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Man Made Disaster The More

Words: 1179 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 21009972

" hile it is true that some plane crashes cannot be prevented, there are measures that can be taken to ensure that when a crash does occur, the proper help gets to the scene in time.

The first secondary measure for a plane crash is "Foster informed, empowered individuals and communities." hether the witness of a crash is a doctor or a hospital secretary, everyone can play a role in assisting at the scene. If nothing else, the person can call authorities and report the crash. For hospital staff, education in basic first-aid is standard at most hospitals and this includes sufficient knowledge to aid a victim in stopping bleeding or splinting a leg.

The second measure is "Develop and maintain the workforce needed for national health security." ith most hospitals understaffed, there is a real need for more nurses in the event of an emergency. Otherwise, a nearby hospital…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baker S, Brady J, Shanahan D, Guohua L (2009). Aviation-Related Injury Morbidity and Mortality: Data from U.S. Health Information Systems. Aviat Space Environ Med, 80(12): 1001-5.

Center for Disease Control (1992). A Framework for Assessing the Effectiveness of Disease and Injury Prevention. Accessed on 30 April 2012 at  http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00016403.htm 

Chaturvedi a, Smith D, Canfield D (2001). Blood carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide concentrations in the fatalities of fire and non-fire associated civil aviation accidents, 1991 -- 1998. Forensic Science International, 121(3): 183-88.

Gouhua, Li & Baker, Susan (1997). Injury Patterns in Aviation-Related Fatalities: Implications for Preventive Strategies. American Journal of Forensic Medicine & Pathology, 18(3): 265-270.
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Nursing Intervention in Disaster the Possibility of

Words: 1365 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3266108

Nursing Intervention in Disaster

The possibility of occurrence of disasters is a reality. With this in mind there should be efforts made to prevent any upcoming or potentially disastrous events. These efforts are what are known as disaster prevention. Disaster prevention therefore refers to efforts put in place to ensure that adverse effects of events that are potentially disastrous are prevented even when the disaster cannot be controlled. Disaster prevention is done at various levels of the society and is undertaken so as to prevent all types of disasters. Nurses are involved to a large extent when it comes to the prevention and mitigation of disasters. Nurses are involved in institutions that can influence change and due to the unique skills that they posses they can make interventions in disasters. To perform efficiently, a nurse must be always prepared to make changes in plan actions at any time and at…… [Read More]

References

Harden, E.G., (2004). The role of nursing in disasters. Retrieved march 22, 2013 from  http://helid.digicollection.org/en/d/Jdi018e/2.html 

Rittenmeyer, L., (2007). Disaster preparedness: Are you ready? Retrieved march 22,2013 from  http://www.nursingcenter.com/prodev/ce_article.asp?tid=726331 

Wolters Kluwer Health, (2007). LWW Journals - Beginning with A. Retrieved March 22, 2013, from  http://journals.lww.com/smajournalonline/fulltext/2007/09000/spiritual_issues_in_the_aftermath_of_disaster.32.aspx
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Health Prevention Programs

Words: 2666 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 64756401

Health Promotion Lesson Plan

The concept of health promotion is thought of as "the science and art of helping people change their lifestyle to move toward a state of optimal health" (Dunphy et al., 2011, p 25). Serious heart conditions can be prevented, which is why it is so important to utilize community education techniques in order to help try to warn community members of the complications before they occur. This current lesson plan works to create three separate community lesson plans, based on specific age ranges. The age 18-29 focuses primarily on the use of social media and health advocacy efforts in association with the American Heart Association. For ages 30-49, there is also a focus on these two, combined with more community oriented issues, and for 50-60, there is much more of a focus on financial training along with community organized workshops.

Prevention has become a major issue…… [Read More]

References McLeod, Saul. (2010). Erik Erikson. Developmental Psychology. Simply Psychology. Web.  http://www.simplypsychology.org/Erik-Erikson.html
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Violence in the Workplace

Words: 1426 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 25474422

excess of five million U.S. healthcare employees from numerous professions execute a wide selection of responsibilities. They're subjected to numerous safe practices risks, such as violence. Current records point out that hospital personnel are at high-risk for encountering violence at work. A number of reports say that violence normally takes place during periods of higher activity as well as communication and interaction with individuals, for example at meals and throughout visiting hours along with patient transport. Attacks can happen whenever services are rejected, whenever a client is involuntarily accepted, or whenever a healthcare employee tries to set limitations on consuming, drinking, or even tobacco or alcohol consumption (USDOL, 2001).

Background

isks for Workplace Violence

Patient risks consist of those intoxicated by alcohol and drugs, prior reputation of violence, psychological diseases for example schizophrenia, gang member, use of firearms, and city youthful male of lesser socioeconomic position.

Environmental risks such as…… [Read More]

References

Allen, P. (2009). Violence in the Emergency Department: Tools & Strategies to Create a Violence-Free ED. Springer Publishing Company.

Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) (2010). Emergency Department Violence Surveillance Study.

Janocha, J.A. And Smith, R.T. (2010). Workplace safety and health in the health care and social assistance industry, 2003-2007. Bureau of Labor Statistics.  http://www.bls.gov/opub/cwc/sh20100825ar01p1.htm 

NIOSH. (2002). Violence: Occupational Hazards in Hospitals. April 2002.  http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/pdfs/2002-101.pdf
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Peter Dirr How Can the

Words: 868 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 23455394

According to Dirr, establishing standard policies is an issue that is still very much in the evolution stage, although much has been accomplished in this respect.

In this regard, Dirr notes that the Council of Regional Accreditation has developed new guidelines for distance education. These are by no means either established or fully accepted into the policies of all tertiary institutions. Indeed, they are still very much in the research stage. Furthermore, far from stabilizing the issue, Cook anticipates a new pedagogy as a result of the nature of distance education. Such a paradigm would entail a pedagogy that "shifts toward the learner and away from the teacher." Such a shift would also hold important implications for the future of research into the issue.

While clear policies are not currently in place, it therefore appears that both researchers and tertiary institutions themselves are aware of the importance of distance and…… [Read More]

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Diversity Inclusion One of the Greatest Challenges

Words: 1325 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33197211

Diversity Inclusion

One of the greatest challenges in education today is the fact that the basic demographic of the average student body has changed significantly over the last decades. This poses challenges not only in terms of cultural programs and inclusion, but also in terms of intellectual abilities and background. This is particularly the case in tertiary education. In most cases today, students come from many different backgrounds in terms of schooling and level of education. This poses challenges in terms of preparing students for the rigors of tertiary academic work. In addition to this and the great variety of cultural backgrounds represented on United States campuses today, there is also the challenge of preparing students for the world of work. Most workplaces today require some level of tertiary education. It is simply impossible to handle the rapid developments in terms of technology today without some sort of post-secondary qualification.…… [Read More]

References

ACPA and NASPA (2010, Jul. 24). Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Practitioners. Retrieved from:  http://www.naspa.org/images/uploads/main/Professional_Competencies.pdf 

Prescott, B.T. (2012, Oct. 4). What Demographic Changes Mean for Colleges and Counselors. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from:  http://chronicle.com/blogs/headcount/what-demographic-changes-mean-for-colleges-and-counselors/31958
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Levels of Prevention

Words: 794 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40241845

Public health screening activities in programs are also essential in ensuring this level of prevention is ensured. A good example is organized screening programs targeted at the community.

The third level of prevention, tertiary prevention, involves bother rehabilitative and therapeutic measures once the person already has the symptoms and signs of the disease. Tertiary prevention has several goals, which include preventing damage and pain that may arise from the disease, slowing down the progression of the disease, preventing the disease from causing complications, giving optimum care to people with signs of the disease, and helping those with the disease to live healthy lives afterwards. A quintessential example of tertiary preventive activities includes treating diabetics to prevent complications that occur as a result of the disease such as liver and kidney failure. Other examples are management of patients with chronic heart disease with therapy and medication, physical and occupational therapy as…… [Read More]

References

Baker, J.E.L. (1992). Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Prevention in Reducing Pesticide-Related Illness in Farmers. Journal of Community Health Nursing, 9(4), 245-254. doi: 10.2307/3427201

Flaskerud, J.H. (1992). HIV Disease and Levels of Prevention. Journal of Community Health Nursing, 9(3), 137-150. doi: 10.2307/3427251

Green, M.M. (1971). The Expanded Role of the Public Health Nurse. Canadian Journal of Public Health / Revue Canadienne de Sante'e Publique, 62(2), 147-152. doi: 10.2307/41984635

Ureda, J., & Yates, S. (2005). A SYSTEMS VIEW of HEALTH PROMOTION. Journal of Health and Human Services Administration, 28(1), 5-38. doi: 10.2307/41288055
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Health Care Profession Is Undergoing Fundamental Change

Words: 1846 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58399567

health care profession is undergoing fundamental change due in part to new laws and regulations. These laws and regulations, although well intended may result in unintended consequences for the nursing profession overall. In the future, the role of a nurse will be fundamentally altered. For one, regulation such as the Affordable Care Act will result in an entire population of insured patients needing care. As such, the role of a nurse will ultimately be predicated on a more individualized basis with specialization in certain aspects. Caring for diabetes is no different in this regard. The public is particularly prone to diabetes primarily due to dietary and lifestyle considerations. As such, the topic of proper care and prevention of this issue is paramount to community health. The population at risk, due in part to regulation, is now society as a whole. This presents interesting challenges and opportunities for the overall health…… [Read More]

References:

1) Mahan LK, Escott-Stump S (2000). Krause's Food, Nutrition & Diet Therapy. 10th Ed., WB Saunders Co. Philadelphia; Reuters (2010)

2) Polonsky, K.S. (2012). "The Past 200 Years in Diabetes." New England Journal of Medicine 367 (14): 1332 -- 1340

3) Stewart WF, Ricci JA, Chee E, Hirsch AG, Brandenburg NA (June 2007). "Lost productive time and costs due to diabetes and diabetic neuropathic pain in the U.S. workforce." J. Occup. Environ. Med. 49 (6): 672 -- 9
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Functional Cardiology Department Within a

Words: 1329 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 54637854



Restatement of Mission Statement and Care Values

Mission Statement. This will vary from healthcare facility to healthcare facility, of course, but for the purposes of this analysis, a representative mission statement would be as follows:

e recognize the value of every person and are guided by our commitment to excellence and leadership. e demonstrate this by:

1. Providing exemplary physical, emotional and spiritual care for each of our patients and their families

2. Balancing the continued commitment to the care of the poor and those most in need with the provision of highly specialized services to a broader community

3. Building a work environment where each person is valued, respected and has an opportunity for personal and professional growth

4. Advancing excellence in health services education

5. Fostering a culture of discovery in all of our activities and supporting exemplary health sciences research

6. Strengthening our relationships with universities, colleges,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Friesen, Michael E. And Johnson, James A. The Success Paradigm: Creating Organizational

Effectiveness through Quality and Strategy. Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1995.

Liebler, Joan Gratto and McConnel, Charles R. Management Principles for Health

Professionals, 6th ed. ISBN-10: 144961468X, 2011.
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Critical Incident Stress Management CISM

Words: 3578 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Dissertation or Thesis complete Paper #: 56690943

CISM Program Surry Nuclear Power Plant

What is CISM?

Why is a CISM program necessary for the agency?

Agency description, community, and social context

Prevention and Interventions

Primary

Secondary

Tertiary

Interventions

Chronic health and innovative approaches

Cultural Issues

Proposed Budget .17

Critical incident stress management plays an important role in assuring the psychological resilience necessary for those who are exposed to a traumatic incident. This proposal outlines a program to add mental Health Services to the existing emergency management plan for the Surry Power Plant. The current plan does not address mental health issues, and this is an important need that will need to be considered in the future. The current plan will modify the existing plan through the addition of mental health services for the community.

Proposal: CISM Program

What is CISM?

A critical incident is any event that produces stress or trauma to personnel that are directly or…… [Read More]

References

Blesdoe, B. (2002), June). CISM: Possible Liability for EMS Services? Prehospital Perspective.

2002; 1(6): September (reprint of Best Practices piece) Retrieved from http://www.bryanbledsoe.com/data/pdf/mags/CISM%20(BP).pdf

Bledsoe, B.E. & Barnes, D. (2003) "Beyond the debriefing debate: What should we be doing?"

Emergency Medical Services Magazine; 32(12), 60-68.
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Syphilis Also Known as The

Words: 1104 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 93358710

(a.D.A.M., 2008) Neurosyphilis has been speculated as the cause for eccentricites among well-known figures such as Henry VIII, Vincent Van Gogh, Adolf Hitler, Oscar Wilde, and Friedrich Nietzsche (McMyne, 2008). Oddly, some dementia caused by syphilis is preceded by a phase of mania and euphoria in which patients feel excitable and "high," often with relaxed inhibitions (Hayden, 2003).

In the United States today, syphilis rarely progresses beyond the first or second stage since treatment is widely available. Upon diagnosis, antibiotics such as penicillin or tetracycline are administered; follow-up tests must be performed at three, six, and twelve month intervals to ensure complete removal of the infection. Syphilis is always contagious, particularly in the first and second stages, so all sexual partners should be notified and treated as well. If treated during the primary stage, syphilis is completely curable with no risk of permanent health damage. Unfortunately, initial symptoms may be…… [Read More]

References

A.D.A.M. (2008, 08-01). Syphilis - Tertiary. Retrieved 11-26, 2010, from health.nytimes.com:  http://health.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/syphilis-tertiary/overview.html 

Baseman, J., Nichols, J., & Hayes, N. (1976). Virulent Treponema pallidum: aerobe or anaerobe. Infectious Immunity, 704-711.

Bonifield, J. (2010, 11-22). Syphilis infections up; progress made on other STDs. Retrieved 11-24, 2010, from www.cnn.com:  http://pagingdrgupta.blogs.cnn.com/2010/11/22/embargo-12p-1122-cdc-progress-on-stds/?iref=allsearch 

Cullen, P., & Cameron, C. (2010, 01-10). Progress toward an effective syphilis vaccine: the past, present, and future. Retrieved 11-26, 2010, from www.expert-reviews.com:  http://www.expert-reviews.com/doi/abs/10.1586/14760584.5.1.67
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Martin Army Medical Center Fort Benning Georgia

Words: 953 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72428112

Martin Army Medical Center, Fort Benning, Georgia and St. Francis Medical, Columbus Georgia

Because resources are by definition scarce, it is important for tertiary healthcare providers to develop healthcare delivery structures that are efficient and effective. Since every healthcare organization is unique, though, these delivery structures can vary widely in scope and purpose. To gain some fresh insights into the healthcare delivery structures that are used by civilian and military health facilities, this paper provides a comparison of Martin Army Medical Center at Fort Benning, Georgia with St. Francis Medical in Columbus, Georgia, followed by a summary of the research and important findings in the conclusion.

eview and Comparison

Martin Army Medical Center, Fort Benning, Georgia

Health care delivery structure. Opened in 1958, this is a U.S. Department of Defense facility operated by the U.S. Army that offers inpatient, outpatient and emergency services. At present, Martin Army Medical Center 250-bed,…… [Read More]

References

About St. Francis Hospital. (2012). St. Francis Hospital. Retrieved from http://www.

sfhga.com/about-st-francis-hospital.

About us. (2012). Martin Army Community Hospital. Retrieved from http://www.martin.

amedd.army.mil/meddepts/about.htm.
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Interview With a Nurse

Words: 1403 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 47405839

Public Health Nurse Interview

When it comes to community education and health care, nurses are essential. They provide important services, but they also provide a lot of ongoing support and education. Those are all important aspects of what they do, and can significantly alter and affect a community based on how they are handled. There are three roles that nurses play in a community when it comes to the prevention of health care problems: primary, secondary, and tertiary. Those will be discussed here, along with an interview conducted with Sarah Winters, a nurse who has been working in community education for 35 years. By combining the educational information of various sources with the personal information that can only be provided by interviewing a person in the field, a better understanding of the role and value of the community health nurse can be seen. That provides insight to communities who are…… [Read More]

References

D'Antonio, P. (2010). American nursing: A history of knowledge, authority, and the meaning of work . NY: JHUP.

Fairman, J. & Lynaugh, J.E. (2000). Critical care nursing: A history. NY: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Fitzpatrick, J.J. & Kazer, M. (eds.). (2011). Encyclopedia of nursing research (3rd. ed.). NY: Springer Publishing Company.

Longe, J. (ed.). (2013). Gale encyclopedia of nursing and allied Hhealth (6 vol.). NY: Gale Group.
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Population Assessment of the Elderly

Words: 2453 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 28794137

Elderly in Monrovia, CA

The population of people aged 65 years or greater is steadily escalating, as baby boomers come of age. It is estimated that this age bracket accounts for 10% of the total world population, and is statistically increasing. As this sector of the population steadily increases, there are of course, accompanying health care issues: osteoarthritis, cardiac and kidney issues, Alzheimer's or dementia, and an ever-growing problem with depression. For this essay, we will concentrate on several health issues that plague seniors nationally, but will specifically focus on the aging population over 65 in Monrovia, California.

Monrovia is a smallish city located at the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains in the San Gabriel Valley, Los Angeles County. Monrovia was settled in the late 1800s as a central hub for the growing orange grove industry, but has now become more of a bedroom community that supports the urban…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Breathe California of Los Angeles County. (2009). Cited in:

 http://www.breathela.org/ 

California Department of Public Health. (June 2009). "Healthy California -- 2010

Midcourse Review." Executive Summary. Cited in:
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Primary Source Is One in

Words: 862 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Book Report Paper #: 8942398

The most superficial is the use of numbers, or lack thereof. Whereas quantitative research emphasizes the study of factors that can be explicitly measured, qualitative data is more descriptive. This has a couple of key implications. The first is that qualitative data is inherently more subjective. It is directly subject to interpretation from the researcher. Quantitative data can be interpreted by the researcher, but ultimately the data is presented in raw form and can therefore be interpreted by another researcher as well. The other implication is that whereas qualitative data is interpreted at the observation level, quantitative must be analyzed at the root level. The way in which is survey is designed will reveal the biases of the researcher, so that is the level that must be given the most scrutiny. Beyond this, quantitative research often reflects the use of proxies, so there is some distance between the numbers generated…… [Read More]

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Dealing Effectively With Organizational Change

Words: 8797 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 50486495



Factors that affect an organization's capacity and willingness to change need to be examined and exploited. Organizational culture, which is a set of shared values and assumptions that are followed by the members of an organization, plays an important role in affecting the attitude of an organization to change. If an organizational history has been unwelcome to change in the past, it is highly unlikely that an organization will be willing to accept change in the future. Sometimes, core competency can assist in the process of change (Porter, 1980).

Lastly, at the individual level, the process of change is completed when it is implemented within a company. The task of the general manager then becomes of envisioning the future of the change and of facilitating cooperation among the workforce. He is also responsible for implementing change at various levels of production, development and distribution. In particular, what needs to be…… [Read More]

References

Saunders, M., Lewis, P. And Thornhill, A (2003). Research methods for business students. 3rd Ed. London: Prentice Hall.

Seaman, C.H.C. (1987). Research Methods: Principles, Practice, and Theory for Nursing. (pp. 174) Appleton & Lange.

Sudman, S. And Bradburn, N.M. (1982). Asking Questions: a Practical Guide to Questionnaire Design. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Inc.

Taylor, Aex III (October 12, 2009) Fortune: "Can GM Survive?" 60 (7), 60. Retrieved October 31, 2009, Proquest, ISSN: 00158259
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Yellow Fever the Fever by

Words: 775 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 6726884

Studies suggest certain mosquitoes may also transmit the virus (Mulla, 1999).

The host for the disease is humans, and the environment of the case study includes the regions of Norfolk and Portsmouth. The agent examined is yellow fever. Other possible hosts include mosquitoes known to bear infection, like the Asian Tiger Mosquito (Mulla, 1999).

Primary Secondary Tertiary Prevention

If living at the time, primary prevention would have included avoidance of natural spread of the disease. This may have been almost impossible however as ships frequently traveled to cities via ports. However, temporary quarantine of ships entering port from affected areas may have served as a primary prevention technique for preventing spread of the disease (Oberle, 2001). Secondary prevention methods would have included providing citizens with clean waters and immunizations (Oberle, 2001).

Vaccines have proven beneficial for preventing yellow fever transmission in humans. Unfortunately vaccines were not available at the time…… [Read More]

References

Mulla, Z.B. (1999 - Oct). "Yellow Fever." Florida Dept. Of State. 15, October 2005:

 http://www.doh.state.fl.us/Disease_ctrl/epi/htopics/reports/yell_fev.pdf 

Oberle, M. (2001). Oberle, M. "Bioterrorism: A changing world and what you can do."  http://healthlinks.washington.edu/nwcphp/bt/27nov2001.ppt 

Wagner, L. (2005 - Jul). "The Fever." The Virginian Pilot, Available:
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Nursing Health Promotion Across the Lifespan

Words: 659 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 33281795

Nursing: Health Promotion Across the Lifespan

Which model or models of health are most applicable to Mr. And Mrs. Arahan and their family? Why?

Since Mr. And Mrs. Arahan seem to be well-assimilated within the American environment and also appear to be of good health, the initial model that appears to be applicable is one of self-care as well as community care. Community members in the church, for example, can help them dealing with minor concerns and give advice regarding more serious intervention should this become necessary. As they age, the couple might choose to use a combination of professional health care and community care, since their relative wealth will most likely support professional interventions over the long-term.

Which "Healthy People 2020" (web site) objectives are of greatest importance to the Arahan family?

The most important objectives for the family include maintaining healthy nutrition for the older couple, including foods…… [Read More]

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Nursing Case Study Mrs C

Words: 599 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 1281547

Nursing Case Study: Mrs. C

Which model or models of health are most applicable to Mrs. C. And Why?

Since Mrs. C. appears to be in relatively good health and very independent, the best models of health to apply to her appears to be self-care combined with a holistic perspective. The integration of community and family connections is important, especially in the light of Mrs. C's tendency to fall and her pride in taking care of her daily necessities herself.

Which Healthy People 2020 objectives are of greatest importance to the Mrs. C.

The main important Objectives for Mrs. C. include quality of life, injury prevention, and, in the long-term, caregivers. Mrs. C. is currently enjoying a high quality of life, especially in terms of being able to handle the necessities of daily life herself. Injury prevention is currently of the highest concern, since she has reported falling. In the…… [Read More]

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Nurse Teaching Learning Plan by

Words: 838 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Professional Writing Paper #: 36321133

; And, 3) The individual must believe that the recommended action can be adhered to successfully. (TC, 1)

Prevention: Primary, Secondary, Tertiary (diet, exercise, immunizations, screenings)

The Health Belief Model would contribute to a lesson in prevention of the condition's worsening severity. Here, the primary level of prevention is seen as dietary. The secondary level is seen as exercise and the tertiary level is viewed as immunizations and screenings.

Teaching Strategies

Teaching strategies will included the use of visual aids and literature materials as well as the applied discussion of realistic dietary and exercise goals.

Resources

Resources to be used in supplement to the education of the patient will include pamphlets regarding the implications of diabetes, the distribution of kits with required self-treatment materials, the compilation of useful web resources, nutritional dietary recipe kits and preliminary exercise regimen diagrams.

Methods of Evaluation

The effectiveness of the proposed teaching learning plan…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

TCW. (2006). Health Belief Model. Universitie Twente. Online at http://www.tcw.utwente.nl/theorieenoverzicht/Theory%20clusters/Health%20Communication/Health_Belief_Model.doc/.
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Nhs Change Analysis of Nurse-Led

Words: 3444 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 89643059

The variability in problems faced by the King Edward Hospital NHS Trust during the period in question, instigated a multi-level response in knowledge sharing and inclusion on practice. Kotter's theory relies upon such a method, where strategies are an exercise multi-tiered obligation.

As Kotter points out, the transformation model may not be suitable for organizations that are in pursuit of prompt change, and the series of responsibilities which result from consortium relationships may apply to one or all organizations within the scope of his definition of institutional cultures: 1) Developing Social Construct; 2) Oriented Social Construct; 3) and Pluralistic Social Construct types. Evidence-based practice in healthcare is compatible with Kotter's proposition. Process methodology including the '8-Steps' process in three (3) phases -- 1) Creating Climate for Change, 2) Engaging and Enabling the Organisation, and 3) Implementing and Sustaining the Change -- is illustrated in Figure 1.

Figure 1

Figure 1:…… [Read More]

References

Abidi, S.S., 2001. Knowledge management in healthcare: towards 'knowledge-driven' decision-support services. International Journal of Medical Informatics, 63 (1-2), pp. 5-18.

Abidi, .S.S. et al., 2009. Knowledge sharing for pediatric pain management via a Web 2.0 framework. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 150, pp. 287-91.

Abidi, S.S. et al., 2004. Knowledge management in pediatric pain: mapping online expert discussions to medical literature. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 107 (Pt 1), pp. 3-7.

Austin, M.J., 2008. Knowledge management: implications for human service organizations. Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work, 5 (1-2), pp. 361-89.
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Patient Mrs Gulcin Ozdemir Primary

Words: 678 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67648867

It should be noted that Mrs. Ozdemir's problems are not entirely physical in nature. Her loneliness and isolation in a country in which she has limited command over English have caused her to pour her energies into cooking traditional, heavy meals for her family and using overeating as a coping mechanism.

Seeing a counselor who speaks her language and can aid her in talking about her cultural adjustment issues seems essential. Without psychological support, it is unlikely that Mrs. Ozdemir will feel sufficiently motivated to change her lifestyle. Ideally, diabetes education at the secondary level should also be culturally sensitive, and provide dietary and exercise-related suggestions. Proposed menus can reflect Mrs. Ozdemir's culture, such as Mediterranean dishes that emphasize vegetables and beans, rather than sugary sauces and meats. Also, walking rather than taking public transportation is a potential source of exercise. Ozdemir should receive regular lipid screening, and, if warranted,…… [Read More]

References

Peeples, Malinda & Seley, Jane Jeffries. "Diabetes care: The need for change."

American Journal of Nursing. June 2007. 107.6 (June 1007):13-19. 7 Apr. 2011.



"Primary care." A Dictionary of Nursing. 2008. Encyclopedia.com. 7 Apr. 2011
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Communicable Disease Epidemiology Has Been

Words: 2112 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 97185279

Using condoms is also an excellent prevention activity that can also be used (Primary and Secondary HIV Prevention, 2008).

Potential obstacles to HIV prevention activities taking place in clinical settings often include:

narrow formations of medical care and the role of physicians or health care providers in HIV prevention, a provider's discomfort with discussing human sexuality and illicit drug use and their attitudes towards persons with HIV or AIDS along with constraints on time and resources, and the vagueness of HIV prevention messages (Primary and Secondary HIV Prevention, 2008).

The very nature of HIV transmission involves behaviors that are not readily discussed in American society. It is important for health care providers to become comfortable discussing sexual and substance-use activities with their patients. They need to create an environment of trust for patients so their risk behaviors can be discussed. It is important to assure the patient of the confidential…… [Read More]

References

ABCs of Aids Prevention - Presentation Transcript. (2009). Retrieved September 3, 2009, from Slideshare Web site:  http://www.slideshare.net/drsujnanendra/ab-cs-of-aids-prevention 

CDC Responds to HIV / AIDS. (2009). Retrieved from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Web site:  http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/aboutDHAP.htm 

HIV / AIDS. (2009). Retrieved September 4, 2009, from MayClinic Web site:
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Water Geography Part One Terms

Words: 2762 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 16776764

But after local wastewater plants were "...upgraded and farms' management practices were improved, the amount of phosphorus declined and the copper sulfate was no long considered necessary" (Royte, 2007). The Times' story reports that to prevent the dumping of partially treated sewage water into the waterways, septic tanks need to be upgraded and "cleaning the water in sewage treatments plants even more thoroughly before it is discharged into the watershed..." is necessary. That will be quite a job, because "more than two dozen of the roughly 100 wastewater treatment plants that discharge into the city's watershed use a suboptimal cleaning process."

TO: The flooding problem. hy has it become a more serious problem in recent years? Taking New York City as an example of the problem and its roots, the New York Times article alluded to in the previous section points out that recently, as developers began clearing more and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Clausen, Jan. (2000). Northwest Tribes Fight Against Formidable Odds to Save Endangered

Salmon. Nation. 270(3), 22-24.

Gelt, Joe. (2005). Managing the Interconnecting Waters: The Groundwater-Surface Water

Dilemma. University of Arizona. Retrieved Oct. 16, 2007, at  http://cals.arizona.edu/axwater/arroyo/081con.html .
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Social Ecology of Health Promotion

Words: 1007 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 98603012

Social Ecology of Health Promotion

Preservation of the existing ecosystems

Accumulating evidence suggest that sustainable agriculture should be promoted. The growth and development of agriculture will still be the driving force of the loss of ecosystems in the 21st century. In specified areas, the growth and development of agriculture poses a danger to ecosystems, establishment, evaluation, and technological diffusion. This could see the rise of the food production sustainably per unit area with the absence of trade-offs relating to excessive water consumption or nutrients and pesticides use, would lessen pressure significantly to ecosystems. For many cases, the required technologies are in place, and they could be implemented in a wider variety, but the nation is facing financial constraints and lacking intuitional capabilities to use and gain the stated technologies. In areas where technology is predominant of the landscape, maintenance of ecosystems within the landscape is a very significant constitute of…… [Read More]

References

Hayden, J. (2009). Introduction to health behavior theory. Sudbury, Mass: Jones and Bartlett.

O'Donnell, M.P. (2008). Health promotion in the workplace. Albany: Delmar Thomson Learning

Scutchfield, F.D., & Keck, C.W. (2009). Principles of public health practice. Clifton Park: Thomson/Delmar Learning

Stephens, C. (2008). Health promotion: A psychosocial approach. Maidenhead: Open University Press
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Nursing Estella Case Study

Words: 575 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 4871247

Nursing: Estella Case Study

Which models of health are most applicable to Estella and his family? Why?

It appears that the action model is the model for health that is most applicable to Estella's family, largely due to the comprehensive nature of this model. It includes assessment, interventions, and dissemination of information that can actuate these people to make changes in their health and in their lives to greater ensure their wellness.

Which Healthy People 2020 (website) Objectives are of greatest importance to Estella's family? All of the objectives that pertain to weight loss and a reduction in the rate of obesity for children and adults pertain to Estella and her family. So do all of the ones that encourage a diversified diet in which fruits and vegetables are encouraged. The two related to a reduction in solid fats and saturated fats applies as well.

What effect do the leading…… [Read More]

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Care Rural Settings Continuum of

Words: 690 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7683624

As well as expanding patient's abilities to obtain primary care, virtually, telemedicine can enable patients in isolated locations to see specialists. When rural patients are connected to a hospital network such as the Grinnell egional Medical Center, they are able to access high-quality physicians through some of the more advanced healthcare technology available, although this is not always possible in a local healthcare system with fewer physicians and less access to high-level technology. Technology can still enable patients in a variety of settings to keep track of vital signs such as heart rate, blood pressure, and blood sugar, and to alert their physician immediately if their readings are abnormal.

While some surgeons have even performed procedures through virtual consults, certain aspects of medicine remain challenging to provide rural patients, such as physical rehabilitative services, which may require the patient to travel to receive the full benefit of the services. Patients…… [Read More]

References

Campbell, James D. (2001, May). Introducing telemedicine technology to rural physicians and settings. Journal of Family Practice. Retrieved January 27, 2011 at  http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0689/is_5_50/ai_75244766/ 

Spath, Patrice. (2011). Community Continuum of Care planning.

Brown-Spath & Associates. Retrieved January 27, 2011 at  http://www.brownspath.com/original_articles/cccplan.htm
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Health Syphilis -- Viewed From

Words: 2554 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 12765813

These diseases may be aggravated or deteriorated because of indulgence in sexual life as well. In severe cases, indulgence in sexual life even may cause vital crises such as cerebral bleeding and myocardiac infarction. Accordingly, sexual life should be moderated during the daily health care and rehabilitation. In severe cases, sexual life should be stopped for the time being (Syphilis, n.d.).

There are several tests that can be used to for Syphilis. These include: Syphilis Serum Test, the venereal diseases research laboratory test (VDL test), unheated serum reagin test (US test), rapid plasma reagin card test (P test), and cardiophospholipid is used as an antigen to examine the anti-cardiophospholipid antibody in serum. This test is used for screening examination. In spirochete antigen test, such as fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption test (FTA-ABS test), Treponema pallidum hemagglutination test (TPHA), usually the diagnosis of syphilis can be confirmed by positive result in the spirochete…… [Read More]

References

Introduction to TCM. (n.d.). Retrieved January 28, 2010, from Traditional Chinese Medicine

Page Web site:  http://www.tcmpage.com/ 

Kent, Molly E. And Romanelli, Frank. (2008). Reexamining Syphilis: An Update on Epidemiology, Clinical Manifestations, and Management. Retrieved January 27, 2010,

from Medscape Web site:  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/571812
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Child Abuse From All Angles

Words: 4974 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 44047446

The victim is often put into situations where they are physically deprived of the things they need to make appropriate decisions. For instance they may be deprived of sleep or food so that they can be more easily manipulated. Mental abuse may also involve teasing or name calling. In many cases the perpetrator is very aware of the victim's weaknesses and uses them to humiliate or subjugate the victim.

Sexual Abuse

The sexual abuse of children is increasing throughout the world and has increased drastically in recent years. Sexual abuse can include the molestation and/or rape of a child. In many cases children are sexually abused by someone that they know, rather it be a neighbor, a parent or an acquaintance. Sexual abuse can also have lasting effects on the psyche of an individual. Studies have found that children who experience sexual abuse are more likely to become promiscuous as…… [Read More]

References

Bolen, Rebecca M. 2003. Child Sexual Abuse: Prevention or Promotion?. Social Work 48, no. 2: 174+.

Cochrane, John, Gaynor Melville, and Ian Marsh. 2004. Criminal Justice: An Introduction to Philosophies, Theories and Practice. London: Routledge. Book online.

Child Abuse. National Institutes of Health. Available at  http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/childabuse.html 

Child Abuse Statistics. Available at http://www.childhelp.org/resources/learning-center/statistics.Internet
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Rousing Fears of a Potential

Words: 584 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Discussion Chapter Paper #: 58799549

If it is understated, however, lives may be lost due to lack of preparation.

DQ 2

One of the difficulties of changing childhood eating habits is the uncertain degree to which environment, genetics, and culture are contributing to the adult and childhood obesity epidemic. One primary intervention would be to study the degree to which influences such as junk food advertising, school lunches, and the proximity of fast food restaurants to schools affect students' BMI. By assessing the degree to which exposure to unhealthy food advertising, meals in schools, and availability of snacks outside of school affect a student's weight, this could provide guidance as to what strategies should be used to prevent childhood obesity. On a secondary level, treating children who are overweight or at risk for obesity with specific intervention programs that could be compared against the weight and health records of control groups would give further guidance…… [Read More]

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Company Is One of Its Most Important

Words: 933 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1362064

company is one of its most important components, as it defines not only the purpose of the business, but also the basic values upon which the business purpose is based. As such, the mission statement serves to define the business at its most basic level (Berry, 2011). Specific questions that the mission statement addresses include who the company is, what it does, what it stands for, and the reason for the business. Some business solve problems, while others offer specific benefits. The two mission statements considered here include those of the College of Nursing at NYU and the Atlanta Medical Center. Both mission statements concern the specific purpose and premise of each respective institution.

The College of Nursing mission statement reads:

"The mission of the College of Nursing, as an integral part of a research-intensive private university "in the public service," is to generate new knowledge and educate future nursing…… [Read More]

References

Berry, T. (2011). Writing a Mission Statement. Palo Alto Software, Inc. Retrieved from:  http://articles.bplans.com/writing-a-business-plan/writing-a-mission-statement/206 

Business Resource Software, Inc. (2011). Mission Statement. Center for Business Planning. Retrieved from:  http://www.businessplans.org/mission.html
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Web Technology Effective Teaching Extant Literature Has

Words: 2384 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69364745

Web Technology

Effective Teaching

Extant literature has attempted to explore the concept of an effective teacher. The question of what constitutes an effective teacher is one that is asked by several stakeholders in the educational sector. According to The Teaching and Learning Center at Winthrop University, an effective teacher is defined as a scholar who uses an appropriate methodology in the sharing of knowledge, demonstrates as well as encourages a high level of enthusiasm on the subject matter while showing a lot of concern for the students in a manner that leaves a lasting as well as vivid conviction of the student having immensely benefitted from the provided instructions.

Some qualities of an effective teacher are noted to be innate to a given person. This is because an individual can never learn to feel a sense of concern if they lack the capacity as well as empathy with their students.…… [Read More]

References

Barry, K. & King, L. (2004). Beginning teaching and beyond (3rd Ed.).South Melbourne: Social Science Press.

Bennett, B., Rolheiser, C. & Stevahn, L. (1991). Cooperative Learning: Where Heart Meets Mind. Toronto: Educational Connections.

Bennett, B. & Smilanich, P. (1994). Classroom management: A Thinking and Caring Approach. Toronto: Educational Connections.

Bloom, B.S., Engelhart, M.D., Furst, E.J., Hill, W.H., & Krathwohl, D.R. (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives: The cognitive domain. New York: Longman.
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Women With Infertility Want Registered

Words: 1200 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 33430357



2. Sociocultural needs. The study by Gibson and Myers examined the relationships among social coping resources, growth-fostering relationships, and infertility stress in 83 women who participated in fertility treatments at urban medical clinics. The findings of their study suggest that both social coping resources and growth-fostering relationships contribute significantly to the variance in infertility stress, with infertility stress decreasing as social coping resources increase; these findings are congruent with the findings of earlier research on the positive effects of social coping on emotional health, particularly as they concern infertile women. In addition, Gibson and Myers found that partner support and family support contribute significantly to the prediction of the variance in infertility stress. "Based on these results," they say, "it is clear that family and partner supports are very important coping resources for women coping with infertility stress" (emphasis added) (p. 69).

3. Biological needs. While the psychosocial and sociocultural…… [Read More]

References

Atwood, J.D., & Dobkin, S. (1992). Storm clouds are coming: Ways to help reconstruct the crisis of infertility. Contemporary Family Therapy, 14, 385-403.

Daniluk, J.C. (2001). Reconstructing Their Lives: A Longitudinal, Qualitative Analysis of the Transition to Biological Childlessness for Infertile Couples. Journal of Counseling and Development, 79(4), 439.

Gibson, D.M., & Myers, J.E. (2002). The Effect of Social Coping Resources and Growth- Fostering Relationships on Infertility Stress in Women. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 24(1), 68.

Men and Women React Differently. (1993). USA Today, 122(2581), 14.
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Ulcerative Colitis Initial Presentation the Patient Is

Words: 2339 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 12190706

Ulcerative Colitis

Initial presentation

The patient is an 18-year-old of the Filipino-American origin. He has no known family history of ulcerative colitis or chronic illnesses similar to colitis. He is a high school senior student.

Historical information

The patient complains of diarrhoea 3-4 times a month although it has been on and off for one year. There is no known allergy that the patient experiences.

Presenting Symptoms

He experienced rectal bleeding, rectal pain and often had an urgent need to empty his bowels. His diarrhoea had bloodstains with mucus at least once a month. This led to few red blood cells due to the low level of iron, which resulted from the bloody stool. He had belly pains, which he described as cramping and his belly felt sore if touched. He experienced constipation, but it was less frequent than diarrhoea. He had no signs of vomiting or nausea, but he…… [Read More]

References

Baumgart, D. (2012). Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis: From epidemiology and immunobiology to a rational diagnostic and therapeutic approach. New York: Springer.

Bayless, T.M., & Hanauer, S.B. (2010). Advanced therapy of inflammatory bowel disease: Volume 1. New York: McGraw-Hill Medical.

Hanauer, S.B., & Marteau, P. (2001). Ulcerative colitis: Focus on topical treatment. Paris: J.

Libbey Eurotext.
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Mix-Methods School Reform Study Exploring

Words: 3003 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Methodology Chapter Paper #: 96140314



esearch Methodology

As mentioned above, a mixed-methods research approach is used to conduct the study. Qualitative data will be collected from research report that concern topics such as official policy documents, institutional policy documents, research reports, as well as by means of approaching individuals and representatives of institutions by means of questionnaires and/or interviews. Schools and tertiary institutions will for example be approached to determine their approach to mitigating the transition of students from secondary to tertiary level, as well as to determine the general opinion regarding the appropriateness of current policies and procedures in this regard.

Specifically, students and teachers from various secondary and tertiary institutions will be interviewed and/or receive questionnaire with open-ended questions to collect qualitative data. The responses will then be compared to identify any similarities or significant differences among the various respondents.

Quantitative data will be collected by means of official state statistics regarding a…… [Read More]

References

Curtis, S.R.G. (2010). Individual Education Plans: The Last School Reform. Capella University.

Handel, S. And Montoya, J. (Dec 2008/Jan 2009). Leadership… Strengthening the Nation by Narrowing the Gap. Community College Journal, Vol. 79, No. 3.

Leskes, a. (2003, Winter). Ensuring Not Simply P-16 Alignment, but Truly Educated Students for the Twenty-First Century. Reality Check.

Schoenfeld, a. (2005). Review: From High School to College: Improving Opportunities for Success in Postsecondary Education by Michael W. Kist and Andrea Venezia (Eds), 2005.
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Open Minds

Words: 2637 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81959352

Closing American Mind

Higher education today is one of the most important components of civilized societies. For decades, and even for centuries, women, African-Americans, and other minorities have fought for the right to obtain a tertiary qualification. Tertiary education means that a person can enter a well-paying workplace, have the opportunity of promotion, do work that is fulfilling and satisfying to him or her as an individual, and so on. The book The Closing of the American Mind by Allan Bloom (1987) appears to lament the fact that higher education is open not only to all cultures, but to all the ideas emerging from such cultures. He believes that a lack of moral standard and an over-abundance of what he refers to as an "open mind" has created a higher education that has not basis in searching for "truth," but rather makes truth relative and not so much worth seeking…… [Read More]

References

Bloom, A. (1987). The Closing of the American Mind: How higher education has failed democracy and impoverished the souls of today's students. New York: Touchstone

Collins, S. (2012, Jun. 29). Re-opening The American Mind. Spiked Review. Retrieved from:  http://www.spiked-online.com/review_of_books/article/12590#.U4WhUPmSxkY 

Elusive Wapiti (2012, May 14). Book Review: The Closing of the American Mind. Spearhead Review. Retrieved from:  http://www.the-spearhead.com/2012/05/14/book-review-the-closing-of-the-american-mind/
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International Trade Is an Important

Words: 4173 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 34868399



Only a few decades ago, China was a struggling economy. It is much newer in the free market economy system as compared to the already established economical giants, given the country's communist history. China, a country with an extremely high population, put its resources to its best possible advantage and that was something which contributed towards the country's rapid growth. China has one of the cheapest labor and energy and power resources available for its production. As a result, the industries can achieve economies of scale and thus can cut down on their cost of production. As a result, China enjoys a greater absolute advantage over its competitors. Importers around the world have realized the fact that importing goods from China is relatively much cheaper as compared to imports from other developed economies. These cheaper imports allow them a greater profit margin. Moreover, given the fragile economic conditions and declining…… [Read More]

References

Kreh, W. (2008). Money, Debt and Wealth of Nations. Canada: COMER publications

Lipsey, R. & Chrystal, K. (1997). An Introduction to Positive Economics. London: Oxford University Press.

Zweig, D. & Jianhai, B. (2005). China's global hunt for energy. Foreign Affairs, 84(5), 25-38.

Hale, D. & Hale, L. (2003). China takes off. Foreign Affairs, 82(36).
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Republic of Mauritius Has Progressed

Words: 10005 Length: 36 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 5798910

" (United Nations, 2000) The Household udget Survey 1996/1997 reported that in excess of 14.5 of households in Mauritius are presently living below the poverty line and economic development has been stalled due to the "…rising cost of labor erosion of the protected international markets due to gradual effects of globalization and liberalization and increasing competition with other countries…" (United Nations, 2000)

The distribution aspect of income and wealth has not been addressed in a sufficient manner by the liberal economic policies that rely on the market. Unemployment has increased in recent years and this has been "accompanied by inflation that has contributed to a loss of purchasing power, especially affecting women." (United Nations, 2000)

There is a failure to meet the needs of very low income housing and creating further tensions in Mauritius are challenges related to employment equality of access and disparity in education which is stated to…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

United Nations Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF) (2000) Mauritius. November 2000.

Constructing Knowledge Societies: New Challenges for Tertiary Education (2002) The World Bank. Online available at:  http://siteresources.worldbank.org/EXTAFRREGTOPTEIA/Resources/Constructing_Knowledge_Societies.pdf 

Gokhool, Dharambeer (2008) 1148th Session of the International Conference on Education (Unesco) 25-28thNovember 2008,Geneva Comprehensive Approaches In Early Childhood Education: The Mauritian Experience.

Gokhool, D. Hon. (2008) Address given Certificate Award Ceremony for Training of Trainers' Course in Healthy Eating and Food Safety. 28 Apr 208, Paul O. Wiehe Auditorium, Reduit.
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Opportunities of a Problem-Based Learning

Words: 2989 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6887204

In addition, the classic version of problem-based learning "requires students to collaborate, formulate learning issues by determining factors that may contribute to the cause or solution of a problem, identify relevant content, and generate hypotheses. Most problem-based learning models also contain student reflection components as a means of self-evaluation" (Knowlton & Sharp, 2003, pp. 5-6).

Although the positive effects of using a problem-based learning approach have been documented in a number of studies, the findings of other studies have indicated that problem-based learning may not compare favorably with more traditional teaching methods with regards to student's knowledge base, technical skills, or the resources expended; however, Dadd (2009) suggests that the benefits of using a problem-based learning approach justify the additional resources this method requires. Moreover, Simons et al. (2004) report that students using a problem-based learning approach "tend to develop more positive attitudes toward learning than students in more traditional…… [Read More]

References

Alavi, C. (1999). Problem-based learning in a health sciences curriculum. New York:

Routledge.

Albion, P.R. (2003). PBL + IMM = PBL2: Problem-based learning and interactive multimedia development. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 11(2), 243-244.

Dadd, K.A. (2009). Using problem-based learning to bring the workplace into the classroom.
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Effects of Kasp

Words: 6179 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 33578773

Saudi

For most of its existence, Saudi Arabia's economy has been driven by revenues from its massive oil fields. While this has allowed the country to have a healthy balance sheet, it has also discouraged investment in other areas. Other countries in the region have begun to realize that having an oil-dependent economy is not sustainable in the long run. Nations with burgeoning populations and limited resources tend to be unsustainable. That lack of sustainability can be seen today in milder forms, such as high unemployment among youth, social problems like abuse and deviant behaviour and stunted economic growth.

The facts concerning the Saudi economy reflect the structural issues in the Saudi economy. The country has a population of roughly 27 million, a third of whom are non-citizen immigrants. Nearly 50% of these are under the age of 25 and the median age is 26.4 years. This means that the…… [Read More]

References

Alamri, M. (2011). Higher education in Saudi Arabia. Journal of Higher Education, Theory and Practice. Vol. 11 (4) 88-91.

Alshahrani, S. & Alsadiq, A. (2014) Economic growth and government spending in Saudi Arabia: An empirical investigation. International Monetary Fund. Retrieved August 13, 2014 from  https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/wp/2014/wp1403.pdf 

CIA World Factbook. (2014). Saudi Arabia. Central Intelligence Agency. Retrieved August 13, 2014 from  https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/sa.html 

Fleischaker, C., Hu, M., Khandewal, P., McHugh, J., Qu, H. & Westelius, N. (2013). Saudi Arabia: Selected issues. International Monetary Fund. Retrieved August 13, 2014 from  http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/scr/2013/cr13230.pdf
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Rates of death and disease

Words: 2419 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 70658414

Population of the City of Atlantis on March 30, 2003 = 183,000

of new active cases of TB occurring between January 1 and June 30, 2003 = 52

of active TB cases according to the city register on June 30, 2003 = 238

The incidence rate of active cases of TB for the 6-month period was: [ONE POINT]

per 100,000 population per 100,000 population per 100,000 population per 100,000 population

130 per 100,000 population

183,000 is 183% of 100,000, so the rate per 100,000 would be 52 divided by 1.84...or 28.

The prevalence of active TB as of June 30, 2003, was: [ONE POINT]

14 per 100,000 population

130 per 100,000 population

144 per 100,000 population

264 per 100,000 population

e. none of the above

B -- using the same math as above...except it's 238 / 1.84 -- 129.3

3. Which of the following is an advantage of active surveillance?…… [Read More]

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Macroeconomic Performance Since 1997 United

Words: 5411 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 91433146

Americans receive two to three weeks of paid vacation per year, while Europeans receive between 5 and 7 weeks. In addition, the U.S. has generally 8 paid holidays per year; the comparable figure for Europe is 12 to 18 days (holidays such as Easter and Christmas, plus national days and even the Queen's irthday in the Netherlands). As a result, Americans average only 10.2 vacation days per year (Zuckerman). Americans work on average nearly 2,000 hours a year, while Germans work about 1,500 hours. This significant difference in hours worked may help to account for a significant portion of the 43% difference in per capita GDP for the two countries.

Retirement Age and Associated Pension Costs third reason are the retirement ages and associated pension costs. Europeans retire at an earlier age than Americans: generally between 57 and 62, while Americans tend to retire between 62 and 65. This difference…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Alesina, a and Tabellini, G.U.S.-Europe income gap: Is it for real? Economic. Cambridge: VOX, 2007.

BBC. "EU unemployment stabilises." BBC News 5 March 2002: n.p.

Blanchard, O. "European unemployment: the evolution of facts and ideas." Economic Policy (2006): 5-59.

BLS. "How the Government Measures Unemployment." July 2004. BLS, Dept of Labor. 1 November 2007  http://www.bls.gov/cps/cps_htgm.htm .
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Intravenous Nursing Implementation of an

Words: 2934 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 54111199

The second purpose was to explore the association of demographic variables and nurses' perceptions of pump implementation to ratings of the management team and job satisfaction. Data was collected via a survey given to 1056 nurses at a tertiary Magnet hospital. The first section of the questionnaire pertained to demographic characteristics, while the second section consisted of thirty questions on a 5-point Likert scale based on both STS Theory and the Life Patterns Model conceptual framework.

The researchers conclude that generalizations cannot be made based on just one study. They did state however that the findings of this study give credence to the importance of technological changes in clinical nursing practice. ecommendations were made for future studies in that there is a need to analyze the degree to which technology affects the environment, patient acuity as well as overall nursing satisfaction. Carrying out this study in more that one hospital…… [Read More]

References

Advantages and Disadvantages of the Survey Method. (2011). Retrieved from  http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/research/survey/com2d1.cfm 

Bowcutt, Marilyn, Rosenkoetter, Marlene M., Chernecky, Cynthia C., Wall, Jane, Wynn, Donald

and Serrano, Christina. (2008). Journal of Nursing Management, 16(2), p.188-197.
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Human Capital Inequality and the Composition of Education Expenditure

Words: 599 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Article Critique Paper #: 59578413

Income Inequality and Education

A Human Capital Inequality and the Composition of Education Expenditure

Hwang, Jinyoung. (2011). A cross-country analysis of human capital inequality and the composition of education expenditure. European Journal of Social Sciences, 24 (1):

According to Hwang (2011), it has been observed in previous literature that substantially inequitable societies in terms of income distribution tend to spend more on tertiary education (university-level education) than lower-level education. "Wealth distribution is a plausible explanation for the distributional bias of government expenditure on education, as long as the distribution of wealth determines the existence and number of organized group[s] in an economy" (Hwang 2011: 97). This discrepancy could be explained by the fact that the rich tend to send their children to private schools not subsidized by the state for lower-level education, or to better-funded, locally funded secondary institutions and thus only need substantial federal support for education at the…… [Read More]

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Loss and Grief the Loss

Words: 3131 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 67987332



Art therapy is particularly useful with younger children. With children under the age of eight it can be difficult for them to grasp the concept of death, it can be equally as difficult for them to express the things they are feeling about the loss of a loved one (Shaw, 2000). Through the medium of drawing or painting a counselor may gain a better understanding of their patient's subjective experience of the loss as well as any unresolved emotions or unanswered questions remaining after the fact. Art therapy is also an effective means of determining the relative normality of a child's cognitive function following a traumatic event (Shaw, 2000).

Older children respond more effectively to client centered interviews (Shaw, 2000). A client centered interview is a psychoanalytic approach which encourages the patient to talk extensively guided minimally by questions or suggestions from the therapist. This approach might allow through the…… [Read More]

References

1. Tomita, T., & Kitamura, T. (2002). Clinical and research measures of grief: A reconstruction. Comprehensive psychiatry, 43, 95- 102.

2. Larson, D., & Hoyt, W. (2007). What has become of grief counseling? An evaluation of the empirical foundations of the new pessimism. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 38, 347- 355.

3. Currier, J., Holland, J., & Neimeyer, R. (2007). The effectiveness of bereavement interventions with children: A meta- analytic review of controlled outcome research. Journal of clinical child and adolescent psychology, 36, 253- 259.

4. Forte, a., Hill, M., Pazder, R., & Feudtner, C. (2004). Bereavement care interventions: A systematic review. BMC Palliative Care, 1-14.
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Recycling Research Proposal

Words: 1899 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29904568

Economical and Ethical Issues in Recycling

Economic Issues

There is a general agreement that the U.S. should be undertaking more recycling, with only 34.3% of current waste recycled. The rate is increasing, and while there have been legislative moves, it may be argued that the ethical awareness and economic factors have had a greater impact. The research proposal argues that the dualistic approach to recycling seen in the anthropocentric model can be used to show how and why the take up has been restrained, as there is a need for economic motivations to support the practice. These are now occurring, but there is still room for improvement. By undertaking quantitative research with businesses and consumers the paper proposes the gathering of information that can be statistically analysed to identify the most efficient policy approaches to improve recycling.

Introduction

The level of waste generated in increasing; it is estimated that in…… [Read More]

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Gang Growth and Membership Characteritics

Words: 4946 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 56950451

However, some gang members specialize in multiple criminal activities such as street robbery, human trafficking and drug trafficking.

Street Gangs

Street gangs are the major concern to parents, school administrators and the communities because they recruit students and the youths across the United States to enhance the growth of gang memberships. Street gangs are the most prevalent type of gangs in the United States because they influence a strong control in the large geographical regions. Typically, street gangs are characterized with criminal activities, which include brutality and drug trafficking. Presence of street gangs is broadened with their special relations with DTO (Drug Trafficking Organization) in Mexico, Canada, Columbia and other Central American countries. Type of street gangs includes regional-level street gangs specially known for their drug dealing. Functional regional-level street gangs include Latin Disciples, Florencia, Fresno Bulldogs, Tango Blast and United Blood Nation. Local street gangs also known as neighborhood-based…… [Read More]

References

Esbensen, F., and Osgood, D.W. (1999). Gang Resistance Education and Training

(G.R.E.A.T.): Results from the national evaluation. Journal of Research in Crime

and Delinquency 36(2):194 -- 225.

Esbensen, F.A. (2000). Preventing Adolescent Gang Involvement. Youth Gang Series.
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Enhancing Service Quality and Delivery in Nursing

Words: 1991 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 7969162

Competencies of IOM

The Institute of Medicine is an American organization founded in 1972 with the aim of training health workers, unlike other medical organizations aimed at profit making. As a non-profit organization, IOM has made remarkable progress, starting from the programs offered to the quality of services and qualifications of health personnel. Unlike earlier years when the organization offered training in only primary levels of medicine, presently IOM offers secondary and tertiary postgraduate programs in medicine, public health, traditional medicine among others. Services like neurosurgery, urology, and Cardiothoracic are now available in almost all health facilities in the United States.

Because of the tertiary programs offered by IOM, health professions highly specialized in these areas offers quality medical services and medical care to the general public. The health sector has greatly improved, and the public receives quality medical services and medical care. IOM managed to accomplish this by putting…… [Read More]

References

Edlin, M. (2013). IOM core competencies focus on collaborative care. Managed Healthcare Executive, ISSN 1533-9300,, Volume 23, Issue 12, p. 48-49

Golemboski, K., Otto, C.N. & Morris, S. (2013). Using performance tasks employing IOM patient safety competencies to introduce quality improvement processes in medical laboratory science education. Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology, ISSN 0894-959X, 2013, Volume 26, Issue 4, p. 205-11

J Hosp Med. 5 Suppl 2:i-xv, 1-114

McNeal, G.J. (2013). Interprofessional education: an IOM imperative. The ABNF journal: official journal of the Association of Black Nursing Faculty in Higher Education, Inc., ISSN 1046-7041, 2013, Volume 24, Issue 3, p. 69-70
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Healthcare Promotion Prevention and the

Words: 3190 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80129421

Nurses, who have first hand knowledge and understanding of how to live healthy and how to take proper care of themselves, are far better equipped to teach others about these concepts. Certain populations can benefit greatly from prevention, especially those who are prone to specific types of diseases or conditions.

One of the most common behaviors that leads to many chronic and often very damaging health conditions is smoking. Smoking can cause a multitude of diseases and conditions from emphysema to heart disease to lung cancer (Chapman, 2007). The list goes on and on. But smoking is 100% preventable and nurses need to understand not only how to treat these smoking-related diseases but how to more importantly discourage and prevent people from smoking in the first place. Many nurses agree that this behavior leads to many of the worst case scenarios for people with pre-existing chronic conditions. It is therefore…… [Read More]

References

Chapman, Simon. (2007). Public Health Advocacy and Tobacco Control: Making Smoking

History. Blackwell Publishing, New York, NY. Pp. 55-56.

Chung, Daniel C. (2008). "Stool DNA Testing and Colon Cancer Prevention: Another Step

Forward." Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 149, No. 7. pp. 509-510.
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E-Learning_how Technology Effects Education the Internet Allows

Words: 1164 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 15597055

E-Learning_How Technology effects education

The internet allows for more information to be spread at a lower cost

The internet allows for constant communication between teachers and students

The internet allows for greater convenience of study and more engaging lessons

Spreading information at low cost

Textbooks cost more than publishing text on the internet

The internet provides cost-effective publishing options for educational materials

Bates, 2005, p. 8 citation

Classrooms cost more to maintain than web hosting

Constant communication

Today's world is defined by an ability and expectation to be constantly available

Development of the internet and smart phones influences today's constantly connected culture

i. Mealy, Loller (Eds.), 2000, p. 233 citation

IV. Greater convenience

A. Students can learn on their own schedule at a location of their choosing

B. Students can engage in multimedia lesson presentation, thus engaging their interests

a. By providing easily-accessed multimedia integration, students do not find their…… [Read More]

References

Bates, T. (2005). Technology, e-learning and distance education (2nd ed.). London: Routledge.

E-learning in tertiary education: where do we stand?. (2005). Paris: OECD.

Kwan, R. (2008). Enhancing learning through technology: research on emerging technologies and pedagogies. Singapore: World Scientific.

Mealy, L., & Loller, B. (Eds.). (2000). E-learning: expanding the training classroom through
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Opportunities to Maximize Resources in

Words: 1522 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89921136

Use this sample to fine-tune your questions, decide how to analyze the data, and change your questions to make your analysis easier" (p. 6). The posters described above helped to raise awareness throughout the hospital concerning the availability of the custom survey instrument on the hospital's intranet which had previously received few responses.

Discussion

In reality, the problems described above were well-known throughout the hospital and steps were underway to resolve some of these problems, but at a snail's pace. These problems are also endemic to many larger organizations that have well entrenched bureaucracies.

Conclusion

Providing world-class healthcare in the 21st century is a challenging enterprise, but patients deserve the best care that hospitals can provide. Because resources are by definition scarce, it is therefore important for organizations of all types and sizes to maximize their resources in order to achieve a competitive advantage over those that do not. For…… [Read More]

References

Chaudron, D. (2008). 'Master of all you survey: Planning employee surveys.' OrganizedChange.com. [online] available:  http://www.organizedchange.com/pdfs  / employeesurveys.pdf.

Cravens, D.W. (2000). Strategic Marketing 6th Edition. New York: Irwin McGraw-Hill.

Cronshaw, S.F. & McCulloch, a.N. (2008). 'Reinstating the Lewinian Vision: from Force Field

Analysis to Organization Field Assessment.' Organization Development Journal, vol. 26,
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Structure of Protein

Words: 1057 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6530335

Structural Organization of Proteins

There are different protein structures, and these correspond directly to the kinds of functions that the proteins address. While many people feel that protein is all the same, this is not the truth. With a number of different kinds of proteins and a wide array of uses for them, it stands to reason that the structural organization of proteins will be different based on each one of those proteins and what type of function it has (Murray, et al., 2006). However, all proteins are similar in that they fold in three dimensions. The structure of the proteins are organized in a hierarchy that begins with the primary structure and moves through to the quaternary structure. Motifs and domains are the higher-level structures (Murray, et al., 2006). The primary structure services the polypeptide chain, and is a sequence of various residues (Van Holde & Matthews, 1996). That…… [Read More]

References

Murray RF, Harper, HW, Granner, DK, Mayes, PA, & Rodwell, VW (2006). Harper's illustrated biochemistry. New York: Lange Medical Books/McGraw-Hill.

Tooze, BC (1999). Introduction to protein structure. New York: Garland Pub.

Van Holde, KE, & Matthews, CK (1996). Biochemistry. Menlo Park, California: Benjamin/Cummings Pub. Co., Inc.
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Analyzing the US Healthcare System

Words: 974 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 99362072

U.S. Healthcare System: An Analysis

Healthcare System: An Analysis

The United States healthcare system is far more than simply a health insurance system with multiple contributors, neither is the government solely responsible for funding the system -- thus it is a hybrid health insurance system. The funding pattern depicts the system aptly, in the year 2010, 12% of funding came from local and state coffers, 38% from the federal government and 50% from private funds. egardless of the source of funding, most people seek care from private health facilities (Dorning, 2014).

Primary Care

Individuals seek primary care for almost all the health concerns they encounter, for instance, one may look for primary care even for common afflictions such as viral fever, bacterial infection or influenza. Individuals also look for primary care if they think they have broken a bone; have skin rash or a sore muscle. Primary care providers (PCPs)…… [Read More]

References

Baldwin, D. M. (2003). Disparities in Health and Health Care: Focusing Efforts to Eliminate Unequal Burdens. The Online Journal of Issues in Healthcare, 8(1).

CDC. (2014, March 13). Healthy People 2020. Retrieved from National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention:  http://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/hp2020.htm 

Dorning, J. (2014, June). The U.S. Health Care System: An International Perspective. Retrieved from Department for Professional Employees: http://dpeaflcio.org/programs-publications/issue-fact-sheets/the-u-s-health-care-system-an-international-perspective/

Squires, D., & Anderson, C. (2015, October 8). U.S.Health Care from a Global Perspective: Spending, Use of Services, Prices, and Health in 13 Countries. Retrieved from The Commonwealth Fund:  http://www.commonwealthfund.org/publications/issue-briefs/2015/oct/us-health-care-from-a-global-perspective
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Financial Plan

Words: 1055 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 68906910

Financial Plan

Carolinas Healthcare System, a non-profit self-sustaining public organization, is the largest healthcare system in combined North and South Carolina. It is a multi-disciplinary, integrated healthcare system that provides an extensive range of health and human services to the general public of Carolina. The organization owns, leases and manages hospitals, nursing homes, physical therapy facilities, home healthcare agencies, as well as other healthcare associated operations (Carolinas Healthcare System, 2016). The organization employs more than 60,000 personnel and has a capacity of over 7,500 registered beds. The following section encompasses a projected budget that contains a 3-year financial projection from December 31, 2015. The financial projection takes into account detailed expenditures, income, contingency, gain or loss (Carolinas Healthcare System, 2015). The financial projection outlines the net revenues and the net expenses of the organization.

CAOLINAS HEALTHCAE SYSTEM

3 YEA FINANCIAL POJECTION

STATING DECEMBE 31, 2015

NET EVENUE

2015

Year 1…… [Read More]

References

Carolinas Healthcare System. (2015). 2015 Annual Report.

Carolinas Healthcare System. (2016). Carolinas Healthcare System Financial Information. Retrieved 6 August 2016 from:  http://www.carolinashealthcare.org/about-us/corporate-financial-information 

Moffit, R. E., Senger, A. (2016). Medicare's Rising Costs -- and the Urgent Need for Reform. The Heritage Foundation.

Ovans, A. (2015). What Is a Business Model? Harvard Business Review.