Subculture Essays (Examples)

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Culture and the Military Cultural

Words: 1915 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48326917



This also has major implications for military operations, both within a military unit and in the interaction between the military unit and another culture. Essentially, the problem of ethnocentrism can be seen at the root of the other cultural problems discussed in this context; it implies both a lack of understanding about the impacts of the unit's culture on the people of a foreign culture, as well as a lack of appreciation and understanding for that culture (Hoskins 2007).

Conclusion

Culture is strange, in that it is both constant and always changing. The only static culture is a dead one; as the various elements and generations of a culture interact, change is bound to happen. When there is no longer any interaction within a culture or between a given culture and other cultures, there is no longer any point to that culture, and indeed that culture could not realistically exist…… [Read More]

References

DiMarco, L. (2003). Traditions, changes, and challenges: Military operations and the Middle Eastern city. Diane Publsihing.

Harrison, D.; Light, L. & Rothschild-Boros, M. (2008). Cultural anthropology: Our diverse world. New York: Wadsworth.

Hoskins, B. (2007). "Religion and other cultural variable in modern operational environments." Accessed 16 October 2009. http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA470675&Location=U2&doc=GetTRDoc.pdf

O'Neil, D. (2007). "Characteristics of Culture." Accessed 16 October 2009.  http://anthro.palomar.edu/culture/culture_2.htm
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Culture and the Media An

Words: 696 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21499519

The major concern is the effect of violence, due once again, to studies that show a connection between watching violence and participating in it. For example, Bushman and Anderson (2002) conducted as study in which they determined that playing violent video games can "engender hostile expectations, leading one to expect that others will respond aggressively" (p. 1679).

The Grand Theft Auto series of video games has undoubtedly been a major instigator in the backlash against the gaming industry. Not surprisingly, most parents are not too thrilled about the idea of their children taking on the persona of a character who commits crimes to earn rewards, and runs over prostitutes so he doesn't have to pay them. There was also a major parental backlash against the PS2 game Bully before it was released, because parents assumed that it would glorify bullying. The frenzy turned out to be unfounded as the game…… [Read More]

References

Bushman, B.J., & Anderson, C.A. (2002). Violent video games and hostile expectations: A test of the general aggression model. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 28, 1679 -- 1686.

Gunter, B., Harrison, J. & Wykes, M. (2003) Violence on television: Distribution, form, context, and themes, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

Rekulak, J. & Spangler, B. (2006) Let's Paint the '90s, Quirk Books
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Culture and Diversity Issues in

Words: 2845 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13936527

Silence too is an important part of communication in Singapore. It is customary to pause before answering a question, to indicate that the person has given the question the appropriate thought and consideration that is needed. Westerners habit of responding quickly to a question, to Singaporeans, often indicates thoughtlessness and rude behavior. Their demeanor is typically calm, and Westerners more aggressive style is often seen as off putting ("Singapore: Language," 2009). Authority is to be respected for both employees of an organization, in Singapore, and when dealing with other organizations (Tse, 2008), and communication content and tone should represent this respect. Business etiquette is also different in Singapore than in many Western countries.

Cultural Business Etiquette in Singapore:

Business is more formal in Singapore than non-Asian organizations are often used to. There are strict rules of protocol, with a clear chain of command, which is expected to be kept on…… [Read More]

References

Choy, W. 1 Jul 2007, "Globalisation and workforce diversity: HRM implications for multinational corporations in Singapore," Singapore Management Review, http://www.allbusiness.com/public-administration/national-security-international/4509815-1.html.

Edewor, P. & Aluko, P. May 2007, "Diversity management, challenges and opportunities in multicultural organizations," International Journal of Diversity in Organisation, Communities & Nations vol. 6, no. 6, pp. 189-195.

Hofstede, G. Feb 1993, "Cultural constraints in management theories," Executive, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 81-94.

Ismail, R. & Shaw, B. Feb 2006, "Singapore's Malay-Muslim minority: Social identification in a post 9/11 world," Asian Ethnicity vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 37-51.
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Culture Workplace This Include Necessarily Limited Fellow

Words: 961 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86890487

culture workplace. (This include, necessarily limited, fellow employees,

Culture plays a vital role in the workplace in contemporary times. Most organizations have their own respective cultures, as well as do individual industries, countries, parts of countries, and even different parts of the world. All of these varying cultures and sub-cultures come together in the workplace environment, and make for some interesting interactions -- not all of which are beneficent. I have had a number of different interactions with individuals who were part of cultures that are not innately my own, and have always come away with them by gaining a degree of didactic knowledge that sheds insight into future situations of intercultural activity.

Industry specific culture is one that is difficult to assess -- or even to necessarily prepare for -- without fully emerging oneself into it. For instance, when I attended my first data governance conference last winter, I…… [Read More]

References

Your PowerPoint Slide, Chapter 3 Slide 9. I don't have the rest of the reference.
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Culture Refers to the Accumulated

Words: 4685 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87152746

In histoy, in most of the Indian families, the inheitance of the estates of the family is left to the lineage of males in the family. Though since the yea 1956, the law in India has always teated females and males as equals in mattes of inheitance whee thee is no legal will witten. Cuently, Indians have become wise and ae using legal wills fo the inheitance and succession of popety. The usage of legal wills at of the yea 2004 stands at about 20%.

The ate of divoce in India is extemely low. It stands at 1% as compaed to 40% which is expeienced in the U.S. These statistics of divoce do not, howeve, give a complete pictue of the divoce situation in India. This is because many maiages that end up being split do so without a fomal divoce. Thee is a eseach gap in the scientific studies…… [Read More]

references. [Article]. Journal of Food Science, 69(4), SNQ191-SNQ192. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2621.2004.tb06362.x

Johnson, H. (2007). 'Happy Diwali!' Performance, Multicultural Soundscapes and Intervention in Aotearoa/New Zealand. [Article]. Ethnomusicology Forum, 16(1), 71-94. doi: 10.1080/17411910701276526

Kurien, P.A. (2006). Multiculturalism and "American" Religion: The Case of Hindu Indian-Americans. Social Forces, 85(2), 723-741.

Mandair, a. (2007). Interdictions: Language, Religion & the (dis)Orders of Indian Identity. [Article]. Social Identities, 13(3), 337-361. doi: 10.1080/13504630701363978

Mintz, S.W., & Bois, C.M.D. (2002). The Anthropology of Food and Eating. Annual Review of Anthropology, 31(ArticleType: research-article / Full publication date: 2002 / Copyright © 2002 Annual Reviews), 99-119.
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Cultures Can Teach Us About

Words: 2123 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74815074

For example, the sexual revolution in Iran was part of a larger cultural movement that encouraged the challenge of a large number of social changes. "This social movement encompasses behaviours such as pushing the envelope on Islamic dress, sexual behaviours, heterosocializing, driving around in cars playing loud illegal music, partying, drinking, dancing and so on -- to include basically, young people doing what they were not supposed to do under Islamic law" (Mahdavi, 2012, p.35).

In fact, the link between how a society approaches sex and that society's overall approaches towards human rights is interesting to note. Generally, the more liberal a society and the more protective of individual freedoms, the more permissive that society's approach will be towards sexuality, particularly female sexuality. In fact, when a totalitarian regime has been challenged, there seems to be a swing in the other direction, with an embrace of human rights, including rights…… [Read More]

References

Elliston, D. (2005). Erotic anthropology: "Ritualized homosexuality" in Melanesia and beyond.

In J. Robertson (Ed.), Same sex cultures and sexualities: An anthropological reader (pp.91-115). Malden: Blackwell.

Hunter, M. (2012). Rights amidst wrongs: The paradoxes of gender rights-based approaches towards AIDS in South Africa. In P. Aggleton, P. Boyce, H.L. Moore, & P. Parker (Eds.), Understanding global sexualities: New frontiers (pp.66-74). London: Routledge.

Mahdavi, P. (2012). 'The personal is political and the political is personal': Sexuality, politics, and social movements in modern Iran. In P. Aggleton, P. Boyce, H.L. Moore, & P. Parker (Eds.), Understanding global sexualities: New frontiers (pp.34-48). London: Routledge.
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Culture There Are'so Many

Words: 1263 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86849342

This research focuses on the public housing neighborhood of Bezirganbahce. Like the first, this article shows how Turkish society "marks the areas populated by the urban poor as dangerous, a breeding ground for illegal activities, and areas of social decay or social ill," (Candan & Kolluoglu 2008 p 38). Those lower ranking social classes and ethnic subgroups are often excluded from the daily existence of mainstream Turkish culture and forced to life a marginalized life in a segregated area that isolates lower socioeconomic classes from the rest of society. The urban poor that reside in the neighborhood are excluded from an external source, and thus left to fend for themselves. In this marginalized space, the residents of this neighborhood have actually created a culture that is all their own outside of the boundaries of typical Turkish life. Like as shown in Yilmaz (2008), this neighborhood is seen as having to…… [Read More]

References

Candan, Ayfur Bartu & Kolluoglu, Biray. (2008). Emerging spaces of neoliberalism: A gated town and a public housing project in Istanbul. New Perspectives on Turkey, 39(2008), 4-46.

Yilmaz, Bediz. (2008). Entrapped in multidimensional exclusion: The perpetuation of poverty among conflict-induced migrants in an Istanbul neighborhood. New Perspectives on Turkey, 38(2008), 205-234.
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Culture in Czech and US Compared

Words: 2236 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44539839

Gender in Post-Communist Society

Consider the differences between gendered behavior in the Czech Republic and the U.S.A.… which socio-historical factors affect the Czechs' present-day gender identity and gender issues?

Men are respected as the stronger sex and this determines the way they relate women. A Czech has a striking mixture of firm attachment to the labor market and strong family values, considerable independence and personal efficiency. The women are homemakers and breadwinners. They are also able to command attention. Another interesting part of the Czech gender roles is that love outweighs work. For example, more women devote their time to care for their children at home unlike before and make considerable efforts in finding husbands (Delphy & Leonard, 175).

I noticed that Czech women are nicely dressed in order for them to find husbands while the men act chivalrously in order for them to find wives. Many women abandon their…… [Read More]

Work cited

Nanette Funk and Magda Mueller, "Feminism East and West," Gender Politics and Post-Communism. Reflections from Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union,(1993) New York and London, Routledge, pp. 318-330.

Berger, John. "Ways of Seeing. London": BBC Penguin Books. pp. 129-154. 1977

Beauvoir, Simone de, "The Psychoanalytical Point-of-View," pp. 49-61. (2010). In the second sex New. York: Vintage Books

Delphy, Ch. And Leonard, D. "The Variety of Work Done by Wives," in (eds.) Jackson, S. And Scott, S. G Gender: A Sociological Reader. New York: Routledge. pp. 170-179.2002
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Culture Change Case 2 Healthcare Acquisition Case

Words: 1566 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1149367

Culture Change Case #2

Healthcare Acquisition Case

Six months after the merger described in Change and Culture Case Study I, the new administration initiated a significant reduction in force. A decision was made to redesign patient care delivery. The administration's first job redesign recommendation was that of a universal worker. The universal worker would deliver many support services. Aware that this model often failed when implemented in other organizations, your administrator charged you with making redesign work this time.

How would you begin the process of job redesign? Do not consider only the universal worker.

The process of cutting staff is a common practice these days in hopes to lower the costs associated with healthcare (Eaton-Spiva, Buitrago, & Trotter, 2010). This is creating a plethora of problems in job satisfaction and hence job redesign demands the utmost attention in order to mitigate some of the common issues. Furthermore, it is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Collins, J. (2001). Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don't. New York: Random House.

Eaton-Spiva, L., Buitrago, P., & Trotter, L. (2010). Assessing and Redesigning the Nursing Practice Environment. The Journal of Nursing Administration, 36-42.

Intergrated Healthcare Strategies. (2010). Separation Arrangements in Healthcare. Retrieved February 15, 2011, from IH Strategies: http://www.ihstrategies.com/articles/139.pdf

Li, L. (2005). The effects of trust and shared vision on inward knowledge transfer in subsidiaries' intra- and inter-organizational relationships. International Business Review, 77-95.
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Culture and Marketing Strategy

Words: 911 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17427450

Culture and Marketing Strategy

About the print ad from http://theinspirationroom.com/daily/2013/johnnie-walker-from-the-future/

The print ad is about a certain brand of alcoholic drink that is endorsed by a professional athlete. The athlete takes a sip from a glass of whisky and begins walking. This in a way appears to suggest that consumers of this particular brand of whisky can cover long distances after taking this whiskey. Information pertaining to alcoholic content and how the brand is matured are not clearly visible on the ad. The only visible thing is the image of the person who has endorsed the brand making some strides.

Assumptions made by the authors of the ad

The authors of the ad try to make the ad to be more appealing to the motives and desires of the consumers. They give form to people's deep-lying desires. They assume that they will best arrest the consumer's attention by tugging consumer's…… [Read More]

References List

Altstiel, T & Grow, J. (2006). Advertising Strategy: Creative Tactics From the Outside/In. CA:

Sage.

Petracca, M. & Sorapure, M. (1998). Common Culture: Reading and Writing about American

Popular Culture. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall.
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Culture Concept and Overseas Subsidiaries

Words: 2919 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11683844

They wanted to know the best places to go after work, and expected him to help them in that regard.

Hanes finally told his Japanese trainers "he preferred not to mix business with pleasure." ithin a couple days, the group requested another instructor. The critical issue here, one can quickly discern, is that Hanes did not do his homework on the Japanese business culture; if he had, he would know the Japanese are intensely committed to their work, on duty and off duty.

The "Miscue No. 2" involves Ray Lopez, top salesperson for his company who was fluent in Spanish; he was sent to Buenos Aires to make a marketing pitch to a distribution firm there. He arrived and was picked up at the airport and surprised to learn that the meeting had been postponed for two days "...so that Ray could rest after the long trip" and also have…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hult, G. Tomas M.; Cavusgil, S. Tamer; Deligonul, Seyda; Kiyak, Tunga; & Lagerstrom,

Katarina. (2007) What Drives Performance in Globally Focused Marketing Organizations? A Three-Country Study. Journal of International Marketing, 15(2), 58-85.

Keeley, Timothy Dean. 2001, International Human Resource Management in Japanese Firms: Their Greatest Challenge, New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Kim, Youngok, Gray, Sidney J. 2005, 'Strategic factors influencing international human resource management practices: an empirical study of Australian multinational corporations', International Journal of Human Resource Management, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 809-830.
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Culture Dismantling Identity Politics The

Words: 911 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9652411

374). It has been assumed that despite these internal cultural differences, overarching political similarities, shared history, or an interest in national diversity would be enough to unite the Canadian people under a single identity.

However, Kymlicka's (2003) close examination of the national and international has illustrated that they are largely shared by most modern, Western nations. Any presumed Canadian uniqueness is largely mythical (p. 368). Of course, mythology can be exceedingly unifying, and there is certainly an interest in Canada of perpetuating the dominant national myths of identity: Canadians as good global citizens, as part of the Western tradition, as a young modern nations, and as distinctly non-American. These national characteristics are generally championed as core parts of a unified Canadian identity, despite their largely exaggerated characteristics and despite the fact that these values do not necessarily unify the myriad subcultural groups within the nation. Aboriginal groups will probably always…… [Read More]

References

Kymlicka, W. (2003). Being Canadian. Government and Opposition, 38(3), pp. 357-385.
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Intersecting Cultures Are Creating a

Words: 1067 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29984481

hen Europeans colonized Brazil, for example, the indigenous peoples intermarried or otherwise bonded intimately with those Europeans and the result was a hybrid identity, "mestizaje," which Noh refers to as a native Brazilian combining his or her identity with a Portuguese identity.

Hence, in the twentieth century hybridity has been transformed into a "…cultural phenomenon" which is now explored by anthropologists and other social scientists -- and it means that growing volumes of people are moving "…from one place to another" and as they move they create "…new cultural and sociodemographic spaces and are themselves reshaped in the process" (Luke, 2003, p. 379). The point of Noh's article -- boiled down to a safe overview -- is that cultural borders between countries and regions "…have been blurred" and in their place is an "intercultural mixture" because "…all cultures are involved in one another" (p. 7). In fact some scholars insist…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bruno, D.C., Scott, J., and Hinton, C. (2012). Educational Research and Innovation Languages

in a Global World Learning for Better Cultural Understanding: Learning for Better

Cultural Understanding. Paris, France: OECD Publishing.

Fleras, a. (2011). "From Mosaic to Multiversality": Repriming Multicultural Governance
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Managing Organizational Culture

Words: 9860 Length: 34 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60831953

Human esources

Managing Organisational Culture

The values and behaviors that contribute to the unique social and psychological environment of an organization make up the organizations culture. Organizational culture is the summation total of an organization's past and current suppositions, incidents, viewpoint, and values that hold it together, and is articulated in its self-image, inner workings, connections with the outside world, and future prospects.

In dealing with the management of organisational culture, it is firstly essential to recognize as fully as possible the characteristics of the existing or new target culture to include the myths, symbols, rituals, values and assumptions that strengthen the culture. Organisational culture is not something that can be viewed very easily it is consequently quite hard to replace it. Usually when certain leaders form a company, their values are converted into the actions of the members of that organisation. When other leaders take over, it may not…… [Read More]

References

Background To Business in China. n.d. [ONLINE]. Available at:  http://www.worldbusinessculture.com/Chinese-Business-Style.html  [Accessed 18 August 2012].

Campbell, B. 2010. [ONLINE]. How To Improve Your Corporate Culture. Available at: http://www.bcbusinessonline.ca/bcb/business-sense/2010/05/28/how-improve-your-corporate-culture [Accessed 15 August 2012].

Differences in Culture. n.d. [ONLINE]. Available at:  http://www.analytictech.com/mb021/cultural.htm  [Accessed 24 August 2012].

Edgar H. Schein's Model of Organizational Culture. 2010. [ONLINE]. Available at:  http://www.businessmate.org/Article.php?ArtikelId=36  [Accessed 18 August 2012].
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Socially-Constructed Societies and Cultures Among Transmigrants and

Words: 1270 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8248085

Socially-constructed Societies and Cultures Among Transmigrants and Transnationals: The Case of United States Migration History

Migration, as a social activity, is a vital element considered not only for its importance in determining specific aspects of a country's socio-demographic characteristics, but in determining the psycho-demographic characteristics of societies and cultures within that country. Indeed, it is evident that apart from serving as a catalyst in changing the social structure of societies, migration also helps change and bring dynamism to a the norms, traditions, and values held important by a society and culture. Take as an example the history of migration in the United States. Historical events such as the first and second World Wars have triggered the sudden increase in migration of people from different countries in the world. Furthermore, migration also increased as an effect of the economic and political stability of the U.S., as compared to other countries in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Castles, S. And M. Miller. (1993). The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World. London: Macmillan Press Ltd.

Kennedy, P. And V. Roudometof. Transnationalism in a global age. In Communities across Borders: New immigrants and transnational cultures. (2002). P. Kennedy and V. Roudometof (Eds.). NY: Routledge.

Massey, D. Why does immigration occur? A Theoretical Synthesis. In The Handbook of International Migration: The American Experience. (1999). C. Hirschmann, P. Kasinitz and J. DeWind (Eds.). NY: Russell Sage Foundation.

Matthews, K. Boundaries of diaspora identity: The case of Central and East African-Asians in Canada. In Communities across Borders: New immigrants and transnational cultures. (2002). P. Kennedy and V. Roudometof (Eds.). NY: Routledge.
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Corporate Culture Survival Guide Chapter 1 &

Words: 1499 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84372633

CORPORATE CULTURE SURVIVAL GUIDE (CHAPTER 1 & CHAPTER 2)

The work of Edward H. Schein (1999) entitled "Corporate Culture Survival Guide" begins by examining the question of why it is important to understand culture. It is important according to Schein (1999) to understand that the organization exists "within broader cultural units that matter in today's global world because mergers, acquisitions, joint ventures and special projects are often multicultural entitles who must have the ability to work across cultures." (p.3) Culture is residual in the individual and is reported by Schein to be the "hidden force hat drives mot of our behavior both inside and outside organizations." (Schein, 1999, p. 3)

Schein (1999) makes it clear that the organizational culture is no small thing but instead is vital and a living aspect of the organization that determines the organization's projection whether that be toward failure or success. People belong to their…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Schein, EH (1999) The Corporate Culture Survival Guide. John Wiley & Sons. Retrieved from: http://books.google.cz/books?id=LkYRFu05W-AC&printsec=frontcover&hl=cs#v=onepage&q&f=false
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Health Culture & Globalization Health Culture and

Words: 886 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47542333

Health, Culture & Globalization

Health, Culture and Globalization

Culture plays an integral role in the lives of societies and individuals all over the world. Across countries and societies, different kinds of culture exist and govern the daily lives of people. Defined technically, culture is the system of beliefs, norms, values, and traditions that a specific group of people perceives and considers as their worldview. Countries have different cultures, and within each culture exists sub-cultures, created because of the diversity/differences existing from even the same group of people with the same nationality, race, or ethnic membership.

Culture inadvertently affects every aspect of an individual's life. Its influence could be as mundane as deciding what to wear and eat for the day, or as critical and important not only to the individual but also to the society, such as deciding who to vote for depending on the candidate's similarities in beliefs and…… [Read More]

References

Eckersley, R. (2007). "Culture, spirituality, religion and health: looking at the big picture." The Medical Journal of Australia, (186)10 Suppl.

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria. Available at:  http://www.theglobalfund.org/en/ 

Huynen, M., P. Martens and H. Hilderink. (2005). "The health impacts of globalization: a conceptual framework." Globalization and Health, (1)14.
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Virtual Cultures in Today's Information-Oriented

Words: 540 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13050941

An example of this virtual culture is the fan culture, wherein individuals having a similar belief or likeness for an idea or another individual (also identified as "cult hero") come together and form a community wherein they talk about their beliefs, and create a culture uniquely identified only to them. Examples of these fan cultures are Star Wars, Lord of the Rings, and Harry Potter fan groups/bases.

In the following years, despite Macionis' expressed fear for these virtual cultures, this form of culture will develop to give way to new, hybrid cultures that will potentially develop as a result of the continuous innovation and creation of computer- and Internet-mediated technologies. Moreover, these cultures will become important in that it will reflect the kind of groups and individuals extant in the society. These virtual cultures will mirror peoples' values, beliefs, and traditions. And most importantly, virtual cultures will become the 'culture…… [Read More]

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IKEA Organizational Culture

Words: 2880 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17579497

Organizational Culture

IKEA Organizational Culture

Strong and Weak Sides of Organizational Culture

Impact of Internal and External Factors

Leadership and Organizational Culture

IKEA Subculture

Values

Employees and Organizational Structure

IKEA Organizational Culture

Every organization has a unique culture that dictates how things are done -- it defines the organization's social and psychological behavior. Though there is no universally agreed definition, organizational culture essentially refers to the values, beliefs, attitudes, assumptions, principles, habits, and customs shared by members of a given organization (Schein, 2010). These behavioral aspects constitute the distinctiveness of the organization (Jain, 2005). Indeed, organizational culture can be an important source of competitive advantage for an organization as it determines its strategic orientation, personnel management approaches, and other aspects of organizational behavior (Schein, 2010; Mullins & Christy, 2010). One organization that has built a distinctive organizational culture is IKEA, a Swedish multinational firm involved in the designing and marketing…… [Read More]

References

Browaeys, M., & Price, R. (2008). Understanding Cross-cultural Management. Harlow: Prentice Hall.

Clarke, L. (n.d.). Corporate culture of the heart. Retrieved from: https://inside.6q.io/ikea- corporate-culture-of-the-heart/

Geert-hofstede.com (n.d.). Country comparison. Retrieved from: https://geert- hofstede.com/sweden.html

Grol, P., & Schoch, C. (2010). IKEA: Culture as competitive advantage. CPA, Paris Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved from: http://www.efbl.org/upload/7730963-Strategijski- menadzment-Studija-slucaja-IKEA-2010-12-16.pdf
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Analyzing a Workplace Culture

Words: 1462 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71612734

Organizational Culture of NYU Langone Medical Center

As a non-traditional volunteer intern at NYU Langone Medical Center from September to December 2016, I obtained a first-hand look at the organization's culture. My objective as a student intern was to develop my communication and problem-solving skills by shadowing various employees at the center and performing tasks appropriate to my skill-level and background. What I discerned in terms of workplace culture came by way of conversations with employees at Langone, observations of interactions among staff and supervisors, documents like the employee hand book and physical artifacts -- like the promotion of the NYU logo on merchandise almost everywhere one looked. In this paper, I will provide an analysis of the culture at NYU Langone Medical Center and explain why the organization's culture supports organizational goals and the well-being, morale, and productivity of individual employees.

Langone's Culture

The organizational goals of Langone Medical…… [Read More]

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Organizational Culture An Analysis Based on Morgan's

Words: 2584 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46542103

Organizational Culture:

An Analysis Based on Morgan's Cultural Metaphor

When one thinks about the word "culture," one tends to think about some far-away, exotic place where people in elaborate costumes perform mysterious rituals. While it is certainly true that people on the other side of the world from wherever one lives certainly have their own culture, it is vital to remember that all people have their lives deeply influenced by culture. We each live in a number of different cultures: The culture of our family, of our neighborhood, of the place where we work, sometimes of a religious and ethnic community. Culture is simply an agreement among the members of a group about how they will behave, what their values are, and how they will communicate with each other. Culture determines how we each interact with each other on a daily basis.

The paper examines the organizational culture of a…… [Read More]

References

Grisham, T. (2006). Metaphor, poetry, storytelling and cross-cultural leadership. Management Decision, 44(4), 486-503.

Harris, J. & Barnes, K.B. (2006). Leadership storytelling. Industrial and commercial training, 38(7), 350-353.

Jensen, D.F.N. (2006). Metaphors as a bridge to understanding educational and social contexts. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 5(1), Article 4, 1-17.

Leder, G. (2007). The power of metaphors: Use of clever analogies to simplify complex subjects and you might just get clients to take your perspective. On Wall Street 17 (5), 88.
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police culture

Words: 1006 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73049144

Description

Law enforcement has a distinct professional culture that is comprised of both formal and informal elements. Formal elements are ensconced in rules and regulations. For example, training, hours of work, how to fill out paperwork, and wearing a uniform according to an individual’s status in the organization are formal elements of the culture. Informal elements are unspoken, including norms of behavior and the jargon used between officers. For example, informal cultural norms are what have a direct bearing on “how to go about their tasks, how hard to work, what kinds of relationships to have with their fellow officers and other categories of people with whom they interact, and how they should feel about police administrators,” (“The Police Culture,” p. 98). Both formal and informal culture impacts productivity, identity, and performance.

Language and Behaviors

One of the defining features of a culture is language. In the professional sectors, jargon…… [Read More]

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Sociology of Popular Culture

Words: 2411 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81906617

Sociology of Popular Culture

Popular Culture

A popular culture is a complex term defined by a number of already existing definitions which explore the different spectrums associated with the term. The initial understanding of this culture was based on the lifestyle adopted by the masses; the subordinate, lower class, which made them separate from the elite class. However, today, it is considered to be a lifestyle which includes different cultural practices, artifacts and other cultural commodities, that is widely accepted by the population. Therefore, in order to study a popular culture, it is important to focus on the varying aspects such as identity, representation, regulation, production and consumption where the latter two have an interdependent relationship. For this reason, this paper would look into the underlying fact of the contemporary popular culture where the producers are also the consumers.

The theorists of the cultural studies started studying popular culture when…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Bielby D, 2001, Popular culture: production and consumption, Wiley-Blackwell, United States.

Douglas, S, 1994, Where the girls are: Growing up female with the mass media. New York: Random House

Kellner, D, 1995, Media culture: Cultural studies, identity, and politics between the modern and the postmodern. New York: Routledge

Leadbeater, 1996, Urban Girls: Resisting Stereotypes, Creating Identities. New York: New York University Press
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Schein 1999 Corporate Culture Survival Guide

Words: 572 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50103952

Schien (1999) the Corporate Culture Survival Guide

Culture content and surviving in the external environment

Mission, Strategy and Goals

Development of assumptions

Sense of mission and identity

Cultural moral of story: Acquisition strategy has to fit existing culture

Over organizational history learning by organization of effective

Complexity of Cultural Analysis due to shared mission and strategic intent

F. Variations in unit organization to achieve mission and strategy

G. Error-detection systems in the organization

F. Actions when discovering important goals are not being met

G. Variation among organizational parts in measure and actions to take on results

New Leaders in the Organization

Organizational culture

Destroy existing culture by ridding organization of key culture carriers;

B. Fight existing culture by forcing their own beliefs, values and assumption on the members of the organization.

C. Cave in to the existing culture abandoning their own beliefs, values and assumptions.

D. Evoke the culture by…… [Read More]

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Rise of Ricers in the Car Culture Scene

Words: 3417 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77672853

Car Culture: How and Why "Ricers" Came into The Scene

Since the advent of cars, people have always wanted to play around with them and make modifications of their own preferences. Car modification has been taking place ever since we started manufacturing vehicles and the reason has been varied. There are some who did it for prowess or just for some mischief. For example, NASCAR evolved from the building of super-fast cars that were mostly a result of bootlegging. The initial modifications that people would perform on their vehicles were mainly conducted due to criminal activities. In the old cars, there was no matching of cars to engine numbers, transmission, or body frame. This made it possible for thieves to change engines and repaint a vehicle, which in turn meant they have a new car. This car modification was referred to as hot rodding. However, all this changed when the…… [Read More]

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Co-Optation Underground Cultures of All Types Are

Words: 679 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88693788

Co-Optation

Underground cultures of all types are frequently co-optated in order to bring them into the mainstream. When an underground culture begins as something unique, that uniqueness is attractive to those who crave unique things and experience. These are the early adopters, and the influencers of others. These influencers then make that culture more attractive to the mainstream. Typically, co-optation occurs when business interests see the potential in something and then market a co-optated version of that to a mainstream audience. The essay on popular culture highlights hip hop music, which grew from an integrated street culture in the Bronx, was first co-optated by African-American urban youth in other cities, leaving out many of the culture's elements in favor of a focus on the fashion and music, and co-optation became even more pronounced when the music's underground popularity with white suburban audiences was noticed. This actually mirrored quite closely the…… [Read More]

References

Jackson, R. (2013). Billabong's downfall may signal the death of the entire surfwear industry. Business Insider. Retrieved April 22, 2014 from  http://www.businessinsider.com/billabong-demise-surfwear-2013-11 

Woody, T. (2012). Surfing's toxic secret. Forbes. Retrieved April 22, 2014 from http://www.forbes.com/sites/toddwoody/2012/04/19/surfings-toxic-secret/
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Vietnamese American Culture Cultural Phenomena of Vietnamese

Words: 717 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40107328

Vietnamese American Culture

Cultural Phenomena of Vietnamese American Culture

The assessment of a patient can be critical to the nursing process. The culture phenomena that a nurse may face can be critical to a proper diagnosis in many cases as well as the overall quality of care. One of the most fundamental phenomena is communication, which includes language, but also includes social organizations, time, environmental control, and biological variation. These factors represent distinct phenomena that can be identified and various cultural barriers can be mitigated through training. Although each individual may be different, culture is a powerful force in one's life and can predict many individualistic tendencies.

Social Organization

The social organization in the Vietnamese American culture is different from the mainstream culture in several ways. One is example is that Asian-American patients in mainstream mental health systems have greater premature dropout rates, shorter duration of treatment, fewer positive outcomes,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fancher, T., Ton, H., Le Meyer, O., Ho, T., & Paternti, D. (2010). Discussing Depression with Vietnamese American Patients. Journal of Immigrant Minority Health, 263-266.

Hongyun, F., & Laudingham, M. (2012). Mental Health Consequences of International Migration for Vietnamese Americans and the Mediating Effects of Physical Health and Social Networks: Results From a Natural Experiment Approach. Demography, 393-424.

Smith, E., & Pham, C. (1996). Doing business in Vietnam: A cultural guide. Business Horizons', 1-47.
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The Black and the White Voice in the Hip Hop Culture

Words: 4208 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17384873

Hip Hop and American Youth Culture

Everyone enters a stage of growth when a strong urge to break out of parental dependence, when he recognizes his own person and desires to assert himself. This sense of individuality is an inherent in the American character, especially the youth. Aligned with this restlessness is the restlessness endured for centuries by the Blacks. Their elders may have learned to live with the malignity, although without yielding to it, or have less energy to fight. But African-American youth found a way to vent their revulsion towards the discrimination and abuses to which they are subjected as a race. That discovery happened in the 70s when the hip-hop spirit evolved into a concept and then into music, dance, poetry and many other creative forms of letting the sea of anguish flow out of their soul.

The voice of the young American who seeks individual freedom…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Aponte, Christian Andres. 2013. "When Hip Hop and Education Converge: a Look into Hip Hop-based Education Programs in the United States and Brazil." Carnegie Mellon

Blanchard, Becky. 1999. "The Impact of Rap and Hip-Hop Music on American Youth." Ethics

Of Development in a Global Environment.

https://web.stanford.edu/class/e297c/poverty_prejudice/mediarace/socialsignificance.htm
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Popular Culture vs High Culture

Words: 1538 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70524590

Pop Art on Society

During the fifties, America experienced tremendous growth in many aspects of society. As a result, technological advancements led to sophisticated aspects of American life. Media and advertising became mass media and the invention of the television paved the way to a new generation of communication. This was also an era of exploration among generations. Traditional forms of art began to experience growth and "culture" expanded into many sub-cultures.

Some of the trends that surfaced were New York City turning into an "international center for painting and architecture" (Davidson 1147), mass circulation of paperback books, network television suddenly becoming the world's most powerful form of mass communication, and rock and roll becoming the language of youth (Davidson 1147).

The explosion of such artistic expression was greeted with optimism, but mostly with pessimism, "warning against moral decadence and spiritual decline" (1147). On one had, the "highbrow intellectuals" argued…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Davidson, Gienapp, Heyman, Lytle, and Stoff. Nation of Nations. New York: McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, 1990. 17 December 2002.

Metrailler, Edouard. High in Saccharine, Low in (Moral) Fiber. The Harvard Salient. 7 October 1996. http://www.digitas.harvard.edu/~salient/issues/961007/mediocrity.html17 December 2002.

Morse, Margaret. Pop Art. Biddingtons. 17 December 2002. http://www.biddingtons.com/content/pedigreepop.html17 December 2002.

Myers, Ken. What Distinguishes "popular" Cultures From Other Varieties of Culture? Modern Reformation. http://www.modernreformation.org/mr97/janteb/mr9/01distinguishes.html17 December 2002.
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Slave Culture

Words: 1276 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89394284

Slave Culture

The trans-Atlantic slave trade shackled together persons from disparate cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Forced contact and communion, pervasive physical and psychological abuse, and systematic disenfranchisement became the soil in which a unique subculture would be born. Slave subcultures in the United States were also diverse, depending on geography, the nature of the plantation work, the prevailing political and social landscape of the slave owner culture, and factors like gender and ethnic backgrounds of the slaves. Presence and type of religion in the community also impacted the evolution of slave culture. Common factors that link disparate slave subcultures include religion, music, crafts, food, social norms, and political philosophies. In spite of the tremendous variations in theme and tone of slave cultures, such as those in Maryland, Virginia, Georgia, or the Carolinas, there did emerge some consistencies that draw attention to commonalities. The forced bondage of slavery created the means…… [Read More]

References

"African Diaspora," (n.d.). Retrieved online: http://www2.coloradocollege.edu/Dept/HY/HY243Ruiz/Research/diaspora.html

Chen, A. & Kermeliotis, T. (2012). African slave traditions live on in U.S. CNN World. Dec 10, 2012. Retrieved online:  http://www.cnn.com/2012/12/07/world/africa/gullah-geechee-africa-slavery-america/ 

Sambol-Tosco, K. (2004). Education, arts, and culture. Slavery and the Making of America: Historical Overview. PBS. Retrieved online:  http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/experience/education/history.html 

"Slave Culture," (n.d.). Retrieved online: http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/disp_textbook.cfm?smtid=2&psid=3043
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Couse Subject Drugs Across Cultures Ant110

Words: 1665 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64646278

Couse / subject= Drugs Across Cultures. ANT110. Writing Anthropology Essay. Essay question = "Is addiction a cultural category a biological reality?' Needs point view, provide backup resource readings. Also -text citation.

The concept of addiction is one of the most debated topics in the present and many individuals have expressed particular interest in discovering the factors that are probable to make certain groups exposed to substances. Addiction is one of society's most pressing problems and it is essential for individuals to focus on combating it through any means available. In order for society to be able to determine whether addiction is more related to biological factors than it is to cultural factors, one would need to follow patterns and learn more regarding what leads to addiction. The fact that the masses over generalize makes it difficult for researchers to get a better understanding of what addiction is. While addiction can…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Ahmad, Diana L. "The Opium Debate And Chinese Exclusion Laws In The Nineteenth-Century American West," (University of Nevada Press, 2007)

Choudhury, Suparna and Slaby, Jan, "Critical Neuroscience: A Handbook of the Social and Cultural Contexts of Neuroscience," (John Wiley & Sons, 2011)

Conrad, Peter and Schneider, Joseph, "Deviance and Medicalization: From Badness to Sickness," (Temple University Press, 1992)

Farrell Brodie, Janet and Redfield, Marc, "High Anxieties: Cultural Studies in Addiction," (University of California Press, 2002)
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Stuart Hall Revised According to Stuart Hall Culture

Words: 3728 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86731684

Stuart Hall/EVISED

According to Stuart Hall, culture is about shared meanings; language is the medium through which meaning is produced and exchanged (Hall, 2003, p. 1). In linking language to identity and culture, Hall uses the word "culture" in an anthropological sense, meaning to distinguish groups of people, whether they belong to a community, nation or social group, by their shared values. The shared values are manifest in literature, art, music and philosophy of the culture. The shared values shape customs and the very fabric of human life, ultimately influencing everything people do. Some shared values are seen in different cultures, while there are a few groups, often in relatively isolated regions of the globe, that have unique values unto themselves, producing customs, practices and beliefs that seem strange to the rest of the world. As Hall puts it, saying that two people belong to the same culture is to…… [Read More]

References

Benmoktar, A 2009, 'More than Words: Arab Body Language', Love Habibi, [blog] July 2, 2009,

Available at: http://www.lovehabibi.com/blog/2009/07/02/more-than-words-arab-body-language / [Accessed: March 17, 2012]

Hall, S, ed. 2003. Representation: Cultural representations and signifying practices.

Sage Publications, London.
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Harlem 1920-1960 Culture of the

Words: 9936 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29403060

Their main arguments are based on historical assumptions and on facts which have represented turning points for the evolution of the African-American society throughout the decades, and especially during the evolutionary War and the Civil War. In this regard, the Old Negro, and the one considered to be the traditional presence in the Harlem, is the result of history, and not of recent or contemporary events.

From the point-of-view of historical preconceptions and stereotypes, it would unwise to consider Harlem as being indeed a cancer in the heart of a city, taking into account the fact that there is no objective comparison being made. Locke points out the fact that the Negro of today be seen through other than the dusty spectacles of past controversy. The day of "aunties," "uncles" and "mammies" is equally gone. Uncle Tom and Sambo have passed on, and even the "Colonel" and "George" play barnstorm…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, Karen Tucker. "Last Hired, First Fired: Black Women Workers during World War II" in the Journal of American History, Vol. 69, No. 1. (Jun., 1982), pp. 82-97.

Barnes, Albert C. Negro Art and America. (accessed 2 December 2007) http://etext.virginia.edu/harlem/BarNegrF.html

Brown, Claude. Manchild in the Promised Land. New York: Touchstone, 1999.

Charles S. Johnson. Black Workers and the City. (accessed 2 December 2007) http://etext.virginia.edu/harlem/JohWorkF.html
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Argentina in the 19th Century Gauchos and Cultured City Folk

Words: 663 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26501685

Independence

What did Domingo Sarmiento think of Latin America in the 1800s?

As president of Argentina from 1868 to 1874, Sarmiento had a very close-up vantage point from which to draw conclusions about Latin America, and he reported on what he had observed through the book Facundo. It is not rare that a country's president becomes a published author following his term in office -- although modern day presidents and prime ministers use ghost writers and editors -- but Sarmiento's work is unique, personal, and very descriptive albeit his biases are sharply noted.

Sarmiento believed that most of the "barbarism" occurred in the countryside, where the gauchos lived and worked, and he believed that the civilized people tended to live in the cities, not the countryside. "Everything that characterizes cultured peoples" can be found in the city, he wrote. He mentions "European" often as he is describing the "elegant manners"…… [Read More]

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Cultures in Texas the United

Words: 1317 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8998624

S. today are called African-Americans or Afro-Americans. As Africans had been brought into the U.S. they had been deprived by their traditions, being forced to integrate in the larger, more complex community. In spite of the slave owners and traders' efforts to break them completely from their culture, during their first years on American land, the blacks managed to keep most of their traditions. However, as time passed, black traditions changed into American traditions and African people became Americans.

Black people in Texas have a very rich history and as they've managed to become independent as a minority, their culture has also been revived. Moreover, the black community in Texas has contributed to the Texan history as it has also contributed to the birth of several important Texans.

A large part of the Hispanics residents of the U.S. inhabit the state of Texas and their number has visibly grown during…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Clutter, a.W., Nieto, R.D. Understanding the Hispanic Culture. Retrieved February 4, 2009 from the Ohio State University Web site: http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/5000/5237.html

Glasrud, a. B, & Smallwood, J. (2007). The African-American Experience in Texas: An Anthology. Texas Tech University Press.

1994-1995). Black-Texans. Retrieved February 4, 2009 from Texas Almanac Web site: http://www.texasalmanac.com/culture/groups/black.html

2000). The Spanish, Mexicans, Tejano. Retrieved February 4, 2009 from UTSA's Institute of Texan cultures Web site: http://www.texancultures.utsa.edu/publications/texansoneandall/tejano.htm
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Turkey and Culture

Words: 720 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32968871

Culture & Marketing in Turkey

Turkey & Culture

Author's note with contact information and more details on collegiate affiliation, etc.

Culture & Marketing in Turkey

Culture is a critical aspect of successful marketing strategies. Marketing firms must perform diligent and thorough research on their prospective consumers for several reasons. Culture is a key factor in determining tastes, aesthetic preferences, behavior, values, and perspectives on other cultures, among other things. As such, it is the responsibility of any marketing department to know the culture to which they intend to market products for consumption. This holds true in any location, though the focus of this paper will be upon the country of Turkey. Turkey is a country that is part of both Europe and Asia, and this trait alone can provide some insight as to the complexity and richness of the culture. This paper will examine the impact of culture on multinational…… [Read More]

References:

Cavusgil, S Tamer, Civi, E., Tutek, H.H., Dalgic, T. (2003) "Doing Business in Turkey." Thunderbird International Business Review, 45(4), 467 -- 479.

Hollis, N. (2009) "Culture Clash: Globalization Does Not Imply Homogenization." Millard Brown: POV, 1 -- 4.
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Drug Culture Final the Second

Words: 1767 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88370120

Brick and Cutter's Way can be categorized as both thrillers and films noir due to the fact that the narratives of these films revolve around an investigation into the mysterious deaths of young women at the hands of power-hungry men. While the investigation in Brick is fueled by a desire to expose a drug trafficking ring at a high school, thus making drugs a central issue, drugs in Cutter's Way are not a factor that contributed to the deaths of the individuals Cutter was looking into. However, that is not to say that drugs to not play a major role, as Cutter is heavily addicted to alcohol, which causes him to be discredited despite the fact that he is able to solve not only the crime at hand, but also reveal why his father was targeted by the same murderer years before.

On the other hand, Cabin in the Woods,…… [Read More]

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Egyptian Culture The Writer Explores

Words: 1813 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27761426



The children also rent decorated bikes to ride around town on for the holiday. It is a time for families to get together and celebrate with food and music and fellowship.

For a lot of families from working neighborhoods, Eid celebration also includes picnics in green areas including parks, zoos, botanical gardens and even green islands on major roads (Osama, 2004)."

Islam

Most of Egypt is Islam. Like Christians, the Islam followers trace their roots to Abraham and believe in one God who is universal. In Islam God is referred to as ALLAH which means One Universal God.

The Quran is the final revealed Word of God and provides the complete guide for human behavior. Its text was revealed directly to the prophet Muhammad between 610 and 632 C.E. Muhammad is revered by Muslims as the last of God's prophets but is not worshipped (Ahmad, 2005)."

Men and women are…… [Read More]

References

Ahmad, Seemi (2005)Islam in a Nutshell

 http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/islam.htm 

Carta, Joyce (2004) Egyptian Food

 http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/food.htm
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Target Culture ID 72669-Title Big

Words: 420 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20579174

They too will be offered the opportunity to sell some of their products or services in the hotel through a written contract that insures both parties will make lots of money.

A project that I will be single, and in an area where there is an equal number of men to women that will provide a suitable dating atmosphere. This area will have an ample number of eating establishments, and places for entertainment. There probably will not be a large population of families in the area, except those visiting the area from another city/state or country. The market will be relatively stable in the hospitality and entertainment industry, with substantial room for growth and development. I believe that although I may only be able to build one hotel in the period, there is a possibility I will own other buildings and business within the five years as long as the…… [Read More]

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Drug Culture in Film

Words: 1707 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86662737

Drug Culture Midterm

Prior to this course, I had a very narrow interpretation of drug culture in regards to film. The films I was most familiar with were those that focused on marijuana such as Cheech and Chong films, Pineapple Express, Half-Baked, and the Harold and Kumar trilogy among others. Additionally, the only other heroin-centric film I was aware of was Trainspotting, and the only other cocaine-centric film that had made an impression on me was Blow. However, as the term progressed, I became aware of how the general public perceived these drugs and how addiction was depicted in films.

Additionally, my definition of drug culture expanded to include things that are not necessarily consumed but that still alter a person's perceptions or contribute to addiction. These different types of addictions and mind-altering phenomena are most evident in Videodrome and The Social Network.

Question 1b.

There are several films that…… [Read More]

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American Popular Culture Impact Overseas

Words: 4214 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94179363

The cultural practices are evolved and based on the financial, social and moral understanding and capabilities of the local population, and it has been observed that Americans, Asians and Africans share extremely different perspectives and understanding on these issues, therefore the cultural adoption has been intense in countries where the technological revolution has been of the same intensity as in North America (Zelli, 1993). In some of the cases, the Americans companies has attempted to nullify the concerns and shortcomings of the American culture, by incorporating the cultural values of the local region, and has therefore evolve a different taste for the customers to avail, this has further delighted and fascinated the local population of different regions towards the American culture, for example the American culture has major differences with the Islamic culture adopted in Arab countries, therefore to compensate for such difference the American companies introduced the concept of…… [Read More]

References

David W. Noble. Death of a Nation: American Culture and the End of Exceptional-ism. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 2002

Tafarodi R., Swann W. Individualism-collectivism and global self-esteem: Evidence for a cultural trade-off. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 1996

Trubisky P, Ting Toomey S, Lin S. The influence of individualism collectivism and self-monitoring on conflict styles. International Journal of Intercultural Relations. 1991

Huesmann, Zelli, Fraczek, Upmeyer. Normative attitudes about aggression in American, German and Polish college students. Presented at Third European Congress of Psychology. Tampere, Finland. 1993
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Compare and Contrast 2 Minority Cultures in South Dakota

Words: 1967 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8650404

Minority Culture in South Dakota

Lifestyles, Values and the Economy of Hispanic-Americans and Indian-Americans in South Dakota

The history of the minority groups in the U.S.A. dates back to historical times in the 1800 and their growth has been somehow stable in USA. It is undisputable that the treatment of the minority groups and the Native Americans and the African-Americans ran out of the borders of the tolerance and freedom. It is however notable that the U.S.A. has all through welcomed huge numbers of diverse immigrants and accommodated them as any other born American. It is no longer viable to ignore the issue of the minority groups in each state since even at the national grid, as U.S. Department of State (2006) indicates, the minority groups have played a significant part in all sectors. For instance Hispanics accounted for nearly half of the U.S.A. population increase between July 1, 2004…… [Read More]

References

Ann W.C. & Ruben D.N., (2011). Understanding the Hispanic Culture. Retrieved May 22,

2011 from http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/5000/5237.html

Bloomberg L.P., (2011). South Dakota Grows as Minority Population Surges, Census Finds.

Retrieved May 22, 2011 from http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-02-17/south-dakota-grows-as-minority-population-surges-census-finds.html
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Globalization the Culture of Western

Words: 1094 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62817705

Behrman holds that it was weak political institutionalization rather than a weak civil society that shackled Weimar Germany.

Unfortunately, many scholars of democracy theory and proponents of democratic culture have approached the Weimar Republic already holding the assumption that a democratic culture is necessary for a functioning democracy. With this assumption in place, they then debate whether Weimar Germany really possessed a "democratic culture." A democratic culture is often taken to entail Toqueville's "associationism," a vibrant public sphere, formal outlets for political dissent, and informed political debate. Such inquiries have provided little insight into the nature of healthy democracies because they are based on a faulty assumption, that culture is a condition or even a determinant in the formation of a society's political structure.

As Berman observed, passionate civic engagement among a nation's citizens, without an adequate institutional foundation to channel such passion, can actually be averse to functional democracy.…… [Read More]