist theory or perspective. The functionalist theory of social inequality contends that stratification exists because it is beneficial for society. Society must focus on and with human motivation because the duties associated with the various statuses are not all equally pleasant to the human species, important to social survival, and in need of the same abilities and talents.

In other words, society depends on certain types of people…… [Read More]

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Sociology of Poverty and Welfare

Words: 3817 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79188435

Interpretive sociology does not agree with the thought that behavior is related to society as effect is related to cause since this entire idea is dysfunctional with that which composes social life in reality. Interpretive sociology holds that understanding of our fellow man should be the pursuit of each day as sense is made of their individual societal existence. Seeking to understand is the concept held in interpretive sociology instead of the seeking of an explanation. Therefore it is understood that "structural" or that of Marxism and Functionalism (i.e. The interpretive/interactionist/social action sociologies) as well as Weber's interactionism, ethnomethodology and the Structural arguments in sociology that a "science of society" is likely. Therefore, there exists an agreement even among the interpretive sociologies. The natural science argument is based on "cause and effect" principles. That claim that the behavior of humans is the effect of some cause in society or class…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Townsend, Peter (1970) the Concept of Poverty. Heinemann Weber, Max (1958) the Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. Charles Scribner's Sons, New York.

Gilbert (1999) Social Research Update No. 27 University of Surrey Department of Sociology

Marx, Karl (1970) first published 1870 capital Vol.1 Penguin.

Sanjeev Prakash is Director of the Environment, Technology and Institutional
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John Updike's A& 38 P

Words: 877 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 7837264

a&P by John Updike

The Themes of omen Empowerment and Modern vs. Traditional American Society in John Updike's A&P

The short story A&P by John Updike chronicles the contemporary American society and how it treats issues of social stratification among members of the society. ritten in the 1960s, A&P provides an insightful look at the dynamics of gender and socio-economic differences of people in American society. hat is remarkable about this literary work is that it discusses issues on social stratification in the eyes and viewpoint of Sammy, a young man who works at the convenience store A&P. Sammy's character is an interesting and essential factor that gives the issue of social stratification because he serves as Updike's 'commentator' on sensitive issues such as gender discrimination on women and the snobbish and oppressive nature of the elite class in the society. Through Sammy's eyes, Updike's audience is given a holistic…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Updike, J. A&P. Available at  http://www.tiger-town.com/whatnot/updike/ .
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Traditional Interpretation of Images

Words: 1199 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 73394275

Traditional Interpretation of Images: Class Stratification in John erger's Ways of Seeing and Sexual Politics in Susan ordo's Hunger as Ideology

The proliferation of popular or mass culture following after the emergence of the Industrial Revolution in 19th century gave birth to new ideologies that seek to understand how these new social phenomena (pop culture and industrialization/capitalism) affected the life of human society over the years. One of the most popular theories that developed in light of the Industrial Revolution is the critical theory perspective, which posits that in the society, there will always be an existing conflict between the elite or bourgeois and middle class/working or proletariat classes. Indeed, this stratification in terms of race, class, gender, and even religion has become the focus of modern studies nowadays. John erger and Susan ordo, adopting the classical Marxist approach, attempted to analyze how popular culture has affected human society, and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Berger, J. Ways of Seeing.

Bordo, S. Hunger as Ideology.
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Somalia- Social Perspective on the

Words: 2501 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 47421796

This idea is also strengthen by the example of the inhabitants from the northern region. Yet, the idea is not completely tolerated. There are, of course, groups which benefit from the current context, like the elite groups that one would furthermore refer to when analyzing social stratification.

Along with the political context of Somalia, which is the principal factor of the economical failure of the country, another significant reason consists in Somalia's vulnerability and lack of defense in front of the world's biggest states which transformed it, at the beginning of the 1990s in a sort of testing ground for all the issues they confronted with.

For example, one knows the fact that a significant amount of the local economy before the 1990 stood in natives' activity of fishing, as both the Aden Gulf and the Indian Ocean are known as being rich in piscicultural resources. After becoming independent in…… [Read More]

References:

Mubarak, Jamil Abdalla (1996). From Bad Policy to Chaos in Somalia: How an Economy Fell Apart. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Abdullahi, Mohamed Diriye (2001). Culture and Customs of Somalia. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press

Feldman, Stacy, Slattery, Brian (2003). Living without a Government in Somalia: An Interview with Mark Bradbury: Development Processes in Somalia Exist Not as a Result of Official Development Assistance, but in Spite of it. Journal of International Affairs, 57 (1), pag 1.

U.S Department of State- Bureau of African Affairs (2011). Background Note: Somalia [January 3, 2011]. Retrieved from  http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2863.htm
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Durkheim Asserts That it Isn't

Words: 860 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62144234



Weber, on the other hand, did not agree that social and political class could really be considered one and the same. For him, the material inequality observable in society was the source of power and stratification, and not merely the result of the system (Davidson 2009). While still uniting the concepts of ideology and materialism, Weber's view can in some ways be seen as a reversal of Marx's; the material inequality was the means by which the ideological and political inequality could be perpetuated (Davidson 2009). The greater opportunities available to those who had greater wealth allowed for their continued dominance.

Briefly describe how two different theorists might analyze the economic climate of today and what brought it on? How would each of them understand how it would happen and what will happen in the near future.

There are many similarities between the sociological theories of Emil Durkheim and Max…… [Read More]

References

Bartle, P. (2009). "Durkheim & Weber." Accessed 12 October 2009.  http://www.scn.org/cmp/modules/soc-web.htm 

Davidson, a. (2009). "Comparing Karl Marx and Max Weber." Accessed 12 October 2009.  http://www.helium.com/items/1598754-marx-and-weber-on-social-class 

Ritzer, G. & Goodman, D. (2004). Sociological Theory. New York: McGraw Hill.
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Spencer Herbert 1860 The Social

Words: 3363 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48573377

However, one can still see remnants of Morgan's ideals as globalization takes hold in developing nations. Although differences are tolerated, the "westernization" of the rest of the world is still a growing reality. One need look no further than modern business attire to see that western ideals are quickly replacing traditional modes of dress and modes of doing business. Morgan's work makes the modern anthropologist aware that "globalization" may be a soft sell for "westernization."

Summary 6:

Fried, Morton H. 1960. On the Evolution of Social Stratification and the State. In Anthropological Theory: An Introductory Theory. Fourth Edition. R. McGee and Richard Warms. McGraw Hill.

Fried explored the development of social stratification, as opposed to a non-ranked society. His primary purpose was to explore the reasons for changes in society that lead to changes in social structure. He compared simple forms of social organization to more complex ones. Fried explored…… [Read More]