Suffering Essays (Examples)

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Faith and the Problem of Pain From the Christian Perspective

Words: 3829 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47868146

Suffering

Tim Murphy

Theology

MA2000D

The existence of human suffering poses a unique theological problem. If God is omniscient, omnipotent, and all-loving, then why does suffering exist? Indeed, this difficulty is confronted in scripture itself: perhaps the most important look into the problem of suffering comes in the Old Testament story of Job. Mainstream Christianity continues to have a variety of ways of approaching this theological question, although historically Christians had a much broader spectrum of responses. For example, today's mainstream Christianity is a result of the establishment of orthodoxy in the face of Gnostic Christians, who used the existence of suffering as a way of questioning whether God was indeed omnipotent or all-loving. Gnosticism instead posits a "demiurge" or "alien god" that created this world and its suffering without being omnipotent or good. ut the oldest mainstream form of Christian orthodoxy today -- represented by the Roman Catholic faith…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Barron, Bishop Robert. "Stephen Colbert, J. R. R. Tolkien, John Henry Newman, and the Providence of God," Word on Fire. Web. 4 Dec 2015.

English Standard Version Study Bible.

John Paul II. Salvifici Doloris. 1984.  http://w2.vatican.va/content/john-paul-ii/en/apost_letters/1984/documents/hf_jp-ii_apl_11021984_salvifici-doloris.html 

Keller, Timothy. Walking With God Through Pain and Suffering. New York: Riverhead Books, 2015.
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Euthanasia through two religions

Words: 1594 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44321676

Suffering is part of life. People feel joy and they feel pain. Christianity and Buddhism share many similarities when it comes to suffering. Christianity provides the story of Job and his suffering at the hands of Satan. Buddhism offers Siddhartha and his journey into enlightenment. While Christianity and Buddhism differ in how they respond to suffering, both are aware suffering is inevitable. The case study of George and his diagnosis of ALS is similar to the stories of Job and Siddhartha. All three came from a means of success and then suffered later on. But it is how that suffering is interpreted that the worldview of each faith can be examined and thus applied to the case of George and his difficulties with ALS.

To begin, Christianity has always included the idea of suffering, with the story of Job being the most prominent example. Job was a good man that…… [Read More]

References

Hesse, H. (2008). Siddhartha (1st ed., p. 19). [Waiheke Island]: Floating Press.

Jordt, I. (2007). Burma's mass lay meditation movement (1st ed.). Athens: Ohio University Press.

Kruse, C. (2012). Paul's letter to the Romans (1st ed., p. 467). Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing.

Olson, C. (2005). The different paths of Buddhism (1st ed., p. 49). New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press.
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Buddhism and Christianity Buddhism Religion

Words: 1868 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40233223

They both emphasize on the teaching of doing good and following rules to live right and happily. They both have vigorous missionary programs, in which they convert people to their religion. In the two religions, the people can worship in groups or individually. The religions have a leader of worship that is a monk in Buddhism and a Priest in Christianity. The two principles in the religion used parables to teach, and they are egalitarians. The teachings on respecting others and treating them as oneself are acceptable in both religions. They both emphasize on charity towards the poor and aspire for greater spiritual perfection.

Differences

The differences are irrefutable, as Buddhism does not talk of a Creator, God while Christianity believes in a divine creator of Universe (allace 26). In Buddhism, the emphasis is on mediation and mindfulness, whereas that of Christianity places stress on prayer. Additionally, Buddhism emphasizes on…… [Read More]

Works cited

Netland, Harold a, and Keith E. Yandell. Buddhism: A Christian Exploration and Appraisal.

Downers Grove, Ill: IVP Academic, 2009. Print.

Wallace, BA. Mind in the Balance: Meditation in Science, Buddhism, and Christianity. New York: Columbia University Press, 2009. Print.

King, Sallie B. Socially Engaged Buddhism. Honolulu: University of Hawai-i Press, 2009. Print.
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History of Development of Blues

Words: 4267 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23025748

Out of about 40 million slaves that were transported from African to the United States, only 15 million of them could survive, however they ended up in pure hell. It was expected of the African-Americans to meet the demands of two ideas, both of which met the needs of the rich white Americans. Thus, where slaves had a disguise to serve their masters and please them, they were just not being honest to themselves in the least bit, and they were living according to the wishes of their masters to escape the beating or to avoid being scrutinized any further. Having said that, just because they had no choice but to live up to the two ideals, it did not mean that there were not any rightfully revengeful and rebellious slaves that went against the books and refused to accept being a cookie cutter cut-out. It is assumed that the…… [Read More]

Works cited

Bensimon, Moshe, Dorit Amir and Yuval Wolf. "Drumming through trauma: Music therapy with post-traumatic soldiers." The Arts in Psychotherapy, 35. 1 (2008): 34 -- 48. Print.

Cohn, Lawrence. Nothing but the blues. New York: Abbeville Press, 1993. Print.

Floyd, Samuel a. The power of Black music. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. Print.

Gussow, Adam. Seems like murder here. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002. Print.
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Christianity Persecution Has Been a Component of

Words: 1080 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77602296

Christianity

Persecution has been a component of the Christian experience since the time of Christ. The oman government periodically led formal persecution campaigns that were significant for the development of Christian identity and consciousness. Ten of these oman persecution campaigns were historically significant, beginning with one led by Nero and causing the martyrdoms of Peter and Paul ("Persecutions in the Early Church," 2013). Martyrdom thus became a core motif for Christians, leading to the tradition of Christian sainthood: "The high regard for the martyrs as the heroes of the church and the privileges assigned to them led to the cult of the saints," ("Persecution in Early Church: Did You Know?" 1990). Although they could be severe, early persecutions of Christians were sporadic and localized, rather than being "a constant experience," ("Persecution in Early Church: Did You Know?" 1990). Once Constantine the Great adopted Christianity as the official religion of ome,…… [Read More]

References

Bible: NIV

"Persecution in Early Church: Did You Know?" (1990). Retrieved online: http://www.christianhistoryinstitute.org/uploaded/50cf7cb17495c9.82992192.pdf

"Persecutions in the Early Church," (2013). Retrieved online: http://www.religionfacts.com/christianity/history/persecution.htm

Reid, D.R. (n.d). Expect to be persecuted. http://www.growingchristians.org/dfgc/persecut.htm
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Sociology and the Effect of

Words: 2125 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72092445



There are things parents can do to help children who have a parent suffering from Parkinson's disease. They can make sure the children understand the disease and how it affects the parent. They can build a support network of friends and relatives to help out when necessary and to nurture the children when they need it. One man, married to a wife with Parkinson's writes, "Strong wrote her book at a time when the plight of 'well spouses' was ignored by doctors, the government, and even friends, who tended to be concerned only with the ill spouse. 'The rest of the world shies away or just plain flees,' she wrote. 'Few people know who we are and what we need'" (Kondracke, 2001, p. 166). Instead of "fleeing," well relatives need to offer help, support, and concern to the family, and worry about the children, too.

Many children may suffer because…… [Read More]

References

2006.) Contemporary theories and children's lives.

Kondracke, M. (2001). Saving Milly: Love, politics, and Parkinson's disease. New York: Public Affairs.

Lane, M. (2005). Helping your child cope with your PD. Retrieved from the PDF.org Website: www.pdf.org/Publications/newsletters/spring05/Helping_Your_Children.cfm4 Oct. 2006.

Perkin, G.D. (2003). An illustrated pocketbook of Parkinson's disease and related disorders. Boca Raton, FL: Parthenon.
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Bipolar Student in Math and Science Class

Words: 2846 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22507836

ability of a bipolar student to learn concepts in the subjects of Math and Science in the general classroom setting

According to sources retrieved from the American Medical Journal, bipolar disorder refers to the psychiatric diagnosis for a mood disorder. Individuals who suffer from bipolar disorder undergo various symptoms such as experiencing episodes of a frenzied state whose medical term is mania (or hypomania). This medical condition typically alternates with episodes of depression. Doctor Annabel Hathaway, a senior psychologist at the University of Stanford, children suffering from bipolar disorders have high intelligence quotient and commendable talents. However, they may have difficulties in coordinating their reflexes and reaction time. They also experience difficulties making transitions, and they may as well have co-morbid syndromes that that render them anxious, inattentive, distractible, moody, argumentative, and withdrawn. Likewise, bipolar disorders may render such children acute and perfectionist.

Psychologists explain that children with bipolar disorders…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anglada, Tracy The Student with Bipolar Disorder: An Educator's Guide BP Children Organization <  http://www.bpchildren.org/files/Download/Educator.pdf >

Child & Adolescent Bipolar Foundation Educating the Child with Bipolar Disorder State: Arizona Department of Education

Grier, Elizabeth Chesno, Wilkins, Megan L. And Carolyn Ann Stirling Pender Bipolar Disorder: Educational Implications for Secondary Students Michigan: University of Michigan Press

The Balanced Mind Foundation An Educator's Guide to Pediatric Bipolar Disorder < http://www.thebalancedmind.org/learn/library/an-educators-guide-to-pediatric-bipolar-disorder>
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Theodicy in Thornton Wilder's the

Words: 2746 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78577330

" (16) In other words, since God is not completely benevolent, one must protest against God for allowing that which is not just or that which is evil to exist.

In an illustration of this strategy, oth refers to the work of Elie Wiesel, who "shows that life in a post-Holocaust world can be more troublesome with God than without him" (9). In his works, Wiesel looks at different forms of theodicies and does not accept them for various reasons. Because of his experiences, he has put together his own personal theory of theodicy that allows him to accept God while still handle his violent experiences. In his book Night, Eliezer, who, despite his young age, has studied Jewish theology, at first wonders the suffering is due to committed sins, but then changes his mind and sees it instead as something to which someone must submit.

In Chapter 3 of…… [Read More]

References Cited:

Hick, John. Evil and the God of Love. New York: MacMillan, 1967.

Kushner, Harold. When Bad Things Happen to Good People. New York: Random House, 1981.

Peterson, Michael. The Problem of Evil. Notre Dame, IND: Notre Dame University, 1992

Roth, John. "Theodicy of Protest" Davis S.T. (Ed.), Encountering Evil: Live Options in Theodicy, Westminster: John Knox Press, 2001
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Real-Life Case Study the Research Informant Selected

Words: 2434 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67730139

eal-Life case study

The research informant selected is a soldier who was deployed in Iraq who is 35 years of age and who was in the army for 15 years. He suffered from drug and alcohol addiction along with post traumatic stress syndrome. At this time he is still battling both of these conditions. When interviewing him, the clear purpose of this project was stated without a doubt, and he was informed of his voluntary participation, along with the fact that he was allowing us to use all the data that he provided. He was reassured of the complete and utter privacy of his responses and how all of his data was going to be kept confidential. For example, he was told that he name was never going to be recorded, none of the researchers would ever have it; instead he was going to be given a number. Furthermore, while…… [Read More]

References

Berger, K. (2009). Invitation to the Life Span. New York: Psychology Press.

Ptsd.va.gov. (2013). Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS). Retrieved from Ptsd.va.gov:  http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/assessment/adult-int/caps.asp 

Schmal, C. (2004). Psychophysiological reactivity to traumatic and abandonment. Psychiatry Research, 33-42.

Walker, P. (2013). Managing Abandonment Depression in Complex PTSD. Retrieved from peter-walker.com:  http://www.pete-walker.com/managingAbandonDepression.htm
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Citizens in the United States

Words: 2671 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64071472

This is achieved through the increase of metabolic rates and lean body mass while eliminating excess fat and burning calories. hile the required amount of physical activity differs based on the caloric intake and body type, sports can assist an individual to maintain a healthy weight. For people who want to maintain a huge amount of weight loss, high-intensity sports can be the best option while reasonably-intensive physical activity helps in realizing weight stability.

ell-being of Muscles and Bones:

As previously mentioned, bone and muscle injuries are some of the most common health-related risks in sports participation. However, as an individual grows older, there is need for maintenance of the well-being of muscles and bones for proper body functioning. hen an individual takes into consideration the necessary precaution measures, sports and physical activity becomes increasingly for muscles, bones, and joints health. Participation in sports provides people with the required elements…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bahr, Roald, and Lars Engebretsen. Sports Injury Prevention. Vol. 17. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, 2011. Print.

Chambers, Abigail E.L., and Grant Cooper. "The Role of Sports and Activity in Osteoarthritis." Arthritis MD - Trusted Arthritis MD - Arthritis Information from Doctors Who Care. Arthritis MD. Web. 16 Nov. 2011. .

Cohen, Bradley. "How Does Playing Sports Affect Your Health?" LIVESTRONG.COM - The Limitless Potential of You. Demand Media, Inc., 30 Mar. 2011. Web. 16 Nov. 2011. .

Gotlin, Robert S. Sports Injuries Guidebook. Illustrated ed. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2008. Print.
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Multisystem Failure in a Geriatric Patient

Words: 2043 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98093554

Multisystem Failure in a Geriatric Patient

Multisystem Failure in a Geriatric

eflect on your analysis of the geriatric patient in multisystem failure by doing the following:

Explain key immediate assessments you should make that would help assess the patient's homeostasis, oxygenation, and level of pain.

There are various diagnoses undertaken in assessing the patient's homeostasis, oxygenation, and level of pain. The immediate objective that nurses prioritize on is checking the patient's vital symptoms. Vital symptoms form the baseline of the assessment by providing significant information that illustrates whether the most essential organs function as required.

The assessment may involve checking the health status of the patient in the laboratory (Kane, 2004). In the laboratory, there is an assessment of the patient's capillary tube, urine test and blood pressure. When there is simultaneous malfunctioning of the body organs, nurses refer to this condition as multiple organ dysfunction (MODs).

Multiple organ dysfunction…… [Read More]

References

Esteban, A., Anzueto, A., Frutos-Vivar, F., Alia, I., Ely, E.W., Brochard, L., et al. (2004).

Outcome of older patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Intensive Care

Medicine, 30(4), 639 -- 646. Evidence Level IV: Nonexperimental Study.

Happ, M.B., Baumann, B.M., Sawicki, J., Tate, J.A., George, E.L., & Barnato, A.E. (2010).
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Erroneous Thinking Behind Genetic Discrimination

Words: 914 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29290555

Newspaper Opinion Editorial

With advances in genetic studies, Canadians can learn if they are at risk of developing devastating diseases -- and so can their insurance companies. Genetic discrimination is growing as an increasing number of people are opting for genetic tests, including people at risk of developing Huntington's disease, a degenerative brain disorder that cannot presently be cured or slowed. Children of parents with Huntington's disease have a 50% chance of developing the disorder, and genetic testing can narrow the probability ratio even further.

Genetic discrimination is unfair and the result of faulty, speculative thinking. Genetic discrimination is misleading also misleading as it is based on probability prediction, which can be absolutely incorrect. Genetic discrimination is defined as "the differential treatment of asymptomatic individuals or their relatives on the basis of their real or assumed genetic characteristics. Consider that for many individuals whose parents do have Huntington's disease, only…… [Read More]

Sources:

Ethical Issues in Genetic Testing. (2008, June). Number 410. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists [Web]. Retrieved  http://www.acog.org/ 

Resources%20And%20Publications/Committee%20Opinios/Committee%20on%20Ethics/Ethical%20Issues%20in%20Genetic%20Testing.aspx

CTV.ca News Staff (2009, June 9). Some Canadians suffering 'genetic discrimination.' Bell Media. Retrieved  http://www.ctvnews.ca/some-canadians-suffering-genetic-discrimination-1.406308 

Lapman, E.V., Kozma, C. And Weiss, J. (1996, October 25). Science, 274. Genetic discrimination: Perspectives of consumers.
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Overload Are Organizations Likely to Find Better

Words: 1676 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27470771

Overload

Are Organizations Likely to Find Better Solutions to Information Overload Through Changes to Their Technical or Social Systems?

In various forms, we human beings are suffering from information overload. The term "Information Overload" clicks one sentence in our minds and that is "Too Much Information." The information theorists have defined typologies that distinguish between data, information and knowledge. Most organizations are unable to identify relevant material on timely basis; this requires management through information tools. This essay is based on an analysis whether better solutions to information overload can be achieved through changes to organizations' social systems or technical systems- or both? This essay also explains how a "socio-technical" perspective involving joint consideration of both systems together may be better than dealing with either system by itself.

Are Organizations Likely to Find Better Solutions to Information Overload Through Changes to Their Technical or Social Systems?

The term "Information Overload"…… [Read More]

References

Bell, B.K. (2000, February). The Role of Email on Information Overload in Organizational Managers. Retrieved July 26, 2012 from http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1029&context=fac_dis

Edmunds, A., & Morris, A. (2000). The Problem of Information Overload in Business Organizations: A Review of the Literature. International Journal of Information Management, 20, 17-28.

Figure from www.crmbuyer.com. (2009, April 16). Drowning in Data: Web Analytics and Information Overload. Retrieved July 26, 2012 from  http://www.crmbuyer.com/story/66810.html .

Heylighen, F. (2002, April 12). Complexity and Information Overload in Society: Why Increasing Efficiency Leads to Decreasing Control. The Information Society. Retrieved July 26, 2012 from  http://pespmc1.vub.ac.be/Papers/Info-Overload.pdf .
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Psychology of Religion

Words: 540 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76800587

problem of evil and suffering has been an issue since the beginning of time. Carl Jung has written passionately and eloquently about the possibility and impossibility of transcending this problem.

According to Jung's reasons for this problem was that God was a schmuck towards Job (and by extension to all innocents who suffer from 'acts of God') due to His not being fully conscious. A strange theory since, it would seem that by definition God is Omniscient.

However, God, in Jung's model, contains all opposites and paradoxes, which includes choosing not to consult his own self.

If he had done so, he could have seen that Job would have been faithful to the end and not needed to take Satan's "bet."

The devil is still able to waltz into heaven in the book of Job and complain about how rotten mankind is. So, it is clear according to Jung, that…… [Read More]

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Juno and the Paycock

Words: 1748 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20757508

Suffering Madonna of Ireland: omen, sentimentality, and mother Ireland

Sean O'Casey's play "Juno and the Paycock" portrays an Ireland where good women and particularly good mothers are the soul and heart of the Irish land, and Irish men are shiftless, murdering, or bad. Army men and unionizing men and worst of all, lawyers, threaten the dignity and the soul of the Boyle family, but only with the integrity of Mrs. Boyle does anything good survive out of the tragedies that ensue over the course of the play.

This deflationary view of men can be seen even if one parses the title of O'Casey's play. The" Juno" of the title is a nickname for the matriarch of the clan, given by her husband to his wife. In contrast, the epithet "paycock" is a dialect rendition of Mrs. Boyle's husband's name, a man who is known as strutting peacock, particularly when he…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Atkinson, Brooks, Ed. The Sean O'Casey Reader. By Sean O'Casey. New York: St. Martin's, 1968.

Gill, Peter. "A New State of Chassis: The Irish Civil War and its background." National Theater. First Published 1989. Last Modified 16 Feb 2005. http://dspace.dial.pipex.com/town/parade/abj76/PG/pieces/ocasey/new_state_of_chassis.shtml

O'Casey, Sean. "Juno and the Paycock."

"Sean O'Casey: Biography" The Moonstruck Theater Database.  http://www.imagi-nation.com/moonstruck/clsc100.html . [1 Mar 2005] Article originally published in Minute History of the Drama. Edited by Alice B. Fort & Herbert S. Kates. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1935.
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The Pros and Cons of Physician Assisted Suicide

Words: 13401 Length: 60 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77432452

Physician Assisted Suicide in Patients With Unbearable Suffering or the Terminally Ill

One of the most hotly debated issues today is physician-assisted suicide. ecently, California became the fifth state to legalize physician-assisted suicide, and there is an increasing likelihood that other states will follow suit in the foreseeable future. The purpose of this study is to determine if the factors chosen have any bearing on those who choose to end their life with physician assisted suicide. In support of this purpose, the objectives of this study were as follows: (a) to research scholarly articles regarding physician-assisted suicide and gather pertinent information into a comprehensive profile; (b) to research whether unbearable suffering is the dominant motive to request physician-assisted suicide; (c) to research whether the race and level of education of the patient are contributing factors when physician-assisted suicide is requested; and, (d) to research whether the type of terminal illness…… [Read More]

References

Bauer-Maglin, N. & Perry, D. (2010). Final acts: Death, dying, and the choices we make. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

Biller-Adorno, N. (2013, April 11). Physician-assisted suicide should be permitted. The New England Journal of Medicine, 368(15), 1451.

Black's law dictionary. (1990). St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Company.

Boudreau, J. D. & Somerville, M. A. (2013,April 11). Physician-assisted suicide. The New England Journal of Medicine, 385, 15.
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Paul's Thorn in the Flesh

Words: 3667 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84204324

Paul's Thorn In The Flesh

Studying the Bible, it becomes apparent that Jesus handpicked a number of his disciples to continue to spread his message after Jesus ascended to heaven. In addition to the men who followed Jesus before his death and resurrection, the leaders of the movement known as "The Way" included the Apostle Paul. Saul of Tarsus had been one of Jesus' most vocal detractors during Jesus lifetime and was skeptical of Jesus' claims that he was the Messiah. However, when Saul encountered a resurrected Jesus on the Damascus oad, Saul's disbelief disappeared. He converted to what is now known as Christianity and began to travel and share Christ's teachings.

Paul was unique from the other apostles in another significant way; he was the only one who received a thorn in the flesh. What this thorn was is never explicitly stated in the Bible, though it seems to…… [Read More]

References

Barnett, Paul. The Second Epistle to the Corinthians:The New International Commentary

on the New Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1997.

Dawson, Audrey. Healing, Weakness and Power: Perspectives on Healing in Writings of Mark, Luke and Paul. Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock Publishers, 2008.

Deane-Drummond, Celia. Brave New World?: Theology, Ethics, and the Human Genome.
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Los Angeles Preface Introduction

Words: 2637 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82147973

This is her suffering.

LUIS J. RODRIGUEZ, THE REPUBLIC OF EAST LA (2002)

"Unfortunately, Rosalba endured many scary nights staying in dingy hotel rooms with other migrants, mostly women, in downtown Los Angeles. She not only didn't have a man to help but no obvious skills except what she learned on the rancho. She had to survive being cast into a peculiar universe of neon and noise. This was a place where women sold themselves for sex or get stoned, and where people on city buses never say anything to you unless they happen to be drunk or crazy" (229).

In this extract, several things become clear about the nature of Los Angeles and its inhabitants. The migrant, whose group Rosalba joins, represents the suffering of poverty. The "peculiar universe of neon and noise" shows just how far Rosalba feels removed from this artificial, seemingly wealthy world. She has nothing…… [Read More]

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Odyssey Much of Homer's Epic Poem the

Words: 1238 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71290931

Odyssey

Much of Homer's epic poem The Odyssey deals with the trouble the titular character finds himself in, and the suffering he and men must endure as he makes his way home over the course of ten years. Upon cursory examination, one might think that suffering in the Odyssey has some actual value, in that Odysseus is ultimately rewarded for his long-suffering efforts by being able to go home and murder everyone who wanted to marry his wife. However, this does not take into account the majority of the play, in which Odysseus' men suffer with no reward, being brutally killed and tortured for no reason other than to fulfill Poseidon's curse against Odysseus. This is most clear when Odysseus and his men visit the island of the lotus eaters, and by examining this scene in conjunction with the conclusion of the story, it becomes clear that the suffering in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Homer. The Essential Odyssey. Trans. Stanley Lombardo. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing

Company, 2007.
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Ethics Project

Words: 4363 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61479708

Life and Death: The Life Support Dilemma by Kenneth E. Schemmer M.D

Kenneth Schemmer in his thorough, thought provoking book brings to life the controversial subject of the life support issue. For years, many all over the country have pondered, "What if a person were in some kind of an accident and the physicians told them that they were not going to make it?" And all that he or she could do is just lie there in extreme pain waiting for their life to the end. Or even worse case scenario what if they happened to end up completely brain dead? These debated questions are taken on by Dr. Schemmer in making his point that life support decisions may not necessarily be the decision of the family, the doctor or the patient but by a higher being that gives life and takes life. Schemmer uses these controversial questions in his…… [Read More]

References:

Court backs right to die | terminally ill have right to refuse medical life support. (1984, Dec 28). The San Diego Union, pp. A.1-1.

Ackerman, T. (2005, Mar 27). Life support battle shifts / A decade ago, patients families had to press for 'right to die. Houston Chronicle, pp. 1-B.1.

Allen, P. (2000, Oct 07). Right to die upheld despite new euro law, doctors can end life support rules judge. Daily Mail, pp. 33-33.

Dolan, M. (2001, Aug 10). Justices deal setback to right-to-die movement; health: State court bans removal of life support from conscious patients whose wishes are not clear. Los Angeles Times, pp. A.1-A.1.
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Buddhism if the Complexity of

Words: 665 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49533708



There are many ironies and paradoxes embedded within the Four Noble Truths. For example, it is ironic that one must desire liberation from desire. Such seeming contradictions are resolved easily by discerning the difference between the desire for truth, wisdom, and peace vs. The desire for things that are harmful to the psyche such as pride, revenge, or anger. The Four Noble Truths are essentially psychological in nature rather than spiritual or metaphysical. The Four Noble Truths are like a type of cognitive-behavioral therapy.

The Four Noble Truths can be understood as a consistent and coherent whole. In fact, the Four Noble Truths are best understood as a whole rather than being fragmented. When considered as a whole, the Four Noble Truths play themselves out in the person's mind each and every day, possibly each and every moment. The person who becomes more aware of how suffering arises in the…… [Read More]

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Emile Zola and the Movies the Translation

Words: 4466 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20910962

Emile Zola and the Movies

The translation of any work of literature into another medium, even one apparently so closely aligned with the written word as film, is always a chancy proposition. While literature and film focus themselves on the same targets within the minds of their audiences; that of completing an organic connection between the conception and the reception of an idea, the very natures of the two disciplines demand different things of the person who is reading or watching the material. As exciting and enveloping as the best film experience may be, it is still, in its essence a passive experience; every action is already determined, "painted," and set in celluloid by the filmmaker. On the other hand, literature demands much more of its audience. Even when a writer devotes paragraphs to descriptions of various characters or activities, the reader still plays an integral part in the final…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Connors M. & Craddock, J. VIDEOHOUND'S GOLDEN MOVIE RETRIEVER.

Visible Ink Publishing, Detroit, 1998.

Horton, A. & Magretta, J. MODERN EUROPEAN FILMMAKERS AND THE ART OF ADAPTATION. New York, Frederick Unger Publishing Company, 1981.

Katz, Ephraim. THE FI LM ENCYCLOPEDIA. A Perigee Book, New York, New
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Tests You Went and Got

Words: 2118 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73385379



While the medical field agrees that prolonged suffering is not a desired product of medical care it has not yet reached the point of accepting that it is actually torture.

When we are at war we have soldiers how are standing trial for the torture and inhumane treatment of prisoners of war, however, we are not allowed to prevent that same level of torture from being thrust upon our loved ones who are ill / this makes no sense. Making someone endure the fevers, the pain, and the physical maladies that come with many of the life ending diseases today is actually a form of torture. It makes a person suffer against their will and at the hands of someone else, in this case the medical community.

More recently there have been strong arguments in courtrooms regarding Euthanasia and the right to choose to die now rather than later after…… [Read More]

References

____(2006) Jury to Rule Whether Woman Had Right to Die

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

Doerr, Ed. (1997)The Right to Die. The Humanist
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Exegesis of Philippians Christians Throughout

Words: 5438 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25222076

This is the same in our lives, because if we remain steadfast in out faith, our suffering can only serve to further God's work in our lives. Paul's example also highlights our responsibilities to each other, because through our own example we can help other Christians that might be facing the same kind of difficulty as us.

In the next few passages, Paul goes on to discuss something that has undoubtedly crossed the mind of any Christian facing extreme difficult, which is the idea that it might just be better to be done with the world and live eternally in heaven. Paul says that "for to me, living is Christ and dying is gain," to the point that "I am hard pressed between the two: my desire is to depart and be with Christ, for that is far better, but to remain in the flesh is more necessary for you"…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fowl, Stephen. Philippians. Grand Rapids: Wm. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 2005. Print.

Gorman, Michael J. Inhabiting the Cruciform God: Kenosis, Justification, and Theosis in Paul's

Narrative Soteriology. Wm. Eerdmans Publishing Co.: Grand Rapids, 2009. Print.

Hays, Richard. The Moral Vision of the New Testament. T&T Clark: London, 1996. Print.
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UK Mental Health Policy Mental Healthcare Service

Words: 5534 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61308516

UK Mental Health Policy

Mental healthcare service delivery in the UK has been subjected to a series of significant imperative policy in the last few decades, and number of people suffering from mental illness is on the increase. ecent statistics reveal that one out of four people in the UK has been diagnosed of mental problem. (Mental Health Foundation, 2013, Singleton, Bumpstead, O'Brien et al. Meltzer 2001). Although, mental disorders are widespread in the UK, however, mental disorders are predominant in some group than other group. (McGorry, Nordentoft, & Simonsen, 2005).

BME (Black and Minority Ethnic) group are four times more likely to experience psychosis than white people. (National Mental Health, 2010, Heller, et al. 1996). Evidence reveals that incidence of psychosis is significantly higher within Black-African and African-Caribbean groups than the White British Population living in the UK. (Cooper et al., 2008) . Black Caribbean have a record of…… [Read More]

References

Allen, T. (1997). The Invention of the White Race: Volume 2 London, UK: Verso.

American Psychiatric Association (2004) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM IV, Fourth Edition, American Psychiatric Association .

Ballou, M.B. & Brown, L.S. (2002). Rethinking Mental Health and Disorder: Feminist Perspectives. UK, Guilford Press.

Barber, P., Brown, R., Martin, D. (2012) Mental Health Law in England and Wales, 2nd Edition, Learning Matters
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Treatments for PTSD Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress

Words: 1633 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21309840

Treatments for PTSD

Treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients has varied from one context to the other depending on the nature of the disorder. However, over the years, an increased number of research studies have been conducted to establish the best treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder patients. A number of findings have been made public as further research takes place. This study will critically evaluate three articles whilst comparing group treatment and CBT in the tackling of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This evaluation is valuable considering the increased number of victims of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the society today.

Sloan, Bovin, and Schnurr (2012) support the idea of using group treatment for PTSD as the best option given to patients. In the article, they advance the value of treating patients suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder as a group. The article gives an overview picture of the benefits accompanied…… [Read More]

References

Gilman, R., Schumm, J.A., & Chard, K.M. (2012). Hope as a Change Mechanism in the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Journal of Psychological Trauma, vol. 4(3):

270-277

Mulick, P.S., Landes, S.J., & Kanter, J.W. (2012). Contextual Behavior Therapies in the Treatment of PTSD: A Review. International Journal of Behavioral Consultation & Therapy, vol. 7(1): 23-31

Sloan, D.M., Bovin, M.J. & Schnurr, P.P. (2012). Review of group treatment for PTSD.
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Buddhism Is One of the World's Major

Words: 749 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2724681

Buddhism is one of the world's major religions -- yet many dispute whether it should be called a religion at all. Buddhism has been called a 'philosophy' as much as a faith, because of its non-theocratic nature. Although the Buddha is revered as a historical figure, and many Buddhist traditions invest his persona with a kind of miraculous power, it is not necessary to believe in a god or gods to be a Buddhist. Buddhism could be defined as a way of coping with some of the perplexing problems that all religions grapple with to some degree: injustice and suffering. In contrast to the caste system of India, which stressed how karma could determine the cycle of one's birth or rebirth, Buddhism stressed the adherent's need to escape from the endless karmic cycle and to find a sense of peace and detachment called Nirvana.

The first noble truth of Buddhism…… [Read More]

References

Sumedho, Ajahn. (2012). The Four Noble Truths. Retrieved:

 http://www.buddhanet.net/4noble.htm
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Euthanasia Is Illegal Euthanasia Otherwise Known as

Words: 1997 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38325739

Euthanasia Is Illegal

Euthanasia otherwise known as assisted suicide refers to the painless extermination of a patient suffering from terminal illnesses or painful or incurable disease. According to Cavan & Dolan, euthanasia is the practice or act of permitting the death of hopelessly injured or sick individuals in a painless means for the purpose of mercy (Cavan & Dolan 12). The techniques used in euthanasia induce numerous artifacts such as shifts in regional brain chemistry, liver metabolism and epinephrine levels causing death. Advocates of euthanasia trust that sparing a patient needless suffering or pain is a good thing. If an individual is hopelessly hurt or ill with no hope of ever getting well, if such a person is in an unending and unbearable pain and cannot experience the things that make life meaningful, the best option for such patients is euthanasia. Euthanasia raises questions on morals, legal and essence of…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Baird, R. Caring for the Dying: critical issues at the edge of life. New York: Prometeus Books 2003, pp.117

Cavan, Seasmus, Dolan, Sean. Euthanasia: The Debate over the right to die. New York: The Rosen Publishing Group, Oct 1, 2000.

Cohen-Almagor, R. Euthanasia in the Netherlands: The policy and practice of mercy killing. Netherlands: Springer, Aug 3, 2004.

Devettere, Raymond. Practical decision making in health care ethics: Cases and concepts. Georgetown: Georgetown University Press, 2009.
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How Did Gandhi Influence Martin Luther King

Words: 1888 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60362372

Gandhi Influenced Martin Luther King

Martin Luther King Jr. is a historical figure as he helped to win civic liberties and social equality for the Black Americans during the 1950s and 1960s. His approach towards the struggle was based on nonviolent civil disobedience as opposed to armed struggle. In that, he was inspired by the philosophy of nonviolence used by Gandhi to gain independence for India against the British. Despite belonging to two different cultures and historical periods, there is great fundamental similarity in the philosophies of both the leaders. At the same time, King adopts a more active approach and gives relatively less stress on personal suffering and endurance.

hat King adopted from Gandhi's Philosophy

Gandhi initiated the civil disobedience movement against the British rule in the Indian subcontinent. Since the British had military superiority over the local Indian population, Gandhi devised a novel and effective strategy to highlight…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Center for Compassionate Living. Principles of Nonviolence. Center for Compassionate Living, 2012. Accessed on 25 April 2012.

King, Mary, E. Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr.: The Power of Nonviolent Action UNESCO Publishing. 1999. Print

Nojeim, Michael, J. Gandhi and King: The Power of Nonviolent Resistance Greenwood Publishing. 2004. Print

The King Center. The King Philosophy. The King Center, 2012. Accessed on 25 April 2012.
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy CBT Techniques for Combat Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder PTSD

Words: 5327 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85865281

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Combat Veterans With Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Although not limited to veterans, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) may be the single most significant mental health risk to veterans, particularly to those veterans that have seen combat. PTSD is an anxiety disorder, which occurs after a person has seen or experienced a traumatic event including, but not limited to: assault, domestic abuse, prison stay, rape, terrorism, war, or natural disaster (Vorvick et al., 2011). In fact, PTSD is unique among psychiatric diagnosis in that it "requires a specific type of event to occur from which the person affected does not recover" (esick et al., 2008). Veterans are at high risk of PTSD because they experience war, but they also experience many of the other traumatic events that can trigger PTSD in the course of the war. PTSD can have serious lifelong effects for veterans. It can impair…… [Read More]

References

Byers, M.G., Allison, K.M., Wendel, C.S., & Lee, J.K. (2010). Pra-zosin vs. quetiapine for nighttime posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in veterans: An assessment of long-term comparative effectiveness and safety. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 30, 225-229.

Chard, K., Schumm, J., Owens, G., & Cottingham, S. (2010). A comparison of OEF and OIF

veterans and Vietnam veterans receiving cognitive processing therapy. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 23(1), 25-32.

Hassija, C.M., & Gray, M.J. (2010). Are cognitive techniques and interventions necessary? A
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Roettgen Pieta

Words: 1704 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37601396

Roettgen Pieta

In or around the year 1325, an unknown German artist sculpted a dramatic scene central to the story of Christ: the moment at which ary laments the death of her only son. This poignant moment is known as "the pity," or pieta. The pieta scene was popularized toward the end of the thirteenth century, making the Roettgen pieta one of the earliest and most historically significant representations this particular moment of passion. The scene is one that would become pervasive in Christian art and iconography, and studies of pieta sculptures can serve as proxy studies of the evolution of Western art, and Christian-themed Western art in particular. At the time the Roettgen pieta was created, pieces like these were known in German as Andachtsbild, or images used for contemplation[footnoteRef:1]. These images were especially common in Germany during the late medieval and Romanesque periods.[footnoteRef:2] oreover, "as affective meditations increased…… [Read More]

Mercer, Christia. "A Mother's Loss: The Medea and the Roettgen Pieta." Lecture. June 29, 2010.

Mercer, Christia. "Knowledge and Suffering in Early Modern Philosophy: G.W. Liebniz and Anne Conway."  http://blogs.cuit.columbia.edu/cm50/files/2011/10/Mercer-Philosophy.pdf 

Sullivan, R. "Deformity: A Modern Western Prejudice with Ancient Origins." Proceedings of the College of Physicians Edinburgh 31[2001]: 262-266.