Telemachus Essays (Examples)

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Odyssey & Bhagavad Gita Odysseus

Words: 387 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10253310

The goddess' relationship with Odysseus and Telemachus is similar, though she takes more of a parental role with Telemachus, who lacks the maturity of his father. With Penelope, Athena only interacts to the extent that it helps her objectives regarding Odysseus.

5) the Odyssey is more about Telemachus because Odysseus is fully-formed but Telemachus comes of age. Much of Odysseus' tale is more for entertainment while Telemachus' tale is richer in morals and insight.

6) Krishna inspires Arjuna by pointing out that the prince's misunderstandings, such as the nature of life and death, and that for him to stay out of battle would upset the balance of the universe. He realizes that Arjuna must see the truth for himself in order to fight.

7) the Bhagavad Gita stresses that the individual must understand the universe and fulfill his or her role in it - that individualism should not run counter…… [Read More]

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Homeric Epics -- a Comparison

Words: 2127 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12091991

However, when Achilles touches Priam as token that he should have no fear; both gods and mortals are said to be asleep. There is a sense of will in Achilles' gentleness towards the man, and his willingness to touch Priam's sleeve that night. In other words, human and divine reconciliation and pity is not simply a law, humans must accept the will of the gods, but they are also capable of choosing to add or subtract the misery of the world by showing pity to their fellow humans. Odysseus' cleverness, although aided by the gods, is also partly drawn from his own resourcefulness and character, as well as merely because Athena helps him.

Achilles makes what is said to be the greatest gift to Priam, that of Hector's body. In Greek custom, gifts were customary to give to visitors. ith such a gift, Achilles gives up his determination to mourn…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Homer. "The Iliad." Trans. Robert Fagles. New York: Penguin, 1990.

Homer. "The Odyssey." Trans. Robert Fagles. New York: Penguin, 1996
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Paintings by David and Raoux Would Have

Words: 765 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35701295

paintings by David and Raoux would have to begin by pointing out that, although both painters dealt with scenes from classical antiquity, they did so almost 100 years apart. As a result, each artist brought to whatever story he was illustrating the preferences and styles of his own generation, not to mention a hint at the political situation in which he found himself.

Raoux (born 1677, died 1734) lived during The Enlightenment, an intellectual movement associated with the 18th century. Paris was, along with London, a center for the growing belief that human reason "could be used to combat ignorance, superstition, and tyranny and to build a better world." (SU eb site) Particularly, the thinkers of The Enlightenment wanted to be free of the constraints of religion as practiced then, and of the domination of society by an hereditary aristocracy. (SU eb site)

Raoux, in his painting Orpheus and Eurydice,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Jean Raoux." Biography, retrieved 12 April 2004 at http://www.getty.edu/art/collections/bio/a197-1.html

Vidal, Mary. "David's Telemachus and Eucharis: Reflections on Love, Learning, and History."

The Art Bulletin, 1 December 2000.

The Enlightenment." Retrieved 12 April 2004 at http://www.wsu.edu:8080/~brians/hum_303/enlightenment.html
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Ulysses Relationships in Ulysses to

Words: 4073 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31567490

For the first several years of one's life, their mother and father are their world. These first relationships occur at a time when the tiny human is learning the basic of their environment and how to respond to it. A child learns much of their early actions by imitating the role models around them. The relationship that exists between a child and each of their parents will set the tone for how they deal with other relationships that they encounter throughout their life.

In Chapter One we discover that our hero has "issues" with his paternal and his maternal relationship. These relationships overshadow almost any other conflict in the story at this time. It is apparent through Stephen's interactions with Mulligan and Haines that he did not have a strong paternal figure to model. He reacts in a rather passive manner. One must remember that this chapter takes place in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Joyce, James. Ulysses. Hans Walter Gabler (ed). Random House. June, 1986.
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Literature and History

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11710054

Universal Themes in Homer's The Odyssey

Homer's The Odyssey is an ancient work that has managed to survive up to the present time. Virginia Woolf argues that the themes and situations presented in The Odyssey are universal themes that all humans can relate to, despite the passing of time. A consideration of the themes and situations presented in The Odyssey will show that this is true. While The Odyssey is set in a different time and culture, the basic situations and struggles are ones that apply equally to all people. These themes and events include the struggle of being adolescent, the changing relationship between a mother and son, the process of a boy becoming a man and the changing relationship between family members as time passes. Each of these are universal themes and this is what makes The Odyssey as applicable to modern life as it was to ancient life.…… [Read More]

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Odyssey the Suitors Pester Penelope

Words: 959 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12403498

In that case, Odysseus' motives are clear: to slip back stealthily into his house and to sabotage the stupid suitors. However, like any sailor Odysseus weaves yarns throughout the epic. Interestingly, Athena probably lies about her identity more so than Odysseus, suggesting that white lies are not necessarily morally wrong if they are done to accomplish a good goal. Therefore, many of the stories Odysseus tells are a means to an end. Others are ways to impress people: he builds himself up in their eyes so that he seems like a more formidable character. Moreover, Odysseus also likes listening to stories, as he does at Alcinous's palace.

5. Odysseus also makes up clever names as integral parts of his disguises. His propensity points to the hero's astute mind, his cleverness, and his ability to manipulate situations with a touch of humor and mischief too.

6. Odysseus needs to outsmart Polyphemus.…… [Read More]

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Xenia as an Institution of Order in

Words: 927 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26608088

Xenia as an Institution of Order in Homeric Society

Xenia, the custom of hospitality in Homeric society, is widely practiced in Homer's "The Odyssey." While xenia was at times extended to guests out of the goodness of a one's heart, it was more often extended as a method of maintaining order and avoiding conflict. Not only did xenia endear guests to their hosts and hostesses, often moving them to extend returning xenia should the opportunity arise; xenia was also a means of pleasing and honoring the gods, as visitors were believed to be sent from the gods for a specific purpose. When xenia is observed, peace and order prevail, as it did when Odysseus' son Telemachus visited Nestor. When xenia is not observed -- either by host or guest -- chaos ensues.

Regarding Telemachus' visit to Nestor, Telemachus was accompanied by the goddess Minerva and Nestor sought to honor the…… [Read More]

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Odyssey A Collection Many Stories

Words: 625 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34261923

Nestor seems saddened by the fact that some of the best Greek warriors were killed in Troy, including Ajax, Achilles, and Patroclus as well as Nestor's own son. The fact that Nestor's own son died may make him particularly sympathetic, of course, to Telemachus' need to hear news of what happened to his father, and how the Greeks became separated at the end of the Trojan War.

Nestor explains to Telemachus that his father acquitted himself bravely during the siege of Troy, and thus he should be proud of his father's conduct as a warrior. He also says that his father was a wise and noble counselor, and the two were often in agreement during the frequent arguments within the Greek camp. But because Zeus sided with the Trojans, the god was angry with the actions of the Greeks during Troy's sacking, and tried to upset the Greek's homeward journey,…… [Read More]

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Ulysses Is a Poem by Alfred Lord

Words: 1133 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48351746

Ulysses is a poem by Alfred, Lord Tennyson that recounts King Ulysses' experiences during his journey back to Ithaca after fighting at Troy. Throughout the poem, Tennyson is able to develop Ulysses' character through a first-person introspective of the king's experiences, which allow the reader to understand what Ulysses is thinking and what his motivations are.

At the beginning of the poem, it is quickly established that the narrator of the poem is someone of high-ranking, specifically a king. Moreover, the narrator establishes that he is old and that despite his rule and authority, he feels as though his people do not know him. Tennyson writes, "It little profits an idle king,/By this still hearth, among these barren crags,/Matched with an aged wife, I mete and dole/Unequal laws unto a savage race,/That hoard, and feed, and know not me" (Tennyson lines 1-5). In these introductory lines, the narrator also establishes…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Tennyson, Alfred. "Ulysses." Web. 24 October 2012.
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Odysseus Fighting for the Right

Words: 751 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71807751

In the traditions of Greek epics, he has not only been a hero in his lifetime, but strengthens his legacy by passing the ability to his son.

In addition to accomplishing works of great military valor, Odysseus's character also lends to his heroism. Neither he nor Telemachus exercise their physical abilities for their own sake, or to get praise, but both do it for a very valuable reason. During the Trojan ar, Odysseus fights for his people. His desire to return home is inspired by the love of his wife and his family. His anger towards the suitors is not just because one of them might have taken his worldly riches, but more importantly because they have been threatening his wife's devotion to him. That Odysseus is a family man of great character can be best witnessed through his interactions with Calypso, who fell in love with him and forced…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Homer. The Odyssey. 800 B.C.E. The Internet Classics Archive. 7 September 2009.
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Odyssey Homer's Odyssey Reveals Much

Words: 1367 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18307551

That argument - to die young as a hero or to live a long, uneventful life - is at the core of the Iliad. By Book XI, Homer has firmly established Odysseus as a hero for all time, but one whose failings made him distinctly human. Heroes such as Achilles, who had previously been accorded godlike status, are also brought to this level. In particular, the point in the interaction between Odysseus and Achilles where the latter declares "I'd rather live working as a wage-laborer for hire by some other man...than lord it over all the wasted dead." (480-500) reveals much about this concept of human nature. Achilles, having previously chosen to die a hero, now as a shade regrets that choice.

Book XXII illustrates the slaughter of the suitors. This chapter reveals not only the superiority of Odysseus in the ease with which he and his men conduct the…… [Read More]

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Odyssey Odysseus the Family Man

Words: 674 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68197781



Even though Odysseus's family holds high opinions of his character as a family man, his actions with Calypso are the true measures of his character. In book five of the epic poem, Minerva, who goes to rescue Calypso, finds the father and husband "sitting upon the beach with his eyes ever filled with tears of sheer home sickness" (Book V). The poem goes on to explain that while Odysseus is forced to sleep in Calypso's cave each night, he does not do this of his own volition, and would much rather be home. Thus, while Calypso, a goddess, attempts to seduce Odysseus, he does not betray his home and his family, but rather remains homesick for them, while being tired of the goddess. Though Calypso is a goddess of extreme beauty, Odysseus is more enticed with his own wife and son. In fact, Odysseus loves his family enough to cry…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Homer. The Odyssey. 10th ed. trans. Samuel Butler. Gutenberg, 1999. 24 October 2008. http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext99/dyssy10.txt.
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Odyssey Odysseus and Athena as Liars the

Words: 901 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58199671

Odyssey

Odysseus and Athena as Liars

The world of the Odyssey is full of legendary heroes, exploitive gods, crude monsters, and devious men. Homer weaves three separate tales, those of Penelope, Athena, and Odysseus, into an epic tale, suitable for the aftermath of the Iliad, his previous book. Homer moves his characters through difficult situations, usually by leveraging a particular strength or weakness at hand, and these characteristics often include, on the part of the characters, personal traits such as cunningness or the ability to lie in order to achieve a wanted result. In the Odyssey, Homer delves into many different aspects of lies and cunning in particular. For instance, Odysseus the hero uses his cunning mind to defeat his enemies and exact revenge, whereas Athena uses lies to push Odysseus along on his journey, as the attributes he exhibits are favored by the goddess. This paper will examine these…… [Read More]

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Telemakhos Development Into Manhood With the Maturing

Words: 1884 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77008590

Telemakhos development into manhood with the maturing of a young male character portrayed in a film

The Odyssey is recognized as the epitome of epics in literature and mythology by which all other epics are judged. Odysseus' journey home to Ithaca after the Trojan war takes many twists and turns and has all of the elements of an action-packed and epic adventure. However, there is another story developing parallel to that of Odysseus and his crew. ack home in Ithaca, Odysseus has left behind a wife, son, and kingdom that suffer in his absence. Telemakhos has a journey of his own while his father travels the world. "The first four books of the Odyssey are often referred to as the 'Telemachiad, or the song of Telemechus as they focus on the difficulties of a young hero coming of age in a hostile environment." (Lucas) In much the same way that…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Everitt, Nick, et al. "Telemachy." Wikipedia. 19 Mary 2005. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telemachy

Fainelli, Michael. "I, Telemakos." Doublethink: AFF's Print Quarterly. 15 February 2005. http://www.affdoublethink.com/archives/018885.php

Fourie, Dirk. "The art of writing and making films adaptation willard." The Writing Studio. 1993. http://www.writingstudio.co.za/page351.html

Ganapati. "Ganesh, God of India, Symbol and Presence." Ganesha. 17 December 2004.
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Daily Life for Greek Women

Words: 2765 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22352252

Odyssey: Daily Life for Women

When it comes to the Greeks, Homer's Odyssey is recognized as a piece of literature that was not just about gods, men, and creatures, this historical read served as a cultural example about the women and their place in society. This book, provides a wide-ranging view of the Achean's peacetime people. Throughout Odyssey, a person is able to pick up some understanding of what is appropriate or inappropriate in relationships among servant and master, father and son, guest and host, god and mortal, and--notably -- woman and ma. It is clear that the women are the ones that perform an important role in Odyssey. With that said, this essay will explore the daily life of women from the literature Odyssey.

Social customs, marriage, rights and freedoms

While Odysseus is looked at as being an interesting figure, the women persons in the Odyssey are just as…… [Read More]

References

Austin, Norman. Helen of Troy and Her Shameless Phantom. Ithaca: Cornell University Press,, 2009.

Cahill, Jane. Her Kind: Stories of Women from Greek Mythology. Peterborough, Ont: Broadview Press, 2005.

Cohen, Beth. The Distaff Side: Representing the Female in Homer's Odyssey. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

DeBois, Page. Centaurs and Amazons: Women and the Pre-history of the Great Chain of Being. Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2012.
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Classical Mythology Penelope

Words: 2774 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88198114

Penelope: The Crafty Ideal of Greek omanhood

One might think of Achilles, the hero of the Iliad, as the Greek masculine ideal. He triumphs over his enemies in an open agonistic contest because he is a greater warrior than they. He shows the virtue of compassion when he finally yields Hector's body to Priam. Even Achilles's arrogance and his obsession with honor, his inability to deal with slights to his reputation, though they might seem repugnant to our sensibilities, are clearly meant to elicit the sympathy from Homer's audience. They might wish to act in the same way if they stood in his shoes. Yet Odysseus, the hero of the Odyssey, presents an entirely different masculine ideal. He shuns glory because it brings responsibilities that are not really in his best interest. Though a brave and able fighter, he is "the man of many wiles" who triumphs because of his…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Marrou, Henri-Irenee. A History of Education in Antiquity. George Lamb, trans. New York: Sheed and Ward, 1956. 25 Apr. 2008 http://books.google.com/books?id=wv6kSdSFTgMC&printsec=frontcover&sig=xw5IKGFqpYWuvJYrmE0eiYrf1Bk#PPR5,M1.

Ovid. Heroides. Trans A.S. Kline. 2001. 25 Apr. 2008 http://www.tonykline.co.uk/PITBR/Latin/Heroides1-7.htm.
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Business Education Training

Words: 2615 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52713621

Mentoring Process in a Business Setting

In most professions, the first years in a new position are fraught with uncertainties and problems. The need for supporting teachers and people in other professions was cited as far back as the Conant eport (1963). During the next twenty years, many attempts were make to put effective mentoring programming in place throughout the business world. This study will address the level of mentoring which exists in different professions, specifically, education, medicine, and law.

As early as 1962, induction programs that provided assistance to beginning teachers were being described (Shaplin, 1962). Mentoring in a business setting is described as being very desirable and conducive to interaction among the protege' and the established workers (Young & Adams, 2000). Medicine has long had a system of mentoring in place which is called residency. Whether nor not the condition of this process is optimal depends upon to…… [Read More]

References

Anderson & Shannon. (1988). "Toward a conceptualization of mentoring." Journal of Teacher Education, 39(1), 38-42.

Barnett & Kirkpatrick. (1986). California's Mentor Teachers: Two Years of Learning.

San Francisco, CA: Far West Laboratory for Research and Development.

Bolton, E. (1980). "A conceptual analysis of the mentor relationship in the career development of women." Adult Education, 30 (4), 195-196.
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Iliad and or Odyssey

Words: 996 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37885203

Women in the Odyssey

The roles women take in The Odyssey are as varied as society itself. There are good women, weak women, caretakers and even monsters. This paper will discuss three chief aspects women's roles in The Odyssey. The first is the role that mortal women play in the epic. The second is the role immortal women (goddesses) play on Mount Olympus and third the departments of life where women are the most powerful.

The Role of Mortal Women

The women of Homeric society are an integral part of The Odyssey and many of the female characters are held in high esteem. A passage that illustrates this the description of Arete, the wife of Alkinoos:

He "gave her such pride of place as no to her woman on earth is given of such women as are now alive and keep house for husbands. So she was held high in…… [Read More]

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Odyssey Outline Nicolas Katz Homer's

Words: 610 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74397026

" (Book XXIV)

C. Throughout the story, Odysseus uses his wits rather than sheer physical strength to accomplish his goals. At the end of the story, he disguised himself so that he could do this once again. He patiently waited for his opportunity to reveal his true identity to the suitors.

IV. Penelope and some of the servants were faithful to Odysseus, even though he did not return home immediately after the war and was presumed dead.

A, It was not only Penelope who was faithful to Odysseus. Euryclea, sometimes called the nurse and sometimes called the housekeeper, was also faithful.

B. "Nurse, draw me off some of the best wine you have, after what you are keeping for my father's own drinking, in case, poor man, he should escape death, and find his way home again after all." (Book II)

C. Telemachus has little hope that his father is…… [Read More]

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Innocence of the Gods A

Words: 1674 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37824065

By taking part in his destiny, she somewhat disproves Zeus' claim that humans are wrong to suggest that the gods are to blame -- for without her interference, the many suitors would not have been slaughtered by Odysseus.

Athena's speech here, which will fuel the eventual release of Odysseus and his long ride home, continues at this point to describe the situation in which (at the story's beginning) he is imprisoned. She described how he is suffering torments "on a wave-washed island rising at the centre of the seas," where he is held captive by "a daughter of Atlas, wicked Titan." This daughter, Calypso, is herself an immortal, and contemporary of the oldest gods. The Titans were those deific forces which proceeded Zeus and the other Olympic Gods. Cronos, king of the Titans, had been the father of Zeus and over thrown by them. In this overthrow, the old titans…… [Read More]

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Mentoring Human History Is Replete With Stories

Words: 1773 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79294847

Mentoring

Human history is replete with stories and myths of relationships between mentors and their proteges

The term "mentor" has its origin in Homer's epic poem "The Odyssey" in which Odysseus, while going to fight in the Trojan ar, entrusts the care of his son Telemachus to his trusted adviser and friend, Mentor

(Kalbfleisch and Keyton, 189). A similar mentor / protege relationship appears in other myths such as the one between Merlin the magician and King Arthur. More concrete examples can be found in American history when President Thomas Jefferson served as mentor to James Madison and James Monroe -- both of whom went on to become U.S. Presidents themselves. (Ibid.) In recent times too, educators, psychologists, and business leaders have recognized mentoring as an important tool for individual development, especially for the "at risk" youth. In this paper, I shall describe what mentoring is, its importance in the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Jekielek, Susan M. et. al. "Mentoring: A Promising Strategy for Youth Development." Child Trends: Research brief. February 2002. June 7, 2005. http://12.109.133.224/Files/MentoringBrief2002.pdf

Kerka, Sandra. "New Perspectives on Mentoring." ERIC Digest. 1998. June 7, 2005.  http://www.ericdigests.org/1998-3/mentoring.html 

Kalbfleisch, Pamela J. & Joann Keyton. "Power and Equality in Mentoring Relationships." Chapter in Gender, Power and Communication in Human Relationships. Cody, Michael J. & Pamela J. Kalbfleisch Eds. Hillsdale, NJ: 1995

'A Message from the Secretary." Yes, You Can: A Guide for Establishing Mentoring Programs to Prepare Youth for College October 1998. June 7, 2005. http://www.ed.gov/pubs/YesYouCan/letter.html
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Comparative Study Between Homer's Odyssey and the Coen Brothers O Brother Where Art Thou

Words: 11490 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45269949

O rother, Where Art Thou?

Homer in Hollywood: The Coen rothers' O rother, Where Art Thou?

Could a Hollywood filmmaker adapt Homer's Odyssey for the screen in the same way that James Joyce did for the Modernist novel? The idea of a high-art film adaptation of the Odyssey is actually at the center of the plot of Jean-Luc Godard's 1963 film Contempt, and the Alberto Moravia novel on which Godard's film is based. In Contempt, Prokosch, a rich American dilettante film producer played by Jack Palance, hires Fritz Lang to film a version of Homer's Odyssey, then hires a screenwriter to write it and promptly ruins his marriage to rigitte ardot. Fritz Lang gamely plays himself -- joining the ranks of fellow "arty" German-born directors who had earlier deigned to act before the camera (like Erich von Stroheim in Wilder's Sunset oulevard, playing a former director not unlike himself, or…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Peter Biskind, Easy Riders, Raging Bulls How the Sex-Drugs-and-Rock'N'Roll Generation Saved Hollywood. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1999. Print.

Cavell, Stanley. Pursuits of Happiness: the Hollywood Comedy of Remarriage. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1984. Print.

Connors, Catherine. Petronius the Poet: Verse and Literary Tradition in the Satyricon. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Print.

Doom, Ryan P. The Brothers Coen: Unique Characters of Violence. Santa Barbara, Denver and Oxford: Praeger / ABC-CLIO, 2009. Print.
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Warrior Hero A Stranger in a Strange

Words: 2455 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70639141

arrior Hero: A Stranger in a Strange Land

The figure of the hero is set apart from the common herd of ordinary men by virtue of his special qualities and abilities; in some works, this separateness is literal - he is in a strange land apart from his own kin. To see how this alienation enhances the tale of the hero's conflict, The Odyssey, Beowulf and The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice will be considered.

Odysseus, Beowulf and Othello are all warrior heroes. Odysseus, in The Odyssey, has been instrumental in the victory at Troy, and now fights to return to Ithaca and bring his men safely home; more struggles await him there. Beowulf, a great fighter who has proven his mettle in many conflicts, hears about the depredations of Grendel on Heorot Hall and journeys there to rescue Hrothgar's people. His role in the conflicts against the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alexander, Michael, trans. Beowulf, Penguin Classics. New York: Viking Penguin, 1973.

Cook, Albert, trans. Homer: The Odyssey. New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1967.

Shakespeare, William. The Tragedy of Othello, The Moor of Venice, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare. London: Abbey Library.
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Goddesses Women Are Often Conflicted

Words: 619 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37610728

Their sexual desire is as strong as their male counterparts, revealing much about the way women were viewed in ancient society. Women were not shown as chaste, innocent, or virginal. Prostitutes and single women both play major roles in the Epic of Gilgamesh and in the Odyssey. In the Epic of Gilgamesh, a prostitute transforms Enkidu completely with her sexual prowess. The power of female sexuality is explored in Homer's Odyssey too. The war hero meets and lives with several women on his way home to Penelope. Odysseus seems uniquely able to seduce women and many fall deeply in love with him: especially Calypso and Circe. Calypso and Circe are independent, unmarried women with strong sex drives.

The titular hero of Gilgamesh seems more enraptured with his burly male friend than with the females he encounters. Gilgamesh is not motivated by the love of a woman, and unlike Odysseus is…… [Read More]

References

Epic of Gilgamesh.

Homer. Odyssey.
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O Brother Where Art Thou And the

Words: 1129 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84605427

O Brother Where Art Thou? And the Odyssey

In the film "O Brother Where Art Thou?" The filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen loosely paralleled the epic found in the Odyssey. Though there are some obvious parallels between the story and the movie, there are numerous similarities which are much subtler. These can be found in scenes, settings, characters, and plot. A close examination of the movie reveals the multiple layers of the film's similarity to the epic work.

Of course, the most obvious comparisons are Odysseus and Ulysses, Penelope and Penny, and the Sirens and the "Sireens." But, there are also additional character similarities. The foot stomping politician Menelaus 'Pappy O'Daniel has the same first name as the King of Sparta, who fought beside Odysseus at Troy. Furthermore, it is no mistake that Homer, the author of the Odyssey, shares the same name as Homer Stokes, the man who was…… [Read More]

References

Coen, J. & Coen, E. (2000). O brother, where are't thou? Los Angeles: Touchstone Pictures.

Homer, The Odyssey. Retrieved December 10, 2011 from MIT website:

 http://classics.mit.edu/Homer/odyssey.html
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Weaving Power of Athena and Penelope Homer's

Words: 1965 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94371648

Weaving Power of Athena and Penelope

omer's tale of the Odyssey is populated by many female characters, ranging in nature from the silent and submissive to the ferociously lethal. If one were to pick out two women who are most influential in the shaping of the story, however, the choice would certainly linger on the strange dyad of Athena and Penelope. Athena serves as the direct initiator of much of the action, and it is her force of will that drives the return of Odysseus and the death of the suitors. Penelope, on the other hand, is the inspiration which motivates the principle actors -- for herself, she takes precious little action and is deeply passive, even paralyzed, yet her very existence is enough to spur Odysseus from the side of his goddess-lover and to inspire the blind devotion of her suitors. There are certain ways in which Penelope and…… [Read More]

Homer. The Odyssey. trans. Samuel Butler. Available from The Internet Classics Archive. http://classics.mit.edu/Homer/odyssey.mb.txt. 11 January 2005.

Homer. The Odyssey. trans. Samuel Butler. Available from The Internet Classics Archive. http://classics.mit.edu/Homer/odyssey.mb.txt. 11 January 2005.

Homer. The Odyssey. trans. Samuel Butler. Available from The Internet Classics Archive. http://classics.mit.edu/Homer/odyssey.mb.txt. 11 January 2005.
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Ulysses by Lord Alfred Tennyson

Words: 915 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53904745

ith this, Tennyson comments that every stage of life is a learning process and just because one is older does not mean learning stops. In fact, it is old age that has made him see how youth can be wasted. Every moment is a gift. I think that he only sees this more as he looks to his son and Telemachus' accomplishments. He is proud of his son's leadership. This makes him comfortable with leaving again. He has come to peace with knowing it has not been his kingdom for a longtime.

ith the above in mind, the view of old age is at times solemn and hard to accept for someone like Ulysses. This brings to mind maybe the human condition has not changed over the years. It is more than likely possible one feels different emotions upon reflection of life and the future. Still there is hope as…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Tennyson, Alfred. "Ulysses." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Ed. M.H.

Abrams. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1986. 1108-1110.
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Odyssey by Homer - Books

Words: 750 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41924531

Nevertheless, I want to get home, and can think of nothing else" (Homer, 2000). Thus, Penelope serves as the catalyst for bringing Odysseus home, and shows that beauty is not all a man looks for in a wise and loving mate. A literary critic writes of her, "Penelope is famous in myth as the waiting wife, faithful -- or otherwise. Odysseus' return will end that phase of her existence and her fame rivaling that of famous women of the past" (Ahl & oisman, 1996, p. 31). However, that does not stop her from longing for Odysseus' return and their reuniting. She is a good, decent woman, who raises a good son alone, makes a living, and never gives up hope. In that, she is an engaging heroine and a fine match for Odysseus, who deserves a woman who respects and trusts him, as well as loves and cherishes him.

Penelope…… [Read More]

References

Ahl, F., & Roisman, H.M. (1996). The Odyssey re-formed. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

Homer. (2000). The Odyssey. Retrieved from the University of Oregon Website: http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~joelja/odyssey.html6 Oct. 2006.
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Inner Truth and Outer Truth the Forefathers

Words: 3475 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76557239

Inner Truth and Outer Truth

The forefathers of our country were not known for their emotional clarity. Neither were they known for expressing publicly their private sense of self. Those who became known at all were known for their hard work and dedication to the public causes meant to benefit the common good. We can perceive them only through our own eyes, much changed by the passage of time.

It is not for us to judge them, but to seek to understand as we hope that those who come after us will seek to understand us. The writings that historical figures have left us reveal their lives in guarded ways, in styles they had been taught were good and proper. If we search closely we may know something of what went on in their inmost hearts. John Woolman sat beside Newbegun Creek and listened quietly for Truth to "open the…… [Read More]

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Ulysses An Odyssey of Errors Critics of

Words: 5176 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77075890

Ulysses: An Odyssey of Errors

Critics of James Joyce call his work cryptic and rambling, not easily followed by most readers. They proclaim that it lacks plot and classical elements of modern literature. However, Joyce did not intentionally write a bad novel, rather he was experimenting with a new literary style, one which broke almost all of the rules of modern literature. None the less, there have been those in society who have attempted to "correct" and "improve" upon Joyce's works. These attempts at "improvement" are to be the subject of this research. This research will approach the controversy surrounding Ulysses in reference to its place as a piece of art. In such a context, it is doubtful whether later versions of Ulysses have succeeded in clearing up the obscurities in the original novel, but rather have served to further confuse the issue.

Joyce was the first to use the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Davies, John. "Kidd's craft in editing." The Times Higher Education

Supplement.February 12, p. 19. 1993.

Ellmann, Richard. James Joyce.New York: Oxford University Press. 1977.

Gabler, Hans Walter. Ulysses: A Critical And Synoptic Edition. Garland: New York.
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Iliad and or Odyssey

Words: 983 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63128125

Religion in the Odyssey of Homer

Homer has the reputation of having "given the Greeks their gods." In so doing Homer has created a type of religion that does not have one god, but one that has many. Each god governs over one or more aspect of the world. This type of religion is known as polytheism, more than one god, as opposed to monotheism, one supreme God. Because there are many gods, no one god is omnipotent, having power over everything, as is God in the Christian, Jewish and Muslim religions. This paper will explore the roles of Homer's gods and how they fit into the religion that Homer has created. The paper also explores the idea that the sort of religion that Homer created does exist today.

The gods in The Odyssey do not create the men that they preside over. The gods are not overpowering, but work…… [Read More]

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Depictions of Marriage in Greek Myth

Words: 2302 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73264203

Marriage in Greek Myth

efore we discuss the depictions of marriage in the Theogony, the Homeric Hymn to Demeter and the Odyssey, perhaps we should first discuss the real- life ancient Greek marriage rituals and reveal their attitude towards marriage.

Indeed, many of the things we see in Greek myths happened in real life as well. For example, the Greek girls usually married quite young, around the age of 14, which was meant to ensure that the girl was a virgin and pure in mind and body. "Marriage to a family member was an acceptable alternative and occasionally encouraged in order to consolidate family wealth"- if we look at many of the marriages between gods (taking only this example), we will notice that many of them were affiliated. Remember, for example, that almost all of the Olympian Gods were in some way related, most of them being brothers and sisters,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Roll, Rose. Gender Ideology in Myth: The Place of the Female Within Male Order. January 2003. On the Internet at http://www.gradesaver.com/ClassicNotes/Titles/eumenides/essays/essay1.html

2. Ancient Greek Marriage. On the Internet at http://www.pogodesigns.com/JP/weddings/greekwed.html

Ancient Greek Marriage. On the Internet at http://www.pogodesigns.com/JP/weddings/greekwed.html

The same excellent article on Ancient Greek Marriage that can be found online at http://www.pogodesigns.com/JP/weddings/greekwed.html
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Odyssey & Aeneid Homer's Odyssey

Words: 937 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88408408

Eumaeus heard the discussion and said: "Don't listen to this girl, she has gone mad after having lost her father, the queen is not ready to pick a suitor yet!" I couldn't tell Eumaeus about my arrangement as he could have ruined it all.

After all the suitors had gathered in the great hall, I've locked all of the doors so that none could escape my father's revenge. My father appeared, and, as if he knew what my plan had been, he asked me for his armor and for his weapons. Soon enough, the great hall boiled as my father murdered every single one of my mother's suitors.

The story of Aeneis pretty much resembles that of Odysseus and like the Greek hero, the Trojan goes through great efforts until reaching his destination. Homer's influence on the Aeneis is seen clearly across the epic.

However, in an attempt to give…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Homer. "The Odyssey."

2. Virgil. "The Aeneis."
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Odyssey Journal Throughout the Iliad

Words: 375 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87663999

I believe both "great" mean got what they deserved in the afterlife.

Journal Part Two

In the Greek world, heroism, valor, and bravery were the greatest of all characteristics, so it is fitting that the Greeks' idea of hell is people walking around without unmotivated, unable to be brave. Americans' version of hell would be a different one, filled with all of the little frustrations of life. Some people would be caught in endless lines in department stores. Others, would be forever in a traffic jam. Still others would he stuck on the line with an infuriating member of customer service forever. Maybe some would get the mail each day, constantly finding letters about matters that they had resolved, and they would have to spend every day talking to the same companies and telling the same stories over and over again. These seem to be the little things that bother…… [Read More]

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Oracles in Oedipus Rex at

Words: 610 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19723253

Their prophecies completely shape the life of Oedipus. It was the oracle who informed Oedipus that he will kill his father and marry his mother. This prophecy led him to abandon Corinth for fear of killing his father and marrying his mother. When he left Corinth he came across a man who he did not know was Laius and killed him. He married his wife Jocasta and towards the end of the play finds out that the prophecy of the oracle did come true. Laius and Jocasta were his biological parents. Laius was killed by his son, Oedipus and according to the prophecy of the oracle; Oedipus marries his mother, Jocasta. Regardless of whatever actions either of the parties took, fate could not be escaped. The oracles warned them about the future and they took steps then led them to the fulfillment of the prophecy. Both Oedipus and Jocasta were…… [Read More]