Therapeutic Communication Essays (Examples)

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Therapeutic Skills

Words: 1396 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7173349

Therapeutic Relationships in Mental Health

Journal Summary Assignment

Complete this m andatory assignment.

SAVE it as docx

SUBMIT

it to your instructor from BLACKBOARD.

Review your journal entries with the aim of analyzing your learning.

Assess your development of therapeutic communication skills.

a) Analyze your own knowledge base: what areas are clear for you and which are fuzzy and need more work?

Type or paste your analysis below. You can add more space to each simply by continuing to type. You can remove unneeded white space by deleting it if you wish.

These areas of the knowledge base/these communication skills are clear to me: Listening skills, nonverbal messaging, empathetic understanding, understandable language, caring helper, genuineness.

I want to work more on these areas of the knowledge base or these skills:

Self-Reflection / self-analysis.

b) Determine how your understanding of the knowledge base guides your use of communication skills.

I apply…… [Read More]

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Communication Modalities Communication Is a Fundamental Facet

Words: 1306 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55571643

Communication Modalities

Communication is a fundamental facet in any production plant or organization. There are various communication channels and applications in the world of communication. Communication modalities are present in almost every organization. Different entities of growth and production require a diversity of communication channels. For instance, different communication channels can be involved like e-mails, web-based forums, and electronic medical records.

Communication modality used for marketing in health care

Web-based forums

Web-based forums are one of the trusted communication channels between consumers and health care providers in the world. The existence of technology has necessitated establishment of online channels where health care service providers are able to interact with consumers in remote senses. For instance, it has become easy for a client in any part of the world to access web-based forums that are provided through the internet. Through web-based forums, clients access a diversity of information and communication from…… [Read More]

References

Ball, M.J., & Hannah, K.J. (2011). Nursing informatics: Where technology and caring meet.

London: Springer.

Nelson, R., Joos, I.M., & Wolf, D.M. (2013). Social media for nurses: Educating practitioners and patients in a networked world. New York, NY: Springer Pub. Co.

Speares, P.A. (2008). Acoustic communication modalities of the round goby (Neogobius
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Therapeutic Relationship Utilizing the HAQ-2

Words: 6249 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79951995

Often the client is unable to take steps to avoid the undesirable emotional attachment. The therapist must take the initiative in maintaining proper distance and personal space. However, it is important to be aware that a positive therapeutic relationship could become too much of a good thing. When it does, a positive relationship can become toxic to the therapeutic outcome.

Comparing and Contrasting the Therapeutic elationship and Client-Therapist Attachment

The therapeutic relationship and client-therapist attachment have many common elements, but the are major differences as well. Both the therapeutic relationship and the client-therapist attachment develop from the relationship between a therapist and their client. esearch cited earlier, tells us that the development of a relationship is necessary for the success of the treatment plan. The more intimate the relationship becomes, the more likely it is to result in the type of shared secrets that result in positive therapeutic outcomes. However,…… [Read More]

References

Barrett-Lennard, G. (1962) Dimensions of therapist response as causal factors in therapeutic change. Psychological Monographs, 76 (43): 1-36.

Butler Center for Research (BCR) (2006): Therapeutic Alliance: Improving Treatment Outcome. Butler Center for Research. October 2006. Retrieved September 22, 2008 at  http://www.hazelden.org/web/public/document/bcrup_1006.pdf 

Cruz, M. & Pincus, a. (2002). Research on the Influence That Communication in Psychiatric Encounters Has on Treatment. Psychiatric Services. 53: 1253-1265.

DeWeert-Van, O., Dejong, C., Jorg, F. & Schrijver, G. (1999). The Helping Alliance Questionnaire: Psychometric properties in patients with substance dependence. Substance Use and misuse. 34 (11): 1549-1569.
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Therapeutic Relationships Within the Medical

Words: 967 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86828533

The goals are what the client hopes will happen because of the care needed -- and the bond the specifics that need to be met in order to meet those goals (iddowson, 2010, 83).

The Transference/Countertransference Section -- ithin this section of the therapeutic relationship, transference and countertransference are phenomenons in which feelings between the client and caregiver are directed and redirected to one another. This has been part of clinical psychology since Jung, and may be both harmful or positive. ithin the caregiver model, it is usually heightened empathy for the patient, with the client, a feeling of greater emotional bonding to the caregiver than that of a professional relationship (iener, 2009).

The Real Relationship -- This is the ideal outcome, the real or personal relationship between client and caregiver. It may, of course, include deception on the part of the caregiver or therapist depending on the actuality of…… [Read More]

Watson, J. (1997). The Theory of Human Caring: Retrospective and Prospective. Nursring Science Quarterly, 10(1), 49-52.

Widdowson, M. (2010). Transactional Analysis: 100 Key Points and Techniques. New York: Taylor and Francis.

Wiener, J. (2009). The Therapeutic Relationship: Tranference, Countertranference. Austin, TX: Texas a&M Univeristy.
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Communication Legalization of Marijuana Pro-Side There Are

Words: 604 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26524213

Communication

Legalization of Marijuana

Pro-Side: There are many good reasons for the legalization of marijuana. While there are few jurisdictions from which to pull evidence on the positive benefits of legalization, we do have extensive experience with the negative impacts of marijuana prohibition. Marijuana prohibition has resulted in high arrest rates, in particular for minorities, which has created social chaos in those communities as young men are incarcerated long-term for what is a victimless crime. Marijuana prohibition also denies governments a potentially important source of tax revenue, as there is a fairly high consumption rate of the plant already. Marijuana prohibition costs law enforcement millions, has created a massive and bloody gang war in Mexico, and has done nothing to stem the use of the plant. These financial and law enforcement resources would be put to better use elsewhere. It is the interests of law enforcement, many politicians and the…… [Read More]

Resources

ProCon.org. (2014) Medical marijuana. ProCon.org. Retrieved January 8, 2014 from  http://medicalmarijuana.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000141 

LegalizationOfMarijuana.com (2014). Pros for legalizing marijuana. LegalizatoinOfmarijuana.com. Retrieved January 8, 2014 from  http://legalizationofmarijuana.com/pros-and-cons-of-marijuana.html
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Collaborative Communication and Therapeutic Interventions Collaborative Communication

Words: 1829 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9363204

Collaborative Communication and Therapeutic Interventions

Collaborative Communication

Collaborative Communication and Therapeutic Interventions Improve care for Health Care Clients and Community

Collaborative communication and therapeutic interventions play a significant role in improving the care for the health care clients and the overall community. This is the reason that these days the health care organizations assess their performances and design high quality improvement initiatives for carrying out collaborative communication.

There is a very strong link between an effective communication and high quality health care. The satisfaction of the patient and his family members can be increased by doing two ways, clear, understandable and respectful communication (Morales et al. 2006, Beach et al. 2005). Gaps between the communication of healthcare professionals and the patients or among the healthcare professionals themselves bring disastrous and unexpected outcomes and the healthcare relationship badly suffers.

There are several ways through which collaborative communication and therapeutic interventions improve…… [Read More]

References

Beach MC, Sugarman J, Johnson RL, Arbelaez JJ, Duggan PS, Cooper LA. (2005). Do patients treated with dignity report higher satisfaction, adherence, and receipt of preventive care? Ann Fam Med. 2005 Jul Aug; 3(4):331-8.

Kilmann, R.H., & Thomas, K.W. (1975). Interpersonal conflict-handling behavior as reflections of Jungian personality dimensions. Psychological Reports, 37, 971 -- 980.

Kilmann, R.H., & Thomas, K.W. (1977). Developing a forced-choice measure of conflict handling behavior: The

"mode" instrument. Educational and Psychology Measurement, 37, 309 -- 325
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Personal Professional Healthcare Communication Paper What Is

Words: 1849 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18387520

Personal Professional Healthcare Communication Paper

What is Healthcare Communication?

Communication can be generally defined and the method of imparting information from a source to targets. The process of sharing thus has its own set of rules and for human communication the written and spoken words are used. There is also a series of communication called non-verbal which is also significant. There are behaviors that show what a person thinks or feels is also communication. (Berry, 2007)

These types of communication applies in the health care settings too. Health communication may be defined as the study of the means of communication and its strategies not only to communicate to individuals but to the community thus creating decisions on health questions. Thus for the health service the communication within itself and the society concerned with individual and public health, is a very important field that requires specialization and research in medical information…… [Read More]

References

Berry, Dianne. (2007) "Health Communication: Theory and Practice." Open University Press:

Maidenhead, England.

Diebold Institute for Public Policy Studies. (1995) "Healthcare Info structures: The

Development of Information-Based Infrastructures for the Healthcare Industry." Praeger: Westport, CT.
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Health Care Communication

Words: 1391 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23803465

Health Care Communication

As the nation's health care resources become more and more strained, health care professionals are being asked to do more with less. They are being pressured to find cheaper ways to improve the quality of health care they deliver. Given the current circumstances, this sounds difficult and even unreasonable, but it may not be entirely impossible.

One simple way for medical professionals to improve the quality of health care they provide is by improving their health care communication skills. Health care communication is "The art and technique of informing, influencing, and motivating individual, institutional, and public audiences about important health issues. The scope of health communication includes disease prevention, health promotion, health care policy, and the business of health care as well as enhancement of the quality of life and health of individuals within the community." (U.S.D.S.H.S., 2000, p.11-20).

In health care, as in all aspects of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2000). Healthy People 2010: Volume I, Focus Area 11: Health Communication (second edition) Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Zachariae, R. et. al. (2003). The relative importance of physician communication, participatory decision making, and patient understanding in diabetes self-management. British Journal of Cancer, 88(5), 658-65.

Heisler, M. et. al. (2002). The relative importance of physician communication, participatory decision making, and patient understanding in diabetes self-management. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 17(4), 243-52.

Safran, D.G. et. al. (1998). Linking primary care performance to outcomes of care. Journal of Family Practice, 47(3), 213-20.
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Therapeutic Touch Healing Comforting Hands

Words: 2455 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89316083

Physically, massage or TT eases muscle tension and improves circulation. In turn, it improves digestion and breathing, enhances mental clarity, and encourages better sleep. TT is particularly useful to terminally ill patients in reducing or mitigating pain to the extent of making prescription painkillers unnecessary. Emotionally, TT or massage is a gentle and compassionate experience for the dying. It reduces the sense of isolation by providing him or her with physical connectedness. It can also re-establish dwindling or lost self-esteem and self-acceptance on account of disease. As a result, it contributes to increased quality of life and a much-needed release of emotions. Medicare as yet does not cover massage therapy for hospice settings but an increasing number of group have been lobbying for its inclusion.

Useful Alternatives to Pain and Discomfort Management

These alternatives have shown to be effective in easing spiritual, emotional and psychological pain that contribute to the…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Aghabati, N et al. (2010). The effect of therapeutic touch on pain and fatigue of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Evidence-based Complementary Alternative

Medicine: PubMed. Retrieved on June 16, 2011 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2887328

Catlin, A. (2009). Hospice massage: easing the pain of a life-limiting illness (Part 1).

vol 9 # 3, Massage Today: MPA Media Publications. Retrieved on June 19, 2011
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Therapeutic Theories and Approaches

Words: 3343 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72461076

Morgan's Case Study

Morgan is a bi-racial 16-year-old adolescent male whose mother is Japanese-American and the father is African-American. His parents divorced when he was 3 years old and have negative feelings towards each other even though they both love him. Morgan's parents have remarried and have children. He has very good relationships with his father, stepmother, and younger sisters but has struggled to have a good relationship with his mother after she remarried. The family situation is quite stressful since it's difficult for Morgan to see his mother who relocated to another state while the father lost his job and the family is experiencing tremendous financial challenges. While Morgan has developed feelings for one young woman in his social group, he is skeptical of asking her out on a date for fear of rejection. In the past year, he has demonstrated behavioral changes including identifying himself as African-American instead…… [Read More]

References

Counseling Staff. (2015, June 1). Five Counseling Theories and Approaches. Retrieved from The Family Institute at Northwestern University website:  https://counseling.northwestern.edu/five-counseling-theories-and-approaches/ 

Han, H.S., West-Olatunji, C. & Thomas, M.S. (2011). Use of Racial Identity Development Theory to Explore Cultural Competence among Early Childhood Educators. SRATE Journal, 20(1), 1-11.

Ivey, A. E., D'Andrea, M. J., & Ivey, M. B. (2012). Theories of counseling and psychotherapy. A multicultural perspective. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications Inc.

Jones-Smith, E. (2012). Theories of counseling and psychotherapy: an integrative approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications Inc.
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Personality & Communication Affect on Supervision

Words: 5219 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63382890

Although interpersonal and group level communications reside at a lower level than organizational communication, they are major forms of communication in organizations and are prominently addressed in the organizational communication literature. Recently, as organizations became more communication-based, greater attention was directed at improving the interpersonal communication skills of all organizational members. Historically, informal communication was primarily seen as a potential block to effective organizational performance. This is no longer the case is modern times, as on-going, dynamic, and informal communication has become more important to ensuring the effective conduct of work

It is also widely accepted that top managers should communicate directly with immediate supervisors and that immediate supervisors should communicate with their direct reports. In regard to issues of importance, top managers should then follow-up by communicating with employees directly. The Communication Accommodation Theory supports this rationale. In terms of supervisor-employee communication, one researcher argues the difficulty of trusting…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bandura, A. (1982). Self-efficacy mechanism in human agency. American Psychologist, 37, 122-147.

Blumberg, A. (1970). A system for analyzing supervisor-teacher interaction. In A.

Simon & G. Boyer (Eds.), Mirrors for behavior, 3, 29-45.

Davis, T. & Landa, M. (1999). The trust deficit. Management Accounting, 71(10), 12-
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Non-Directive Communication Theories of Communication

Words: 3036 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38946940



The Rogerian Model

This is a theory of communication introduced by psychologist Carl Rogers (Lee 2011). It is founded on trust and emphasizes common goals. This theory proposes that an argument or situation should begin with a brief and objective definition of the problem. Rogers believes that communication will be more effective if trust exists. The nurse or therapist should make a neutral analysis of the patient's position so in order to show understanding of his views. She should also establish and present a neutral analysis of her own position. She should then analyze the goals and values they have in common. Their problem situation should construct a proposed solution that recognizes the interests of both sides, rather than one of them dominating and winning the problem situation (Lee).

Motivational Interview

This is a client-centered, directive method meant to encourage the patient's intrinsic motivation to change by discovering and handling…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bozarth, G.O. 2011, 'How to use person-centered therapy for mental health,' eHow:

[Online] Available at http://www.ehow.com/how_2092776_use-person-centred-therapy-mental.html

Lee, L.W. 2011, 'What is the Rogerian model?, ' eHow [Online] Available at http://www.ehow.com/facts_7264316_rogerian-model.html

Lussier, Marie Therese 2007, 'The motivational interview in practice,' 53 (12) Canadian
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Facilitated Communication

Words: 833 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29329424

Facilitated communication is widely under scrutiny and doubt owing to the fact that one cannot ascertain the authorship of the typed messages. FC, as it is commonly known, is designed to assist a person with autism to communicate by use of a message board or even an electronic device. The procedure involves a facilitator supporting the hand or other body organ of the affected person with the intention of assisting them to point to letters or type on a provided display to formulate messages. The intention of the physical contact is to provide support for the body organs and give stabilization and to enable them to slow down. It is also meant to assist such a person draw away from the keyboard before choosing the next letter. osemary Crossley is credited for introducing the method for the first time in the 70s in Australia. It was first used to handle…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association. (1994). Resolution on facilitated communication by the American Psychological Association. Adopted in Council, August 14, 1994, Los Angeles, Ca.

Supporting school age students on the autism spectrum. (2014). Retrieved August 26, 2016, from  http://www.positivepartnerships.com.au/en/fact-sheet/facilitated-communication-autism
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Multiple Therapeutic Models of a Family the

Words: 1306 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92071633

Multiple Therapeutic Models of a Family

The main components of structural therapy

Structural therapy is a family treatment model founded on the frameworks of systems theory. The distinctive component of this model is the emphasis it has placed on structural adjustments as the primary objective of the therapy session. This emphasis is prominent over details of adjustments in individual behaviors. This model is distinctive because the therapist is the most active agent and receives much attention in the course of family restructuring (Lock & Strong, 2012).

The main purpose of structural family therapy is prevention of sequences from repetition by coveting the hierarchical structures of families. This encompasses shifts in power distribution among family members by adjusting interaction styles. Nevertheless, structural family therapy operates by making alterations on the dysfunctional family structure through encouragement and promotion of growth among family members with the primary intention of re-building the family (Petridis,…… [Read More]

References

Goldenberg, H., & Goldenberg, I. (2008). Family therapy: An overview. Australia: Thompson Brooks/Cole.

Lock, A., & Strong, T. (2012). Discursive perspectives in therapeutic practice. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Peterson, G.W., Steinmetz, S.K., & Sussman, M.B. (2009). Handbook of marriage and the family. New York: Plenum Press.

Petridis, N., Pichorides, S.K., & Varopoulos, N. (2010). Harmonic analysis, Iraklion 1978: Proceedings of a conference held at the University of Crete. Berlin: Springer-Verlag.
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Military Therapeutic Group Introduction and

Words: 2672 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52442895

Attendance will be required for all group members to optimize the effect of the sessions. Group members will be allowed to leave the group as long as the intention to leave is provided in writing. No reasons will be required.

Because of the nature of the group, a mutual confidentiality agreement will be signed by all group members, including leaders, at the first meeting of the group. There will generally not be homework, apart from the requirement to apply what has been learned to the work and home environment. Group members may report on results if they feel they want to.

There is no need for a formalized institution to determine the ground rules and structure of the meetings. This will be a collaborative process between me and the group members.

IX. Group essions

Group dynamics generally consist of four stages: forming, storming, norming, and performing (Group Dynamics, Unit 10).…… [Read More]

Sources

Adams, B.D. And Webb, R.D.G. Trust in Small Military Teams. Retrieved from  http://www.dodccrp.org/events/7th_ICCRTS/Tracks/pdf/006.PDF 

Armstrong, R. (2005) Requirements of a Self-Managed Team Leader. Leader Values. Retrieved from  http://www.leader-values.com/Content/detail.asp?ContentDetailID=1004 

Borchers, T. (1999). Small Group Communication. Retrieved from http://www.abacon.com/commstudies/groups/leader.html

Castano, E. Leidner B, and Slawuta, P. (2008, Jun). Social identification processes, group dynamics and the behaviour of combatants. International Review of the Red Cross, Vol 90, No. 870. Retrieved from http://www.icrc.org/Web/eng/siteeng0.nsf/htmlall/review-870-p259/$File/irrc-870_Castano.pdf
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Larry Explain How Common Skills E G Communication

Words: 3785 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 959526

Larry

Explain how common skills (e.g. communication and values attitudes and beliefs) can ensure good interprofessional practice for Larry and his wider family.

Communication skills are a vital part of both personal and professional practice (Axtell, 1990; Dimitrius & Mazzarella, 1999). They are necessary in the workplace and in families that function well, but they are also certainly necessary when it comes to how people are treated when they are injured, sick, or unable to care for themselves (oter, 2001). Because Larry was the primary caregiver to his wife but did not want anyone to know that she was suffering from dementia, he made the problems that he is currently facing more difficult for himself and also for his wife, Jeanie. Larry should have been open and upfront about Jeanie's problems, so that others would be able to plan for any eventuality. If people who are sole caregivers for ailing…… [Read More]

References

Axtell, R.E. (1990). Gestures: The Do's and Taboos of Hosting International Visitors. New York: John Wiley and Sons.

Dimitrius, J. & Mazzarella, M. (1999). Reading People: How to Understand People and Predict Their Behavior-Anytime, Anyplace. New York: Ballantine Books.

Gilsdorf, J.W. (1997). Metacommunication Effects on International Business Negotiating in China. Business Communication Quarterly. v. 60, 20-37.

Guerrero, L.K. et al. (1999). The Nonverbal Communication Reader: Classic and Conteporary Readings. New York: Waveland Press.
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Professional Communication Cultural Sensitivity Among Native Americans

Words: 1623 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5979652

Professional Communication: Cultural Sensitivity Among Native Americans

In nursing school, we are normally taught that we should respect the dignity and rights of all clients. As the "world becomes reduced" and societies and individuals become more mobile, we are progressively able to network with people that are from other cultures. Cultural respect and competence for others becomes particularly significant for us as nurses and patient supporters. Applying the principles and theories of communication is important for sufficient patient care. A lot of various communication methods are executed and have diverse focuses. Small groups use mechanisms such as objectives, standards, cohesiveness, behaviors, and therapeutic issues. Duty, process and midrange groups are separate categories. Orientation, tension, cohesion, working and dissolution are stages groups go through. Successful personal and professional communication profits the patients and other health professionals; however, the lack of applicable communication can lead to poor patient results and a hostile…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Barker, A.M. (2009). Advanced practice nursing -- Essential knowledge for the profession. Boston: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Doane, G. (2004). Exploring the heart of nursing Ethical Pratices. Nursing Ethics, 11(3), 241-251.

Makaroff, K.S. (210). Do We speak of Ethics. Nursing Ethics and, 17(5), 566-576.

Ryan, M. (2000). Learning to Care for Clients In Their World not Mine. Journal of Nursing Education, 3(9), 25-79.
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United Therapeutics Is an American

Words: 5394 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74203267



Marketing Considerations

Marketing in the biotechnology industry is critically important. The basic path to market involves receiving regulatory approval for products. From there, marketing is conducted to physicians directly, necessitating a relatively large sales force. The presence of competing treatments necessitates significant investment marketing, compounded by the impact of the need to recoup the sunk costs associated with product development. In addition, marketing in the biotechnology industry is strictly regulated by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA exerts tight control over marketing -- a firm is only allowed to promote products for approved uses. Off-label marketing -- defined as marketing a product for uses not approved by the FDA -- is prohibited and firms found guilty can be subject to significant fines.

An example, of the strong regulatory influence on marketing can be found in the approval that United received in July for Tyvaso. The product, already delayed multiple…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

MSN Moneycentral: UTHR. (2009). Retrieved October 29, 2009 from http://moneycentral.msn.com/companyreport?Symbol=U.S.%3aUTHR

2008 United Therapeutics Annual Report (includes Form 10-K).

United Therapeutics website, various pages. (2009). Retrieved October 29, 2009 from  http://www.unither.com/ 

Press Release: United Therapeutics. (2009). FDA approves Tyvaso (treprostinil) inhalation solution for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Retrieved October 29, 2009 from http://ir.unither.com/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=400062
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HR Communications Integration Management Active

Words: 3577 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24985688

At the primary level of active listening are administrative personnel, especially at hospitals, who need to direct patients to the correct physicians for their ailments. Administrative personnel at doctors' offices are also important, as these personnel are often engaged in decision-making processes regarding the length of appointments and the care that is needed.

6. oles, responsibilities and relationships of project team members

The team leader will administer the responsibilities of each team member, as well as collocating the data gathered during interviews. The team leader will also determine the final format and content of the report.

Several roles will cover the various interviews to be conducted. Physicians, nurses, administrators, and patients will be interviewed. Within these groups, the type of illness and cultural context should also be investigated. Where doctors operate in a multi-cultural context, the potential exists to investigate the effectiveness of active listening, or its absence, can be…… [Read More]

References

Butow, P., Cockburn, J., Girgis, A., Bowman, D., Schofield, P., D'Este, C., Stojanovski, E. And Tattersall, M.H.N. (2007). Increasing oncologists' skills in eliciting and responding to emotional cues: evaluation of a communication skills training program. Psycho_Oncology. Retrieved from: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/Resources/Research%20Centres/CHERP/publications/Previous%20pdf%20papers/PsychOncCUES%20paper.pdf

Fassaert, T., Van Dulmen, S., Shcellevis, F., Van der Jagt, L. And Bensing, J. (2008). Raising positive expectations helps patients with minor ailments: A cross-sectional study. BMC Family Practice, Iss. 9. Retrieved from: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2296/9/38/

Fassaert, T., Van Dulmen, S., Schellevis, F. And Bensing, J. (2007, June). Active listening in medical consultations: Development of the Active Listening Observation Scale (ALOS-global). Patient Education and Counseling Vol 68. Retrieved from: http://igitur-archive.library.uu.nl/fss/2008-0714-200810/bensing_2007_active.pdf

Ferguson, W.J. And Candib, L.M. (2002). Culture, language, and the doctor-patient relationship. University of Massachusetts Medical School. Retrieved from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1060&context=fmch_articles&sei-redir=1#search=%22active%20listening%20doctor%20patient%20relationship%22
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Music and Therapeutic Influence on

Words: 2089 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66616166

As per Dr. Sacks, Alzheimer patients take advantage from listening to the familiar music. The music entails them memory stimulus, restoring the accessibility to personal history. It is said to have motivated the powers of speech and the thought process. However, his entire emotional as well as intellectual configuration, his life history, his identity, is greatly influenced by the music. The study of psycho-neuroimmunology narrates the influence of neuropeptides on human emotions. The beta-endorphins appear to be released and the body is permitted to perform its own healing work on physiological level, while the person is in a relaxed condition. The music therapy attempts to bring such state which is revealed to be 'audio analgesisa'. (Music Heals: Music for Healing and Transition)

5. What facilities practice this form of therapy and where and is it becoming more and more popular?

The Kaiser-Permanente Medical Center in Los Angeles was regarded to…… [Read More]

References

Alzheimer's and Other Dementias: Understanding the Differences. Retrieved at http://www.helpguide.org/elder/alzheimers_dementias_types.htm. Accessed 6 June, 2006

Forgeron, Nicole. The Impact of Music Therapy on Alzheimer's Disease Patients. March, 1999. Retrieved at http://faculty.uccb.ns.ca/gcarre/courses/health/music.htm. Accessed 6 June, 2006

Gerosa, Cristina. M; Bonanomi, Claudio. Observation of the Alzheimer Patient and Music

Therapy. Retrieved from www.musictherapyworld.de/modules/mmmagazine/issues/20020801160643/20020801170306/Bonamifinal.htm. Accessed 6 June, 2006
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Choosing the Appropriate Therapeutic Intervention

Words: 777 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37325692

Cognitive Behavior Therapy as My Therapeutic Orientation

Overview of my orientation

Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) combines two effective psychotherapy interventions. These are behavior therapy and cognitive therapy. Behavior therapy helps a patient weaken the ties between troubling situations and the habitual reactions to these situations (Vaske et al. 2011). Such reactions include self-damaging, self-defeating behavior, rage, depression, and fear. Besides, it teaches the patient how to calm the mind and body so that they can feel better, think clearly, and make informed decisions. CBT teaches the patient on how the thinking trends may cause symptoms of mental illness by creating a distorted image of what is happening in their life. In the end, the person may feel angry, depressed or anxious for no good reason. When integrated into CBT, cognitive and behavior therapies serve a strong tool for stopping these symptoms and getting the patient's life on a normal path…… [Read More]

References

Moss-Morris, R., Dennison, L., Landau, S., Yardley, L., Silber, E., & Chalder, T. (2013). A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Adjusting to Multiple Sclerosis (The Sams Trial): Does CBT Work and for Whom Does It Work? Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 81, 2, 251-62.

Vaske, J., Galyean, K., & Cullen, F. T. (2011). Toward A Biosocial Theory of Offender Rehabilitation: Why Does Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Work? Journal of Criminal Justice, 39, 1, 90-102.
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Ineffective Communication in Acute Care Settings

Words: 2335 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77763657

Ineffective Communication Between Shifts in Acute Care Settings

Significant

A recent statistics of the adverse effects arisen from ineffective communication between shifts in acute care setting range from 2.6% to 7.6%, however, Okoniewska, et al. (2015) believes that the adverse effects on in-patients can be between 19% and 23%. (Classen, esar, Griffin. et al. 2011).

The Study aims to discuss the adverse effective arisen from ineffective communication between shifts within acute care settings.

Consequences of not solving the problem

Without implementing the strategies that can enhance effective communication between shifts in an acute healthcare setting, the issue can lead to mortality, readmission, and post-hospital adverse effects. Moreover, poor communication between shifts can lead to medication problems resulting to therapeutic errors. (Okoniewska, et al. 2015). Moreover, lack of intervention to address the problem can lead to medical errors, which can lead to patients' harms. Communication failure has also been identified as…… [Read More]

Reference

Aebersold, M., Averhart, V., Keenan, G., Kocan, M. J., Lundy, F., Tschannen, D. (2011). Implications of Nurse-Physician Relations: Report of a Successful Intervention. Nursing Economics. 29 (3):127-135.

Almost, J., Wolff, A., Mildon, B., Price, S., Godfrey, C., Robinson, S., . . . Mercado-Mallari, S. (2015). Positive and negative behaviors in workplace relationships: a scoping review protocol. BMJ Open, 5(2). doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2015-007685

Carlson, E. A. (2012). Improving Patient Safety Through Improved Communication and Teamwork. Orthopaedic Nursing, 31(3), 190-192.

Classen, D.C., Resar, R, Griffin. F, et al. (2011). "Global trigger tool" shows that adverse events in hospitals may be ten times greater than previously measured. Health Aff (Millwood). 30(4):581 -- 589.
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Counseling and Communication

Words: 1292 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20985205

Listening Better: A Practical Book Review

SUMMARIZE!

In the book, Why don't we listen better? Communicating and Connecting in Relationships, James Peterson begins with a few personal anecdotes to explain how he became aware of the value of listening. Particularly striking is the fact that he refers to "grumpy" people, and the fact that, just by asking questions and listening, he could get to the bottom of their actions. Mostly, that is perceived by most as grumpiness is simply a manifestation of some inner pain or hurt feelings caused by a specific event. This provides an excellent hook for the rest of the book, where the author offers specific tools to help those in counseling positions to develop the tools they need to offer effective and targeted advice for their clients.

Specifically, the author explains the listening paradigm in terms of the brain, the heart and the stomach. With the…… [Read More]

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Nursing Experience After Spending a Semester in

Words: 1904 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78302969

Nursing Experience

After spending a semester in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) as a student nurse in training, I can report that I have learned a great deal about the vital issues and practices that are involved in the intensive care unit for newborns, and about the duties and responsibilities of a nurse in that area of healthcare. Part of my training involved treating wounds and the therapeutic communication that is involved in wound care; also, I became well familiarized with the family centric care that is part and parcel of the NICU.

Family Centered Care at the NICU

hat can be more important for a family that has just been on the emotional roller coaster of giving birth prematurely to a new member of the family than being made to feel welcomed and to be treated with a great deal of professionalism and respect? There are a number…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Auckland District Health Board (2010). Car seats for babies / Information for parents. Retrieved May 2, 2013, from http://www.abhd.govt.nz.

Auckland District Health Board (2010). Establishing and Maintaining Breast Milk Supply /

Information for parents. Retrieved May 2, 2013, from http://www.abhd.govt.nz.

Aukland District Health Board (2010). Meconium and Newborn Babies / Information for Parents. Retrieved May 2, 2013, from http://www.abhd.govt.nz.
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Psychiatric Nursing Care Delivery the

Words: 738 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98695622

Clarifying is communication that makes clear the point made by the patient to make sure that no misunderstanding occurs. Conveying information is a simple sharing with the patient of information relevant to his or her health status. Providing feedback is the provision of information that is constructive to the patient in relation to how the nurse has perceived what the patient has stated. Stating observations may be used in communication with patients in a manner that defuses anger while at the same time acknowledging their stress or anger. Confrontation is a method of calling attention to the discrepancies stated by the patient and specifically the discrepancy between what the patient has to say and their actions. Summarizing is the provision of feedback to the patient concerning generalities from the nurses' point-of-view. Silence can be used to convey concern or support and enables the patient in thought-organization and self-reflection. (Zychowicz, nd;…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Robbins, Charles a. (1963) a Therapeutic Milieu in a Continued Treatment Service Mental Hospital 14:494-494 September 1963.

Zychowicz, Michael (nd) Therapeutic Communication. Mount Saint Mary College (MSMC) Online available at  http://faculty.msmc.edu/zychowic/therapeutic%20communication_files/frame.htm 

Merriam-Webster Medical Dictionary (2008) http://medical.merriam-webster.com

Merriam-Webster Dictionary (2008)  http://www.merriam-webster.com
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Nursing Leadership Management Theories and

Words: 1506 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47845342

When this happens, they will be effective in reaching out to different patients (from a host of backgrounds). This is the point that the underlying quality of care will improve. As a result, I have learned how to apply these concepts to real world health care environments. This will help in day-to-day practices by preparing me for the new challenges that will be faced on a continuing basis.

ecommendations / Conclusions

The only recommendation is to show how leadership strategies must be adjusted to the health care environment and situation. Having this kind of flexibility will give nurses a major advantage in addressing a host of challenges in the future. This is when they can deal with the increased responsibilities and control the added amounts of stress. Once this takes place, is the point they are capable of maintaining high standards of professionalism, quality and ethics at all times. This…… [Read More]

References

Benner, P. (2010). Educating Nurses. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Finkelman, a. (2012). Professional Nursing Concepts. Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Lockwood, L (2011). Therapeutic Communication Techniques. E How. Retrieved from:  http://www.ehow.com/about_5098131_therapeutic-communication-techniques-nursing.html 

Nagelkerk, J. (2006). Leadership and Nursing Care Management. St. Louis, MO: Saunders.
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Two Questions About Nursing Assessments

Words: 665 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33487116

Dorothea E. Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory focuses on the need for all patients to develop self-reliance, particularly after traumatic injuries or in cases of disability. A self-care deficit exists when patients lack the ability to care for themselves, such as by feeding the self, performing personal hygiene, or by behaviors that might be harmful to self or others. Nurses are defined as self-care "agents" within the Orem theoretical construct, as nurses are uniquely trained to provide evidence-based interventions that can help the patient achieve the goal of self-caring. To help patients achieve their goals, the nurse will need to understand the health assessment process within the Self-Care Deficit Theory.

The Self-Care Deficit Theory (also referred to more simply as the Self-Care Theory) conforms to the fundamental tenets of healthcare assessment including the design of a plan of care. Data is to be collected on the patient's health history and…… [Read More]

References

"Dorothea Orem's Self-Care Theory," (n.d.). Nursing Theories. Retrieved online: http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/self_care_deficit_theory.html

Kourkouta, L. & Papathanasiou, I.V. (2014). Communication in nursing practice. Materia Sociomedica 26(1): 65-67.

"Therapeutic Communication in Psychiatric Nursing," (n.d.). Nursing Planet. Retrieved online: http://nursingplanet.com/pn/therapeutic_communication.html

Wayne, G. (n.d.). Dorothea Orem's self-care theory. Nurse Labs. Retrieved online: http://nurseslabs.com/dorothea-orems-self-care-theory/
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CBT Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Case Study

Words: 5334 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41705783

Cognitive Behavior Therapy- A Case Study

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) Case Study

Case report

K is a forty-eight-year female who referred to Midlothian's clinical psychology psychosis service. K has a twenty-year history of mental health conditions. She first decided to contact mental health services because of the episodes of paranoia and severe depression she had experienced. During her initial contact with the mental health services she was diagnosed with schizo-affective disorder in 1996. When she was first referred to the mental health services department she was a single. She told of having only two close relationships in her past life. She however also said that she found these relationships challenging when it came to intimate contact. She also generally described that she found it somewhat difficult to form friendships or to trust people in her life. Despite the mental health conditions her general physical well-being was good. K was prescribed…… [Read More]

References

Bladek, M. (2014). Against memory: Acts of remembering in Jamaica Kincaid's My Brother. Retrieved from http://criticism.english.illinois.edu/2007%20Fall%20Documents/Affect%20Abstracts/Abstracts.htm

DeJong, P. & . Berg I.K (1998): Interviewing for solutions. Thomson: Brooks/Cole.

Drisko, J. (2014). Research Evidence and Social Work Practice: The Place of Evidence-Based Practice. Clin Soc Work J. 42:123-133 DOI 10.1007/s10615-013-0459-9

Freud, S. (1924) A general introduction to psychoanalysis. New York: Boni & Liveright.
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United States Has the Most

Words: 6833 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34903730

al., 2010).

Nursing and the E

The Emergency oom is often one of the most visible parts of healthcare for political debate. It is also one of the most difficult environments for a modern nurse. It is interesting that one of the founders of modern nursing had emergency experience prior to developing her overall theories. Nightingale also looked at negatives and positives that are the conditions, which could help make people recover and reach their actual potential, as also noted by Maslow hierarchy of needs. She did not look or speak directly of the disease per se, but rather, looked at air, clean water, environment, and sanitation. She published her book in1860 with the title a "Notes on Nursing: What it Is and What it Is Not," connecting human beings and quality of human life, and comparing the stagnant sewage she saw in Scutari, as well as in London. She…… [Read More]

References

Americans at Risk. (March 2009). Families USA. Retrieved from:

http://www.familiesusa.org/assets/pdfs/americans-at-risk.pdf

Patient Perceptions in the Emergency Department: Physicians, Physician Assistants,

Nurse Practitioners. (30 August 2010). Retrieved from: http://idiopathicmedicine.wordpress.com/2010/08/30/patient-perceptions-in-the-emergency-department-physicians-physician-assistants-nurse-practitioners/
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Reducing Risky Behavior for African-American Teens an

Words: 4795 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64204545

EDUCING ISKY BEHAVIO FO African-American TEENS

An Intervention for educing isky Behavior Among African-American Female Adolescents: Provider Cultural Competency Training

The Office of Minority Health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2013) quotes Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. As a way to introduce the topic of updating and enhancing the National CLAS (Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services) Standards. The quote is "Of all forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane" (p. 14). Long recognized as a significant problem in the United States, health inequity along social, economic, racial, and ethnic boundaries has become a central focus of health care policy in this country. Although health care providers have little control over the historical determinants of discrimination in the U.S. they can work towards eliminating health disparities that exist through cultural competency. In addition to the ethical and moral rationale for attaining…… [Read More]

References

Aronowitz, T. & Agbeshie, E. (2012). Nature of communication: Voices of 11- to 14-year-old African-American girls and their mothers in regard to talking about sex. Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing, 35(2), 75-89.

Aronowitz, T. & Eche, I. (2013). Parenting strategies African-American mothers employ to decrease sexual risk behaviors in their early adolescent daughters. Public Health Nursing, 30(4), 279-87.

CDC. (2012). HIV and AIDS among African-American youth. Retrieved 2 Feb. 2014 from: .

CDC. (2013). HIV among African-Americans: Fast facts. Retrieved 2 Feb. 2014 from: .
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Verbal and Non-Verbal Skills in

Words: 756 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40510868

" This type of skill or behavior is also closely linked to self-disclosure, genuineness and immediacy.

Central to this skill is the ability to communicate one's thoughts and feelings in a way that is respectful of the other person's feelings and does not denigrate or overtly criticize them in any way.

While there are many skills that can be interpreted as confrontational, it is also possible to present both verbal and non-verbal types of behavior that are confrontational but in a way that promotes and conveys sincere and genuine feelings of interest and openness in the therapeutic relationship. In the use of language this means to convey to the other individual that the apparent attitude of confrontation is really an effort to sincerely and genuinely help and assist. The key words here are assertive, calm and concerned.

One uses language in a way that is serious and calm but also…… [Read More]

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Expectancy Violations Theory Evt Begun

Words: 1844 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76062096

Instead, it can provide an important springboard for future investigation in order to better understand the communication paradigms and expectations of cultures other than those in the United States. This, in turn, can lead to further nonverbal theorizing.

Furthermore, Burgoon's theory can also provide an important platform for more modern types of communication such as digital communication, for example (Littlejohn and Foss, 2009). Nonverbal cues are also inherent in this type of communication, although the assumption tends to be that this type of communication is primarily verbal. This is a very exciting development for communication studies. Currently, online communication has seen little in terms of formalizing theoretical findings. Because this communication medium is becoming increasingly important not only in personal interaction but also in the business world, it is becoming vitally important to provide theories of interaction by means of which such communications can most effectively be conducted. This can…… [Read More]

References

Littlejohn, S.W. And Foss, K.A. (2009). Encyclopedia of communication theory. Sage Publications.

Gudykunst, W.B. (2005). Theorizing about intercultural communication. Sage Publications.

Jacob, a. (2008). Expectancy Violations Theory (EVT) of Judee Burgoon. Retrieved from:  http://www.slideshare.net/ajacob/expectancy-violations-theory 

Kalman, Y.M. (2010). Online Pauses and Silence: Chronemic Expectancy Violations in Written Computer-Mediated Communication. Retrieved from:  http://www.kalmans.com/evt.pdf
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Nunkoosing Karl 2005 The Problem

Words: 1582 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50378849

In this sense, there is often a political element to the interview, its interpretations, and the texts that are derived from it" (Nunkoosing 2005: 702).

It is impossible to do without the interview process, given the additional and unexpected insight it has the potential to yield to pure numerical data, yet no matter how potentially therapeutic, it is always using the experience of the subject for purposes that he or she might not directly benefit from. Perhaps the answer to the unanswerable questions that Nunkoosing raises is that the ethical obligations of interviewing are similar to that of much of qualitative medical research: the research should be designed to serve the community used in the interviews, thus making at least the benefits of the research outweigh any possible individual misunderstandings that might take place. Using health data from a low-income community to help a high-income community, for example, would be…… [Read More]

References

Nunkoosing, Karl. (2005). "The problem with interviews." Qualitative Health Research.
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Relaunch of Cadbury's Wispa Bar

Words: 2607 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90377350

2 Marketing Communication Objectives

• Promotional Objectives: Initiate grass root, interactive, and experiential campaigns, over a six-month period, throughout the United States, to increase brand awareness, trial consumption, and long-term end-users. Target the college and college-aged segment, and college beach territories. Track consumer activity through specialized giveaways and promotions one to 1.5 years to determine the number of resulting repeat, long-term users. Aside from branding results, promotional efforts, with a budget capacity of $300,000, aim to secure at least 20,000 new long-term users or $250,000 in traceable sales, within one to 1.5 years.

• randing Objectives: Maintain and augment a fun, celebratory brand image for Wispa bars. Contract brand ambassadors to foster brand awareness among 250 U.S. colleges, and reach 250,000 U.S. college-aged students with gratuitous Wispa bar samples, over a six-month period.

• Sales and usiness Development Objectives: Establish relationships with five new major retail distributors in the United…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cadbury. (2012). Cadbury Products. Available:

http://www.cadbury.co.uk/ourproducts/Pages/OurProducts.aspx. Last accessed 7th April 2012.

GlobalData. (2010). Cadbury plc (CBRY) - financial and strategic analysis review. Available:

http://www.just-food.com/market-research/cadbury-plc-cbry-financial-and-strategic-analysis-review_id97007.aspx. Last accessed 6th April 2012.
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Analyzing Ethics in Career Counseling

Words: 1228 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25643273

applying ethics to the career counseling field, as mandated by the Californian State and national organizations.

Numerous legal and ethical aspects need to be taken into account by professionals in the counseling field. Misunderstanding or unawareness of some ethical standard(s) cannot, by itself, help as a form of defense if charged with behaving unethically. Because of the fairly recent emergence of the 'counseling' concept in Nigeria, counselors have insufficient practical experience with regard to the relationship existing between counseling and the law (Bosede, 2010).

The counseling profession is dedicated to enhancing professional and scientific behavior-related knowledge and individuals' understanding of self and other individuals. It is also devoted to applying this knowledge towards proving individuals', societies' and organizations' conditions. Counselors safeguard and respect human and civil rights as well as the central significance of the freedom of expression and enquiry when it comes to research, publication, and teaching. For instance,…… [Read More]

References

(2015). American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). Code of Ethics. Retrieved May 19, 2016, from http://www.aamft.org/iMIS15/AAMFT/Content/legal_ethics/code_of_ethics

(2010). American Psychological Association (APA). Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. Retrieved May 19, 2016, from http://www.apa.org/ethics/code/

Bosede. (2010). Ethical Principles of Guidance and Counseling. International Journal of Tropical Medicine, 5(2), 50-53. Retrieved May 19, 2016 from http://www.medwelljournals.com/fulltext/?doi=ijtmed.2010.50.53

Herlihy, & Dufrene. (2011). Current and Emerging Ethical Issues in Counseling: A Delphi Study of Expert Opinions. Counseling & Values, 56(1). Retrieved May 19, 2016, from  http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/67121129/current-emerging-ethical-issues-counseling-delphi-study-expert-opinions
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Parent Trap 1 And 2

Words: 4825 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55523589



Family therapy believes that problems that the individuals evidence stem from the fact that problems occur within the family unit itself and that the family is divided into several component parts. To address these problems the therapist, as it were, therefore steps into the family unit, becomes "a part of it" and intervenes. His doing so not only enables him to see the family patterns from the inside; thereby understanding faults of fission but also enable him to practice therapy. Intervention in the family is called enactment.

Enactment refers to the therapist encouraging acting of dysfunctional relationship patterns within the family therapy session and him acting out some of this behavior by actually entering the family unit. The therapist thereby learns about the family's structure and interactional patterns and is able to interfere in the process by modifying some of the negative elements, pointing these out, intensifying positive elements, and…… [Read More]

References

Family Systems institute Bowen Family Systems Theory and Practice: Illustration and Critique

http://www.familysystemstraining.com/papers/bowen-illustration-and-critique.html

Bowenian Family Systems Theory and Therapy

http://www.theravive.com/research/Bowenian_Family_Systems_Theory_and_Therapy
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Road Is Not Just the

Words: 2197 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93749944

These values can be as operational for the parent/child association as it is for the owner/pet relationship.

Strategy for communication

The objective of any family is for all members to live in agreement with each other. It is the first basis of a Childs education and moral standards (Gouze & Wendel, 2007). With that said, a strategy called floor planning is what will be utilized for Jeff and Roger.

Floor Planning

This method should also be done throughout the instigating stages of counseling for Jeff and Roger. Jeff and Roger will be requested to draw a floor plan of their house. They will then be asked to remember the odors, sounds, colors, and people that are in their home. While they are drawing particular questions are asked regarding the environment such as;

What room does the family gather in?

What conversations take place in the various rooms?

Are any rooms…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gouze, K.R., & Wendel, R. (2007). INTEGRATIVE MODULE-BASED FAMILY THERAPY: APPLICATION AND TRAINING. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 286-296.

Hogarty, G.E., Greenwald, D., Ulrich, R.F., Kornblith, S.J., & a, e. (1997). Three-year trials of personal therapy among schizophrenic patients living with or independent of family, II: Effects on adjustment of patients. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 56-89.

Kissane, D.W., & McKenzie, M. (2006). Family Focused Grief Therapy: A Randomized, Controlled Trial in Palliative Care and Bereavement. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 56-78.

Lund, L.K., Zimmerman, T.S., & Haddock, S.A. (2002). The theory, structure, and techniques for the inclusion of children in family therapy: A literature review. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 67-89.
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Analyzing Yalom's if Rape Were Legal

Words: 1541 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13288052

Psychoanalysis

The opening phase of dynamic psychotherapy helps the therapist to understand why the patient is seeking treatment; what kind of triggers to current problems are present; and house troubled the patient is in terms of both physical and psychological health (text p. 41). Yalom (1989) allows for several sessions of introductory therapy, also in keeping with the psychodynamic model. At this introductory phase, the therapist gets an idea of what treatment options to present and how to proceed. Yalom (1989) also determines the frequency of the treatment in the introductory phase (text p. 41). The core way that the relationship between Yalom (1989) and Carlos exemplifies psychodynamic therapy is in regards to the transference neurosis, which intensifies in therapy (text p. 53). However, transference is worked through as a core element of the therapeutic process. In the case with Carlos, neurotic transference is exemplified most clearly in the way…… [Read More]

References

Corsini & Wedding (n.d.). Textbook.

Yalom (1989), I.D. (1989). "2 - If Rape Were Legal..." In Love's Executioner and Other Tales of Psychotherapy. New York: Basic, 1989. 59-78.
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Hildegard Peplau the Nightingale of

Words: 1812 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60714060

ut if they can manage to terminate the temporary relationship, they will become more emotionally balanced and mature persons (Young).

Why Choose the Peplau Model

oth its interpersonal theory and nursing process have a concrete sequence of use and focus on the therapeutic relationship (Current Nursing, 2012). oth utilize appropriate problem-solving techniques, which aim in common at filling the client's needs. oth use observation and communication as well as recording as basic tools, which are already used in nursing care. The four phases inter-relate and inter-weave the varying components of each phase. The Theory or model is applicable to endeavors, which follow the concepts of client, health, environment and nursing. It proceeds in a logical and systematic manner in viewing and processing nursing situations. Its generalizability rests in its simplicity in the logical progression of the partnership. It has produced testable hypotheses. It can be used in psychiatric patients. It…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Current Nursing (2012). Theory of interpersonal relation. Current: Current Nursing.

Retrieved on March 30, 2012 from http://www.currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/interpersonal_theory.html

Landry, a, (2009). Hildegard Peplau: interpersonal relations theorist. Suite 101:

Suite 101.net. Retrieved on March 30, 2012 from http://www.alicelandry.suite101.com/hildegard-peplau
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Black's Law Dictionary 1991 Child

Words: 5968 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76815004



Moreover, it is unclear whether Jim has attempted to reestablish any meaningful contact with his children; rather, his entire focus has been on becoming a better person. While there is certainly nothing wrong with that goal in and of itself (it is, after all, a universal human quality), he appears to have pursued this goal to the total exclusion of making any substantive reparations to his family. Finally, it is interesting that Jim somehow feels compelled to tell others -- including potential employers -- about his criminal past and his current status in treatment, as if this ongoing commitment to all-out honesty somehow absolves him from a deceptive and duplicitous history, or at least helps to explain it (which it does if one is interested). According to Jim, "Entering into society again was very difficult. I had lost my business, my friends and was now divorced. After leaving jail, I…… [Read More]

References

Black's law dictionary. (1991). St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Co.

Bryant, J.K. (2009, June). School counselors and child abuse reporting. Professional School

Counseling, 12(5), 130-132.

Bryant, J. & Milsom, a. (2005, October). Child abuse reporting by school counselors.
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Depression Not Just a Bad Mood Mdd

Words: 3261 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90318784

Depression: Not just a Bad Mood

MDD: Not Just Another Bad Mood

The term "Prozac Nation" says a lot. This catch-phrase had begun to describe the current state in the U.S. when cases of clinical depression began blooming and treatment turned to medication as a first response. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, over fourteen million of the adult U.S. population suffers from Major Depressive Disorder. Major Depressive Disorder, or MDD, is the leading cause of disability in people ages 15-44. The average age of onset is 32 (U.S. Department of, 2011.) It is often also found co-occurring with other mental disorders, such as anxiety and substance abuse. Perhaps it is worth taking a closer look at a case example in order to better understand this often debilitating disorder in our times.

Taylor is a 24-year-old single, Jewish female presenting with symptoms of depression. She reports that for…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Burns, D.D. (1989). The feeling good handbook. New York, NY: Plume.

Cornes, C.L., & Frank, E. (1994). Interpersonal psychotherapy for depression. The Clinical

Psychologist, 47(3), 9-10.

Cuijpers, P, van Straten, A, Hollon, S.D., & Andersson, G. (2010). The contribution of active medication to combined treatments of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for adult depression: a meta-analysis. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 121(6), Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?hid=13&sid=568ccfe5-0fe6-4429-92a3- cb159b2e4044%40sessionmgr115&vid=5&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3
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Positive Effects of Music in Brain Injured Patients

Words: 1594 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33172784

Music

The field of music therapy is an emerging one in medical practice. Nevertheless, there is a growing body of research to support the use of music therapy in a wide range of instances, one of which includes patients who are suffering from brain injury. This paper will review some of the literature on the subject in an attempt to understand how music affects the brain and is therefore useful in therapy.

Music Therapy

The idea of music therapy is ancient, and was extolled by the likes of Plato. The Roman god Apollo was god of music and medicine, further cementing the link between the two in estern civilization. Non-estern cultures were also known to use music to attempt to heal people. Certain forms of music could drive out evil spirits or demons, according to the lore of many cultures. It is from these myriad traditions that the modern use…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bradt, J., Magee, W., Dileo, C., Wheeler, B. & McGilloway, E. (2010). Music therapy for acquired brain injury. Wiley. Retrieved April 28, 2013 from http://ssh.snvtest.com/wp-content/uploads/articles/06_Music_Therapy_For_Brain_Injury.pdf

Formisano, R., Vinicola, V., Penta, F., Matteis, M., Brunelli, S. & Weckel, J. (2001). Active music therapy in the rehabilitation of severe brain injured patients during coma recovery. Annals of the Instituto Superiore di Sanita. Vol. 37 (4) 627-630.

Hamilton, L., Cross, J. & Kennelly, J. (2001). The interface of music therapy and speech pathology in the rehabilitation of children with acquired brain injury. Australian Journal of Music Therapy. Vol. 12 (2001) 13-20.

Thaut, M.H., Gardiner, J.C., Holmberg, D., Horwitz, J., Kent, L., Andrews, G., Donelan, B. And McIntosh, G.R. (2009) Neurologic music therapy improves executive function and emotional adjustment in traumatic brain injury rehabilitation. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1169, 406-416.
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Mental Health Counseling Discuss the Role in

Words: 1923 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96482523

Mental Health Counseling

Discuss the role in relationship to the prescription and monitoring of pharmacological treatments for mental health issues.

Unique advances have been achieved in the treatment offered to clients suffering from mental illness. Mental health care providers must understand the original causes of mental health disorders in order to provide treatment to clients with these disorders. Therefore, mental healthcare providers are able to treat disorders associated with mental health. This is being done with much success as physical disorders (Madden, 2008).

The profession of mental health provision has categorized strategies of treating mental health problems as either psychotherapeutic or somatic. Somatic methods of treating mental disorders include therapies such as electroconvulsive therapy, which have the potential of stimulating the brain. Psychotherapeutic method includes behavioral therapy strategies, hypnotherapy, and psychotherapy. esearchers have established that most mental health disorders require treatment strategies that involve both psychotherapy and drugs. This is…… [Read More]

References

Madden, R.G. (2008). Legal issues in social work, counseling, and mental health: Guidelines for clinical practice in psychotherapy. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications

Palmo, A.J., Weikel, W.J., & Borsos, D.P. (2011). Foundations of mental health counseling.

Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas.

World Health Organization (2009). Mental health aspects of women's reproductive health: A
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Nursing Process Improvement and Change Management or

Words: 3030 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27787686

Nursing Process Improvement and Change

Change management or process improvement in healthcare guarantees that the vital systems in the healthcare organizations are functioning at their optimal. The objectives of healthcare procedure enhancement are to promote the effectiveness of the systems across units while capitalizing on profits and in due course improving quality of patient's care and experience. Clinical procedure improvement does not only concentrate on patient care, but also evaluates the whole procedure from planning through patient's discharge. Process improvement entails underlining the systems selected for enhancement effort, categorizing problems in the system, starting a redesign procedure that eradicates the problems and radically enhances the system's performance (Strople & Ottani, 2006). The Critical Care Unit charge nurse reporting is crucial and determines the efficiency and quality of care provision.

The charge nurse in Critical Care Unit is a need to employ clinical expertise and managerial skills to enhance efficiency in…… [Read More]

References

Aspden, P. (2007). Preventing medication errors. London: National Academies Press

Georgieva, K ., & Stoykova. (2011).Developing a training program modules for general technical disciplines in the application of E-technologies', Trakia Journal of Sciences, 9 (4), 5-8.

Kavaler, F.(2012). Risk management in health care institutions. London: Jones & Bartlett

Publishers.
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Treating Mental Illness With a Family Oriented Approach

Words: 1782 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91979540

Family Therapy Treatment of Mental Illness

There has been a growing movement towards the use of family therapy methods for the treatment of mental illness in recent years. To determine the facts about this trend, this paper provides a review of the relevant literature concerning family therapy treatment of mental illness in three sections. In Section 1, a discussion concerning the views of O'Hanlon and owan's (2003) and Zeig and Munion (1999) for working with clients with chronic or severe mental illness is followed by an analysis of the extent to which they succeed in making a strong case for "brief therapy" with intensive clients. An assessment concerning the contribution of Milton Erickson to the assessment and treatment of different mental health diagnoses is followed by an analysis of their respective approaches and the corresponding benefits and limitations of each of these models. Section II provides a discussion concerning the…… [Read More]

References

Daroff, R. B. (2005, Fall). Solution-oriented therapy for chronic and severe mental illness. Journal of Psychotherapy Practice Research, 8(4), 318.

Gurman, A. S. & Messer, S. B. (2003). Essential psychotherapies: Theory and practice. New York: Guilford Press.

McFarlane, W. R., Dixon, L., Lukens, E., & Lucksted, A. (2003): A review of the literature about psychoeducation and schizophrenia. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 29(2), 223-227.

Simoneau, T., & Miklowitz, D. (2001): The sights and sounds of schizophrenia.
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Applied Structural Family Therapy

Words: 1287 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31198792

Psychology -- Counseling -- Structural Family Therapy Model

"Juno" is a refreshingly nonjudgmental look at teenage pregnancy and a family's ultimately positive, supportive response. Addressing the situation from a systematic therapeutic perspective, the counselor can accept Juno, her family and the adoptive family as they are and help them reach their agreed upon goals. The movie's portrayal of a teenager's situation that is normally deemed problematic in a positive human light makes the happy outcome of this film readily achievable and believable.

Juno

"Juno" (Reitman, 2007) is a film about teenage pregnancy, an aspect of life that frequently positively and negatively confronts modern American families. hen 16-year-old Juno irresponsibly becomes unexpectedly pregnant by her teenaged best friend, Bleek, she decides against abortion and chooses to give the baby to an as-yet-unknown infertile couple. hen she tells her father and stepmother, they are initially rattled but quickly become supportive because after…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chenail, R. J. (2009). Learning marriage and family therapy in the time of competencies. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 28(1), 72-87.

Gehart, D. R. (2014). Mastering competencies in family therapy, 2nd edition. Balmont, CA: Brooks-Cole Cengage Learning 978-1-285-07542-6.

Gerhart, D. (2011). The core competencies and MFT education: Practical aspects of transitioning to a learning-centered, outcome-based pedagogy. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 37(3), 344-54.

Reitman, J. (Director). (2007). Juno [Motion Picture].
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Clinical Psychology

Words: 60005 Length: 200 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12402637

Deam Content as a Theapeutic Appoach: Ego Gatification vs. Repessed Feelings

An Abstact of a Dissetation

This study sets out to detemine how deams can be used in a theapeutic envionment to discuss feelings fom a deam, and how the theapist should engage the patient to discuss them to eveal the elevance of those feelings, in thei pesent, waking life. It also discusses the meaning of epetitious deams, how medication affects the content of a deame's deams, and if theapists actually "guide" thei clients in what to say. This "guidance" might be the theapist "suggesting" to thei clients that they had suffeed some type of ealy childhood tauma, when in fact, thee wee no taumas in thei ealy childhoods. The oigin of psychiaty is not, as it would have people believe, medicine, theapy o any othe even faintly scientific endeavo. Its oiginal pupose was not even to cue mental affliction.…… [Read More]

references. This may be related to the large decrease in familiar settings in the post-medication dreams. Although Domhoff (1996) does not list a high percentage of elements from the past as an indicator of psychopathology, he does mention that people suffering post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a type of anxiety disorder, tend to have dreams in which distressing events are relived again and again. It may be that other anxiety disorders invoke a similar response in which the dreamer has a tendency to dwell on past events, which merits further research.

A final observation is that the results of this study provide support for Hartmann's (1984) biological model of the effects of drugs on dreams. An early study which focused mainly on long-term sleep patterns found little change in dream content associated with psychotropic drug administration (Hartmann & Cravens, 1974), but a later study conducted in Hartmann's laboratory indicated that increased levels of dopamine resulted in more vivid, nightmarish dreams (Hartmann, Russ, Oldfield, Falke, & Skoff, 1980). Based on his own research and the literature on drugs and nightmares, Hartmann (1984) proposed that drugs that increase the neurotransmitters dopamine or acetylcholine, or decrease norepinephrine or serotonin, produce nightmares and more vivid and bizarre dreams.

Drugs that have the opposite effects would decrease the incidence of disturbing dreams. The dreamer in this study was taking a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, which served to increase the effects of serotonin. According to the biological model, with the onset of medication the dreamer should have experienced a decrease in nightmares, or, in Hall and Van de Castle's terms, lower aggression, negative emotions, and other unpleasant factors. This was, in fact, the case.

The emphasis on statistically significant differences without regard to effect sizes slowed progress in the study of dream content by creating unnecessary polarities and focusing energy on methodological arguments. The introduction of effect sizes into the study of dream content makes it possible to suggest that the controversy over home and laboratory collected dream reports never should have happened. The emphasis in dream content studies henceforth should be on effect sizes and large samples. Then future dream researchers could focus on testing new ideas using dream reports collected either at home or in the sleep laboratory.

Summary
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Market Driven Management

Words: 25695 Length: 75 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32150042

Pharmaceutical industries have to operate in an environment that is highly competitive and subject to a wide variety of internal and external constraints. In recent times, there has been an increasing trend to reduce the cost of operation while competing with other companies that manufacture products that treat similar afflictions and ailments. The complexities in drug research and development and regulations have created an industry that is subject to intense pressure to perform. The amount of capital investment investments required to get a drug from conception, through clinical trials and into the market is enormous. The already high-strung pharmaceutical industry is increasingly investing greater amounts of resources in search of the next "blockbuster" drug that can help them gain market position and profits. Laws, regulations and patents are important to the industry while spending billions of dollars in ensuring the copyright of their products.

It is the intention of this…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ansoff, H.I. (1957). Strategies for diversification. Harvard Business Review, 35(5), 113-124.

Ansoff, H.I. (1965). Corporate Strategy. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Ashour, M.F., Obeidat, O., Barakat, H., & Tamimi, A. (2004). UAE Begins Examination of Patent Applications. Tamino.com. Retrieved January 18, 2004, from the World Wide Web: http://www.tamimi.com/lawupdate/2001-01/intprop.htm

Bain, J.S. (1954). Economies of scale, concentration, and the condition of entry in twenty manufacturing industries. American Economic Review, 44, 15-36.
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Who's Controlling Our Emotions Emotional Literacy as a Mechanism for Social Control

Words: 8437 Length: 28 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90031219

CONTROLLING OUR EMOTIONS?

EMOTIONAL LITERACY:

MECHANISM FOR SOCIAL CONTROL?

At the core of becoming an activist educator

Is identifying the regimes of truth that govern us the ideas that govern how we think, act and feel as educators because it is within regimes of truth that inequity is produced and reproduced. (MacNaughton 2005, 20)

Disorder, addictions, vulnerability and dysfunction...."

Disorder, addictions, vulnerability and dysfunction...." These terns, according to Nolan (1998; Furedi 2003; cited by Ecclestone N.d., 135), denote a therapeutic ethos prevalent in American culture that some consider to be seeping into ritish media, popular culture and politics. Currently, in England, "Personalised learning," according to Ecclestone (2005, 456), includes an increasing number of initiatives, which constitute a powerful discourse to respond to varied, frequently contradictory public, political and professional concerns relating to a person's emotional needs. Her article debates critical policy research and evaluates the subtle ways policy initiatives strive…… [Read More]

Bibliography www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5014543540

Benninga, Jacques S., Marvin W. Berkowitz, Phyllis Kuehn, and Karen Smith. "Character andAcademics: What Good Schools Do Though There Has Been Increasing Interest in Character Education among Policy Makers and Education Professionals, Many Schools Hesitate to Do Anything That Might Detract from Their Focus on Increasing Academic Performance. The Authors Present Evidence Indicating That This May Be Misguided." Phi Delta Kappan 87.6 (2006): 448. Questia. 24 June 2008 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5014543540.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5022190711

Buckingham, David, and Andrew Burn. "Game Literacy in Theory and Practice." Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia 16.3 (2007): 323+. Questia. 24 June 2008 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5022190711.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5010848471
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Paranoid Schizophrenia This Work Details

Words: 1791 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54486945

(Walsh & Meyersohn, 2001, p. 188)

Therapeutic Interventions

Therapeutic interventions, as has been mentioned are frequently multifaceted. Nursing interventions can be associated with the disease treatment or can be in support of other diseases the individual has that need treatment, i.e. when and individual is hospitalized for illness or injury the diagnosis and therapeutic evidence of PS is absolutely essential to support and understand as incompliance can be global and "new" therapeutic relationships can be met with extreme distrust. Education is essential as PS patients still have some (greater or lesser) cognitive impairment and may not give appropriate clues as to how well he or she understands or intends to comply with treatment interventions. Nurses in a psych or medical setting must be careful how they word everything and how they educate patents about their treatment. Expected outcomes are dependant on severity but many people with PS can and do…… [Read More]

References

Bond, G.R., & Meyer, P.S. (1999). The Role of Medications in the Employment of People with Schizophrenia. The Journal of Rehabilitation, 65(4), 9.

Higgins, P.B. (1995). Clozapine and the Treatment of Schizophrenia. Health and Social Work, 20(2), 124.

Hilsenroth, M.J., Fowler, J.C., & Padawer, J.R. (1998). The Rorschach Schizophrenia Index (SCZI): an Examination of Reliability, Validity, and Diagnostic Efficiency. Journal of Personality Assessment, 70(3), 514-534.

Mayo Clinic "Paranoid Schizophrenia Definition" http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/paranoid-schizophrenia/DS00862
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Ethical Practice Involves Working Positively Diversity Difference

Words: 2498 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31023695

Ethical Practice Involves Working Positively Diversity Difference

Counseling is a profession that involves associations based on principles and values ethically. Patients are able to benefit by understanding themselves better and through creating relationships with others. Through counseling, the clients are able to make positive alteration in life and enhance their living standards. Communities, organizations, couples and families are different groups of individuals are main sources of relationships (BACP Ethical Framework, 2013, p.4). Frameworks of ethical practice direct the attention of counseling practitioners to engage in ethical responsibilities. This stud describes the purpose of each principle following the development of good counseling practice. Practitioners make reasonable decisions grounded on these principles without making any contradictions. Nevertheless, research indicates that professionals have met barriers hindering them to integrate all the principles in some cases. In such situations, they are forced to select between required principles. A course of action or a decision…… [Read More]

References

BACP Ethical Framework. (2013). The Ethical Framework for Good Practice in Counselling. Pp 1-10. Accessed April 7, 2013 from www.bacp.co.uk/admin/structure/files/pdf/9479_ethical%20framework%20jan2013.pdf

Clarkson, P. (2009). The Therapeutic Relationship. New York NY: Wiley

Handout 1. MkSame-Sex Relationships, an Historical Overview. A review by Robin Heme

Handout 2. What are the potential abuses of these kinds of power in the relationship between counsellor and client? Janet Dowding 02.2010 saved as power
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Alternative Dispute Resolution ADR Many

Words: 4053 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36419336

Furthermore, he has displayed extreme anger towards her and appears completely unwilling to compromise. He wishes to keep both the house and Eduardo to himself, as he seems to feel betrayed by Cherry, and wants as little as possible contact with her. Cherry in turn is worried about the effect of this upon her child.

The requirements for mediation have therefore only been fulfilled by Cherry, whereas Giovani appears to need some level of therapy for his unresolved emotions and conflicts. He therefore needs to reach Cherry's more advanced level of preparedness in order for a more traditional form of mediation to be effective for them. ecause one partner is already at a level where she is ready for mediation, it is suggested that a combination of therapy and mediation might be effective in this case towards reaching a more speedy and amicable resolution. In addition, Giovani's attitude indicates that…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Alexander, Nadja Marie. Global Trends in Mediation. Kluwer Law International, 2006.

Fisher, Thelma, Ventura, John and Reed, Mary. Divorce for Dummies. Indianapolis: Wiley Publishing, 2005.

Fishman Green, Rachel. Mediator Neutrality - How is it possible? Divorce Source, Inc. http://www.divorcesource.com/NY/ARTICLES/green3.html

Folber, Jay, Milne, Ann L. And Salem, Peter. (eds) Divorce and Family Mediation: Models, Techniques, and Applications. Guilford Press, 2004.
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Skilled Helping Interview Clarifying the

Words: 1821 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89277365

Linguistic analyses of conversational patterns indicate that most pauses can be predicted by linguistic structures, such as clause or sentence breaks" (Levitt, 334) by eliminating some of the non-verbal factors that may tend to undermine these silences, I would find that the interviewee was far more comfortable with the nature of the interview and its opportunity for a free and informal discussion relating to treatment experience, personal history and current disposition.

3. Conclusion

The helping model, according the research which was conducted in preparation for and in light of Mr. Smith's situation, would be further illuminated by the interview. Here, firsthand interaction illustrated that individuals who have undergone such institutional experiences are sometimes eager to share details and feelings directly related thereto. The way that Mr. Smith opted to open up would be especially revealing in verifying the value of allowing one's self to fully accept and understanding the nature…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Levitt, H.M. (2002). The Unsaid in the Psychotherapy Narrative: Voicing the Unvoiced. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 15(4): 333-350.

Myers, S. (2003). Relational healing: To be understood and to understand. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 43(1): 86-104.

Myers, S. (2000). Empathetic listening: Reports on the experience of being heard. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 40(2): 148-173.

Rogers, C.R. (1995). What understanding and acceptance mean to me. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 35(4): 7-22.
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Experimental Understanding and Enganging Patient S Inelligence

Words: 3073 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75375065

self-therapy in the context of what needs to be done to elevate the healing process in life. The therapy that is often used to treat is that which people rely on to practice self-treatment. In this paper, Art Bohart's talk on self-healing is will be used to manifest what is best-used means of conducting self-therapy. In this paper, the general supportive treatment of stress and other psychological ailments will be covered. The aim is to reach out to the diverse sections of the therapy and how it may be of use to the people. The paper also discusses the relevance of this program in the treatment of emotional challenges that people face. Finally, the paper will discuss whether the lessons learned from Art Bohart's talk can be integrated into real life. The focus extends to include the texistential-humanistic therapeutic interventions and the benefits associated with their use on patients.

Part…… [Read More]

References

Bohart, A. C., & Tallman, K. (1999). What Do We Mean By The Client As Active Self-Healer? In, How Clients Make Therapy Work: The Process of Active Self-Healing (Pp. 3-23). Washington, DC, U.S.: American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/10323-001

Bohart, A. C., & Tallman, K. (1999). Research Results That May Surprise You -- How Do We Know the Client is an Active Self-Healer? In, How Clients Make Therapy Work: The Process of Active Self-Healing (pp. 25-55). Washington, DC, U.S.: American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/10323-002

Bohart, A. C., & Tallman, K. (1999). Self-Healing Without a Therapist. In, How Clients Make Therapy Work: The Process of Active Self-Healing (Pp. 57-84). Washington, DC, U.S.: American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/10323-003

Bohart, A. C., & Tallman, K. (1999). Self-Healing With a Therapist. In, How Clients Make Therapy Work: The Process Of Active Self-Healing (Pp. 87-104). Washington, DC, U.S.: American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/10323-004
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Child Counseling

Words: 2053 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2474313

Child Counseling

The objective of this work is to provide viable research techniques to use in order to help a child and her family. This report represents a summary of Alicia Thomas, a nine-year-old African-American 4th grader with a series of legitimate medical as well as possibly psychosomatic physiological and psychological concerns. The young lady has been specifically diagnosed as having a duodenal ulcer with the inherent gastrointestinal symptoms including vomiting and intermittent pain. The pain has been linked to increased absenteeism from school, four hospitalizations, adverse sleeplessness, nightmare experiences with detail of dismemberment and professed fears of death for herself and for her family members.

The family consisted of eight total children and an intact parental situation but of these members, there has also been a history of mental retardation, depression and one sibling who has since deceased but in life was a main care provider. There is also…… [Read More]

References

Annunziata, Jane. (n.d.). "Play Therapy With A 6-Year-old With Jane Annunziata, PsyD." Retrieved May 10, 2005, from http://www.apa.org

College of Agricultural Sciences (1999). Cognitive Development/Play-Overview. College of Agricultural Sciences, Penn State University. Retrieved May 10, 2005, from http://www.penpages.psu.edu/penpages_reference/28507/2850764.htmL

Ferguson, E.D. (1989). "Adlerian Therapy: An Introduction." Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: Adlerian Psychology Association of British Columbia.

Wikopedia. (n.d.). Post-traumatic stress disorder. Retrieved May 10, 2005, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-traumatic_stress_disorder
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Macpherson Thorpe and Thomas 2006 Reported an

Words: 2481 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58109216

MacPherson, Thorpe, and Thomas (2006) reported an interesting qualitative study on the use of acupuncture in the treatment of low back pain. They report the results of a qualitative study nested within a large quantitative study (there were actually tow qualitative studies performed but the current study only addresses one of them). The quantitative study design was one of a large randomized controlled trial that compared acupuncture against typical general practitioner care. The study was carried out York between the years 1999 and 2003. The acupuncture treatment for the study was founded on the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) using six acupuncturists who all had a minimum of three years of post-qualification clinical experience. The acupuncturists were encouraged by the researchers to provide their typical treatment so that the study would evaluate the effect of routine care for lower back pain, each acupuncturist making meticulous notes of the aspects…… [Read More]

References

Campbell, A. (2006). Point specificity of acupuncture in the light of recent myofascial pain.

Acupuncture Medicine, 24(3), 118-122.

MacPherson, H., Thorpe, L., & Thomas, K. (2006). Beyond needling therapeutic processes in acupuncture care: A qualitative study nested within a low-back pain trial. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 12, 873-880.
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Behavioral and Cognitive Behavioral Theories

Words: 2290 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71659198

Behavioral and Cognitive Behavioral Theories

Psychodynamic and Cognitive Behavioral Theories

In this paper, there is going to an examination of Cognitive Behavioral and Psychodynamic theories. This is accomplished by focusing on: the two theories, their theoretical concepts, micro skills / techniques and a summary of these ideas. These elements will show how each one can address issues impacting the patient and the long-term effects upon them.

In the world of psychology, there are different theories which are used to explain how someone reacts to various stimuli. The result is that there has been contrasting ideas about the best way to understand human behavior. Two schools of thought which are very popular are the psychodynamic and cognitive behavioral approaches. (Okun, 2008)

To fully understand them requires examining each one. This will be accomplished by focusing on the two theories, their theoretical concepts, micro skills / techniques and a summary of these…… [Read More]

References

Larson, P. (2012). How Important is an Understanding of the Clients Early Attachments. Counseling Psychology Review, 27 (1), 10 -- 18.

Lucia, M. (2012). Therapeutic Activities and Psychological Interventions. Counseling and Psychotherapy Research, 12 (2), 118 -- 127.

Okun, B. (2008). Effective Helping: Interviewing and Counseling Techniques. New York, NY: Brooks and Cole.

Parpottis, P. (2012). Working with the Therapeutic Relationship. Counseling Psychology Review, 27 (3), 91-97
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Statement of Purpose for Phd in Public Health

Words: 1270 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73324675

working with a diverse population of Native Americans, Hispanics, and other individuals in the prison systems and public clinics of this country, I have come to two, crucial conclusions. Firstly, that the currently cost-strapped environment of the national health care system cries out for innovative financial and sociological solutions. Secondly, I believe I require further education in the field of public health to accomplish my goals in seeking to remedy the systemic abuses I have personally witnessed in my own, current capacity as a physician's assistant. These two crucial reasons combine and fuse in my desire to pursue a PhD at Walden in the field of public health.

"Physician, heal thyself," goes the famous quotation -- and indeed, I have sought to heal my own gaps of knowledge through continually educating myself in the technical innovations of the medical field and of the current state of public health in America.…… [Read More]