Tintern Abbey Essays (Examples)

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Frankenstein Offers a Great Analysis

Words: 1283 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16084218

The Monster's suffering was the root of all his murders, and Victor the cause of all his pain. It was at this point that the monstrosity of Victor's character is understood better, making Victor the greater monster in the story.

2.)

The poem "Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey" encompasses everything that the Romantic period had to offer. The physical aspect that the poem can portray, and the feeling that reading invokes makes this one of great substance and significance. The deep connection with Nature, is one that makes this poem a part of the Romantic Era's history, encapsulating a part of history in its lines.

The poem provides very rich description that invokes feeling; that is what the Romantic Period is all about. "Here, under this dark sycamore, and view / These plots of cottage ground, these orchard tufts, / Which at this season, with their unripe…… [Read More]

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Beowulf as a Hero Lesson

Words: 8817 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81934961

Your answer should be at least five sentences long.

The Legend of Arthur

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 9 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7A: Honor and Loyalty

1. Consider how Arthur's actions and personality agree with or challenge your definition of honor. Write a few sentences comparing your definition (from Journal 1.6A) with Arthur's actions and personality.

2. Write a brief paragraph explaining the importance or unimportance of loyalty in being honorable.

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 10 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7B: Combining Sentences

Complete the Practice Activity on page 202 of your text. After completing this activity, read over your Essay Assessment or another journal activity you've completed.

* Identify three passages that could be improved by combining two or more sentences with coordinating or subordinating conjunctions. Below the practice activity in your journal, write the original passages and the revised sentences you've created.

* Be sure to…… [Read More]

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English Romanticism in the 1790s

Words: 3717 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45643615

"O Sylvan ye! thou wanderer thro' the woods, / How often has my spirit turned to thee!" (http://www.uoregon.edu/~rbear/ballads.html) Now, the poet wishes to "transfer" the healing powers of nature that he himself has experienced to his sister. By stating."..Nature never did betray / the heart that loved her" (http://www.uoregon.edu/~rbear/ballads.html) ordsworth assures his sister that she will also find peace in the middle of nature if she believes in the communion with nature. This prediction is an artifice of the poem and is not simple. "ordsworth's ability to look to the future to predict memories of events that are happening in the present is ingenious and complicated. But ordsworth beautifully clarifies this concept by using nature as the ideal link between recollection, foresight, and his relationship with another."(Eilenberg, Susan. Strange power of Speech: ordsworth, Coleridge, and Literary Possession. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992).

Moreover, by imagining the future of his…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. Ed. Beth Newman. Boston: St. Martin's, 1996.

Baudelaire, Charles. Selected Writings on Art and Literature. London:

Penguin, 1992.

Spector, Jack the State of Psychoanalytic Research in Art History. The Art
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Role and Importance of the

Words: 5946 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47971090



Most individuals fail to appreciate life to the fullest because they concentrate on being remembered as some of the greatest humans who ever lives. This makes it difficult for them to enjoy the simple pleasures in life, considering that they waste most of their time trying to put across ideas that are appealing to the masses. While many did not manage to produce ideas that survived more than them, others succeeded and actually produced thinking that remained in society for a long period of time consequent to their death.

Creativity is generally regarded as one of the most important concepts in society, considering that it generally induces intense feelings in individuals. It is responsible for progress and for the fact that humanity managed to produce a series of ideas that dominated society's thinking through time. In order for someone to create a concept that will live longer than him or…… [Read More]

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Coleridge & 18 Thcent Tradition Samuel

Words: 1523 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25263539

His belief that literature is a magical blend of thought and emotion is at the very heart of his greatest works, in which the unreal is often made to seem real.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge effectively freed British (and other) poetry from its 18th century Neo-classical constraints, allowing the poetic (and receptive) imagination to roam free.

orks Cited

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor. Kublai Khan. In The Portable Coleridge, I.A. Richards

Ed.). New York: Penguin, 1987. 157-158.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. In The Portable Coleridge, I.A. Richards

Ed.). New York: Penguin, 1987. 80-105.

Moore, Christopher. "Introduction." Samuel Taylor Coleridge. New York:

Grammercy, 1996. 10.

Nokes, David. Raillery and Rage: A Study of Eighteenth Century Satire. New York: St. Martin's, 1987. 99.

Pope, Alexander, The Rape of the Lock. Representative Poetry Online. Retrieved September 22, 2005, from: http://66.102.7.104/search?q=cache:0gO7fceq2_

AJ:eir.library.utoronto.ca/rpo/display/poem1644.html+text+of+Pope%27s+The+Rape+of+the+Lock&hl=en&lr=&strip=1.html>.

Romanticism." ikipedia. 3 Apr. 2005. Retrieved September 22, 2005, at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanticism.

Samuel Taylor…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor. Kublai Khan. In The Portable Coleridge, I.A. Richards

Ed.). New York: Penguin, 1987. 157-158.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. In The Portable Coleridge, I.A. Richards

Ed.). New York: Penguin, 1987. 80-105.
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Creative Arts Therapy 1 Discussion

Words: 1473 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5298098

There are many instances of art acting as a means of enabling people back to health. This healing aspect of creativity is, I believe, due to the fact that we are liberated from the restrictions of the world in the process of creativity and because artworks are in a sense the residue of the experience of spiritual and expanded consciousness.

There are numerous clinical studies which show the effective of art therapy. For example, a number or art therapists have studied the affect of art therapy on people who have experienced loss. "Art therapists consistently observe the power and potential of art to help identify, cope with, and heal the pain experienced during the grief process..." (Hill, M.A.)

However, the healing process in creativity can best be explained by the deeper meaning of spontaneity.

Nachmanovitch asks the important question: "How does one learn improvisation?" The answer to this question is…… [Read More]

References

Hill M.A. Healing grief through art: art therapy bereavement group workshops. Retrieved 8 September, 2006, from Malinda Ann, M.A http://www.drawntogether.com/healing.htm

Nachmanovitch, S. (1990) Free play: The Power of Improvisation in Life and the Arts. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher.

Wordsworth W. LINES COMPOSED a FEW MILES ABOVE TINTERN ABBEY,

ON REVISITING the BANKS of the WYE DURING a TOUR. JULY 13, 1798. Retrieved September 7, 2006, at  http://www.bartleby.com/145/ww138.html
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Dorothy Wordsworth -- We Journeyed Side by Side

Words: 3339 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81637438

Dorothy ordsworth --"we journeyed side by side."

illiam ordsworth was the famous Romantic poet. His sister Dorothy was his quiet strength, support and inspiration. Dorothy ordsworth (1771-1855) devoted her life to her brother (1770-1850).

Intimate friends and close confidants, they shared an immense mutual dependence and were of extreme significance and value to each other. As illiam put it in his poem, "The Recluse," as quoted in the title above, brother and sister journeyed not only to Grasmere, but through all of life, "side by side," blown by the winds of life, "like two birds, companions in mid-air,/Parted and reunited by the blast (Clark 28).

Dorothy and illiam's mother died in 1778. Dorothy, age six, was separated from all her brothers, including illiam, age eight, and raised by various relatives, while he lived at school. As young children illiam and Dorothy were very close, and it was perhaps this separation…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alexander, Caroline. "The Other Wordsworth, In England's Lake District." New York Times 28 February 1999, sec. 6, p. 15, col 1.

Alexander, Meena. "Dorothy Wordsworth: the Grounds of Writing." Women's Studies. 1988 Vol. 14:195-210.

Clark, Colette. Introduction. Home At Grasmere. By Dorothy Wordsworth. New York: Penguin Books, 1978.

Mallaby, George. "Dorothy Wordsworth: The Perfect Sister." The Atlantic Monthly. 1950 December. http://www.theatlantic.com/issues/50dec/mallaby.htm.(accessed 11-26-2002),
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Romantic Poets Nature and Romantic

Words: 737 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87474870

The urn is a symbol to him of all great works of art which, picturing beauty, will always reflect truth to those who behold them. To Keats "beauty is truth, truth beauty," and art is the balm which soothes his fevered soul. He died at the age of 25 from tuberculosis.

ordsworth, who lived longer than the other poets, dying at the age of 80, was the leading poet of the nineteenth century. His work, with exquisitely turned phrasing, accurately depict both nature and his emotions. Nature was his inspiration and solace. He believed that nature could heal and commune both the elemental and divine through its natural forces. Like Coleridge, he believed that transcendental meditation was possible and that one could rise to a plane above that of the merely human with contemplation of nature and beauty. His verses rose to new heights in rhythm and meter, unlike the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fiero, Gloria K. The Humanist Tradition, Book 5: Romanticism, Realism, and the Nineteenth-Century World. New York: McGraw-Hill. 2002.
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Interpretation Analysis Evaluation of a Poem

Words: 1431 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25650472

Idyllic, Idolizing, Late Victorian Tears

The poem by the Victorian poet laureate Alfred Lord Tennyson entitled "Tears, idle tears," has the unfortunate status of having its become such a common phrase in modern parlance, that the reader finds him or herself bracing his or her ear for more and more cliches as the poem progresses. In other words, one hears that tears are idle so often, one can easily forget, not only that Tennyson said, "I know not what they mean," but that the poem attempts to express the seriousness of futility of grief, or outward displays of affection by calling tears idle, in that they do no real work in the world. The use of 'idle' in multiple variances of meaning, from impractical and lazy, to idyllic, to idolizing is in fact quite profound and sophisticated, yielding a poem with a compact linguistic and stylistic structure.

It is also…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Flanders, Judith. Inside the Victorian Home. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 2004.

Hilton, N. "Tears, Ay, Dull, Tears" Lexis Complexes. Chapter 6. 2004. http://www.english.uga.edu/nhilton/lexis_complexes/chap6.html

Tennyson, Alfred. "Tears, Idle Tears." From The Bedford Reader. Sixth Edition, 2000.

Tears Idle Tears." Poetry Page. 2004.  http://glenavalon.com/idletears.html
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Metaphysical Poetry Journal Exercise 3 1A

Words: 3452 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67044569

The Lord will lead one to safety always. One can simply believe in something higher to get the meaning of this; it doesn't have to be Jesus. Psalm 127, contrarily is confusing because it states that unless the Lord builds the house, it is built in vain. This seems to be more literal, but I do get the idea. Unless the people building the house are doing it with the love of the Lord in their hearts, or building it for him, then what is the point?

Didactic poetry can be quite comforting as seen in Psalm 23 or it can be much too literal and seen as both confusing and condescending. Psalm 127 isn't very instructive spiritually speaking, unlike Psalm 23.

Updated Proverb: A broken toe can hurt, but a broken heart can kill.

Metaphors: Obscure or Illuminate? Didactic literature with its use of metaphors can sometimes obscure the…… [Read More]

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Childhood Poets of the Eighteenth Nineteenth and

Words: 2033 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8823671

Childhood

Poets of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth century concerned themselves with childhood and its various experiences, but the particular historical and aesthetic contexts within which different poets wrote affected their perspective on the matter greatly. As literature moved from Romanticism to naturalism, the tone poets took when considering children and their place in society changed, because where children previously existed as a kind of emotional or romantic accessory, they soon became subjects in their own right, with their own experiences and perspectives. By examining illiam ordsworth's "Michael," illiam Blake's "The Chimney Sweeper," and .B. Yeats' "A Prayer for my Daughter," one is able to see how the gradual transition from Romanticism to naturalism brought with it a less exploitative consideration of children, one that better reflected their place in the rapidly changing world.

The first poem to examine is illiam ordsworth's "Michael," because it fall squarely in the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Blake, William. Songs of Innocence and Experience. London: Basil Montagu Pickering, 1866.

Wordsworth, W. Lyrical Ballads. 4th. 2. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, & Orme, 1805.

Yeats, William. The Collected Poems of W.b. Yeats. London: Wordsworth Editions, 2000.