Theoretical Framework Essays (Examples)

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Theoretical Foundations of Nursing Nursing Can Be

Words: 4161 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25325887

Theoretical Foundations of Nursing:

Nursing can be described as a science and practice that enlarges adaptive capabilities and improves the transformation of an individual and the environment. This profession focuses on promoting health, improving the quality of life, and facilitating dying with dignity. The nursing profession has certain theoretical foundations that govern the nurses in promoting adaptation for individuals and groups. These theoretical foundations include theories, theory integration, reflection, research and practice, and assimilation.

Grand Nursing Theory:

There are several grand nursing theories that were developed by various theorists including the Science of Unitary Human Beings by Martha ogers, Sister Callista oy's Adaptation Model, and Systems Model by Betty Neuman. Sister Callista oy's Adaptation Model is based on the consideration of the human being as an open system. She argues that the system reacts to environmental stimuli via cognator and regulator coping techniques for individuals. On the other hand, the…… [Read More]

References:

American Sentinel (2012). 5 Steps for Nurses to Stay Updated with Health Care Changes.

Retrieved September 4, 2013, from http://www.nursetogether.com/5-steps-for-nurses-to-stay-updated-with-health-care-changes

Andershed, B. & Olsson, K. (2009). Review of Research Related to Kristen Swanson's Middle-range Theory of Caring. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 23, 598-610.

"Application of Theory in Nursing Process." (2012, January 28). Nursing Theories: A
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Theoretical Characteristics for Leadership as

Words: 643 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72141659

(Clark, 1) This is an approach which is given foundation by such theories as Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, which dictates that personnel will perform according to the manner in which certain ranked needs are met by leadership.

The Political Framework which is offered "suggests some characteristics linked to the concept of political leadership: (1) an interactive process, (2) the emphasis on individual political behavior, (3) the collective purpose, and (4) the non-routine influence over the political process." (Peral, 68) These are instructive in promoting such theoretical characteristics as coalition building which garners real support and dedication from members of the organization at every level and which balances the use of persuasion, negotiation and coercion as various instrumental ways to achieve intended organizational outcomes. (Clark, 1)

The fourth leadership framework is the Symbolic Framework, which relies upon the leader as a symbol through whom certain organizational characteristics and cultural conceits are…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Clark, D. (1998). Bolman and Deal's Four Framework Approach. NWLink. Online at  http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/leader/framwork.html 

Meyer, K. (2006). The Structural Framework. University of Memphis. Online at https://umdrive.memphis.edu/kmeyer/.../Structural%20Frame.ppt

Peral, N. (1998). Political Leadership: A Tentative Framework. Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, 4(3), 68-83.
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Theoretical Perspective it Is a

Words: 704 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9326689

Once this has been done in a thorough and global manner, comparative studies can be conducted in order to assess any similarities among the historical threats to determine measures to take against potential future threats.

Capelli and Moore (2011, p. 25) go a step further in suggesting that targeted research, not only on language, but on the security environment in general, will greatly assist in both predicting and preventing insider threats in the online world. The organization CET (Computer Emergency esponse Team), for example, is part of the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) at Carnegie Mellon University. The Team has investigated the problems and concerns surrounding insider cloud computing threats since 2001. During this investigation, a database of more than 300 criminal cases have been compiled where persons with online access to company information, such as former employees, contractors, or business partners have abused the access and trust placed upon them.…… [Read More]

References

Cappelli, D. And Moore, a.P. (2011, Spring). Insider Threat Center at GERT Grows Solutions from Reality-Based Research. IAnewsletter, Vol. 13, No. 2. Retrieved from: http://iac.dtic.mil/iatac/download/Vol13_No2.pdf

Ho, S.M. And Lee, H. (n.d.) Journal of Wireless Mobile networks, Ubiquitous Computing, and Dependable Applications, vol. 3, no. 1/2. Retrieved from:  http://isyou.info/jowua/papers/jowua-v3n12-6.pdf 

Hori, Y., Claycomb, W., and Yim, K. (n.d.) Frontiers in Insider Threats and Data Leakage Prevention. Journal of Wireless Mobile networks, Ubiquitous Computing, and Dependable Applications, vol. 3, no. 1/2. Retrieved from:  http://isyou.info/jowua/papers/jowua-v3n12-0.pdf
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Theoretical Applications on Why Bill

Words: 1905 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3464459

Therefore Clinton can be said to have generally followed a realist foreign policy program in Kosovo, yet due to changes in the international system which made it problematic to cut too many deals with dictators and war-criminals like Milosevich, a more conflictive approach to the issue was created. National interest, while predominant, was no longer the only consideration.

One of the problems with a constructivist understanding of the war though, is to what extent the international system allows for freedom of choice. If constructivism were true, then there were no "real" constraints on the actions of ill Clinton during the crisis. Yet sending ground troops in for example, would have been politically infeasible, not only due to American public opinion, but because Russia might have seen that as a threat to its interests in the region and moved to act in a provocative way. The point is then, that if…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bacevich, a.J., and Eliot a. Cohen. 2001. War over Kosovo. Columbia University Press.

Morgenthau, Hans J. 1978. Politics Among Nations: The Struggle for Power and Peace. 5th ed. New York: Alfred a. Knopf.

Sell, Louis. 2003. Slobodan Milosevic and the destruction of Yugoslavia. Duke University Press, September 1.

Wendt, Alexander. 1992. Anarchy is what States Make of it: The Social Construction of Power Politics. International Organization 46, no. 2 (Spring): 391-425.
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Theoretical Approach to Generational Poverty

Words: 3947 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70625438

Theoretical Approach to Generational Poverty

Poverty is one of the most pressing social problems and the generational nature of poverty remains one of the reasons it is so difficult to eradicate poverty. While there are several different theories suggesting why poverty is transmitted from generation to generation and theorists sometimes strongly disagree on those reasons, there is almost universal acceptance of the idea that poverty is transmitted from one generation to another. In fact, there has been a significant amount of study directed at chronic poverty in the developed and developing countries. This research suggests that while poverty may be simplistically defined as a lack of money, the problem of poverty actually addresses the "absence of transfer of different forms of capital: human, social-cultural, social-political, financial/material and environmental/natural" (Moore, 2001). This more complex definition of poverty helps explain why simply providing financial resources to a family does not generally fix…… [Read More]

References

Andrisani, P. (1977). Internal-external attitudes, personal initiative, and the labor market experience of black and white men. The Journal of Human Resources, 12(3), 308-328.

Bartos, O. & Wehr, P. (2002). Using conflict theory. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Buck, M. & Austrin, H. (1971). Factors related to school achievement in an economically disadvantaged group. Child Development, 42(6), 1813-1826.

Duckitt, J. & Mphuthing, T. (1998). Political power and race relations in South Africa: African attitudes before and after the transition. Political Psychology, 19(4), 809-832.
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Theoretical Perspectives on the War

Words: 6124 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22412840

Anachy is but one aspect of the Realist paadigm. Anachy is the impetus fo all othe components of the Realist theoy to come into play. Elements such as powe, secuity dilemma's, balance of powe, polaity and alliances and ultimately wa ae all outcops of the existence of any eal centalized powe and an absence of tue legitimacy in the fom of a well established, espected, influential cental govenment. Each of these elements is now discussed in elation to the wa in Afghanistan.

Pio to Septembe 11th, 2001 the main souce of powe in Afghanistan ested in the hands of the Taliban. As Seth Jones' assets, the Taliban's ise to powe gew out of utte discontent with the govenment in Kabul within the tibal egions of the county. The Taliban's leade Mullah Oma successfully led a coup against the existing govenment in 1996 and quickly established a had-line eligious fundamentalist state…… [Read More]

references Seriously: A Liberal Theory of International Politics. International Organizations, 51, 513-533.

Nagl, J.A. (2005). Learning to eat soup with a knife: counterinsurgency lessons from Malaya and Vietnam (Pbk. ed.). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Nau, H.R. (2009). Perspectives on international relations: power, institutions, ideas (2nd ed.). Washington, D.C.: CQ Press.

Rubin, B. (2007). Saving Afghanistan. foreign affairs, 86, 57-68.

Siebert, F. (1983). Four Theories of the Press. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.
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Theoretical Applications in Sociology Critical Theory vs

Words: 3169 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88672210

Theoretical Applications in Sociology: Critical Theory vs. Systems Theory

Exciting advances are being made in the development and application of sociological theories to social work practices. Two of the foremost theories are systems theory -- currently undergoing an architectural evolution due to the implications of the chaos and complexity disciplines -- and critical theory, which seeks to change the current systematical frameworks of society for the better. For the purposes of this paper, I will compare and contrast the two theories, highlighting the similarities between them as well as the segments of departure and their practical implications. I will then apply both theories to a single case study in order to show the strengths and weaknesses of each theory in practice.

In "New Directions in Systems Theory: Chaos and Complexity," authors Warren, Franklin and Streeter examine how advances in the chaos and complexity disciplines are instigating an evolution of traditional…… [Read More]

References

Dominell, L. (2003). Anti-Oppressive Social Work Theory & Practice. Publisher's City: Publisher's Name.

Warren, K., Franklin, C. & Streeter, C.L. (1998). New Directions in Systems Theory: Chaos and Complexity. Social Work, 43 (4), 357-372.

**Not sure of all the information for the other sources (Book Title, Publisher, Publisher City ect). Take a look at the following cite for help in completing the reference page: http://www.library.cornell.edu/resrch/citmanage/apa
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Teaching Leadership Frameworks in Action

Words: 1383 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31039988



One example of this flaw is found in the third force in Sergiovanni's model, the educational force, which is associated with gathering and analyzing specialized knowledge applicable to education (Victoria Department of Education 2007). At the private senior school where I am employed, certain school leaders have certainly mastered the educational force and have amassed a wide range of specialized educational knowledge, but their inability to interact effectively with their colleagues in the school has rendered this knowledge largely useless. In fact, the interpersonal difficulties that these leaders have in dealing with others have led to a certain level of resentment regarding such information as it has become attached to hostile personalities.

Yet despite this apparent flaw of Sergiovanni's hierarchy, the actual identification and separation of the forces in his Model of ransformational Leadership still holds up to examination. hese first three forces taken separately paint a nearly complete picture…… [Read More]

The symbolic force in Sergiovanni's leadership framework is the aspect of leadership that involves providing an example to other members of the learning institution in regards to making this type of differentiation (Victoria DOE 2007). Particular behaviors that exhibit this force include clearly reflecting goals and priorities through action -- basically "leading by example" -- and making "explicit reference to school goals when decisions are being made about changes within the school" (Victoria DOE 2007). Sergiovanni's separation of this aspect of leadership makes total sense; the symbolic elements of a leadership role do not involve any direct practical action that is immediately relevant to educational situations, but instead helps both the leader and those under her or his leadership to prioritize their practical decisions.

The fifth and final leadership force that Sergiovanni identifies, and the one that appears at the pinnacle of his pyramid, is the aspect of cultural leadership which makes a sort of "high priest" out of the leader (Sergiovanni 1984). This is where the hierarchy defined by Sergiovanni truly makes sense; just as the symbolic level of leadership is meant to differentiate and prioritize the other leadership aspects according to the various goals of the school/learning institution, the higher level of cultural leadership's aim is "leading the school community by defining, strengthening, and articulating values and beliefs that give the school identity over time" (Victoria DOE 2007). That is, the effective cultural leader will consistently define goals (i.e. The aims of the symbolic aspect of leadership) that in turn reflect the aims of each of the lower three leadership forces. My particular place of employment has been decidedly lacking in cultural leadership, but this in no way subtracts from the validity of Sergiovanni's Model of Transformational Leadership. Rather, the noticeable absence of effective long-term and consistent leadership in my school can be seen as the direct result of failings in the symbolic and cultural leadership forces at work (or not at work) in the private senior school.

Part of the problem with the differentiation of leadership roles in theoretical frameworks is the subsequent attempt to fragment leadership in practical situations by placing certain leaders in charge of different aspects of the school. Though this can be effective and even necessary to a degree in many situations, my experience has shown that Sergiovanni's insistence that the separability of these leadership aspects is theoretical only, and cannot be effective in real world situations.
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Theoretical Pillars With the Current National Divorce

Words: 1268 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56207439

Theoretical illars

With the current national divorce rate stubbornly at 50%, the phenomenon of single parenthood, notably single mothers, definitely isn't going anywhere. The single parents which are at the greatest disadvantage are those who are of a lower socioeconomic class, as they're unable to offer the best education, healthcare, basic provisions and other items to their children. They often work two jobs and don't get to spend enough times with their children, as current and past research reflects.

The ultimate focus of the research that this dissertation is centered around seeks to identify the most compelling and effective interventions which can minimize the likelihood of negative outcomes for high-risk children, such as those born to low-income single parents. For this reason, I have created an annotated bibliography that addresses this body of research. An example of a title for the literature review would be: Modulators of Child Development Outcomes…… [Read More]

Perlmutter, D. & . (2013). Thinking Beyond the Dissertation. Retrieved from wmich.edu:  http://wmich.edu/sites/default/files/attachments/u224/2013/psci-phd-beyond-dissertation_0.pdf 

Stavrovra, O., & Fetchenhauer, D. (2014). Single Parents, Unhappy Parents? Parenthood, Partnership, and the Cultural Normative Context. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology.

Zaslow, M., & Emig, C. (1997). When Low-Income Mothers Go to Work. The Future of Children, 110-115.
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Theoretical Views on Leadership Applied

Words: 3640 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78677468

ill Gates is perhaps a good example in this sense: Microsoft during the early 70s was but a mixture of their programmers, but they selected ill Gates to coordinate and organize their efforts because they saw him as the best prepared among them. This is also what named him chief software architect at Microsoft (besides the fact that he owned the company at that point) and he retained the respective function even after he was no longer CEO.

There are other particularities of leadership in the software development industry as well.

ecause the work activity is based on the existence of development teams that generally incorporate developers, testers and writers and which are led by a team leader or project manager, there is a distinctive importance attributed to the project manager or team leader. His or her job is many folded, which means that he probably needs to have all…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Spencer, Emily. Leadership Models and Theories: A Brief Overview. On the Internet at http://www.cda-acd.forces.gc.ca/cfli/engraph/research/pdf/12.pdf.Last retrieved on August 10, 2008

2. Models and Theories. On the Internet at http://www.stewart-associates.co.uk/leadership-models.aspx.Last retrieved on August 10, 2008

3. P.G. Northouse, Leadership: Theory and Practice, (Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 1997

4. G. Yukl, Leadership in Organizations, 4th Edition, (New Jersey: Prentice-Hall Inc., 1998
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Theoretical Approaches to Learning

Words: 2498 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78319889

theoretical approaches to learning and explores possibilities of learning applications to special education. A matrix is presented and the information in the matrix is explained within a professional setting that deals with special education. The theoretical approaches to learning provide the framework for development of leaning skills and are examined in detail.

Keywords: Learning, Learning theories, Cognitive development, andura's social learning, Pavlov, Classical condition, special education, Erikson's theory, social development theory, experiential learning.

andura's Social Learning Theory

Social learning theory by andura highlights the societal processes in learning suggesting that people learn from each other using the means of observation and imitation. This means that children watch and learn behavior of adults and family members and during the process of observation they pick up skills which they imitate. The theory of social learning requires an analysis of the psychological processes of motivation, attention and memory and these three cognitive processes…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Bandura, A. (1997). Self-efficacy: The exercise of control. New York: W.H. Freeman.

Bandura, A. (1986). Social Foundations of Thought and Action. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Bandura, A. (1977). Social Learning Theory. New York: General Learning Press.

Bandura, A. (1969). Principles of Behavior Modification. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.
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Theoretical Foundations of Nursing First Half

Words: 2037 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10078501

diverse population nurses must attend to, the concept of 'transcultural' nursing is important to understand. Instead of viewing health as a universal concept, transcultural nursing attempts to understand the conceptual building blocks of the nursing profession as cultural products that are socially-constructed. It strives to understand the similarities and differences between different health attitudes and practices (Leininger 1991). First developed by Madeline Leininger, transcultural nursing is founded upon the idea that the "health care providers need to be flexible in the design of programs, policies, and services to meet the needs and concerns of the culturally diverse population, groups that are likely to be encountered" (Transcultural nursing, 2012, Current Nursing).

Nurses must be culturally astute and adapt their practices to patient's cultural needs as well as to physical needs. This concept has been somewhat controversial within the nursing profession given that Western medicine's emphasis on preserving life and optimizing treatment…… [Read More]

References

Adult obesity facts. (2013).CDC. Retrieved:  http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html 

Dorothea Orem's self-care deficit theory. (2012). Nursing Theories. Retrieved:

http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/self_care_deficit_theory.html

Milligan, F. (2008) Child obesity 2: recommended strategies and interventions. Nursing Times;
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Theoretical Contributions of Durkheim and

Words: 1931 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15250898

662). In other words, individuals coalesce around environments repetitively to form the collective. The collective structure stays even when the individual is alone. This is close to the collective representations of Durkheim, but it is based on innate or genetic structures that connect during the repetition of social encounters (which in Allport are not religious). The social bonding function is similar: "The collective-structure event-format (so called 'reality of the group') is thus preserved, though the particular contacts of individuals may vary in space, time, and number" (Allport, 1955, p. 662).

This interweaving with the collective has lasting effects on the individual structure. He says, "It is also worth noting that the collective structure itself is often represented, usually in a schematic or abridged format, in the meaning-cycles of the individuals involved, on the basis of their contacts with other individuals in the regular and repetitive course of the structure's operation"…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Allport, F.H. (1955). Theories of perception and the concept of structure: a review and critical analysis with an introduction to a dynamic-structural theory of behavior. New York: John Wiley.

Durkheim, E. (1984). The Division of labor in society W.D. Halls, Trans. New York: Free Press.

____. (1915). The Elementary forms of religious life J.W. Swain, Trans. New York: Free Press.

____. (1938). The Rules of sociological method S.A. Solovay & J.H Mueller, Trans. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
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Theoretical Perspectives of Sigmund Freud

Words: 3109 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85590489



Super ego. In Freud's model, the final element of personality to develop is the superego. According to Cherry, "The superego is the aspect of personality that holds all of our internalized moral standards and ideals that we acquire from both parents and society -- our sense of right and wrong. The superego provides guidelines for making judgments" (2010, para. 3). Freud believed that the superego first starts to emerge during early childhood, typically at age 5 years or so (Cherry, 2010). The super ego is comprised of two parts as follows:

1. The ego ideal includes the rules and standards for good behaviors. These behaviors include those which are approved of by parental and other authority figures. Obeying these rules leads to feelings of pride, value and accomplishment.

2. The conscience includes information about things that are viewed as bad by parents and society. These behaviors are often forbidden and…… [Read More]

References

Auffret, D. (2010). Perception-consciousness (PCPT-CS). International Dictionary of Psychoanalysis. Retrieved from http://www.enotes.com/psychoanalysis-encyclopedia / perception-consciousness-pcpt-cs.

Blanco, I.M. (1998). The unconscious as infinite sets: An essay in bi-logic. London: Karnac

Books.

Cherry, K. (2010). The id, ego and super ego. About.com: Psychology. Retrieved from http://
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Theoretical Information With Relevance to

Words: 3480 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76308197

Still, this trait is mostly applicable within the growing services industry, whereas the industry and manufacturing fields still rely tenability on their machines and equipments to lead to the attainment of the pre-established objectives.

In such a setting then, the problems with the plant's machineries and equipments constitute a pivotal factor in the generation of delivery delays. The more stringent situation in this sense is represented in the case of lean times, which subsequently exacerbate the delays in using the respective machine; lead times can take any time from a few weeks to several months. In this context, the single solution is for the manufacturing managers to ensure adequate planning solutions (the Eagle Technology Group, 2011).

Another example is represented by the malfunction in plant production equipments which would also slow down -- or even temporarily cease -- the manufacturing operations. Aside from the actual delays, these forces also generate…… [Read More]

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Theoretical Analysis of Anoop Nayak's Boyz to Men

Words: 1649 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57041878

Sociology research review and critique: "oyz to Men"

Anoop Nayak's 2003 sociological study "oyz to Men: masculinities, schooling and labour transitions in de- industrial times" examines the adaptation (or lack thereof) of a representational group working-class ritish young men to a changing labor economy. Life in ritain has been profoundly altered due to shifts in the class structure. There is a dearth of stable factory jobs and a shift to "service sector economies, part-time work, fixed-term contracts and more 'flexible' patterns of labour" (Nayak 2003: 148). The study focuses specifically on the Northeast of England and details a specifically 'male' experience inside and outside of school. The perspective adopted is thus one of social constructivism, which seeks to understand how the subjects understand their own experiences in a social context and contextualizes those experiences within a wider cultural framework of interpretation which has many 'layers.'

The Northeast region was historically…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Nayak, Anoop. 2003. 'Boyz to Men': masculinities, schooling and labour transitions in de-

industrial times. Educational Review, 55(2): 147-158.
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Theoretical Dimensions Involving Criminal Behavior

Words: 1371 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43899327

Criminal Acts and Offender Behavior

Theoretical Dimensions of Criminal Behavior

Laws exist to maintain order and peace and provide for the safety and well-being of all members of society. Acts that disrupt and threaten this system of order are deemed criminal in nature and are therefore punishable by law. The psychology of criminal behavior addresses the thought processes that result in deviant acts and the motivations that drive them. It is believed that criminal types operate from a self-centered framework that shows little, if any regard, for the safety and well-being of others (Merton, 1968).

There are generally three broad theoretical models of criminal behavior: biological, psychological, and sociological. Most theoretical models overlap in their analysis and point to the genetic predisposition of some individuals toward criminal behavior, as well as environmental influences (Morley & Hall, 2003). Most commonly both play a part in developing a person's tendency to engage…… [Read More]

References

Holmes, S.E., Slaughter, J.R., & Kashani, J. (2001). Risk factors in childhood that lead to the development of conduct disorder and antisocial personality disorder. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 31, 183-193.

Merton, Robert K. (1968). Social Theory and Social Structure. New York: Free Press.

Morley, K., & Hall, W. (2003). Is there a genetic susceptibility to engage in criminal acts? Australian Institute of Criminology: Trends and Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice, 263, 1-6.

Raine, A. (2002). The biological basis of crime. In J.Q Wilson & J. Petrsilia (Eds.) Crime: Public policies for crime control. Oakland: ICS Press.
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Theoretical Thinking Exercises

Words: 1317 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61525261

Sociology

Universal Values

Societies and social beliefs change from tribe to tribe, and from nation to nation. The constructed nature of social beliefs mandate that from one society to another, the social beliefs change because each tribe has experienced a different growth curve, has experienced a different history, has identified different seminal events. As a result, each tribe has a unique set of socially constructed beliefs.

For most of the last century, the primary understanding of social values has been based on a constructed and evolutionary model. Darwin's and his cousin Galton's theories of constructed identities have influenced the field of sociology. What was once believed to be passed down as 'truth' on the authority of a society's religious beliefs has now been redefined as 'myth construction.' We believe that man's feelings of weakness, or powerlessness over aspects of his environment has led individual societies to build myths which look…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Goodale, Jane. To Sing with the Pigs is Human. Seattle: University of Washington Press. 1995
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Circle of Life Framework in Breast Health

Words: 1427 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41464869

Circle of Life Framework in Breast Health Education

Article Critique Analysis: Use of the Talking Circle for Comanche omen's Breast Health Education, by E. Haozous, V. Eschiti, and J. Lauderdale

The journal article, "Use of the Talking Circle for Comanche omen's Breast Health Education" by E. Haozous et. al. (2010), promotion of education on breast health was explored using a specific and unique tradition as the framework of the study. This tradition, called the Circle of Life (COL), is an "intertribal cancer prevention program focused on breast health education" and is specifically implemented among American Indian (AI) women (378). Using the COL as framework, the authors aimed to achieve "cultural congruency" in exploring, discovering, and identifying the different dimensions concerning breast health education and promotion effectiveness in the context of AI women's culture -- specifically, Comanche women (378). Harmonized understanding of the Comanche community, female and health cultures led to…… [Read More]

Work cited:

Haozous, E., V. Eschiti, and J. Lauderdale. (2010). "Use of Talking Circle for Comanche Women's Breast Health Education." Journal of Transcultural Nursing, Vol. 21, No. 377.
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Nursing Theory Framework

Words: 2702 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33960538

Nursing Theory Framework

Attachment Theory

ecognizing Addiction through Attachment Theory

Affect egulation and Addiction

Handling Addiction as an Attachment Disorder

The First Phase of Therapy

Concepts

Autonomy

Beneficence

Nonmaleficence

Nursing Theory Framework

The misappropriation of prescription drugs by teens in the United States is a growing public health issue. Using a nursing theory framework, the scope of the problem of prescription drug use among teens is reviewed. Equal in variety to manifestations of addiction are sundry psychological theories that attempt to explain and treat the problem. Hardy (2011) was able to look into four traditional models for recognizing alcoholism (social learning theory, tension reduction theory, personality theory, and interactional theory,) in addition to five theoretical models that were developing at the time of their writing.

An approach to treating and understanding addiction that has created a huge amount of research in current decades, and which displays big promise for effective…… [Read More]

References

Caplan, J.P. (2012). Neuropsychiatric effects of prescription drug abuse. Neuropsychology Review, 17(3), 363-80.

Elkashef, A.M. (2012). Prevention and treatment of addiction. Psychiatric Times, 16-18.

Fischer, B.P. (n.d.). Assessing the prevalence of nonmedical prescription opioid use in the general canadian population: Methodological issues and questions. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 55(9), 606-9.

Flores, P.J. (2012). Group psychotherapy and neuro-plasticity: An attachment theory perspective. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 60(4), 546-70.
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HRM Organizational Behavior Theories Frameworks and the

Words: 4457 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44961156

HM Organizational Behavior, Theories, Frameworks and the Links Between Individual and Organizational Performance

This work in writing conducts a critical evaluation of HM Organizational Behavior Theories Frameworks that link performance.

Defining and measuring the effectiveness and performance of workers is a specific part of the HM manager's work. The question presenting is one that asks how the skills, behaviors and attitudes that are needed by workers to successfully and effectively perform their roles is defined. One way of measuring this is linking the performance of individuals to the organizational goals. This is generally accomplished through use of competencies which are described as "the integrated knowledge, skills, judgment, and attributes that people need to perform a job effectively. By having a defined set of competencies for each role in the business, it shows workers the kinds of behaviors the organizational values…" (MindTools, 2011) Lawrence (1998) reports that people are "multifaceted and…… [Read More]

References

Alderfer, C.P. (1972). Existence, relatedness, and growth. New York: Free Press.

Argyris, C. & Schon, DA (1996) Organizational Learning II Theory, Method, and Practice. Reading MA: Addison-Wesley.

Beer, M. (1980) Organization Change and Development: A Systems View. Santa Monica, CA, Goodyear.

Castellano, William G. (nd) A New Framework of Employee Engagement. Center for Human Resource Strategy Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.
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Applying Justice Framework Practice

Words: 2593 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42425787

Applying Just Practice Framework

Social Justice Framework

There is a reason that jigsaw puzzles are so often used to represent complex processes and enduring problems, the solutions to which are not immediately evident to the puzzler. It is a curiosity how, at some point, each piece in a puzzle reveals where it fits in the frame. Most people have their favorite strategies for solving puzzles, and they generally do contribute to a more expedient solution -- or at least, they give that illusion. Oddly, spending time not puzzling over the fit of the pieces seems to bring about a solution, and the ease with which understanding comes after such a break never ceases to astonish. Why is it that -- when we can't find a fit -- we don't gain greater clarity through a forced, hyper-focus on finding the missing piece. Indeed, our use of theory, as explained in Chapter…… [Read More]

References

Finn, J.L. And Jacobson, M. (2003, Winter). Just practice: Steps toward a new social work paradigm. Journal of Social Work Education, 39(1), 57-58.

Finn, J.L. And Jacobson, M. (2007). Just practice: A social justice approach to social work (2nd ed.). Eddie Bowers Publishing Company.
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Evidence-Based Assessment Framework Evidence Based

Words: 897 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 618208

The abnormal activities observed can point out at many different issues such as anxiety or heart failure.

The interview of the patient is a very vital and essential assessment tool in the hands of the nurse. The nurse can conduct a thorough interview to have the complete and big picture of patient (the nurse can assess the patient both physically and mentally much more efficiently by just asking what is wrong and where are the problems).

The observation is also a very important tool, nurses can make avail of the interactions they made with patients by observing their responses to different kinds of stimuli. This practice assists the nurses in recognizing the overall pain, any sort of emotional disturbances and the patient's reaction towards the treatment applied.

This observation factor is very important especially for those patients who have any sort of difficulty in communicating with the nurses or medical…… [Read More]

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Nursing Concept Theoretical Background One of the

Words: 3582 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46011406

Nursing Concept

Theoretical Background

One of the complexities of 21st century medicine is the evolution of nursing care theories in combination with a changing need and expectation of the stakeholder population. Nurses must be advocates and communicators, but must balance these along with an overall philosophy of ethics while still remaining mindful of budgets and the need for the medical institution to be profitable. It seems as if these issues comprise a three-part template for nursing: respect for patient value & individuality, education of patients, and cognition and respect for the realities of contemporary medicine. In many ways, too, modern technology has advanced further than societal wisdom, especially when confronting the issue of death. The modern nurse's role is to create a nurse-patient culture that encourages the individual to take responsibility for their healthcare and, in partnership with the nurse, to be involved in their recovery. The modern complexities of…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Basford, L. And O. Slevin. (2003). Theory and Practice of Nursing: An Integrated Approach to Caring Practice. New York: Nelson Thomas.

Beckstead, J. And Beckstead, L. (2004). A multidimensional analysis of the epistemic origins of nursing theories, models and frameworks. International Journal of Nursing Studies. 43

(1): 113-22.

Cohen, J. (1991). Two portraits of caring: a comparison of the artists - Leininger
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Strategic Framework in BP-Deepwater Horizon Accident One

Words: 4053 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91654562

Strategic Framework in BP-Deepwater horizon accident

One of the most eminent names in the oil and gas industry is British Petroleum, considered as the largest provider of oil and gas to its customers for transportation, energy for heating and light and retail services for petrochemical products globally. The financial and operational picture of the company's performance is illustrated in table1 below.

Performance at a glance for 2010

Facts and figures

Sales and other operating revenues

eplacement cost profit

Number of employees

Proved reserves

etail sites

Upstream

efineries (wholly or partly owned)

efining throughput

$297,107 million (year 2010)

($4,519) million (year 2010)

79,700 (at 31 Dec 2010)

18,071 million barrels of oil equivalent

22,100

Active in 29 countries

16

2,426 thousand barrels per day (year 2010)

(BP's Corporate website, 2010)

On 20th April 2010 the company faced a serious challenge when one of its oil rigs started leaking and simply couldn't…… [Read More]

References

BP's Corporate website, 2010. Annual Report 2010. Retrieved through http://www.bp.com/sectionbodycopy.do?categoryId=9035798&contentId=7066618 on 12th August 2010

Corner, P. Kinicki, A. And Keats, B. (1994) Integrating organizational and individual information processing perspectives on choice, Organizational Science, vol. 3.

Drucker, P. (1954) The Practice of Management, Harper and Row, New York, 1954.

Gellerman, S. (1989) Managing Ethics from the Top to Down, Sloan Management Review;
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Zachman Framework Overview

Words: 1538 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62820620

Zachman Framework is "a descriptive framework" for information systems architecture, and was developed drawing on other disciplines as a source of inspiration (Zachman, 1987). The Framework comprises the following elements: identification, definition, representation, specification, configuration and instantiation (Zachman, 2008). This paper will seek to cut through the gobbledygook on the Zachman webpage and develop an understanding of what the framework is and how it was developed.

Zachman developed the framework while working for IBM during the 1980s. He saw the problem as being that information systems were increasing in their size and complexity during this period, and believed that a response was to have a framework by which the architecture of such systems could be understood. This framework uses analogies from outside of information systems to explain IS architecture, allowing for better managerial understanding of information systems. He rightly recognized that the pace of IS complexity was increasing, and that…… [Read More]

References

Frankel, D. (2003). The Zachman Framework and the OMG's model driven architecture. Business Process Trends. Retrieved November 4, 2014 from  http://petros.omg.org/mda/mda_files/09-03-WP_Mapping_MDA_to_Zachman_Framework1.pdf 

Ostadzadeh, S., Aliee, F. & Ostadzadeh, S. (2007). A method for consistent modeling of Zachman Framework cells. Advances and Innovations in Systems. Vol. 2007, pp. 375-380.

Pereira, C. & Sousa, P. (2004). A method to define an enterprise architecture using the Zachman framework. SAC '04.

Ross, J. (2004). Generating strategic benefits from enterprise architecture. Center for Information Systems Research. In possession of the author.
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Nursing Concepts and Theory Conceptual-Theoretical Structure Paper

Words: 1674 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18218062

Nursing Concepts and Theory

Conceptual-Theoretical Structure paper

Personal belief about nursing theory and knowledge development process for nursing practice

All nursing theories play an important role in defining nursing and giving the roles that nurses need to play. Originally, the role of nurses was simply to carry out activities as instructed by doctors, however, over the years, this role has been changed to include more responsibilities as the nursing world has evolved. Nursing theories describe, predict and explain the various phenomena in nursing practice and thus create foundations for nursing practice. They also help to generate knowledge in the field of nursing and to point the direction which the field should develop in future. This view is supported by Carper (1978)

who states that nursing theories elaborate nursing practice and create professional boundaries for the profession. Nursing knowledge comes from research that has been conducted on nursing which forms scientific…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, A.M. (2005). Nursing Leadership, Management, and Professional Practice for the LPN/LVN (3rd ed.). Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company.

Carper, B. (1978). Fundamental patterns of knowing in nursing. Advances in Nursing Science, 1(1), 13-23.

Clark, M.J. (2003). Community health nursing: Caring for populations (Fourth ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Dayer-Berenson, L. (2010). Cultural Competencies for Nurses: Impact on Health and Illness. Burlington, Massachusetts: Jones & Bartlett Learning.
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Mckinsey 7s Framework Congruence Model

Words: 1088 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6099125

In regard to organizational strategy, the companies can work towards a similar strategy of delivering high quality products to their clients. This would be the same for their shared values. The efforts towards integrating the structures, systems and strategy should however be given most attention. The strategy of partnerships, strategic alliance and acquisitions must be upheld.

Using this framework, we can see the need for new leadership so as to ensure that the new acquisition does not suffer from the past bad decisions.

Congruence Model for Organization Analysis

The congruence model of organizational analysis specifies the inputs, outputs and the throughputs in manner which is more consistent with the open systems theory as noted by Katz and Kahn (1978).In this regard the inputs, outputs and the throughputs of both Skype and Microsoft must be analyzed with a view of transforming them into a clear and concise organizational model.According to this…… [Read More]

References

Bryce, DJ (2011). Microsoft's Skype Deal: How to Make it Work.Available online at http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2011/05/microsofts_skype_deal_how.html

Cummings, T.G. & Worley, C.G. (1993). Organization development and change. Fifth Edition. New York, NY: West Publishing.

Gable, R.K. & Wolf, M.B. (1993). Instrument development in the affective domain: Measuring attitudes and values in corporate and school settings. Boston, MA: Kluwer Academic Publishers

French, W.L. & Bell, C.H. (1995). Organization development: Behavioral science interventions for organization improvement. Fifth Edition. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
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Milo's Framework Modern Healthcare Is'so Complex

Words: 673 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55552813

Milo's Framework

Modern healthcare is so complex, so rife with new technologies, new procedures, and new expectations from stakeholders, that the contemporary nurse and physician need all the tools possible to pull for varied situations. Milo's framework is a set of propositions that help frame strategies to improve health inducing behaviors by enhancing personal choice-making while still in the context of societal and cultural expectations. Milo posits that the health status of populations at any given time is essentially the result of individual choice. However, the choices that individuals have tend to be limited by what the individual perceives to be options, depending on their personal and cultural/societal background, not necessarily the choices that are really available. In fact, Milo says, "Most people, most of the time will make the easiest choices, i.e., will do the things, develop the patterns or life-styles, which seem to cost them less and/or from…… [Read More]

Cody, M., ed. (2012). Philosophical and Theoretical Perspectives for Advanced Nursing Practice. Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett.

Milo, N. (1976). A framework for prevention: changing health-damaging to health-generating life patterns. American Journal of Public Health. 66 (5): 439-9. Retrieved from:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1653306/ 

Citation, not plagiarized.
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Sustained Competitive Advantage Using Human Resources Theoretical

Words: 1379 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69971313

Sustained Competitive Advantage Using Human esources

Theoretical Critique essay format. Within a challenging economic environment role strategic human resource management insignificant. Do approaches strategic

There has been tremendous growth in the strategic management field, and this has made it more popular amongst the practitioners and academics in the previous twenty years. For research structuring, industrial organization strategist rely on the SWOT framework. This has been the case since strategy became a recognized area in the management field Oliver, 1997.

ecently there has been other contributions made to the literature strategy, and this has emphasized the external part of the SWOT framework. The external part focuses mostly on the environmental impacts of the firm's performance. Models that focus on the environmental impacts of the firm's performance have little use to the practitioners though they are well received. These models communicate little regarding the manager's influence.

In strategic management, there has been…… [Read More]

References

Cockburn, I.M., Henderson, R.M., & Stern, S. (2000). Untangling the Origins of Competitive Advantage. Strategic Management Journal, 21(10/11), 1123-1145.

Ferligoj, A., Prasnikar, J., & Jordan, V. (1997). Competitive Advantage and Human Resource Management in SMEs in a Transitional Economy. Small Business Economics, 9(6), 503-514.

Narasimha, S. (2000). Organizational Knowledge, Human Resource Management, and Sustained Competitive Advantage: Toward a Framework. [Article]. Competitiveness Review, 10(1), 123.

Newbert, S.L. (2008). Value, Rareness, Competitive Advantage, and Performance: A Conceptual-Level Empirical Investigation of the Resource-Based View of the Firm. Strategic Management Journal, 29(7), 745-768.
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Contemporary Nursing Framework

Words: 613 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78447773

Nursing/Framework

The conceptual framework is a very serious document about the philosophy of nursing espoused at this particular University and the Helene Fuld School of Nursing in particular. It incorporates HFSON's mission statement and core values, and provides the philosophy for this learning institution. That philosophy is greatly influenced by the crux of the conceptual framework, which itself is influenced by the model provided by Myra Levine (HFSON, p. 3). However, the philosophy of the school and the conceptual framework are similar in that both of them emphasize a synthesized approach to nursing. The former largely pertains to a synthesis between theoretical work and practical application. As such, it greatly pertains to blending scientific research, technological improvements and adaptations, and an interactive process between the nurse, the environment, as well as sociological factors such as the different units of society. Those units of society help to provide part of the…… [Read More]

References

HFSON. (date). HFSON Conceptual Framework.
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Social Work a Practice Framework

Words: 2826 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47164383

This drives a value system that makes our work preventative by one intent. ith a clear understanding that some intervention will require a removal of the child from his or her parents' care, the value of family togetherness will direct the strategy of community involvement on the part of the agency.

Specialised knowledge:

The practice framework is guided by specialized knowledge on the patterns and trends dominating the landscape of abuse cases. The breakdown of major abuse categories reported by Bromfield & Horsfall finds that 39% of abuse cases are of the emotional abuse category, 29% in the category of neglect, 22% in the category of physical abuse and 10% in the category of sexual abuse. (p. 3)

Moreover, a major thrust of the report by Bromfield & Horsfall is that reports of all types of cases are on the rise, but also attributes this to certain realities including the…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

BBC News. (20009). Australia 'Sorry' for Child Abuse. Bbc.co.uk.

Bromfield, L. & Horsfall, B. (2010). Child Abuse and Neglect Statistics. National Child Protection Clearinghouse.

Department for Child Protection (DCP). (2010). Homepage. Government of Western Australia. Online at http://www.community.wa.gov.au/DCP/

Early Childhood Australia (ECA). (2006). Statistics Show Child Abuse in Australia is Getting Worse. Early Childhoodaustralia.org.
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Organization Analysis Analysing Organisation Using Relevant Theoretical

Words: 3563 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90414650

Organization Analysis

Analysing Organisation: Using relevant theoretical perspectives frameworks, critically analyse organisation choice.

Analyzing organization is the process of assessing the organizations systems, functionality and capacity so as to increase the organizations performance, efficiency and overall output. This is done by using various theories and models whose aim is to understand the structure of the organization, technology and behavioral relationships Bate, Khan, & Pye, 2000.

This should be a periodic and detailed activity that assists the organizations management to identify any inefficiency or problems that may have risen and have not been dealt with the management will then come up with strategies to deal with them.

The Company

Compulyzed Telecommunications is a telecommunications company dealing with telephone, cabling, and internet provision services for both home and corporate clients. Compulyzed Telecommunications had an increase of 1.7% operating profit in the fiscal year 2011 as compared to the previous year this was…… [Read More]

References

Barney, J.B. (1995). Looking inside for Competitive Advantage. The Academy of Management Executive (1993-2005), 9(4), 49-61.

Bate, P., Khan, R., & Pye, A. (2000). Towards a Culturally Sensitive Approach to Organization Structuring: Where Organization Design Meets Organization Development. Organization Science, 11(2), 197-211.

Becker, I., & Flaxer, E. (2008). Analysing the Hierarchical Organization of Text by Using Biologically-Inspired Statistical Methods. [Article]. Journal of Quantitative Linguistics, 15(4), 318-339. doi: 10.1080/09296170802326657

Bloodgood, J.M., & Bauerschmidt, A. (2002). Competitive Analysis: Do Managers Accurately Compare Their Firms To Competitors? Journal of Managerial Issues, 14(4), 418-434.
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Constructive Therapy Constructivism Is a Theoretical Perspective

Words: 3489 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13177749

Constructive Therapy

Constructivism is a theoretical perspective that asserts that people attempt to make sense of the world by developing their own set of personal individualized constructs. Personal experience, interpretation, social context, and linguistic factors define a person's subjective reality. Constructive psychotherapy focuses on individual experience, personal resilience, change, and the therapeutic relationship to assist people with change. The current article asserts that constructivism and constructive psychotherapies heavily draw from principles of past theorists such as George Kelly and Kurt Lewin, and constructivism and constructive psychotherapies do not represent facets of a new paradigm. In this sense constructive psychotherapy is not a unified form of psychotherapy but instead a form of integrated psychotherapy. Finally the article applies five basic principles of constructivism: activity, order, the self, social-symbolic relations, and lifespan development in the proposed psychotherapy of Sam, a man who is experiencing frustration and anger-management issues at his work and…… [Read More]

References

Arkowitz, H. (1992). Integrative theories of therapy. In D.K. Freedheim, H.J. Freudenberger, J.W. Kessler, S.B. Messer, D.R. Peterson, H.H. Strupp, & E.L. Wachtel (Eds.), History of psychotherapy: A century of change (pp. 261-304). Washington, DC: APA Press.

Chiari, G., & Nuzzo, M.L. (1996). Psychological constructivisms: A metatheoretical differentiation. Journal of Constructivist Psychology, 9, 163-184.

Dollard, J. & Miller, N.E. (1950). Personality and psychotherapy: An analysis in terms of learning, thinking, and culture. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Kelly, G.A. (1955). The psychology of personal constructs (Vols. I & II). New York: Norton.
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Designing a New Regulatory Framework for Telecommunications Interception and Access in Jordan

Words: 5019 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44407856

New Regulatory Framework for elecommunications in Jordan

Jordan elecommunications

QUANIAIVE RESULS AND ANALYSIS

Chapter X presented the pre-test results of the pilot study that used qualitative data collected from the interviews with Jordanian dignitaries. his chapter presents the quantitative results from the survey administered to the larger representative sample of respondents from Jordanian businesses.

he interviews conducted for the pilot study and a review of the literature supported the development of questions used in the survey. he interview process was used to ensure that the questions used in the research would have content validity and, thus, would accurately reflect the primary issues concerning telecommunications law. Further, the pilot study served to verify that terminology used in the survey questions showed consistent usage in the respondent sample.

Sample and Response Rate (Questionnaire)

he random stratified sample is representative of the population at large for persons affiliated with or interested in telecommunications…… [Read More]

The results of this research indicate that Jordan is conceptually poised to develop and adopt a regulatory framework for telecommunications interception and access that support the use of standards-based technical implementations for this lawful interception. The following categorical considerations support the views expressed by respondents in this research that a culture of acceptance regarding the regulatory framework for telecommunications interception and access exists and, further, that there is a need for this regulatory framework.

Use of digital communication is rising in Jordan. In 2006, only 4.6% of the population in Jordan was regularly using the internet. Today, nearly five years later, that rate of usage will have increased if only because internet access is moving to mobile digital platforms. Five years ago, many people used desktop personal computers to access the internet. For younger consumers particularly, internet access shifted to laptops and smart phones. Recent studies in social networking indicate that many young people may exclusively access the internet on these mobile digital devices (The Research Intelligence Group http://www.trig-us.com / ). Mobile digital devices are becoming exponentially faster, cheaper, and capable of replacing stationary personal computers. It is reasonable to assume that the use of mobile digital devices is rising among criminals and terrorists as well.

Incompatible laws. A number of Jordanian laws are designed to protect the privacy and human rights of its citizens with regard to modes of communication. The Telecommunications Act protects privacy related to the use of telephones and telecommunication networks. The Jordanian Constitution Act Article 18 protects communication through the postal, telephonic, and telegraphic systems. Monitoring and surveillance occurs where the law permits where persons are considered to pose a threat to the government or national security. Provisions of these regulations do not necessarily work in concert, and this situation may be exacerbated by the fact that Jordan does not have specific telecommunication interception and access statutes.
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Business Model Framework to Analyse the Impact

Words: 893 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8966635

Business Model Framework to Analyse the Impact of eBusiness on an Existing Business by Susan Lambert. This was published at the Collecter Conference 2007, held December 9-11th in Australia. The article attempts to "demonstrate that a business model framework that affords primacy of concept to the value proposition and that follows the rules of the object-oriented paradigm can be useful in evaluating e-business initiatives." The wording of this objective obfuscates the nature of the study, which appears to be that the use of models can help to understand why e-business initiatives succeed or failure in established companies. The author wastes considerable space on superfluous information, such as three pages defining "primacy of concept," and this further obfuscates the findings of the work. The author's conceptual background is then applied not to a study but to a singular anecdote.

The author's base question revolves around finding ways to determine the success…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Lambert, S. (2007). A Business Model Framework to Analyse the Impact of eBusiness on an Existing Business. Collecter Conference 9-11 December 2007, Australia.

Kimery, K. & Amirkhalkhali, S. (2008). Cultural Differences in the Adoption of Electronic Commerce: A Comparison of Japan and the United States. EABR & TLC Conference Proceedings, Rothenburg, Germany, 2008.
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Administrative Style What Theoretical Constructs

Words: 607 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92838641

For example, I am very self-motivated, and hate to see a job poorly done. But I have realized that some employees are more motivated by external rather than internal rewards, and thrive on a sense of competition with others, otherwise they will slacken in their duties. These external rewards must also be varied as employees bring different experiences and needs to their work. Showing sensitivity to an individuals' desire to balance career and family by offering flexible work hours vs. A promotion might be better suited to that employee. Using the prospect of promotion might be more motivational for a younger and more driven employee. Some employees work for a paycheck while some are easily bored and seek challenges and the ability to create. Others are cynical and try to cheat the system, while the more idealistic employees at a company might be offended by close oversight and feel as…… [Read More]

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the use of a focus group in qualitative research

Words: 561 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99384304

Theoretical/Conceptual Framework

No conceptual or theoretical framework was clearly identified. However, the authors do focus on patient-centered care within an evidence-based practice framework.

esearch/Study Design

The research design is described as being descriptive and is therefore phenomenological. The authors use a focus group model, and operationalize the definition of the term focus group. A focus group for the purposes of this study is defined as a small group and has as its objective the "acquisition of information based on perceptions, beliefs, traditions, and values of its participants," (Heinrich & Karner, n.d., p. 31). Focus groups are one of the most commonly used study designs in qualitative research in health care (Gill, Stewart, Treasure & Chadwick, 2008). Furthermore, the focus group was selected for this qualitative research design because it permitted 'interaction and discussion" among the participants, leading to "rich data related to the learning needs of older adults living in…… [Read More]

References

Gill, P., Stewart, K., Treasure, E. & Chadwick, B. (2008). Methods of data collection in qualitative research: interviews and focus groups. BDJ 204: 291-295.

Heinrich, C. & Karner, K. (n.d.). Ways to optimize understanding health related information. Geriatric Nursing 32(1).
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International Framework Seeking to Reduce

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97916371

However, decreasing greenhouse gas emissions will demand some procedural decisions to be made that will surely entice unpredictable results.

From the viewpoint of an outside management consultant who has been called in to advise top management on what to do, the first task will be the thorough investigation of the international framework seeking to reduce the concentration of greenhouse gasses. Moreover, all steps to be taken in an effort to mitigate the impact of anthropogenic climate change solely on the basis of multilateral arrangements without infringing upon the rights of the self-governed must be itemized and better distinguished. This will lead us to a resolution on ways to diminish, lessen, and ultimately relieve the production of greenhouse gasses emitted by human activity.

I would like to suggest that this is not possible without significant buy-in at the local levels; that citizens of developed countries must recognize the effort as non-zero-sum…… [Read More]

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Carson v 2012 St George Bank Staff's

Words: 1231 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96058828

Carson, V. (2012). St. George Bank staff's cash windfall. The Telegraph. 3 April 2012. Retrieved online: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/business/st-george-bank-staffs-cash-windfall/story-fn7ki9fd-1226317134801

In 2008, the St. George Bank merged with Westpac. In order to retain the core of seven senior executives, who were already being wooed by rivals for their expertise in currency trading and money market management, the then-CEO Paul Fegan offered retention incentives to the tune of up to $50,000. After the merger, however, the numbers changed. Over a hundred employees who had been eligible for bonuses did not receive them and, as Carson (2012) points out, a group of staff sued the bank over the bonus and redundancy payouts. The lawsuits were settled in court, and the St. George Bank was forced to pay not just the bonuses but interest on them: a total of $3 million. According to Carson (2012), the lawsuits present a major public relations gaffe for St. George…… [Read More]

"Unions Vote for Ban on Asbestos Site." The Telegraph. Mar 30, 2012. Retrieved online: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/business/unions-vote-for-ban-on-asbestos-site/story-fn7ki9fd-1226314210935

Australian law protects workers against conditions that are unsafe or unsound. The "Unions Vote for Ban on Asbestos Site" story is one example in which Fair Work and Best Practice Guidelines have practical application. Unions in several different sectors have voted to "ban work" at the former James Hardie factory site in Sydney," ("Unions Vote for Ban on Asbestos Site"). The site is "said to be riddled with asbestos," ("Unions Vote for Ban on Asbestos Site"). The strike is related to workplace health and safety concerns, as well as broader social and environmental justice issues. A German firm Remondis has proposed the construction of a waste treatment plant on the site, and the construction would require extensive excavation and unearthing of the potentially dangerous asbestos. The site has been called "contaminated," and the workers are invoking their rights to protest a job based on clear health and safety concerns ("Unions Vote for Ban on Asbestos Site").

This article shows the importance of managing employee relations based on current law and ethical sensibility. The law protects employees against working in conditions that are unsafe or unsound. Moreover, companies that wish to retain their employees and cultivate a workplace environment conducive to business growth and development need to rethink their approaches to management. Employment relations in the industrial sector are changing, as are the theoretical frameworks that guide them. A pluralist perspective still prevails, in which antagonism between management and unions is expected. A Marxist or radical perspective pulls in the opposite direction but is equally as relevant in the modern business and legal climate. The sound middle ground is offered by the unitarist perspective on employment relations: in which the company understands the value of its human resources and a healthy organizational culture.
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Interdisciplinary Inquiry

Words: 629 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84539467

Interdisciplinary

Introduction and Theoretical Framework

Fox News claims to be "America's 1 Cable News Network." Its tagline reads, "Fair and balanced." But is Fox News truly "fair" and truly "balanced"? Content analysis is the best method to analyze Fox News. Used frequently in media and communications studies, content analysis can be a quantitative and/or a qualitative approach. A quantitative approach is helpful when counting instances of specific words or images and using that numerical data for classification, tracking, or comparisons with other texts. A qualitative approach is broader in scope, potentially multidisciplinary, and rich with potential for discourse.

External validity is the goal of content analysis (Downe-Wamboldt, 2009). This is because content analysis enables the social sciences to have real-world meaning and application (Colin, n.d.). Content analysis of major media sources like Fox News are meaningful in the real world, because of the huge impact television viewing has on human…… [Read More]

References

Colin, R. (n.d.) Real world research: A resource for social scientists and practitioner-researchers. Retrieved online:  http://media.matthewsbooks.com.s3.amazonaws.com/documents/tocwork/063/9780631213055.pdf 

Comstock, G. (1978). Television and Human Behavior. New York: Columbia University Press.

Downe-Wamboldt, B. (2009). Content analysis: method, application, and issues. Health Care for Women International 13(3).

Fox News.com. Retrieved online:  http://www.foxnews.com/
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Social Research Effective and Ethical

Words: 1797 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33012620

This allows the researcher and the research to be completely and comprehensively concerned with doing the "right" thing, regardless of what the observations and evidence gathered in the course of the research shows. This applies to honesty in recording and presenting information as well as to the collection methods for obtaining this information.

Without a strong ethical through-line in social research, the entire purpose of this research ends up being lost. Social research exists specifically to identify issues in society and among individuals and to suggest ways to improve these issues, and to build better-functioning societies that allow for greater chances at group and individual success. The measures of this success and the determination of exactly what constitutes a "better functioning society" are, of course, issues with many often hugely divergent conclusions, but even when these conclusions seem diametrically opposed the individuals that hold these conclusions are working towards the…… [Read More]

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Cognitive and Behaviorist Approach Comparative

Words: 448 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91019994



Typical experimental research methods relied upon in the cognitive approach to psychology include measuring patterns of neural activity in response to specific stimuli and of the effect on external behavior of other internal processes such as hormonal activity.

Personal Preference

I my opinion, the cognitive approach to understanding psychology is more comprehensive than the strict behavioral approach. Because the behavioral approach limits the analysis to a relatively narrow focus on behavior that is externally observable, it seems to ignore significant causal explanations for those behaviors. Conversely, the cognitive approach does not necessarily discount the value of externally observable behavior within the overall framework of understanding the many contributing influences on human behavior.

Cognitive psychology also seems to have more unexplored potential for future development of the field by virtue of the relatively recent evolution of various new technological applications of medical imaging processes. Specifically, whereas the methods and materials relied…… [Read More]

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Art Theory Paradigms Modernism and

Words: 911 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27015664

"This means that there will be as many different forms of postmodernism as there were high modernisms in place, since the former are at least initially specific and local reactions against those models."

One of the key transitional moments from modernism to postmodernism, frequently cited by a number of sources, is Marcel Duchamp's decision to display a urinal in an art gallery; this disruptive moment effectively shattered previous paradigms, thus giving way to an "opening up" of boundaries in art that Duchamp perceived as restrictive.

In art, one of the more recognizable features of postmodernism is pastiche.

Pastiche is contingent on the paradigm of "the death of the author," or the end of individualism, as it was previously known under Modernism. As it is impossible to be original, to have a unique style because "everything has been done before," postmodernist discourse is concerned with using previous styles in a playful…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Jameson, Frederic. "Postmodernism and Consumer Society." Retrieved May 14, 2008, at  http://evans-experientialism.freewebspace.com/jameson_postmodernism_consumer.htm .

Kermode, Frank. The Sense of an Ending. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1967.

Kermode, p. 24.

Jameson.
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Deinstitutionalization Importance of a Historical Literature Review

Words: 4057 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94795957

Evaluating theoretical framework also assists in determining whether the structure directs the research study. This process entails identification of constructs or concepts, assessment of definitions, relationships, variables, hypothesis, methodology and findings.

Discussion Question Two: Will there always be a theoretical framework that aligns with your chosen topic of study? Why or why not?

Theoretical framework entails the collection of combined concepts that are not essentially well established (Aparasu, 2011). Theoretical framework determines the things a researcher measures and the statistical link to look for. Through theoretical framework, researchers engage preconceived ideas. For instance, some people deem that human beings are untrustworthy and lazy. Such basic beliefs regarding human temperament influences how a researcher views things when conducting a research. In this regard, not understanding the actual framework is an enormous concern. Theoretical framework directs the researcher to what he/she views in his/her environment, and what he/she does not notice in…… [Read More]

References

Aparasu, R. (2011). Research methods for pharmaceutical practice and policy. New York:

Pharmaceutical Press.

Beck, C., & Faan, C. (2013). Routledge international handbook of qualitative nursing research.

New York: Routledge
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Family Theory Application the Purpose

Words: 1595 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6216315

Specific recommendations for family therapists who employ parent training techniques are offered.

Summary and Conclusion

While Rogers does not completely define precisely the 'human' it is easily understood to be that of all aspects of the individual therefore, the environmental/ecological interaction theory, while not perfect is a good basis for the provision of healthcare to families by the nursing professional. Every aspect of the lives of a family illustrated through the interactions between the individuals and the community, neighborhood, place of employment, daycare institutions or school, laws, safety precautions, travel, mode of travel, mode of living, housing environment and indeed all elements expressed by the Macro, Micro, Meso, and Exo Levels effect the individuals. The individuals affect the environment and the elements contained therein as well through either actions or even inactions. These two facts clearly demonstrate the validity of the theory and the theoretical framework base described in this…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Sandelowski M. Troubling distinctions: a semiotics of the nursing; as cited by Joan Engebretson in Document entitled Hands-on: The Persistent Metaphor in Nursing, Holistic Nursing Practice Vol.16 No.4 07-01-2002 ISSN 09979311.

The Ecological Theory (nd) Online available at www.unt.edu/cpe/module1/blk1.htm

The Theoretical Matrix for a Rogerian Nursing Practice" by E.A.M.Barrett 2000, Theoria: Journal of Nursing Theory, 9 (4) p.3-7. Copyright 2000 by the Swedish Society for Nursing Theories in Practice, Research, and Education. Reprinted with permission. http://medweb.uwcm.ac.uk/martha/theory.htm

Meyers, S.A. An Ecological Approach to Enhancing Parenting Skills in Family Therapy "http: Kluwer Academic Publishers. http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/klu/coft/1998/
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Establishing an NP-Led Day Treatment Facility in Bessemer Alabama

Words: 12948 Length: 47 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85464574

Establishing an NP Led Wellness and Recovery Center for Deinstitutionalized Individuals

Historically, nursing, and medicine professions have been loath to utilize tools commonly linked with mercenary aspects of business, such as market research and decision analysis. In the contemporary health care setting, however, consumers hold numerous options for care providers. The division of the market or market segmentation into different subgroups allows the determination of target markets and the buildup of marketing policies specific to the needs and interests of the selected subgroups. Market analysis allows the identification of policies for nurse practitioners to enhance their practice in a way that centers on the interests and needs of the selected market. While scores of the nurse practitioner's dream of operating their own businesses, those that have set up their own practice understand that it requires a compelling passion for owning a business, and for the profession.

A nurse practitioner is…… [Read More]

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Positivist Theory of Crime Lombroso

Words: 1786 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72636028

Positivist Theory of Crime, Lombroso

Criminal ehavior Treatment Program and Positivist Theory

The objective of this study is to examine the positivist theory of crime posited by Lombroso and to develop a crime prevention or treatment program.

Cesare Lombroso is held to be the founder of modern criminology and to have introduced the positivist movement in the latter part of the nineteenth century, which has made a more scientific approach to criminology available. Empirical scientific research in understanding criminality was first introduced by the positivist approach. According to Farr (nd) positivism is based in logic and is "the philosophy that combined epistemological phenomenalism with 'scientism' that is, with the belief in the desirability of scientific and technological progress." (Farr, nd, p.2)

Three Types of Positivism

Positivism as it relates to criminology can be divided into three types including: (1) biological; (2) psychological; and (3) Social. (Farr, nd, p.2) Positivist methods…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Deviance and Social Control (nd) McGraw-Hill. Retrieved from: http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/dl/free/0070918082/83003/Chapter7.pdf

Gowan, T. Whetstone, S. Making the criminal addict: Subjectivity and social control in a strong-arm rehab. Punishment and Society. January 2012. Vol 14 No 1. Retrieved from:  http://pun.sagepub.com/content/14/1/69.abstract 

Farr, Z. (nd) Critically assess the impact of positivist approaches to understanding crime. Retrieved from: http://www.essex.ac.uk/sociology/documents/pdf/ug_journal/vol8/2012sc242_Zoefarr.pdf
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Cnos Proposed Study

Words: 6509 Length: 21 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51901261

civilians think of the nursing department in any well-run hospital, they often don't consider all the structure, organization and guidance which is required to make this department run as smoothly as it needs to be and to achieve the highest level of patient-centered goals. One position at the top of the pyramid of the nursing department is the position of Chief Nursing Officer or CNO. The Chief Nursing Officer is the person who is responsible for overseeing the crux of the entire nursing operation, ensuring that the entire team runs like a well-oiled machine and that all members are responsible for pulling their weight, following policy and engaging in the most proactive and balanced measures for patient centered goals (Dickson, 2008). This is without a doubt an extremely demanding job and absolutely requires a person who truly enjoys working with patients and other nurses, and thrives on the challenge of…… [Read More]

References

Alsop, C. (2012). Compassion Fatigue in Nurses Within Their First Year of Employment. New York: Routledge.

Austin, A. (2010). Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing for Canadian Practice. Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins.

Bern-Klug, M. (2013). Transforming Palliative Care in Nursing Homes: The Social Work Role. New York: Columbia University Press.

Bolden, R. (2003, June). A Review of Leadership Theory and Comeptencies. Retrieved from  http://business-school.exeter.ac.uk/ :