Student Behavior Essays (Examples)

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Incidents of Students Behavior

Words: 1782 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61633386

Students ehavior

The learning atmosphere in schools have changed drastically over the years and the schools which were once considered safe are becoming sites of bullying, violence and anti-social activities, Presently the school administration and also the teachers are under tremendous pressure for ensuring a safe, disciplined and effective learning environment, enabling students to acquire academic and social skills that would equip them in academic achievement and assist them in the overall development of the students. This recent increase in the pressure is greatly due to the increasing incidences of violence in the schools and played up by the media and the challenges faced by the teachers in deciding the most appropriate disciplinary measures to set the problem student back on the learning path. This brings to light the changing profiles of teachers, from that of good academicians to that of a versatile educator-cum-counsellor-disciplinarian, capable of guiding his students through…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gresham, F.M. (1998). Social skills training: Should we raze, remodel, or rebuild? Behavioral Disorders, 24, 19-25.

Grusec, J.E. (1982). The socialisation of altruism. In N. Eisenberg (ed), The Development of Prosocial behavior, 135-57.New York: Academic Press

Hartup, W.W. (1996) The company they keep: Friendships and their developmental significance. Child Development, 67, 1-13.

Horner, R.H. & Sugai, G. (2002). Overview of Positive Behavior Support. Paper presented at the 2002 Convention of the Council for Exceptional Children, New York.
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Students With Visual Impairment the

Words: 4694 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29814845



Serving students with a full range of abilities and disabilities in the general education class room with appropriate in-class support is how Roach (1995) defines inclusion using this practice. Friend & Bursuck (1996) noted that children with disabilities are considered as full members of the classroom learning community in such setting with their special needs met there. Students with disabilities are helped to establish and maintain social networks and opportunities to be accepted by no disabled peers (Farmer & Farmer, 1996; Kennedy & Itkonen, 1994). Students with severe disabilities developed social networks, positive interpersonal relationships, and friendships with students without disabilities (Hendrickson, Shokoohi-Yekta, Hamre-Nietupski, & Gable, 1996).

Surprisingly, according to authors Cloninger & Giangreco (1995), Harig & Romer (1995), students who are deaf blind or have other severe or multiple disabilities are being educated in general education classes has increased. Sharp, York and Knight (1994) added that the inclusion of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Foundation for the Blind (AFB). (2005). Educating Students With Visual Impairments for Inclusion in Society. Retrieved March 08, 2007 http://www.afb.org/Section.asp?SectionID=44&TopicID=189&DocumentID=1344

Behrmann, J. (1993). Including everyone. The Executive Educator, 15(12), 16-20.

Bennett, T., Bruns, D. And Deluca, D. (1997). Putting Inclusion into Practice: Perspectives of Teachers and Parents. Exceptional Children, 64.

Bertness, H.J. (1976). Progressive inclusion: The mainstream movement in Tacoma. In M.C. Reynolds (Ed.), Mainstreaming: Origins and implications (pp. 55-58). Reston, VA: Council for Exceptional Children.
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Students With ADHD

Words: 1533 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91522386

Students with ADHD

Education 518, Section B13

Dr. Carolyn McCreight

Qualitative article review: Students with ADHD

Homeschooling is one of the controversial approaches to educate children with 'special needs'. Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder are preferred to be taught at home by their parents. Instructors for homeschooling are also arranged for this purpose. However, there has been widespread criticism on this method of teaching attention-deficit students. The main purpose of this paper is to review a qualitative study conducted on the topic of providing homeschooling to attention-deficit students. Duvall, Delquadri and Ward (2004) conducted a study to investigate the appropriateness of homeschooling environment for instructing basic skills to children with special needs. The main purpose of this qualitative study was to ascertain whether or not parents of children having attention-deficit as well as hyperactivity disorder could provide their children with instructional environmental that was conducive for facilitating acquisition of…… [Read More]

References

Duvall, S.F., Delquadri, J.C., & Ward, D.L. (2004). A Preliminary Investigation of the Effectiveness of Home-school Instructional Environments for Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. School Psychology Review, 33(1), 140-158.
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Students Integration and Transitioning in New Zealand School

Words: 1410 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20885111

Integration of Students Transitioning in New Zealand

The study uses the mixed methods to collect data using both quantitative and qualitative research approach. The mixed methods address the shortcomings of both the quantitative and qualitative research by combining the strengths of the qualitative and quantitative research. Johnson, & Onwuegbuzie (2004) define mixed methods as a class of research that combines both qualitative and quantitative research methods, technique approach and concepts. Philosophically, mixed methods use the pragmatic method to carry out the research using the induction, deduction, and abduction to seek explanations to an understanding. Unlike the qualitative or quantitative research that uses induction or deduction approach to seek for research explanation, the mixed methods combine both induction and deduction to seek explanation of research inquiry. The benefit mixed methods is that it attempts to use multiple research approach to answer the research questions rather than restricting to single research choice…… [Read More]

Reference

Johnson, R.B. & Onwuegbuzie, A.J. (2004). Mixed Methods Research: A Research Paradigm Whose Time Has Come. Education Research.33(7): 14-26.

Leech, N.L. Dellinger, A.B. Brannagan, K.B. et al. (2010). Evaluating Mixed Research Studies: A Mixed Methods Approach. Journal of Mixed Methods Research. 4(1) 17-31.

Seidman, E. & Elizabeth, F. S. (2004). Developmental Trajectories and Ecological Transitions: A Two-Step Procedure to Aid in the Choice of Prevention and Promotion Interventions. Developmental Psychopathology. 16(4):1141-59.

Weiss, C. C., Bearman, P. S. Fresh, S. (2007). Reinvestigating the Effects of the Transition to High School on Student Outcomes. American Journal of Education. 113(3):395-421.
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Behaviors a Principal Should Look

Words: 636 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23459608

ather, it is essential to convey the fact that walk-throughs are merely a means for instructors to learn about how to better their performance, and subsequently increase the knowledge and retention levels of their students. The important thing is to not make instructors feel defensive or overly-scrutinized, but to view the entire walk-through process in a positive means in which they can refine and improve their prowess as a pedagogue.

In terms of communicating the findings or the results from the walk-through to a particular teacher, it is important to do so in a manner that is encouraging and in which both professionals, -- the principal and the teacher -- are at ease. One of the ways to do so would be during a 'lunch and learn', informal lunchtime setting. It is probably best if the principal has some sort of written documentation delineating bot the positives and areas of…… [Read More]

References

Ellis, R. (2003). Task-Based Language Learning and Teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Raven, R. (2010). "The sandwich technique." Bright Hub Project Management. Retrieved from  http://www.brighthubpm.com/resource-management/56534-the-sandwich-technique-for-giving-feedback/ 

Woodward, J.R. (2010). "Taking Learning to Task by Jane Vella: A Proactive Report." Jrwoodward.net. Retrieved from  http://jrwoodward.net/2010/03/taking-learning-to-task-by-jane-vella-a-proactive-report/ .
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Student Attrition Is the Reduction in the

Words: 1573 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78929374

Student attrition is the reduction in the student population in a school because of dropouts or transfers. Student attrition has become an important concern for many colleges and universities that has resulted in much research because students who drop out normally suffer from personal disappointments, minimization of career and life goals, and financial setbacks. The research on student attrition or retention has mainly been on the basis of statistical analyses of the variations between dropouts and persisters. One of the main reasons for the analyses is to understand the phenomenon of school drop outs, which was regarded as a major problem in today's society.

Student Attrition ate:

In the last two decades, student attrition rates in both higher and distance learning education have come under increased scrutiny ("Student Attrition in Higher Education," n.d.). Some of the reasons attributed to the recent student attrition rate are political factors and the extensive…… [Read More]

References:

Angelino, L.M., Williams, F.K. & Natvig, D. (2007, July). Strategies to Engage Online Students

and Reduce Attrition Rates. The Journal of Educators Online, 4(2), pp. 1-14. Retrieved from  http://www.thejeo.com/Volume4Number2/Angelino%20Final.pdf 

"Factors Affecting Student Attrition: An Overview of NCEC Study of Short-term Enrollment in Postsecondary Education." (2003). Research Review. Retrieved from University System Georgia website: http://www.usg.edu/research/pubs/rreview/rev-spr03.pdf

Ferreira, M.M. (2003). Gender Issues Related to Graduate Student Attrition in Two Science
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Students' Adjustments and Skills Every Book Has

Words: 1528 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28721454

Students' Adjustments and Skills

Every book has a preface that gives an overview to the reader regarding the content. Since, it prepares the reader's mind according to theme and thus enables him/her quickly understand the concept of the writer. Similarly, preparing yourself before moving towards any new task helps in better outcome even if it is the matter of taking admission in University. An institute has the responsibility to teach students everything related to the subject but before that, students themselves have to develop certain skills required for effective learning. These key skills ensure the bright future employability and higher levels of attainment. Since, students with these skills have enhanced study skills and capable of effectively plan personal development processes. This essay discusses the importance of these key adjustments that students must make before starting University.

The Dearing Report emphasized on four major skills that are important for success in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Learning and Teaching Support Network. The Development of Key Skills in Higher Education . LTSN, n.d.

Stepenson, John, and Tim Challis. The Dearing Report. Higher Education, UK: The Higher Education Academy, 1997.

Wingate, Ursula. "Doing Away With 'Study Skills'." Teaching in Higher Education, 2006: 457-469.
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Students Smoking Behavior

Words: 1077 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67689990

Student Smoking Behavior

Given that the health risks of smoking are very well-known, one would think that smoking would be rare behavior among college students. After all, the average college student is not only young enough to have been exposed to anti-smoking education throughout their lifetimes, but might also values education more than their same-age peers who are not students. However, according to the research, young people, including college students, do smoke. In fact, college students may actually smoke more than their peers outside of college. What this suggests is that there is a social factor linked to smoking behavior. As a result, I would expect to be able to observe more students smoking when in social situations than in non-social situations.

Assumptions

I began with three assumptions about smoking behavior. The first assumption was that approximately one-third of observed college students would smoke. The second assumption was that students…… [Read More]

References

Levinson, A., Campo, S., Gascoigne, J., Jolly, O., Zakharyan, A., & Vu Tran, Z. (2007).

Smoking, but not smokers: Identity among college students who smoke cigarettes. Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 9(8), 845-852.

Schorr, M. (2013, August 13). A third of college students smoke. Retrieved February 5, 2014

from ABC News website:  http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=118065
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Student Smoking Behavior

Words: 900 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25896854

Students Smoking Behavior

The rates of campus students smoking have fluctuated over a period of the last twenty years. Most of the lifelong smokers' start their smoking habit before they reach the age of 24 years. This therefore means those campus years are a very crucial time when it comes to any study of cigarette smoking. Cigar rete smoking in campus has now become a very serious issue in public health issue. This has led to an increase in campus wide bans in smoking alongside other preventive programs in place to reduce students smoking rates. There are several economic, social and environmental factors that have been associated with the increase of smoking around campus students. Some of these factors are low socioeconomic status, students who have parents, close friends and relatives who smoke the acceptance as well as positive views of peers who smoke the exposure and high availability of…… [Read More]

References

Indiana University (2011), September 14). Campus smoking ban reduced students' smoking, changed attitudes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 11,2013 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110914122700.htm

Schorr, M.(2009).A Third of college students smoke. Retrieved September 11,2013 from  http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=118065 &page=1

Coster, D.(2013). Campus smokings ban a drag for some students. Retrieved September 11,2013 from  http://www.stuff.co.nz/taranaki-daily-news/news/9122346/Campus-smoking-ban-a-drag-for-some-students
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Student Searches Free Speech and Expression and Privacy in the Wired Age

Words: 1422 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68396652

Student Searches, Free Speech & Expression, and Privacy in the Wired Age

Student searches and in-school discipline for off-campus conduct

Free Speech and Expression on and off campus

Privacy in the wired age on and off campus. (Facebook, twitter, myspace, blogs, cellphones)

What are a students' constitutional rights when it comes to searches and seizures, on and off campus discipline, free speech, expression, and privacy in the wired age when on and off campus? How are students protected by the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights when it pertains to the three items listed above?

Students are often subject to rules and regulations that are associated with school codes of conduct and those rules and regulations are sometimes not reflective of constitutional rights to free speech and free action inside the laws. These long list of potential violations are printed by institutions and are made available to students, in…… [Read More]

In short students and especially minor students and their parents should make themselves aware of the codes of conduct the student is expected to uphold and live within those guidelines even if they feel the guidelines are overreaching as students have little recourse because even most public institutions such as public schools are still considered voluntary and enrollment in them requires certain standards to be upheld. This is not to say it is likely that all new students will read and memorize a code of conduct but they must beware that violations especially that hurt others will not likely be tolerated. It is not likely that the constitutional protection of students will be expanded, rather to the contrary laws that protect others from immoral, unethical and/or illegal or harmful behaviors in a public forum such as the internet, across email, and cell phones will likely be expanded. It also must be made clear that the intent to harm another does not have to be present for that harm to be done or for the individual(s) responsible to be held accountable for it. In other words consider yourself under public scrutiny when you are enrolled in any institution and act accordingly, upholding the law and the moral and ethical standards associated with your role as a student.

Wheeler, T. (2011). Facebook Fatalities: Students, Social Networking, and the First Amendment. Pace Law Review, 31(1), 182-227. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

Williamson, L. (2009). Private Rants Become Public When Aired Online. InsideCounsel, 20(211), 67-68. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.
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Student Participation in the College

Words: 332 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47850128



The study shows the reasons behind college student's lack of class room participation based on the relationships they have with their fellow classmates as well as their teachers. esearchers based their findings on surveys given to both male and female students which showed different reasons for their quietness in class. It is interesting that male and female students each have their own justifications for not speaking in class; the majority of males said it was due to their admission of not doing the assigned work, while most females justified that they did not know the subject material well enough to speak publicly in class. This shows the very different justifications for the same type of behavior seen in students all over the country. Each student, based on his or her own unique background will have different ways of behaving and different justifications for that behavior as well.

eferences

Karp, David…… [Read More]

References

Karp, David a; Yoes, William C. "Student Participation in the College Classroom."
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Student Profile John Is a

Words: 1152 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5317822

Such assistance allows him to focus more clearly on his school work and lessens his tendency to be distracted by others and by the classroom activity. The presence of the paraprofessional also seems to enable him to be more confident in his interactions with the other students in the classroom. Since the beginning of the school year, John has been participating in a contract (behavioral plan) that was drafted in an attempt to provide him with some structure. For the moment, John continues to have occasional problems but, overall, he has done well within the confines of the contract and a continuation of the contract terms would seem to be in his best interests. At the present time, there is no compelling need to adjust the contract.

Socialization

As has been already mentioned, John functions best under the guidance of his paraprofessional. The presence of the paraprofessional appears to provide…… [Read More]

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Students With Disabilities in General

Words: 1985 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39606996



There is little doubt that students with special needs require more support services, and the article referenced above adds clarity to that assertion. hat also is true is that often students with disabilities are harassed, made fun of and even bullied because they are "different." An article in The Journal of Counseling & Development refers to emotional abuse that students (not necessarily students with disabilities but rather students that are "different" per se) are subjected to from teachers. This topic is not one that gets a lot of attention, the authors day, but in certain classrooms "…it can be a daily occurrence" (McEachern, et al., 2008, p. 3). Take Jason, he has had a fear of this one particular teacher and while he was "at the peak of his humiliation" because his second period teacher teased him in front of the class about the way he dressed, he finally got…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Elbaum, Batya, and Vaughn, Sharon. (2001). School-Based Interventions to Enhance the Self-

Concept of Students with Learning Disabilities: A Meta-Analysis. The Elementary School

Journal, 101(3), 303-329.

Letrello, Theresa M., and Miles, Dorothy D. (2003). The Transition from Middle School to High School: Students with and without Learning Disabilities Share Their Perceptions.
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Student Affairs Over the Last

Words: 1363 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57353470

This is when the university arranges for: providing educational, healthcare, and counseling services to all the students. The aim is to support wellness practices for the long-term health of everyone.

The establishment of conversations with teaching faculty that has resulted in model community "service learning" projects consistent with the mission of the college or university.

The drug and alcohol program supports coordination among: the students, university administration, and faculty members in different areas. As students are assisted by the faculty members to deal with different learning issues they could face. Where, they are encouraged to discuss their problems with the teaching staff or counselors, in order to receive help on: strategies and skills required to achieve success in the real world. This is significant, because we are creating different student learning projects that are a collaborative effort between: staff members and the students. This is in line with the mission…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Effective Strategies to Reduce High Risk Drinking. (2006). Forum On Public Policy. Retrieved from: www.forumonpublicpolicy.com/archivesum07/brinkley.pdf

Learning Reconsidered: A Campus-Wide Focus on The Student Experience. (2004). Delsuggs. Retrieved from:  http://www.delsuggs.com/articles/Learning%20Reconsidered.pdf 

Student Affairs 8. (2011). Essaytree. Retrieved from: http://*****/education-theories/student-affairs-8/

DeJong, W.. (2005). A Typology for Campus-Based Alcohol Prevention: Moving toward Environmental Management Strategies. College Drinking Prevention. Retrieved from:  http://www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov/supportingresearch/journal/dejong.aspx
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Student Survival Guide as an

Words: 2007 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68043649

There are three types of goals to focus one: short-term, medium-term, and long-term goals.

In a study environment, short-term goals would refer to attending classes, handing in assignments and studying for tests and other assessments. The study schedule plays the most important role in this type of goal. Furthermore helping to achieve this goal is the sections relating to academic honesty, as well as research and studying skills. Each goal can then be integrated with the time schedule in order to keep it in mind while adhering to the study schedule.

The medium-term goal would be to achieve success in the overall Axia study program.

Medium-term goals are generally fulfilled by a number of short-term goals that are completed successfully.

Long-term goals are the driving force for current action. In the long-term, for example, the Axia student may wish to stand within a specific profession. Success in the short- and…… [Read More]

Chilimo, W.L., Emmanuel, G. And Lwoga, T.E. (2006) Developing online research strategies. Sokoine University of Agriculture. http://www.itoca.org/TEEAL-AGORATanzania.pdf.

Kizlik, Bob (2006, July 20). How to Study and Make th eMost of Your Time.  http://www.adprima.com/studyout.htm 

Sherry, L. (1996). Issues in Distance Learning. International Journal of Educational Telecommunications, 1 (4), 337-365. http://carbon.cudenver.edu/~lsherry/pubs/issues.html
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Students' Right to Free Speech the Right

Words: 1540 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6534914

Students' ight to Free Speech

The right of student to free speech is a matter that has been debated over years. Where many people claim that students, just like any other group of people, have the right of free speech, others claim that students should know where their limits end. Therefore, at many schools, colleges and universities, the students are provided with a code of conduct that they have to follow. This code of conduct defines rules of speech for the students; to tell them where they have to start speaking and where they should end. These codes have also been controversial in some places.

The right of free speech can be highlighted from the fact that the distinguishing feature between human beings and other creatures is speech. By the freedom of speech, one does not only mean to speak what one feels like speaking, but it means to express…… [Read More]

References

Ash, Timonthy Garton (2012). "The basic Principle." Free Speech Debate.

Biskupic, Joan (2007). "High court case tests limits of student speech rights." USA Today. Gannett Company.

Mears, Bill (2007). "High court hears 'Bong hits 4 Jesus' case." CNN.

Morrison, Eric (2008). "School Board, Frederick reach settlement in 'Bong Hits' case'." Juneau Empire. Morris Communications.
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Student of Prague Film Analysis

Words: 2113 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10568186

Student of Prague and German Cinema

The Germany film industry revolution

The Film industry in Germany has come a long way and is seen as one of the ancient film industries that gave a portrayal of both the artistic as well as the aesthetic and the economic value of films in Germany in the early 1900s. The paper will hence not only look into the history of the Germany film industry, but also select a relevant film to demonstrate the significance of the film selected to the subject matter it covered, the people and the relevance to the time that it was produced and it depicted. The film that will be used in this demonstration is "The Student of Prague" which would be analyzed to see the kind of contribution that it brought to the film industry in Germany at that given moment in time.

The films of the early…… [Read More]

References

Brockmann Stephen. (2010). A Critical History of German Film. Retrieved October 28, 2014 from http://books.google.co.ke/books?id=hz1I0Ty9AUYC&pg=PA2&lpg=PA2&dq=A+Critical+History+of+German+Film&source=bl&ots=q9OmTTPbcr&sig=v86AFKoxkpwSMfQrASMO2LX6LjQ&hl=en&sa=X&ei=MzdOVJHRKJevaYj2gqgE&ved=0CEUQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=A%20Critical%20History%20of%20German%20Film&f=false

Kracauer Siegfried (1947). From Caligari to Hitler: A Psychological History of the Germany Film. Princeton and Oxford, Princeton University Press. Retrieved October 28, 2014 from  http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/docs/icb.topic591072.files/Kracauer%20I.pdf 

Paul Wegener, (1913). Der Student von Prag. Retrieved October 28, 2014 from  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OuvIvwSi1gI 

Pulver A., (2011). New Europe: A history of German cinema in clips. The Guardian. Retrieved October 28, 2014 from  http://www.theguardian.com/film/2011/mar/15/german-cinema-history-new-europe
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Student Retention in High School

Words: 936 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86818175

They establish identities or are confused about what roles to play. Additionally, Cherry (2011) states that child must have a conscious sense of self that is developed through social interaction. A child's ego identity is constantly evolving as he or she acquires new experiences and information. Processing these new experiences and information embodies and shapes one's sense of self.

According to Piaget's Stages of Cognitive Development (Berger, 2010), thoughts and expectations profoundly affect attitudes, beliefs, values, assumptions, and actions. In turn, these factors have a direct correlation to the sense of self that motivates competence, positive behaviors, and actions. If a void occurs in developing a sense of self relative to others, he or she will have psychological barriers that are translated into a defense mechanism to conceal one's lack of motivation, fear of failure, and social dysfunction (Berger, 2010). Lowering the affective filters are critical to foster social development…… [Read More]

References

Berger, S. (2010). The developing person: Through childhood and adolescence. New York: Worth Publishers

Cherry, K. (2011). Erikson's theory of psychosocial development. Retrieved from http://psychology.about.com/od/psychosocialtheories/a/psychosocial.htm
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Student Philosophy of Behavior it Is Necessary

Words: 1043 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76347221

Student Philosophy of Behavior

It is necessary for instructors to meet the individual needs of their students, particularly when these students have special needs such as learning differences or other potential disabilities. The pedagogue must discuss any concerns regarding a student's behavior with his or her family, and then attempt to provide an environment in which these concerns are anticipated daily and steps are taken to ensure that disadvantageous behavior is minimized. It is necessary to do so in order to not interrupt the learning process of others.

Jackson - Student Description

Jackson is a four-year-old boy who is highly autonomous, opinionated, and somewhat circumscribed in his social interactions with others. He is fairly astute and generally cognizant of what is expected of him and is able to understand and communicate with others excellently -- when he so desires. However, he can be extremely loud, rude and even violent when…… [Read More]

References

Borremans, E., Rintala, P., Kielinen, M. (2009). Effectiveness of an exercise training program on youth with Asperger Syndrome. European Journal of Adapted Physical Activity. 2(2), 14-25.

Santhana, S.P. (2014). Social communication intervention for an adult with Asperger Syndrome: experiences, perspectives and challenges. Perspectives on Language Learning & Education. 21(1), 29-37.

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Student Discipline and Bullying

Words: 2164 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99830650

Student Bullying/Discipline
1. Abstract
According to the Illinois Legal Aid Online (2018) Bullying can be understood as the aggressive and unwanted traits espoused by school going children. The traits entail some perceived or real power imbalance. Some of the students will use this power (such as their physical strength, popularity, access to privileged information) to harm, blackmail or harm other students. This behavior has to be repeated or have the potential of being repeated for it to qualify as bullying (Illinois Legal Aid Online, 2018). This paper explores a bullying scenario and maps out a strategy to alleviate bullying among students. In doing so the paper quotes three cases (i.e. Goss v. Lopez, Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District, and New Jersey v. T.L.O). The rulings in these cases will be used to delineate the process of investigation, disciplining of bullies and bullying prevention measures. The paper also…… [Read More]

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Students at the End of

Words: 944 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14093439

They must also solve polynomial, exponential and logarithmic equations both analytically and graphically.

tandard 4: tudents must be able to understand and use matrices to perform basic operations. This includes addition, subtraction, multiplication and inversion of matrices. They must also be able to identify the appropriate methods and technology to accomplish this. In addition, students must demonstrate the ability to find the inverses of two-by-two matrices without only with the use of pencil and paper, without additional technology.

tandards for Grade Level 11

tandard 1: At the end of this grade level, students must be able to explore rational functions in terms of investigating and explaining the characteristics of rational functions. Elements such as domain, range, zeros, points of discontinuation, and intervals of increase and decrease must be included in this ability. They must also find the inverses of rational functions with discussions of domain and range, symmetry, and function…… [Read More]

Sources

Cox, K. (2006). Georgia Performance Standards: Mathematics 2. Georgia Dept of Education. Retrieved from https://www.georgiastandards.org/standards/Georgia%20Performance%20Standards/Math-II-Stds-rev-0409.pdf

Cox, K. (2006). Georgia Performance Standards: Mathematics 3. Georgia Dept of Education. Retrieved from https://www.georgiastandards.org/standards/Georgia%20Performance%20Standards/Math-III-Stds-rev-0409.pdf

Cox, K. (2006). Georgia Performance Standards: Mathematics 4. Georgia Dept of Education. Retrieved from https://www.georgiastandards.org/standards/Georgia%20Performance%20Standards/Math-IV-Stds.pdf

Dillon, S. (2010, Mar 10). Panel Proposes Single Standard for All Schools. The New York Times. Retrieved from  http://www.nytimes.com /2010/03/11/education/11educ.html
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Behavior-Based Safety Bbs Is a

Words: 2139 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89601095



7. Fenn, P., & Ashby, S., 2004. Workplace risk, establishment size, and union density. British Journal of Industrial Relations, 42, 461 -- 480.

8. Griffin, M.A., & Neal, A., 2000. Perceptions of safety at work: A framework for linking safety climate to safety performance, knowledge, and motivation. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 5, 347 -- 358.

9. Neal, A., Griffin, M.A., & Hart, P.M., 2000. The impact of organizational climate on safety climate and individual behavior. Safety Science, 34, 99 -- 109.

10. Hechanova-Alampay, R.H., & Beehr, T.A., 2001. Empowerment, span of control and safety performance in work teams after workforce reduction. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 6, 275 -- 282.

11. Kaminski, M., 2001. Unintended consequences: Organizational practices and their impact on workplace safety and productivity. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 6, 127 -- 138.

Turner, N., & Parker, S.K., 2004. The effect of teamwork on safety processes and…… [Read More]

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Students' Access to Birth Control

Words: 3923 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24777458



In conclusion, atkins draws an important link between teen childbearing and poverty, which takes this discussion past morals and values and moves it into socioeconomic territory. Half of all mothers currently on welfare assistance "were teenagers when they had their first child," atkins writes. Also, a) less than a third of teen mothers "ever finish high school"; b) the children born to teenage mothers "are twice as likely to raise their children in poverty"; c) the children of teen mothers "...are more likely to do poorly in school, more likely to drop out of school, and less likely to attend college"; and d) girls whose mothers were teenagers at the time of their birth are "...22% more likely to become mothers as teens themselves," thus completing the cycle and perpetuating the problem into future generations.

An article by Jennifer a. Hurley ("Promoting the Use of Birth Control Reduces Teen Pregnancy")…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bakalar, Nicholas. "Adolescence: Abstinence-Only Programs Not found to Prevent HIV." The New York Times 14 August 2007: Retrieved Dec. 3, 2007, at  http://www.nytimes.com .

Garrett, Robert T. "Texas teens lead nation in birth rate." The Dallas Morning News 5 November 2007: Retrieved Dec. 2, 2007, at  http://www.dallasnews.com .

Green, Tanya L. "Parents Have the Right to Know when their Children Receive Family

Planning Services at School." Opposing Viewpoints: Students' rights. Greenhaven Press,
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Student Affairs as Both a Field of Study and a Profession

Words: 3850 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98237300

Student Affairs as Both A Field of Study and a Profession

What is Student Affairs?

Tyrell (2014) believes student affairs professionals have a continually expanding and evolving role in community colleges, with recognition of increasingly complex student experiences and with broadening of community colleges' role in the way students are engaged outside of and within formal, institutional settings.

The student affairs domain is an extensive and complex part of college campus operations, covering several departments and involving professionals hailing from a broad range of academic backgrounds. Student learning does not occur only in classrooms; rather, it is interwoven all through students' experiences in college, right from their freshmen days to the time they leave its doors after earning their college diploma. College students are molded by these experiences, conflict management lessons learnt from sharing dorms with fellow students, critical thinking skills perfected through challenging coursework, leadership skills attained through leadership…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Hoffman, J. L., & Bresciani, M. (2012). Identifying What Student Affairs Professionals Value: A Mixed Methods Analysis of Professional Competencies Listed in Job Descriptions. Research & Practice In Assessment, Vol 7, 26-40. Retrieved from http://www.rpajournal.com/

Long, D. (2012). The Foundations of Student Affairs: A Guide to the Profession. In L. J. Wong, Environments for student growth and development: Librarians and student affairs in collaboration (pp. 1-39). Chicago: Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://ir.library.illinoisstate.edu

Long, D. (2012). Theories and Models of Student Development. In L. J. Wong, Environments for student growth and development: Librarians and student affairs in collaboration (pp. 41-55). Chicago: Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://ir.library.illinoisstate.edu

Reason, R. D. & Kimball, E. W. (2012). A New Theory-to-Practice Model for Student Affairs: Integrating Scholarship, Context, and Reflection. Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice, Vol 49, No. 4, 359-376. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com
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Students' Email Usage and Student

Words: 10852 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84013386

This research will fill in a gap that was discovered in the literature review. There have been many, even in an academic setting, that have made comments regarding the effects of email on the student environment. However, there have been no significant studies to substantiate these claims. This study will fill in the existing gap in research and will examine the actual importance of email to the academic setting.

Chapter 2: Literature eview

The importance of technology in the academic setting was an accepted fact from the inception of the internet. However, there have been few academic studies that have attempted to quantify its impact on student lives and success. In order to understand the importance of email and its impact on students lives, one must examine several areas of academic research on the topic. It has been implied that self-esteem and a feeling of satisfaction play an important role…… [Read More]

References

Beffa-Negrini, P., Miller, B., and Cohen, N. (2002). Factors related to success and satisfaction in online learning. Academic Exchange Quarterly. September 2002.

Borowitz S., & Wyatt J. (1998) the origin, content, and workload of e-mail consultations. JAMA 280: 1321-4.

CNN.com. (2003). Firm can e-mail at work. September 19, 2003. CNN.Com Retrieved October 29, 2007 at  http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/internet/09/19/e-mail.ban/index.html 

Ferguson T. (1996). A guided tour of self-help cyberspace. [monograph on the Internet]. Rockville (MD): Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of Public Health and Science, Office of the Secretary, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 1996 Retrieved November 3, 2007 at http://odphp.osophs.dhhs.gov/confrnce/partnr96/summary.htm
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Student Centered Teaching Progressivism Social

Words: 6624 Length: 21 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55418377



Now we have examined two extremes in educational thought that have developed over the past century. Teacher centered and student centered philosophies differ significantly in their approach to the student-teacher relationship. Teacher centered philosophy does not depend on the student's wants and needs at all. Teacher centered philosophy uses antiquated methods, such as rote learning. However, these methods are quickly being replaced by a more student-centered approach. Student centered approaches to learning are an important part of the new technologically advanced society. The following will explore the role of student-centered philosophies in the emerging technological tends

Teaching Philosophies and the Changing Society

The emphasis of essentialism and perennialism is on standardization and the learning of material. This style of learning is authoritarian and disciplinarian. The study is acted upon and has no choice or preference in the material or the method by which they choose to learn it. They are…… [Read More]

References

Aretakis-Fredo, a. (2003).

Literacy Review. Retrieved June 14, 2007 from  http://ashleyfredo.tripod.com/Social%20Reconstructivism.htm .

Bagamery, B., Laslik, J.J., & Nixon, D.R. (2005). Determinants of success on the ETS business major field exam for students in an undergraduate multi-site regional university business program. Journal of Education for Business 81 (1), 55-59.

Bondy, a (1999) Visually us: Validating the curriculum for MA-ori students. Unpublished MEd thesis. VUW.
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Technology on Disruptive Behavior What

Words: 5645 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88322181

The teachers acknowledge that the other disruptive behaviors propagates the destruction of the school property therefore computer-based management results in the upstaging of the security of the school properties. This eminent vandalism is prominent in the cases where the students would like to have money selling the school properties.

The teachers separately attribute the poor morals of the students to inexperience and the ignorance of the students. Involving of computer-based programs in the student behavior management clears the doubt in the effectiveness of the management of the issues entailed. The perspective to the approach assists in the enhancement of the Developmental period of the basis of the Phase learner. They view the approach to increase the contact between the teacher and the student in the countering of the trends emergent in the process. They attribute the computer approach to the advancement in the mastery of the life skills for the…… [Read More]

References

Dziegielewski, S.F. (2010). DSM-IV-TR in action. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

O'Donnell, a.M., Reeve, J., & Smith, J.K. (2011). Educational psychology: Reflection for action. Hoboken, N.J: Wiley.

Spiegler, M.D., & Guevremont, D.C. (2010). Contemporary behavior therapy. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.

Leaman, L. (2009). Managing very challenging behaviour. New York: Continuum
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Positive Behavior Support What Are

Words: 1353 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30211056

Hence, variables that occur outside of the classroom have an impact on the teacher's ability to institute positive behavior support (PBS). That makes it all the more vital that strategies are in place in the classroom designed to deal with all setting events, distant and recent, when possible.

Body of Paper -- Distant Setting Events & Antecedents

How do antecedents effect the behavior of students? Antecedents have a tendency to either pull individuals or push individuals into doing something, or feeling a certain way. Author Edward P. Sarafino points out that a stimulus serves as an antecedent; for example, children seeing other children rope jumping before class starts is a stimulus for an antecedent because it sets the table for behavior. The rope jumping is orderly, fun, and children have smiles when they to their rope jumping (Sarafino, 2010, 71).

Children learn through stimulus generalization, by responding to stimuli, and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baron, Grace M. (2006). Stress and Coping in Autism. New York: Oxford University Press.

Demchak, MaryAnn, and Greenfield, Robin G. (2003). Transition Portfolios for Students with Disabilities: How to Help Students, Teachers, and Families Handle New Settings. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Durand, Vincent Mark. (1990). Severe Behavior Problems: A Functional Communication

Training Approach. New York: Guilford Press.
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ED Students and Teacher Behavior

Words: 6032 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57044186

This study used quantitative techniques to measure the dependent variables, but the answers obtained have a high level of subjectivity present in them.

Confounding Variables

Aside from the independent and dependent variables, almost every study has a number of factors present that affect the results obtained in the study and the ability to interpret them. In this study, there are a number of factors that must be addressed in regards to the teacher responses to the survey. Confounding variables can be internal or external factors over which the researcher has no control. It id difficult to find a study that has absolutely no confounding variables that could affect the results.

In this study, the first confounding variable is dependent on the interactions of other confounding variables. The student's type and severity of emotional disturbance are the first factors that affect the results obtained in this study. Neither the teachers, nor…… [Read More]

References

Hyatt, K. & Filler, J. (2007). A Comparison of the Effects of Two Social Skill Training

Approaches on Teacher and Child Behavior. Journal of Research in Childhood

Education. 22 (1): 85.

Lane, K., Wehby, J., Robertson, J. & Rogers, L. (2007). How Do Different Types of High
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Interventions for ED Students Interventions

Words: 2681 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20386765



Realty therapy, which was developed by psychiatrist illiam Glasser during the 1960's, requires those working with a student with emotional disturbance to develop a positive, friendly relationship, especially with those particular students who do not want such a relationship (ong 2004). Realty therapy differs from other psychological models because it urges everyone who works with the student to enter into a counseling relationship with them, not simply the psychologist (ong 2004).

Research on the use of reality therapy for students with emotional disturbance has demonstrated a positive effect on student behavior. According to Glasser, "Counseling is just one human being helping another with a problem. This is not hard to do, if the person with the problem wants to be counseled" (ong 2004). However, students with emotional disturbance may be defensive and resistant to counseling, thus the school psychologist's job is to motivate them to participate in counseling and to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Harris, Karen M. (2002, June 22). A school, family, and community collaborative program for children who have emotional disturbances. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. Retrieved November 11, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Nelson, Ron J. (2003, September 01). Status of and trends in academic intervention research for students with emotional disturbance. Remedial and Special Education. Retrieved November 11, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Sabornie, Edward J. (2004, September 22). Characteristics of emotional disturbance in middle and high school students. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. Retrieved November 11, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Sugai, George. (2000, September 22). A Self-Management Functional Assessment-
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Overrepresentation of Minority Students With

Words: 1676 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80450440

This study has noted that educators are noting better methods to assist these students rather than placing them in special education classes which fail to assist these students in school or across the span of their lifetime endeavors.

RECOMMENDATIONS

Recommendations arising from this review of literature in this study include the recommendation that different methods be utilized in assisting culturally and linguistically diverse students in the school setting. Among these methods are those noted by Knotek (2003) and Craig, Hull, Haggart and Perez-Selle (2000) which involves educators and school counselors assisting in addressing the difficulties faced by these students in the school environment and which may include but are not limited to addressing the needs of students as well as their strengths through strategies of individualized behavior contracts, specialized counseling techniques and culturally appropriate reinforcements that serve to encourage positive behavior on the part of the culturally and linguistically diverse…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Coutinho, M.J. & Oswald, D.P. (1999). Ethnicity and special education research: Identifying questions and methods. Behavioral Disorders, 24, 66-73.

Oswald, D.P., Coutinho, M.J., Best, A.M & Singh, N. (1999). Ethnic representation in special education: The influence of economic demographic variables. Journal of Special Education, 32, 194-196.

Murtagh, Damien (2003) Investigating the Overrepresentation of Ethnic Minorities in Special Education. Graduate Studies. Online available at: www.lynchburg.edu/documents/GraduateStudies/Journal/MurtaghD.doc

U.S. Department of Education. (2000). Twenty-second annual report to Congress on the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Act. Washington, DC: Author.
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School Clinics Affects on Students

Words: 3382 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58532109

Utilization of the data and collection of the data should be one of the main aims of the policy makers. The data can be used by the policymakers in order to develop the policies and implement these in order to make sure that improvement can be ensured (Basch, 2011, p. 9).

3. One of the main roles that can be played by the policy makers includes reviewing the policies that have already been designed for the schools. How these previous policies have played roles in an improvement of academics of the children, their environments and their health are important parts of the review by the policymakers. It is important that funding is collected for the issues that affect health and academics of children.

4. The policymakers should make sure that the importance of school-based health clinics that can play roles in looking after the needs of the students.

Great levels…… [Read More]

References

Basch, C. (2011). Executive Summary: Healthier Students Are Better Learners. Journal of School Health 81, pp. 4-107.

Bruzzese, J., Sheares, B.J., Vincent, E.J., Du, Y., Sadeghi, H., Levison, M.J., Mellins, B.R., and Evans, D. (2011). Effects of a School-based Intervention for Urban Adolescents with Asthma: A Controlled Trial. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. April 15, 2011 183, pp. 998-1006.

Gall, G., Pagano, M.E., Desmond, S., Perrin, J.M., and Murphy, J.M. (2000). Utility of Psychosocial Screening at a School-based Health Center. Journal of School Health 70, pages 292 -- 298.

Geierstanger, P.S., Amaral, G., Mansour, M., and Walters, R.S. (2004). School-Based Health Centers and Academic Performance: Research, Challenges, and Recommendations. Journal of School Health 74, pages 347 -- 352.
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Technology to Improve Behavior and Performance in

Words: 2515 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69308425

Technology to Improve Behavior and Performance in an Elementary Classroom

The role of teachers in a child's education has fundamentally changed. Instruction isn't primarily lecturing to students who sit in rows at desks dutifully listening and recording what they hear but offer each and every child a rich, rewarding and unique learning experience." (Lanier, 1997). Because of revolutions in knowledge and information technology and the demand for learning to be more meaningful and lifelong, schools are changing their structures and teachers are changing with them. Teachers' roles now embrace relating to their students more personally and individually; to integrate social, emotional and intellectual growth. Teachers are now tuning more into how students learn, prompted recently by Howard Gardner's theory of Multiple Intelligences, and so have had to improve on and add to their instruction methods.

In order to make students more interested in learning, teachers are adding project-based and/or participatory…… [Read More]

References.

Davis, B.C, & Shade, D.D.(1994). Integrate, don't isolate! Computers in the early childhood curriculum. ERIC Digest ED376991. Retrieved from the World Wide Web: http://www.ericfacility.net/ericdigests/ed376991.html

Farnsworth, B.J. (2002). Preparing tomorrow's teachers to use technology in learning and attitudinal impacts on elementary students. Journal of Instructional Psychology. Retrieved from the World Wide Web: http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/3_29/91707788/print.jhtml

Haugland, S.W. (2000). Computers and young children. ERIC Digest. ED438926. Retrieved form World Wide Web: http://www.ericfacility.net/ericdigests/ed438926.html

Hutinger, P.L. & Johanson, J. (2000). Implementing and maintaining an effective early childhood comprehensive technology system. Topics in Early Childhood. Retrieved from the World Wide Web: http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/mohdg/3_20/68206887/print.jhtml
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Using Positive Behavior Supports and Instruction

Words: 773 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25772508

Positive in Student Behavior Change

The purpose of this research is to investigate ways to increase positive behavior of students in special education programs who spend time in inclusive general education settings. The research design is action research, which generally means that quantitative data collection will be conducted, although the stakeholders in the action research project may chose to also collect qualitative data. Since the unit of analysis will be individual students in classroom settings, a case study framework for the action research is both logical and practical.

What methods are effective for increasing positive behavior during instructional time?

What methods are effective for increasing positive behavior throughout the school building.

What data collection approach will inform all phases of the positive behavior intervention.

What supports are needed by school administrators to increase the positive behavior of students with learning difficulties?

Target Behaviors

The goal of the action research is…… [Read More]

References

Horner, R. (2013, March 18). Presentation at the Orange County RtI Conference. Rob Horner University of Oregon www.pbis.org Orange County RtI2 Conference. Retrieved from http://www.ocde.us/PBIS/Documents/OC%20RtI%20Keynote%20Rob%20Horner.pdf

Georgia Department of Education. What Is Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports? Georgia's PBIS Framework. Retrieved from http://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/Special-Education-Services/Documents/PBIS/What%20is%20PBIS.pdf

Lodico, M.G., Spaulding, D.T., & Voegtle, K.H. (2010). Methods in educational research: From theory to practice.
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Enhancing Teacher-Student Connectedness an Increasing

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72670701



Persistence: Students that received long-term contact with teachers were more likely to foster feelings of belonging. The persistent contact acted as encouragement which promoted student motivation (Edgar & Johnson, 1995). Teachers that continually worked with students were sending nonverbal messages affirming their belief in the students. Edgar & Johnson (1995) found counselors were more successful when students perceived them as trusting and helpful. Actions that earned counselors the respect of the students were: demonstrating continual interest in the students, doing favors to show care, and by being respectful and courteous in return to the students (Edgar & Johnson, 1995). According to Wheatley (2002), teacher persistence was especially beneficial for students who had low self-expectations and whom others viewed with lower expectations. Teacher persistence has been noted to promote higher expectations among their students (Wheatley, 2002).

Fairness: Edgar & Johnson (1995) cited findings that encouraged schools to review their school rules…… [Read More]

Literature Review- Scholarly examination on the subject of student-teacher relationships shows only marginal and very sporadic accounts within the educational field prior to 1980. Edgar & Johnson (1995) suggested using relationship building strategies that have been approved by three federally financed prevention programs for middle school and high school youth for promoting teacher-student connectedness. Strategies presented were: maintaining persistence, establishing fairness procedures, and increasing student affiliation (Edgar & Johnson, 1995).

Persistence: Students that received long-term contact with teachers were more likely to foster feelings of belonging. The persistent contact acted as encouragement which promoted student motivation (Edgar & Johnson, 1995). Teachers that continually worked with students were sending nonverbal messages affirming their belief in the students. Edgar & Johnson (1995) found counselors were more successful when students perceived them as trusting and helpful. Actions that earned counselors the respect of the students were: demonstrating continual interest in the students, doing favors to show care, and by being respectful and courteous in return to the students (Edgar & Johnson, 1995). According to Wheatley (2002), teacher persistence was especially beneficial for students who had low self-expectations and whom others viewed with lower expectations. Teacher persistence has been noted to promote higher expectations among their students (Wheatley, 2002).

Fairness: Edgar & Johnson (1995) cited findings that encouraged schools to review their school rules to ensure that the discipline procedures supported equal treatment for all students. By treating all students the same, in regards to discipline matters, demonstrated a sense of caring across all individual students' backgrounds (Edgar & Johnson, 1995). Regardless of ethnic or socioeconomic background, all students appreciated the core value that fairness be practiced by all school staff. Students quickly observed and perceived adult responses and made judgments as to whether or not they were
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College Student Development

Words: 1522 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33840744

The college atmosphere plays an integral role in the social development of students. As per the college student development theory (CSDT), college significantly contributes to students' academic, cognitive, social, psychological, as well as spiritual and moral development (Patton et al., 2016). Indeed, CSDT provides student affairs practitioners with a solid foundation for practice. More specifically, given the widespread prevalence of development-related issues in colleges, such as attrition, violence, suicide, and drug abuse, CSDT to a large extent guides and informs the work of community college counsellors. In this essay, I illustrate my personal knowledge, skills, and dispositions regarding my role as an outreach community college counsellor. I also compare and contrast CSDT and practice. I particularly pay attention to key developmental moments in my undergraduate education, the connection between these moments and CSDT, as well as my current comfort level in terms of applying CSDT to students.

Going through college…… [Read More]

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Planning and Reflection During My Student Teaching

Words: 2663 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15884440

Planning and Reflection

During my student teaching experiences I kept a journal, which greatly helped me to organize my thoughts and clarify the areas in which I most needed to improve. My mentor also pointed out for me the key areas that need improvement. Therefore, as I look forward to a professional career as a teacher, I will be able to draw on these early experiences. I will remember what works and what doesn't and I already feel far more confident and proficient than I did before I undertook the student teaching challenge. In general a few major themes emerged through reviewing my journal entries and the statements written by my mentors. My strengths are my willingness to use a wide variety of teaching materials and teaching styles. An enthusiastic implementation of multimedia materials keeps students actively engaged, and keeps lessons more interesting. Moreover, my lessons are well-planned and incorporate…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Armidale. http://www-personal.une.edu.au/~jmalouff/problem.htm

Ballantyne, R & Packer, J 1995, making connections: gold guide no 2, Hersda, Canberra, pp 4-14

Department of Education and Training. Online at < http://www.eddept.wa.edu.au/>.

Lorsbach, Anthony and Tobin, Kenneth. "Teaching"
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Emotionally and Behaviorally Challenged Students Benefit From Time-Outs

Words: 5345 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69571305

EBD Students

Time-Outs in the Classroom

Time-Outs for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

Time-Outs for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

On the second page of a 2010 report published by the National Disabilities ights Network (NDN) called School is Not Supposed to Hurt is a picture of a 7-year-old girl who died while being restrained and secluded in a Wisconsin school. This report went on to describe the wide-spread used of restraints and seclusion by schools in the United States and its publication triggered a congressional investigation. The Government Accountability Office (GAO, 2009) published its own report a few months later, which examined 10 court cases resulting in criminal convictions, civil adjudications, or settlements. These 10 cases formed the basis for judging the veracity of hundreds of allegations of mistreatment, injuries, and death resulting from children being restrained or secluded by school personnel. Even more troubling was the…… [Read More]

References

Benshoof, S.R. (2012). The Use of Time-Out with Escape Extinction to Reduce Noncompliance Maintained by Escape or Attention (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing. (No. 3534847).

Donaldson, J.M., Vollmer, T.R., Yakich, T.M., & Van Camp, C. (2013). Effects of a reduced time-out interval on compliance with the time-out instruction. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 46(2), 369-78.

Everett, G.E., Olmi, D.J., Edwards, R.P., Tingstrom, DH, Sterling-Turner, H.E., & Christ, T.J. (2007). An empirical investigation of time-out with and without escape extinction to treat escape-maintained noncompliance. Behavior Modification, 31(4), 412-34.

Fabiano, G.A., Pelham, W.E. Jr., Manos, M.J., Gnagy, E.M., Chronis, A.M., Onyango, A.N. et al. (2004). An evaluation of three time-out procedures for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Behavior Therapy, 35, 449-69.
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Inclusion Behavioral Approaches for Inclusion Students With

Words: 1230 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15226041

Inclusion

EHAVIORAL APPROACHES FOR INCLUSION

Students with emotional or behavioral problems face serious hurdles both in school and when their education has ended. Few receive services outside the school, making school the only place they receive any help (Mannella et. al., 2002). In recent years, professionals have devised better ways for dealing with these students (Childs et. al., 2001). The approaches include inclusion in regular settings instead of isolating the students in special settings whenever possible, using tools such as functional behavioral analyses (FA), and using the results of behavioral analyses to plan positive educational and behavioral interventions.

One problem with using inclusion with any kind of student, but especially students with emotional or behavioral disorders, is that schools often think they're using inclusion when they are not. Some schools have claimed to be using inclusion when all special-needs students remained in special classes (Mamlin, 1999). In one case, students…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, Cynthia M., Proctor, Briley; and Shriver, Mark D. 2001. "Evaluating the Validity of Functional Behavior Assessment." School Psychology Review Vol. 30.

Bustamante, Selina; Harrower, Joshua K.; Kincaid, Donald; Knoster, Tim; and Shannon, Patrick. 2002. "Measuring the Impact of Positive Behavior Support." Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, Vol. 4.

Childs, Karen; Clarke, Shelly; Delaney, Beth; Dunlap, Glen; and Kern, Lee. 2001. "Improving the Classroom Behavior of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders Using Individualized Curricular Modifications."

Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders Vol. 9.
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Action Effective for Resolving Inappropriate School Behavior

Words: 605 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61844273

Action Effective for Resolving Inappropriate School ehavior Towards Staff and Peers

At focus in this study is a child named Ed who has exhibited inappropriate behavior at school including fighting, profanity and disrespect towards staff at the school and towards his peers. There have been several meetings with teachers to attempt to resolve the situation but the behavior of Ed only continues to escalate. This study will identify the appropriate measures for dealing with this situation and will incorporate different systems available to the parents and child.

Positive ehavioral Interventions

The work entitled 'Positive ehavioral Interventions & IDEA 2004: New Opportunities for Teaching & Learning' reports that the idea of the use of positive approaches in assisting students to learn new behavioral skills "is not new. What is new is the requirements under the individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) that for the student with disabilities who exhibits inappropriate or…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Positive Behavioral Interventions & IDEA 2004. New Opportunities for Teaching & Learning. (2004) Partners Resource Network. Retrieved from: http://www.partnerstx.org/PDF/Positive_Behavioral_Interventions.pdf

What Are the Benefits of Behavior Therapy (2012) My Child Without Limits Advisory Committee. Retrieved from: http://www.mychildwithoutlimits.org/?page=benefits-of-behavior-therapy
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Planned Method of Student Assessment

Words: 590 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67246225

Here, it would be possible to establish a range of categories and subcategories relating to student socialization, academic performance, emotional development, improvement and a host of other crucial learning and developmental areas. The great value in the observational checklist is that it essentially creates a context in which all students are assessed according to the same standards of consideration. This improves the objective veracity of the yielded findings.

Finally, portfolio logs will become possible over the course of a later school year, with the larger sample of completed work allowing for the observation of certain longterm patterns or periods of transition. By taking the time to assess the formulation of these patterns over the course of the school year, the teacher can begin to create a valuable data set through which to observe any number of importance issues relating to strengths, weaknesses, needs and areas of excellence for each student.…… [Read More]

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Racism and Discrimination Impact on Civil Rights and Student Rights

Words: 1436 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44747855

How Racism and Discrimination Affects ‘Civil Rights’ and Student Rights
Racism is the belief that one race is superior to another. It can result in prejudice and discrimination towards people based on their ethnicity and color. Discrimination is the treatment of people in an unfair manner based on their characteristics such as sexual orientation, age, race and gender. Racism is a type of prejudice that most countries fight, do not tolerate and hotly discuss. Countries such as Brazil had once categorized themselves as racial democracies. They allowed people who were racially indifferent to live side-by-side. Such countries are now experiencing the harsh reality of historic and entrenched racism. Some people argue that class and not race is the main cause of social distinction. This is because racism has become illegal officially from forms of overt racism such as abuse on social media and killing of unarmed blacks by police, especially…… [Read More]

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Effects of Different Interactions on Students Sense of Community in E Learning Environment

Words: 666 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63180069

Questions and Answers: Effects of Different Interactions on Students' Sense of Community in E-Learning Environment
1. Correctly reference the article using current APA format.
Luo, N., Zhang, M. & Qi, D. (2017). Effects of Different Interactions on Students' Sense of Community in E-Learning Environment. Computers & Education, 115, 153-160
2. What is the purpose of the study?
In the present study, the authors sought to “understand how interactions influence students' sense of community and continuous use intention of e-learning platform.” A study of this nature is of great relevance, particularly given the fact that most educational institution continue to adopt e-learning in an attempt to broaden and extend their reach while at the same time further enhancing convenience in learning.
3. List the hypotheses; then, underline and label the corresponding independent/dependent variables or predictor/criterion variables. Are there any covariates? If so, name them.
In reference to effects of student-instructor interaction…… [Read More]

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Privacy for High School Students

Words: 12892 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13864282

Internet: Privacy for High School Students

An Analysis of Privacy Issues and High School Students in the United States Today

In the Age of Information, the issue of invasion of privacy continues to dominate the headlines. More and more people, it seems, are becoming victims of identity theft, one of the major forms of privacy invasion, and personal information on just about everyone in the world is available at the click of a mouse. In this environment, can anyone, especially high school students, reasonably expect to have any degree of privacy? High school students, after all, are not protected by many of the same constitutional guarantees as adults, but their needs for privacy may be as great, or greater, than their adult counterparts. To determine what measure of privacy, if any, high schools students can expect at home and school today, this paper provides an overview of the issue of…… [Read More]

References

Alarming Number of Teens Addicted to the Internet. (2001, February 1). Korea Times, 3.

Albanes, R., Armitay, O., Fischer, B., & Warner, J. (1998). Marijuana, Juveniles, and the Police: What High-School Students Believe about Detection and Enforcement.

Canadian Journal of Criminology, 40(4), 401-20.

Black's law dictionary. (1990). St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Co.
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Sped Art Review the Self-Advocacy Behavior

Words: 645 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42652333

"

ABM uses a five-step process, designed and managed by the student with guidance from the teacher-facilitator. In step one, the student self-monitors behavior to identify problem areas. ABM uses a daily form, making it easy for students to track behavior and providing a visual record of happened through the course of each day. The student and teacher conference in step two and together complete the third step, which includes student reflection and development of goals and strategies. The fourth step is the follow-up conference, which takes place for each goal and strategy identified. In the fifth and final step, adjustments are made if the strategy does not work to meet the goal.

ebag shares anecdotal evidence of the ABM model's success with a student identified as Jane. Jane, a student with a learning disability, ultimately showed improved behavior as well as academic gains. ebag notes that changes in Jane…… [Read More]

Six weeks, with respect to a student's school year, is a short period of time. Jane's success is remarkable. It would be irresponsible to generalize Sebag's experience with Jane to all students with disabilities and yet this success story illustrates what is possible with a new approach. Educators who are frustrated with challenging student behavior are encouraged to try SABM. Giving students a voice can be a big part of effecting positive change.

Reference

Sebag, R. (2010). Behavior management through self-advocacy: A strategy for secondary students with learning disabilities. Teaching Exceptional Children 42 (6), 22-29.
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Building Caring Relationships With Students

Words: 1667 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29272262

Building Caring elationships With Students

This paper is on building caring relationships between teachers and students.

esearch and experience indicates that schools with small classrooms as in having a restricted number of students are a great source of encouraging teacher cooperation and shared planning, with greater emphasis on the development of relationships between students and teachers with time. Such a relationship leads to the following achievements:

Higher graduation rates

Much greater student participation in school activities

Many fewer discipline problems and violent incidents

Academic achievement at a level at least as high and often higher than larger schools similarly situated

Greater student, teacher and parent satisfaction with the school experience and greater retention of good teachers.

Source: Building Successful Schools

Small schools actually means having strength of around 350 or less in elementary schools, and 600 or less in high schools. They can also function as stand-alone schools, or in…… [Read More]

References

Building Successful Schools, available at: http://www.nancypappas.com/Articles/School%20Construction/School%20Bond%20Construction/building_successful_schools1.htm, accessed on: May 4, 2004

Caring for the Individual, available at: http://test.woodgreen.oxon.sch.uk/prospectus/caring_for_the_individual.htm, accessed on: May 4, 2004

Chapter 2: Building a Schoolwide Foundation, available at http://www.esc2.net/Title_I/ias_2001/offices/disidea/topdocs/cecp/action/Chapter_2.htm, accessed on: May 4, 2004

Educational Psychology Lecture Notes, available at http://cehd.ewu.edu/cedpsite/Faculty/Gerber/Courses/Unit3.html, accessed on: May 4, 2004
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Facilitating Learning for All Students

Words: 677 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44720033

Houston ISD

What strengths do you possess that support high academic expectations for all Houston ISD students?

One of my key strengths that support high academic expectations for all Houston Independent School District (ISD) students is an overarching commitment to balancing constructive criticism with encouragement for work well done, a strength that is congruent with the Houston ISD Effective Instructional Practice (EIP) guidelines. For instance, the ISD EIP clearly states, "Expect students to be what you want them to be. Observe your students doing well, and let them know how much you appreciate their efforts" (2015-2016, p. 2). In addition, setting and achieving high academic expectations also requires close collaboration with parents (Sanders & Field, 2009), a requirement that also represents another strength of mine. Finally, another important strength that helps me support high academic expectations for all Houston ISD students is my unwavering belief that all young learners can…… [Read More]

References

Ababneh, S. (2012, October 1). Towards a better English classroom: Implementing effective classroom management strategies. International Journal of Education, 4(4), 300-304.

About Alief ISD. (2016). Alief ISD. Retrieved from http://www.aliefisd.net/site_res_view_ template.aspx?id=a9589cd6-6f34-46a9-a7aa-018b79580a98.

Asiyai, R. (2014, December). Students' perception of the condition of their classroom physical learning environment and its impact on their learning and motivation. College Student Journal, 48(4), 716-720.

Houston ISD effective instructional practice. (2015-2016). Houston ISD. Retrieved from http://www.houstonisd.org/cms/lib2/TX01001591/Centricity/Domain/29920/Effective%20Instructional%20strategies%2015-16.pdf.
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Students Are Required to Position Their Own

Words: 945 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4829209

Students are required to position their own personal set of values, opinions and convictions in view of the theories and topics justifying them rationally and using a philosophical approach and language taken

Developing Emotional Intelligence (EQ) to build a more effective sales team

Being a salesperson is a demanding job. It demands verbal acuity, a quick grasp of facts and figures, but above all emotional intelligence. The architect of the theory of Emotional Intelligence (EQ), Daniel Goleman, defined the five basic components of the attribute of EI as follows: emotional self-knowledge, emotional self-governance, the ability to independently motivate one's self, the ability to regulate one's own emotions, "recognizing and understanding other people's emotions," and the ability to manage the emotions of others in an effective manner to reach personal goals (Chapman 2009). Enhancing the emotional intelligence skills and competencies of a group of ten sales associates working in a wireless…… [Read More]

References

Chapman, Alan. (2009). Emotional Intelligence. Business Balls. Retrieved October 26, 2010 at  http://www.businessballs.com/eq.htm 

Goleman, Daniel. (2000). Working with Emotional Intelligence. New York: Bantam.
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Student Education What Were the

Words: 1479 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3965558



10. What was the decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in Honig v. Doe?

In this case, the Supreme Court was of the opinion that free and appropriate public education also applied to children having behavioral difficulties. Further, the Supreme Court also concluded that when a student's misbehavior has a definite connection to his or her disability, such a student should not be excluded from school.

11. Explain when a school must hold a "manifestation determination hearing"

A manifestation determination hearing is held when as a result of a disabled student's inappropriate or wrongful behavior, the school deems it fit to have the student removed. Amongst other things, the said hearing is held to determine whether there is a connection between the student's disability and his or her faulty behavior.

12. Explain when a school must develop a "behavior intervention plan" (BIP) for a student

A school must develop the…… [Read More]

References

Merrell, K.W., Ervin, R.A., & Peacock, G.G. (2011). School Psychology for the 21st Century: Foundations and Practices (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Guilford Press.

New York State Education Department. (2011, May). Behavioral Intervention Plans. Retrieved from  http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/publications/topicalbriefs/BIP.htm 

Odom, S.L., Horner, R.H. & Snell, M.E. (Eds.). (2009). Handbook of Developmental Disabilities. New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Oyez. (2013). Schaffer v. Weast. Retrieved from http://www.oyez.org/cases/2000-2009/2005/2005_04_698
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Behavior Therapy

Words: 1338 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48431061

Evolution and Development of Behavioral Therapy

The 20th century approach to psychology is notable because, while there was an emphasis on the medical approach to treating psychological disorders, there was also a focus on nonphysiological therapies that began to gain some credence in the medical profession. While nonmedical interventions were generally dismissed, "at least some nonmedical practices were no longer widely regarded by either professionals or the general public as quackery. An important contributor to the increased acceptance and status of nonmedical therapies was their enhanced relationship with science" (O'Donohue & Krasner, Year). These nonmedical therapies gained greater and greater usage in the mental health arena, and eventually came to be regarded not only as complementary treatments to standard medical interventions, but as "necessary components in the treatment of problems such as depression, attention deficit disorder, schizophrenia, and many of the anxiety disorders"(O'Donohue & Krasner, Year). One of the areas…… [Read More]

References

Fishman, D. & Franks, C. (Year). The conceptual evolution of behavior therapy. In Book Title.

City: Publisher.

Glass, C. & Arnkoff, D. (Year). Behavior therapy. In Book Title. City: Publisher.

O'Donohue, W., & Krasner, L. (Year). Introduction. In Theories of behavior therapy:
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Student With Intellectual Disability

Words: 967 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55372902

IEP

Student With Intellectual Disability

Goals and IEPs: Aiden

One of the critical components of any IEP is 'goal setting.' Goals are determined for each individual student and a specific instructional plan is designed to meet those goals. Goals are usually set annually but each annual goal has a series of short-term goals designed to facilitate reaching that objective. In the case of 'Aiden,' for example, a student identified as having ADHD, the first major goal was for the student to pass all of his classes. Despite testing with a near-normal IQ, Aiden struggled with paying attention in class and often acted as a distraction to other students. His grades did not reflect his abilities because of his difficulty in focusing. Short-term goals designed to achieve this long-term objective including turning homework assignments in on time, getting a C. Or above on all in-class tests and quizzes, and making a…… [Read More]

References

Helping the student with ADHD in the classroom: Strategies for teachers. (1998). LD Online.

Retrieved:  http://www.ldonline.org/article/5911/ 

Sample IEP goals. (n.d.). netreach. Retrieved:

 http://www.netreach.net/~bhohlfeld/thohlfeld/study_skills/iepgoal.html
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Behavior Bullying the Merriam-Webster Online

Words: 1924 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34633373



Parents can team up with teachers and schools by asking for school conferences where they can address the issue of bullying, (Barreto). The parents can also keep a record of incidents of harassment and the ways in which the school handled these situations. They should also insist on the putting up of a bullying prevention committee if one is not already in place. In order for the committee to be effective, it needs to have representatives from administration, teachers, school mental health teams and parents.

2. Teachers should be encouraged to involve the students in creating rules for the classroom regarding bullying. They should have a serious talk with the bully and explain the unacceptability of the behavior as well as its negative consequences. Reports of bullying should not be left to deal with bullying on their own in the hope that the experience will make them stronger individuals, bullying…… [Read More]

Works cited

Barreto, Steven. Bullying and Harassment Stop When Parents Help Break the Silence. 2005.

23 May, 2010



Batsche, G.M., & Knoff, H.M. "Bullies and their victims: Understanding a pervasive problem in the schools." School Psychology Review, 22.6 (1994): 165-174.
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Behavior Research Study Review The

Words: 1563 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4328663

For example, an upscale restaurant, mid-market clothing store, hardware store, and general store could all be sampled, and over the course of four days shoppers could be asked to respond to a survey at the check-out counter about their perceptions of the store and shopping experience. The data could then be analyzed demographically, in terms of consumer perceptions, and also precisely what the different shoppers bought on different days, as opposed to what they said they would buy. This would also allow repeated testing -- using the same four-day musical format over different periods of the year at different stores. The article's study takes the form of a posttest only study design: the independent variable of the music (or in the case of the control group, the lack thereof) is applied, and then subjects record their responses.

The advantage to the test is that there is no 'learning,' necessary to…… [Read More]

Reference

North, Adrian C. & David J. Hargreaves. (1998). The effect of music on atmosphere and purchase intentions in a cafeteria. Journal of Applied Social Psychology. 28 (24):
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Student's Performance or Potential Could

Words: 301 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55053532



Q2.Identify specific behaviors that would help an educator understand student achievement, cognition, behavior, and communication.

Coming to class on time and being 'ready to learn,' being able to pay attention to the teacher without being unduly distracted by outside stimuli, being able to be organized, and showing consideration for the welfare of others and the rules of the classroom in an age-appropriate fashion are all important for an educator to note when evaluating a student's ability to achieve. Students that show deficits in these areas as well as fail to meet certain benchmarks of student achievement may need additional assessment and support. A student's social behaviors, such being able to empathize with others and a student's cognitive capacity to demonstrate age-appropriate understanding of concepts such as form and mass are also important to note.… [Read More]

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student with'specific disability

Words: 1362 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56505188

I am a fourteen-year-old boy, studying at present, at a special education school. A few months after I turned one, my mom started noticing that I behaved differently or "strangely" (in her precise words) as compared to other toddlers. She also noted that such atypical behavior started surfacing immediately after I was administered a succession of vaccinations. As months passed, she started becoming anxious as I stopped making eye contact with all, even her. I refused to look people in the eye when addressed and started exhibiting repetitive behavioral patterns (for instance, I would solve a puzzle, jumble it, and again set about solving it) (Nagle, 2011). At age two, I'd stopped talking and seemed to be lost in my own world. If my parents took me out with them to supermarkets or other places having bright or flashing lights, I would grow fussy and distressed. Every small sound had…… [Read More]

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Students With EBD Need Approaches

Words: 667 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18999368

The language employed did not obfuscate the points the authors were making and generally assisted in ensuring that their argument was lucid and efficient. This is an important feature because very often writers will produce work where the reader is sentenced to time reading the work, not in this case. More substantively, however the thesis was well supported by the argument presented. While, I concur with most of the positions advanced there are some elements that seem discordant and required further elaboration by the authors. In particular, the section on the limitation of CBM was not thoroughly balanced. It appeared as though the authors were attempting to place limited scrutiny on the weaknesses rather than give the complete picture.

An additional concern is the actual transition from clinical practice by a trained professional to the use of the techniques by those who are uninitiated in the specific discipline. The authors…… [Read More]

Reference

Mayer, M., Lochman, J., & Van Acker, R. (2005). Introduction to the Special Issue:

Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions with Students with EBD. Behavioral Disorders,

30(3): 197-212. Retrieved February 7, 2011, from ProQuest Psychology Journals.

(Document ID: 938654351).
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Student Critically Evaluate a Selected Reading Reviewi

Words: 911 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84334542

Student Critically Evaluate a Selected Reading, Reviewi

There are a number of highly unusual, but seemingly valuable points raised in this work of Kohn's entitled Punished by Rewards. At various times in this document, the author appears to advocate abandoning a system of grades (yet not necessarily assessment), exploring new ways to teach, and eschewing conventional systems of rewards. What is most interesting about this manuscript is the author also advocates discontinuing the usage of punishments within an educational, classroom setting, and instead appealing to the talents and insight of instructors to create and utilize curriculum that can truly engage the student intrinsically. Many of the author's points appear valid (particularly since a number of them are substantiated by empirical evidence) and have the potential to transform classroom learning and the potential for students to perceive learning in a much more positive way than they currently do.

The most fundamental…… [Read More]

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Behavior Is Not Seen the

Words: 1196 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61042892

Many overweight people for example would attest to the fact that they have pictures of some skinny models in their rooms to motivate them to lose weight. Many would actually lose weight like that because it is a reminder of how they can look if they are able to lose weight. Setting ambitious goals is important because even if you are unable to go that far and really achieve those ambitious targets, you would still be far ahead of where you had started. It is like saying I will walk three miles in half an hour today. Then you start out and run like mad alternating with some fast walking only to realize that it is not entirely possible to walk three miles in half an hour but you will also notice that you reached very close to your goal and are far ahead of where you had started or…… [Read More]

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Students Becoming More Eager to Learn With

Words: 1054 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96755834

students becoming more eager to learn with technology?

What affect does the use of technology in the classroom have on the students or interest in the curriculum?

Does the engagement in computer activities improve the concentration span of the students?

The reason why I chose these questions:

The reason I would find this topic exciting is because, my son is on an IEP with a learning disability in reading. I must say he has gotten a lot better with using the computer and the opportunity to learn on various sites as well as other different programs. This has motivated him to learn and he has gained confidence from it, so I felt it would become great to find out why is it easier for children to learn from technology than an actual teacher. Is technology taking the place of an educator?

Processes

The processes in coming up with these three…… [Read More]

References

Carpenter, S. (2000). In the digital age, experts pause to examine effects on kids. American Psychological Association, 1.

CIO. (2003). Technology's impact on child's growth and development. Retrieved June 27, 2011, from CIO: http://www.cio.com/article/29797/David_Elkind_Technology_s_Impact_on_Child_Growth_and_Development.

The Real Truth. (2009). Does technology stunt children's social development? Retrieved June 27, 2011, from The Real Truth: http://www.realtruth.org/news/090303-008-society.html.