Totalitarian State Essays (Examples)

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Totalitarian Governments

Words: 2698 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29415750

It is necessary to control the workers and make them dependent on the government. The policy also makes it possible for the government to direct all its resources on a single project -- typically the major "goal" of a regime such as war.

Complete government control on weapons, although not an exclusive characteristic of totalitarian governments precludes the chances of successful uprisings.

Case Studies: Specific Examples of Totalitarian egimes

The Soviet Communist regime under Joseph Stalin, the fascist regime under Mussolini in Italy and Nazi regime led by Adolf Hitler are typical examples of totalitarian regimes.

Soviet Union under Joseph Stalin: As observed earlier, it is debatable whether Karl Marx had clearly envisaged the formation of totalitarian governments by the application of his Communist theory. However, the first country to adopt Communism, i.e., the Soviet Union soon degenerated into the worst type of totalitarian government imaginable under Joseph Stalin who…… [Read More]

References

Arendt, Hannah. (1966). The Origins of Totalitarianism. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=23477515

Blum, G.P. (1998). The Rise of Fascism in Europe (R. M. Miller, Ed.). Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Characteristics of Totalitarianism." (n.d.) From: Totalitarian Dictatorship and Autocracy, by Carl Friedrick and Zbigniew Brzezinski. Retrieved on November 5, 2004 at http://plato.newarka.edu/~labbey/ap_total_charac.html

Kreis, Steven. (2004) "The Age of Totalitarianism: Stalin and Hitler." Lectures on Twentieth Century Europe: The History Guide. Retrieved on November 5, 2004 at http://www.historyguide.org/europe/lecture10.html
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Totalitarian Architecture

Words: 2679 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49196426

Fear of the Return of Totalitarian Architecture Due to Technological Advancements

This paper examines some of the different aspects of the coming worldwide technological totalitarianism and the expanding of it influence. The argument that this is both a conscious and accidental program of influential individuals and organizations carried out through the procedure of reification of philosophical beliefs which are misshapen into institutions, services, technologies policies and in the end, culture. Some experts that have explored this topic believe that by pay no attention to the costs of new technologies, what there may be some kind of loss in the bargain and that it can lean so something that is immeasurable and potentially disastrous. It is obvious that history was not or is not all the way inevitable, however, it is likewise a question of human values in connection to changes that are looked at as being natural. Although there have…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Carpo, Mario. "Architecture in the Age of Printing." The History of Architectural Theory. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data, 6 March 1998.

-- . "The Alphabet and the Algorithm." Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data. The MIT Press, 7 May 1995.

Giroux, Henry. Totalitarian Paranoia in the Post-Orwellian Surveillance State. 14 Feruary 2014.  http://billmoyers.com/2014/02/11/totalitarian-paranoia-in-the-post-orwellian-surveillance-state/ . 18 March 2014.

Keller, Marcello Sorce. "Why is Music so Ideological, Why Do Totalitarian States Take It So Seriously: A Personal View from History, and the Social Sciences",." Journal of Musicological Research, XXVI 2.3 (2007): 91 -- 122.
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Big Brother Among Us George

Words: 2108 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31229773

Everyone is under suspicion, according to the eye of the camera. Everyone is treated as if they are a likely criminal. This has a negative psychological affect on the general population who are not criminals.

For those who are not criminals, they feel as if their privacy is being invaded for no reason. They are reduced to being under suspicion and scrutinized even though they are upstanding citizens. They feel as if they are being treated as a criminal and that their freedoms are being slowly eaten away one by one. More and more the general population expresses concerns about the trend toward and Orwellian world. The telescreens in Orwell's world broadcast propaganda and continually exaggerated positive production numbers and lied about the failing state of the economy. The telescreens made the economy sound like a growth economy, when it was slowly slipping away, sound familiar?

In Orwell's novel, inston…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Froomkin, D. Obama Hasn't Entirely Abandoned the Bush Playbook. February 18, 2009. the

Washington Post. < http://voices.washingtonpost.com/white-house-watch/bush-rollback/obama-hasnt-entirely-abandoned.html >. Accessed December 6, 2010.

London Evening Standard. George Orwell, Big Brother is watching your house. March 31, 2007.

< http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/article-23391081-george-orwell-big-brother-is-watching-your-house.do > . Accessed December 5, 2010.
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Best and Worst in Post-1877 US History

Words: 1398 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55998003

U.S. History 1877-Present

America has changed so vastly since the U.S. Civil War that it is hard to single out three events that have had the most beneficial impact from the later nineteenth century to the present day. However, in terms of selecting events that have had the greatest impact on the daily lives of Americans in this time period even to the present day it is possible to nominate some specific events. he ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920, the introduction of the New Deal under President Franklin Roosevelt, the passage of the Civil Rights Act during the Presidency of Lyndon Johnson are all events which continue to have a positive impact felt by all Americans.

he Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is what permits women to vote. he fact that it was only passed in 1920 is something of a scandal --…… [Read More]

The use of Communism as a fake menace was a staple of American political rhetoric well before Senator McCarthy's day -- the Haymarket Riot was an attempt to place blame on progressive political organizers, and the raids conducted after World War One by attorney general A. Mitchell Palmer were perhaps even more illegal than anything McCarthyism accomplished. However, the real function of McCarthyism was to conduct a witch hunt in American public life, and ruin the careers of people -- also effectively stigmatizing progressive politics for a long stretch afterwards. The most troubling aspect of McCarthyism, however, was that it was brought down by nobody except McCarthy himself. If McCarthy had not overreached by going after the U.S. Army -- which proved to be a crucial miscalculation -- he might have continued his red-baiting until he had effectively forced America into becoming a right-wing one-party totalitarian state, the inverted mirror image of his imaginary enemies.

Finally the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on Bush v. Gore in 2000 was a scandal in any number of ways, but chief among them was the Constitutional crisis that this decision represented. Because the justices split purely along party lines, the decision essentially politicized the Supreme Court, which was not to the benefit of the legal system. But moreover, there was no valid reason to delay the recount in Florida -- which ultimately found Al Gore had won the popular vote there too -- and merely underscored the bizarre elitist character of the Electoral College as being an element of the U.S. Constitution like the three-fifths compromise, a relic of a bygone era. As a result, America ended up with a president who had been installed by a bunch of judges appointed by his dad and his dad's boss -- the fact that his presidency was so disastrous should not be a surprise.

In conclusion, these three events all damaged the public life of the United States in various ways. The Spanish-American War turned warfare into a profiteering activity that could be conducted by coercing the public with propaganda campaigns. McCarthyism demonized political opinion in what should ideally be a tolerant and pluralist society. And the elevation of George W. Bush to the presidency ultimately damaged America's status in the eyes of the world, and its legal system, and ultimately its economy, even if it did give us the most charming amateur painter on the world stage since Adolf Hitler. The fact that Bush essentially revived the worst excesses of the Spanish-American War with his Iraq invasion, and of McCarthyism with his PATRIOT Act, demonstrate how all of these tendencies in American life are still with us.
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State of Nature General Will

Words: 2320 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92224182

Nature.... General Will

The ideas to create just and liberal society go all the way back to ancient times. The first examples of civil society were proposed by Plato and Aristotle, who saw the ideal state to be a republic ruled by the wise men and aristocrats as "first among equal." They didn't go in depth to explain its structure, functions of government in details, etc. These were the first discourses about the state where the harmony and equality established by the laws of nature will be preserved and developed. But the history shows that Greek republic failed under the pressure of power-gaining ome and Greek democracy was forgotten for centuries, but some of its principles preserved and where later developed by the philosophers of Enlightenment.

Enlightenment or renaissance of political thought and birth of civil political teachings was represented by a new idea of state, where the power was…… [Read More]

References:

1. Locke, John, The Second Treatise on Government, ed by Thomas P. Peardon, Indianapolis, In.; The Library of Liberal Arts, 1952

2. Lavine, T.Z From Socrates to Sartre Bantam; Reissue edition, 1985

3. Camus, Albert The Stranger Vintage; Reissue edition, 1989

4. Marx, Karl Communist Manifesto Signet Classics; Reprint edition, 1998
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What Do State Do

Words: 779 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33619065

Max Weber defined state as "a human community that (successfully) claims the monopoly of the legitimate use of physical force within a given territory whether that legitimacy derives from charisma, tradition, or law" (Hokim 2012). Weber held that domination of people being ruled by a ruler is an unavoidable political fact. His vision for democracy in Germany was a political marketplace where charismatic rulers are elected by winning votes in free competition, whether in struggle or not. He saw localized, public associational life as the breeding ground of charismatic rulers.

Weber suggested that social pluralism should be the sociocultural ground for political education of lay citizens, which requires an organized civil society. He also suggested that the political education should contain ethics in conviction and responsibility. The political ethics also involved value-freedom and value-relativism.

Under Weber's definition, North Korea under Kim Jong-il, after American invasion or Cambogia under the Khmer…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"Charisma." New World Encyclopedia. Apr 2, 2008.  http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Charisma  (accessed Jan 26, 2013).

Hokim, S. "Max Weber." Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. July 31, 2012. http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/weber / (accessed Jan 25, 2013).

Norman, J. The world's enduring dictatiors: Kim Jong-il, North Korea. June 4, 2011. http://www.cbsnews.about.com/od/profilesofasianleaders/p/BioKimJongil.htm (accessed Jan 25, 2013).

totalitarism. 2013. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/600435/totalitarism (accessed Jan 25, 2013).
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Liberal States Values When Curtains Fell to

Words: 1427 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50615924

Liberal States Values

When curtains fell to mark the end of the cold war, countries like the United States who were the protagonists in the cold war era resorted to promoting international spread of democracy. This became guiding principle in the formulation of foreign policy (Lynn-Jones, 1998). Democratization therefore became America's next mission because it was believed liberal democracy would benefit the citizens of new democracies, promote international peace, and serve America's interests abroad. This paper supports the notion that liberal states like the United States are obliged to promote their values abroad.

United States of America is a country that is credited for having an open democratic space where anybody can air out their grievances without the fear of being shut up by the government. It is the hallmark of almost every person migrating to the U.S. To experience the liberal approach to almost everything, the liberal approach to…… [Read More]

References List

Hoffman, S. (1986). Liberalism and International Affairs. New York: West view Press.

Karatnycky, A. (1997). Freedom on the March. Freedom Review, 28(1), 7, 11.

Lynn-Jones, S.M. (1998). Why the United States Should Spread Democracy. Retrieved from http://belfcenter.ksg.harvard.edu/

Sartori, G. (1987). The Theory of Democracy Revisited. Chatham, N.J.: Chatham House.
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Saddam Hussein & His Totalitarian

Words: 2601 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73694026

In the words of BBC Middle East analyst Gerald Butt (2001), "…his (Saddam's) opponents have not been able to nominate anyone else who might hold Iraq together -- with its Kurds in the north, Sunni Muslims in the centre [sic], and Shi'a in the south. What the outside world calls terror, Saddam calls expediency." Interestingly, Butt's analysis took into consideration the fact that despite the atrocities that Saddam had and has purportedly done to Iraqis and Iraq's neighbors, world leaders, particularly Western leaders like the U.S. And Britain, are still actually taking an active role in Saddam's political decision-making, albeit the latter has chosen to contain himself within Iraq's borders. Prior to 9/11, U.S. leadership continued to tolerate Saddam's regime, only until the point that it is able to find a 'suitable' replacement for the dictator (Dickey and Thomas, 2002).

In addition to "covert actions" taken to secure that Iraq…… [Read More]

References

Butt, G. (January 2001). "Saddam Hussein profile." BBC News World Edition website. Available at:  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/1100529.stm 

Dickey, C. And E. Thomas. (September 2002). "How the U.S. helped create Saddam Hussein." Global Policy Forum website. Available at: http://www.globalpolicy.org/component/content/article/167/34978.html

O'Reilly, B. (2004). "Document connects Saddam Hussein to 9/11 terrorists." Fort Worth Business Press.

Paz, M. And J. Aviles. (2009). "Demonizing the tyrant: Saddam Hussein's image in Spanish news programs during the Second Persian Gulf War." International Journal of Contemporary Iraqi Studies, Vol. 3, No. 1.
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United States Should Apply Greater

Words: 986 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46105061

Instead of providing a democratic model that Chinese companies could follow, American companies and not only go to China for the advantage of paying a lot less for the same work. The fact that our government tolerates and encourages such practices must change.

After the 1989 massacre in Tiananmen Square, one of the sanctions imposed on China was to be denied any World ank loans. A year later, the sanction was reduced as China was supposed to improve its human rights practices in order to get World ank loans. This measure, as many others, was never applied, as China is now one of the main beneficiaries of World ank loans and has done little in changing its human rights practices. Despite the fact that U.S. could have used its influence in the World ank and impose strict sanctions on China, it preferred not to do so, most probably based on…… [Read More]

Bibliography

China (includes Tibet, Hong Kong, and Macau)," Country Reports on Human Rights Practices - 2005, released by the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006, available at http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61605.htm;

Christensen, Nick, a Standoff Between Giants: America's Policies Towards the Human Rights Record of China, December 9, 1998, available at  http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rtanter/F98PS472PAPERS/CHRISTENSEN.NICK.CHINA.HTM ;

Kourous, George and Tom Barry, "U.S. China Policy: Trade, Aid, and Human Rights," Foreign Policy in Focus, Vol. 1, No. 5, November 1996.
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Nazi State in the 1960s and 1970s

Words: 1875 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89194224

Nazi State

In the 1960s and 1970s, New Left historians in the Federal Republic of Germany reexamined the Third Reich in ways that created major controversies, especially because they found continuity between the Nazi era and attitudes and institutions that existed both before and afterwards. This meant "purging society" of its racist, authoritarian and paternalistic tendencies, and preventing revived Nazi movements like the National Democratic Party (NDP) from gaining a foothold in political life again (Gassert and Steinweiss 1). Fritz Fischer had helped initiate this historical controversy in Griff Nach der eltmacht (Germany's Drive for orld Power) in which he asserted that Germany had been the aggressor in orld ar I and that Hitler and the Nazis borrowed their ideas about Lebensraum and an empire in the East from their Second Reich predecessors. Indeed, the historical record demonstrates that during the Third Reich, the German people, the old conservative elites,…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Aly, Gotz and Jefferson Chase. Hitler's Beneficiaries: Plunder, Racial War, and the Nazi Welfare State. Holt Paperbacks, 2005.

Caplan, Jane and Nikolaus Waschmann (eds). Concentration Camps in Nazi Germany: The New Histories. Routledge, 2010.

Collier, Martin and Philip Pedley (eds). Hitler and the Nazi State. Heinemann Educational Publishers, 2005.

Gassert, Philipp and Alan F. Steinweiss. Coping with the Nazi Past: West German Debates on Nazism and Generational Conflict, 1955-1975. Berghahn Books, 2006.
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Cultures Can Teach Us About

Words: 2123 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74815074

For example, the sexual revolution in Iran was part of a larger cultural movement that encouraged the challenge of a large number of social changes. "This social movement encompasses behaviours such as pushing the envelope on Islamic dress, sexual behaviours, heterosocializing, driving around in cars playing loud illegal music, partying, drinking, dancing and so on -- to include basically, young people doing what they were not supposed to do under Islamic law" (Mahdavi, 2012, p.35).

In fact, the link between how a society approaches sex and that society's overall approaches towards human rights is interesting to note. Generally, the more liberal a society and the more protective of individual freedoms, the more permissive that society's approach will be towards sexuality, particularly female sexuality. In fact, when a totalitarian regime has been challenged, there seems to be a swing in the other direction, with an embrace of human rights, including rights…… [Read More]

References

Elliston, D. (2005). Erotic anthropology: "Ritualized homosexuality" in Melanesia and beyond.

In J. Robertson (Ed.), Same sex cultures and sexualities: An anthropological reader (pp.91-115). Malden: Blackwell.

Hunter, M. (2012). Rights amidst wrongs: The paradoxes of gender rights-based approaches towards AIDS in South Africa. In P. Aggleton, P. Boyce, H.L. Moore, & P. Parker (Eds.), Understanding global sexualities: New frontiers (pp.66-74). London: Routledge.

Mahdavi, P. (2012). 'The personal is political and the political is personal': Sexuality, politics, and social movements in modern Iran. In P. Aggleton, P. Boyce, H.L. Moore, & P. Parker (Eds.), Understanding global sexualities: New frontiers (pp.34-48). London: Routledge.
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Newspaper Response to Orwell's 1984 to What Extent Is Resistance to Liberalism Justified

Words: 1643 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5263363

Big Brother

Combat. A French Resistance Newspaper from 1944

COMBAT: THE RESISTANCE NESPAPER

Big Brother: The Physical Embodiment and Symbol of the Party in Oceania

Big Brother's Predecessors: Hitler, Stalin and an Old British Recruiting Poster Featuring Lord Kitchener

BIG BROTHER IS HITLER AND STALIN, INCLUDING THE MOUSTACHE

By O'Brien X

Unlike the real dictators Hitler and Stalin, Big Brother does not really exist and has never existed, except as the symbol of English Socialism (Ingsoc) and the Party that controls all aspects of life in Oceania through totalitarian, police state methods. After all, a dictator with a physical body will eventually become ill, decline with age and die, Big Brother will live forever as the image of a Party that intends to remain in power forever. Its members will die off, even at the privileged Inner Party levels, but that matters no more than cutting off dead fingernails. As…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Aly, Gotz and Jefferson Chase. Hitler's Beneficiaries: Plunder, Racial War, and the Nazi Welfare State. Holt Paperbacks, 2005.

Orwell, George, Nineteen Eighty-Four. NY: Houghton Mifflin, 1949, 1989.

Spielvogel, Jackson T. And David Redles. Hitler and Nazi Germany: A History, 6th Edition. Prentice Hall, 2009.

Trotsky, Leon. The Revolution Betrayed. Dover Publications, 2004.
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Politics Heywood Describes a Number

Words: 727 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26915290

I think the state should be neutral, and there should be opportunities for everyone, but that is not real life. I think that men mostly run government, but to call states patriarchal seems too extreme for me. I believe that there will be more opportunities for women both in government and the private sector, and that this is a wiser and less volatile outlook than the more radical feminist ideas. I do not have a problem with women or minorities in government, and I believe the state should encourage and make way for more of this type of participation.

As far as economic ideals are concerned, I believe a blend of the Minimalist and the Developmental state is the best alternative. I believe that capitalism is a good thing, but that wealth does not need to be distributed evenly, so I am not a fan of the socio-democratic state. I…… [Read More]

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Zhang Ailing the Rice Sprout Song Book

Words: 1774 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33004706

Rice Sprout Song

In a foreword given by David ang, he explains the important background for this story, written as an anti-communist story set in the 1950s, just after the Land Reform Movement has taken place in rural China. The Land Reform was meant to liberate local peasant by redistributing land, "giving" each farmer his or her own plot to own. However, what was meant as a way for farmers to produce more in an area that had always been prolific, another threat of famine is on the horizon but no one, not even Communist Party members, are allowed to speak about the "deepening misery" the peasants must face.

hat was interesting to me as I read through the story, is that on the surface the novel should be about celebration. There is, after all, a wedding and the impending New Years celebrations which is taken just as seriously, if…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Change, Eileen. The Rice Sprout Song. 3rd. Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press, 1998. 1-182. Print.
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Civil Society

Words: 1385 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74067468

Civil Society -- a Definition and Defense of this Critical Aspect of Modern Life

What is a civil society? To answer this question, what is the nature and composition of a civil society, one must first answer the question -- what is a society? A society may be defined as a conglomeration or an association of individuals greater than and representing a wider and more diverse range of interests than 'the one.' In other words, a society is more than an individual. And, although a family or at least an extended family could be perceived as a kind of microcosm of society, technically a family is not equated with a society by sociologists because of its relative singularity of interests, emotional and social, and economic. In contrast, the nature and components of the civil societies such as trade unions, churches, and interest groups of various political colors are voluntary in…… [Read More]

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Huxley & G Orwell Two

Words: 2815 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63572806

Whatever happened you vanished, and neither you nor your actions were ever heard of again" (Orwell, 1949, p.168).

Capitalism

Principles of mass production are very clear in the novels. Huxley for instance, applied the idea of mass production in human reproduction, since the people has abandoned the natural method of reproduction. Mass production as the conventional feature of capitalism and Huxley's novel reinforces such. He talked about the requirement of the World State about constant consumption, which is considered as foundation of its stability. Huxley apparently criticizes the commercial dependence of the world towards goods. Conditioning centers teaches people to consume. Orwell similarly provides criticism to capitalism as well: "The centuries of capitalism were held to have produced nothing of any value." The Proles are the symbols of the capitalist system as they constitute the working class who work in assembly lines.

Destruction of the concept of family

oth novels…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bessa, Maria de Fatima (2007). Individuation in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World and Island: Jungian and Post-Jungian Perspectives. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.

Beniger, James K. (1986) the Control Revolution. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 61.

Greenberg, Martin H., Joseph D. Olander and Eric S. Robbon. No Place Else: Expectations in Utopian and Dystopian Fiction. Southern Illinois: University Press, 1983. 29-97.

Grieder, Peter. "In Defense of Totalitarianism Theory as a Tool of Historical Scholarship" Totalitarian Movements and Political Religions 8.314 (September 2007) Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Grace Van Dyke Bird Library, Bakersfield, CA. 15 November 2008 (http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct-true&db=aph&an=27009808&site=ehost-live.
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Systems the Concept of Freedom

Words: 2498 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91721707

In the older forms, people could live and work in relative independence if they disengaged from politics. Under a modern totalitarian government, people are completely and utterly dependent on, and submissive to, the rule and whims of a political party and its leaders. Older forms of such a government ruled by divine right, while the modern totalitarian state is ruled and run by a dictator who controls a political party. Examples of totalitarian governments are Germany under Adolph Hitler, the U.S.S.R. particularly under Joseph Stalin, the People's Republic of China under Mao Tse Tung, Italy under enito Mussolini and Iraq under Saddan Hussein. The ruling party is the elite and the whole society is subjugated to a hierarchical order wherein an individual becomes responsible to another of a higher position of authority. All social groupings are either destroyed or subjected to the purposes of the ruling party and the state.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Labor Law Talk. Parliamentary System. Labor Law Talk Forum: Jelsoft Enterprises, Ltd., 2006

2. Lee, Dwight R. Liberty and Individual Responsibility. The Freeman: Foundation for Economic Educatin, 2005. http://www.fee.org/publications/the-freeman/articles.asp?aid=2124&print_view=true

3. MNS Encarta. Totalitarianism. Microsoft Corporation, 2006. http://encarta.msn.com/text_761574819_0/Totalitianism_html

4. Mikuriya H.N. Authoritarianism: a Social Disease. SOHOComp, 2006. http://www.mikuriya.com/sp_authority.html
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Hitlers' Germany the Role Propaganda

Words: 1434 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63619546

Marie Corelli writes in her article: Poisoning Young Minds in Nazi Germany: Children and Propaganda in the Third Reich about a math problem taught in the German schools under the Nazi regime: "The Jews are aliens in Germany -- in 1933 there were 66,060,000 inhabitants in the German Reich, of whom 499,682 were Jews. What is the percent of aliens?"(Corelli, 2002).

Another important age group, the youth, received full attention from the part of the Nazis and the first youth organization was established in 1922 and was called the Jungsturm Adolf Hitler. It went through a series of transformations and had several different names, till it finally became the name: Hitler Yugend. y 1935 over a half of the total German youth was member of this organization. After 1939 it became compulsory for the young Germans to join the organization.

It is obvious that children, young people, mothers were only…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Eher, Franz. On the German People and Its Territory.Nazi Propaganda: 1933-1945. 2007. Retrieved: Oct. 21, 2007. Available at http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/hjhandbuch.htm

2. Spielvogel, Jackson J. Hitler and Nazi Germany a History 5th Edition. Prentice Hall. Upper Saddle River. 2004

3. Welch, David. The Third Reich Politics and Propaganda 2nd edition. London. Routledge. 2002.
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Zamyatin We 20th Century Russian Literature

Words: 782 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28844284

paradox of the perfect selfless citizen O-90

On one hand, the soft, unified and always feminine presence of O-90 in Yevgeny Zamyatin's novel e stands as an idealized example of unquestioned obedience to the authority of a unified and totalitarian state. The future dystopia of e in the form of One State in e has entirely erased the concept of human individuality and independent thought. It has produced a citizen body that is entirely permeated by its beliefs, of which the spherical O-90 is perhaps the most obvious physical and psychological example. However, O-90's existence in a state of emptiness and her willingness to become a psychic void lacking a sense of self also means she is paradoxically capable of embodying the ideal of unconditional love, more than anyone else in the novel.

Of course, unconditional love is something hardly tolerated as a product of a unified state ideology. Love…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Zamyatin, Yevgeny. We. New York: Eos, 1984.
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Globalization the Culture of Western

Words: 1094 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62817705

Behrman holds that it was weak political institutionalization rather than a weak civil society that shackled Weimar Germany.

Unfortunately, many scholars of democracy theory and proponents of democratic culture have approached the Weimar Republic already holding the assumption that a democratic culture is necessary for a functioning democracy. With this assumption in place, they then debate whether Weimar Germany really possessed a "democratic culture." A democratic culture is often taken to entail Toqueville's "associationism," a vibrant public sphere, formal outlets for political dissent, and informed political debate. Such inquiries have provided little insight into the nature of healthy democracies because they are based on a faulty assumption, that culture is a condition or even a determinant in the formation of a society's political structure.

As Berman observed, passionate civic engagement among a nation's citizens, without an adequate institutional foundation to channel such passion, can actually be averse to functional democracy.…… [Read More]

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Gang Activity Please See Notes

Words: 3398 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36646386

This becomes further complex as economic ties blur between the poor and middle classes and the expectations each has about the definition of materialistic success. By belonging to a subculture, however, one can feel part of something larger, insulated a bit from the criticisms and unattainable messages of the upper middle class, and certainly a way to belong and feel important with one's own environment (Siegel and Welsh, 2009, 130-1).

Contemporary Urban Issues- in the United States, the National Gang Center estimates that there are almost 800,000 active street gang members, most concentrated in Los Angeles County and the greater Chicago area. Demographically, Hispanics account for almost 50% of gang members, African-Americans 30%, Caucasians 13%, and Asians 6% (Carlie, 2002). Unfortunately, Native American communities are also being overrun by gang violence and drug trafficking. Most tribal communities, in fact, have significant gang activity; contributing also to the continued economic downturn…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Gangs in America. (2003). The National Center for Victims of Crime. Retreived January 2011, from NCVC.org:

http://www.ncvc.org/ncvc/main.aspx?dbName=DocumentViewer&DocumentID=32352

The Gang Threat - Get Educated. (2009, February 6). Retrieved January 2011, from Federal Bureau of Investigation: http://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/2009/february/ngta_020609

Adamoli, Di Nicola, Savona and Zoffi. (1998, March). Orgqanized Crime Around the World. Retrieved January 2011, from University of Helsinki: http://www.heuni.fi/uploads/mmadzpnix.pdf
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Revolutionary America Describe Shay's Rebellion

Words: 2441 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19771269

The ritish came to impose serious taxes as a result of the French Indian war. These in turn were unacceptable to a people which considered itself not to be responsible for the causes of the war. The confrontation had been in fact another matter of European dispute that had to be solved outside the continent in the colonies.

Third, there is a disagreement in the way in which the war was perceived at the local level. The American colonies viewed this struggle as a need for independence from a regime that continued to impose an undemocratic control over its institutions and the lives of the people. On the other hand, the ritish saw it as a rebellion that must be immediately squashed. In its view, it was a war for the maintenance of a certain order, while the Americans viewed it as one of disruption of this order. While the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brainard, R. (2005) "Shays' Rebellion." 18th century history. 11 June 2008. http://www.history1700s.com/articles/article1120.shtml

British Battles. (N.d.) the War of the Revolution 1775 to 1783. Accessed 11 June 2008  http://www.britishbattles.com/american-revolution.htm 

Calliope. (2008) "Shays' Rebellion." A Historical Synopsis. 11 June 2008.  http://www.calliope.org/shays/shays2.html 

Jenkins, P. (1997) a history of the United States. New York: Palgrave.
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Fall of the USSR

Words: 3983 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20415392

Fall of the Soviet Union: Internal Causes Were to lame, Not External

In December of 1991, as the world watched in sheer perplexity and wonder, the mighty Soviet Union disintegrated into fifteen separate smaller countries. Its collapse was hailed by the west as a convincing victory for freedom, a triumph of democracy over totalitarianism, and evidence of the final proof of superiority of capitalism over socialism. The United States rejoiced as its sworn enemy was brought to its knees, thereby ending the unprecedented Cold War which had hovered over these two superpowers like a thunderhead since the end of World War II. In fact, the end of the Soviet Union transformed the entire world political situation, leading to a complete reformulation of political, economic and military alliances all over the globe, not to mention spurred a whole new set of political-economic theories.

What were the causes of this monumental historical…… [Read More]

Bibliography www.nytimes.com www.washingtonpost.com www.brookingsintitute.com

The Times of London.

Encyclopedia Britannica.

The Volume Library.

Sakwa, Richard. Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union.
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Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Words: 1765 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90959021

1. The terroism eras before and after 9/11 are quite different with respect to the role that the Israel/Palestine conflict plays. Since 9/11, the majority of terrorist incidents in the United States are committed by domestic, right-wing terrorists (Neiwert, et al, 2017), and the majority of "jihadist" terrorists are domestic, not imported, there remains a threat from the Middle East. Within the segment of homegrown jihadist-inspired terrorists, there were some 20 attacks carried out by about 178 people since September 11th (Jenkins, 2017). Among foreign-born terrorists who committed or plotted attacks in the US, the largest number were from Pakistan, at 20, and the remainder were from 39 other different countries, mostly Muslim-majority (Jenkins, 2017). A study of documented jihadist ideology, featuring jihadists from around the world, highlighted three common features: idealistic commitment to a righteous cause, individualism in interpreting religion, and a conviction that Muslims today are engaged in…… [Read More]

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Role of Government in Economy

Words: 1789 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51539750

This provides two strong disincentives to innovate. hat is left is a Chinese state that discourages the development of the most tried-and-true means of economic development -- competition and innovation -- and instead relies on wealth transfer due to currency manipulation as the foundation of its success.

The role of government in an economy, therefore, should be limited if long-term sustainable growth is the objective. For totalitarian capitalism to be the superior system would require that system to develop competencies that enable its economies to compete globally. Thus far, these competencies have only emerged in the Chinese firms that have access to estern systems -- Lenovo's Hong Kong roots place it into estern-style competition for example. ithout competencies, you have short-term success built on an artificial and unsustainable economy, rather than long-term success. The estern style emphasizes a limited role for government and the power of market forces. The totalitarian…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Huang, Y. (2008). Just how capitalist is China? MIT Sloan Research Paper 4699-08.

No author. (2008). The long march backwards. The Economist. Retrieved March 21, 2010 from http://www.economist.com/culture/displaystory.cfm?story_id=12333103

No author. (2010). The spirit of enterprise fades. The Economist. Retrieved March 21, 2010 from http://www.economist.com/business-finance/displaystory.cfm?story_id=15331470

Krugman, P. (2010). Taking on China. New York Times. Retrieved March 21, 2010 from  http://www.nytimes.com /2010/03/15/opinion/15krugman.html?hp
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Art and Literature

Words: 2435 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16949376

Humanities are Important:

An analysis of the Da Vinci Code, Beethoven's 9th, and 1984.

A novel by George Orwell (pseudonym), real name Eric Blair

Published in 1949

A reaction to the totalitarian state engulfing the global community

The Da Vinci Code

A (2006) film by on Howard

Based on the novel by Dan Brown

obert Langdon follows a series of clues that link Leonardo's masterpieces, the mystery of Jesus Christ, and a totalitarian regime in the guise of the Catholic Church

Beethoven's 9th Symphony

Completed in 1824 after the composer (Ludwig van Beethoven) had gone completely deaf, this -- his final symphony -- is often considered to be one of the greatest musical masterpieces of all time. The fourth movement is based on Schiller's "Ode to Joy" and invokes a chorus of universal brotherhood. If you listen long enough, you will hear the music swell into a magnificent burst of…… [Read More]

Reference List

Kyziridis, T. (2005). Notes on the History of Schizophrenia. Retrieved from  http://www.gjpsy.uni-goettingen.de/gjp-article-kyziridis.pdf 

Lief, R.A. (1969). Homage to Oceania: the prophetic vision of George Orwell. OH: Ohio University Press.

McLellan, J. (1988). The Beethoven Collection. NY: Time-Life Books.

Orwell, G. (1949). 1984. NY: Harcourt.
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Autocracy and Democracy There Are Different Forms

Words: 1257 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86849628

Autocracy and Democracy

There are different forms of government throughout the world. Each nation decides how it will govern its people and in whom the power will be vested. It is expected that when the nation is established, either the citizens or those who led the efforts to create the new nation will find a system of governance that works for all considered. There are many different forms of government, perhaps as many different forms as there are governments to adopt them. Some nations have kings and queen who rule their monarchy, others are theocracies where the rulers are the clergy, and still others are meritocracies where those who are put in positions of power have been granted the honor based on their value to the rest of the society. Two nearly diametrically opposed systems of government are democracies and autocracies. In the former government type, the people are the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Danziger, J. (2013). Understanding the Political World. 11th edition. Pearson.
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Politics Some Say That World

Words: 3064 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33301639



yan Dawson (2011) helps illustrate the way ideology shapes foreign policy by digging into Project for a New American Century files and showing how the PNAC reports are basically a lobbying tool for Israel. Dawson refers viewers of his documentary to PNAC many times in his attempt to show how the papers lay out the blueprint for American foreign policy post-9/11: "The policy of 'containment' of Saddam Hussein has been steadily eroding over the past several months. As recent events have demonstrated, we can no longer depend on our partners in the Gulf War coalition to continue to uphold the sanctions or to punish Saddam when he blocks or evades UN inspections." Such reports coupled with the yellow cake uranium story and the WMDs hoax, and of course the "harboring terrorists" myth, and the American public was read to back a war against Iraq -- even though Iraq was no…… [Read More]

Reference List

1962-Year in Review. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.upi.com/Audio/Year_in_Review/Events-of-1962/Cuban-Missile-Crisis/12295509437657-6/

BusinessMate. (2009). Max Weber's Theory of Bureaucracy. BusinessMate.org.

Retrieved from  http://www.businessmate.org/Article.php?ArtikelId=30 

Chayevsky, P. [writer]. (1976). Network. Los Angeles: MGM.
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Liberal Democracy Who Are Were Its Competitors This

Words: 1166 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45152137

liberal democracy? Who are/Were its competitors?

This article by Francis Fukuyama was written 15 years ago, in 1989, so when reviewing his points, it is important to keep in mind that the views he makes are dated. Though his views are taken 15 years ago, that should not make them obsolete, it is just important to keep the perspective of when he offered this paper.

Liberal democracy is, from reading Fukuyama's article, the democratic force that defeated fascism (Hitler) and totalitarian fanaticism (Japan) in WWII. Since there are no "viable systematic alternatives to Western liberalism," the author states, then liberal democracy must be the best system (although that ignores the huge power wielded by the Chinese form of communism). Liberalism generally is defined as a progressive form of politics, where minorities and women should be given equal rights with men, and where voters decide whom their leaders will be -…… [Read More]

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Inspiration for Apple Computers George

Words: 1519 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61550091

"The rumor claiming that the commercial almost never aired is true," said Clow (www.ciadvertising.com).The Apple board "demanded that it not be aired," Clow goes on, but Apple CEO Steve Jobs insisted that it be played, and so it was. Clow says that this commercial wasn't just a parody of Nineteen Eighty-Four; "one could almost interpret this commercial as a bleak commentary on society," he writes. It shocked the "PC world into paying a little more attention to their competitors in their field," Clow asserts.

In conclusion, TV Guide called the Apple commercial "the greatest commercial of all time," according to CNN. And while Orwell's book isn't the greatest by any means, it has created an endless number of allusions and references, including the phrase "Big Brother," who, unfortunately, is with us today far more than most of us probably realize.

orks Cited

Clow, Lee. "Lee Clow: His Masterpiece." Chiat/Day Advertising.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Clow, Lee. "Lee Clow: His Masterpiece." Chiat/Day Advertising. Retrieved Nov. 28, 2007, at http://www.ciadvertising.org/SA/fall_02/adv382/qwkag/assign2/master.htm.

Leopold, Todd. "Why 2006 isn't like '1984'." Cable News Network / CNN.com. Retrieved Nov. 28, 2007, at http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/0202/eye.ent.commercials.

Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty-Four. New York: Plume / Penguin Group, 2003.
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Human Beings Make Sense of Things in

Words: 3786 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29364579

Human Beings Make Sense of Things

In the early-1900s, Edmund Husserl sought to provide psychology with a truly scientific basis, not by copying the physical sciences but through the description of conscious experiences. This would be a truly humanistic psychology, grounded in human life and experience rather than materialistic and mechanistic theories like functionalism and behaviorism. Karl Jaspers called for a psychology that would describe phenomena such as "hallucinations, delusions, dreams, expressions, motor activity, and gestures" for the "person as a whole" (Churchill and Wertz, 2001, p. 247). This holistic or Gestalt psychology is dedicated to the search for the authentic self, and to heal the "hollow' men and women of our time who have lost touch with themselves" (Churchill and Wertz, p. 248). Intentionality is one of the key assumptions of phenomenological psychology in which "experience must be grasped holistically and a relationship in which the subject relates to…… [Read More]

REFERENCE LIST

Churchill, S. And Wertz, F. (2001) "An Introduction to Phenomenological Research in psychology: Historical, Conceptual, and Methodological Foundations," in K.J. Schneider, J .F .T. Bugental, & J.F. Pierson (Eds.) The Handbook of Humanistic Psychology: Leading Edges in Theory, Research, and Practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, pp. 247-62.

May, R. (1958). "The Origins and Significance of the Existential Movement in Psychology" and "Contributions of Existential Psychotherapy" in R. May, E. Angel and H. Ellenberger (Eds.), Existence. New York: Basic Books, pp. 3-36; 37-91.

Heidegger, M. (1971)." Building, Dwelling, Thinking," and "The Thing" in Poetry, Language, Thought. (A. Hofstadter, Trans.). New York: Harper and Row, pp. 145-61; 165-86.

Heidegger, M. (1955, 2003)."Memorial Address," in Stassen, M. (Ed). Martin Heidegger: Philosophical and Political Writings. Continuum International Publishing Group, pp. 87-96.
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Flatland A Romance in Many

Words: 1501 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98469950

Some of the mathematics of the book are shown to correlate to certain political aspects of the book, making the work perhaps more profound than Abbott ever intended (McCubbins & Schwartz, 1985). Certainly, the entire novel pushes for freedom, justice, and equality, both by satirizing certain social institutions and beliefs and by promoting the free and rigorous use of logical examination as a way of discovering, learning, and truly knowing things about the world we live in. he alternative that Flatland shows is a world full of people that do not really listen to or respect each other, and they often show as little regard for the realities of physical and theoretical truth.

hough this book is almost one hundred and thirty years old, it is still very useful today. It can be read as an introductory text to certain mathematical and philosophical concepts, a historical document showing the opinions…… [Read More]

The last portion of the novel, after the Sphere ridicules the Square and leaves him, is again highly political, and deals with the justice system in the basically totalitarian state that the Square and his family live in. In order to maintain complete control over the citizens, the government of Flatland outlaws the use of color or "chromatic expression," and also ends up outlawing the discussion or mention of dimensions beyond the second, which carries the death penalty for some.

The Square is not killed, but he is imprisoned for continuing to discuss his ideas about other dimensions (Abbott, 1884). This mirrors the persecution that many scientific figures suffered at the hands of various governments and religious institutions (particularly the Catholic Church) for spreading knowledge that they had verified through repeated observation or mental exercises. In fact, both the mathematics and the politics that appear in Flatland have continued to influence political thinking and evaluation. Some of the mathematics of the book are shown to correlate to certain political aspects of the book, making the work perhaps more profound than Abbott ever intended (McCubbins & Schwartz, 1985). Certainly, the entire novel pushes for freedom, justice, and equality, both by satirizing certain social institutions and beliefs and by promoting the free and rigorous use of logical examination as a way of discovering, learning, and truly knowing things about the world we live in. The alternative that Flatland shows is a world full of people that do not really listen to or respect each other, and they often show as little regard for the realities of physical and theoretical truth.

Though this book is almost one hundred and thirty years old, it is still very useful today. It can be read as an introductory text to certain mathematical and philosophical concepts, a historical document showing the opinions and mores of an incredibly restrictive society and the response that this restrictiveness inspired in certain individuals, and a manifesto for social justice. It is still meaningful in all of these ways, and the popularity that the book has enjoyed over the past century is a good indicator that it will remain popular for centuries to come.
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Company Should Decide How Much

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7828345

A second major advantage of online catalogs over their printed counterparts is speed of updating; with the web you can update a catalog literally overnight. There is also the advantage of being able to quickly change pricing with an online catalog, with a printed catalog this is simply not the case. The advantages of a printed catalog include greater depth to the products presented, more "shelf life" of the catalog itself, and more focus on how to make the catalog more magazine like, as Disney often drives towards with their catalog designs.

) What, if any, are the dysfunctional aspects of the "New Economy" promoted by e-Business? Identify any legal, ethical, regulatory and social issues that might negatively impact people, organizations and/or society.

What was once thought of as being the panacea for global growth of democracy has become a balkanized medium where quantification of trust and security is very…… [Read More]

3) What, if any, are the dysfunctional aspects of the "New Economy" promoted by e-Business? Identify any legal, ethical, regulatory and social issues that might negatively impact people, organizations and/or society.

What was once thought of as being the panacea for global growth of democracy has become a balkanized medium where quantification of trust and security is very critical. The pendulum of web users' rights at times seems to be swinging more in the direction of what George Orwell, author of Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949), defined as a totalitarian state that is dominated by excessive monitoring and control of its citizens. Internet monitoring of citizens and most specifically, employees, is one of the most dysfunctional aspects of the Internet today. In this issue are ethical, legal, regulatory and social issues that will influence the future of the Internet and its use for decades to come.

Many researchers are tackling the issues of workplace and government monitoring head-on, and finding some fascinating results. Foremost of these researchers is the Pew Internet & American Life Project, headquartered in Washington, D.C. Their insights into Internet social trends specifically around privacy and its recent invasions by government,
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Globalization and the Problems Associated

Words: 359 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 445310

" This predictability is not and could never be a part of democracy; democracies must change with the will of the people, and so might have periods of instability. In fact, Berber notes, "Multinational corporations sometimes seem to prefer doing business with local oligarchs, inasmuch as they can take confidence from dealing with the boss on all crucial matters." Consistency and predictability are almost by definition easier to find in harsh dictatorships or oligarchies than democracies. The real danger I see in this is the possibility of a totalitarian state that looks like a democracy, such as the imagined by Aldous Huxley in Brave New World and which is every similar to the McWorld Barber sees us approaching. It might, in fact, already be happening, as warrant-less wiretapping becomes executive practice, and perhaps even more insidiously through the attempts of companies like Google to maintain huge databases of information about…… [Read More]

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England - China for Managers Conducting Cross-Border

Words: 3146 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20399198

England - China

For managers conducting cross-border activity between England and China, there are a number of factors that should be considered. The differences between English and Chinese business culture are striking, and it is important to understand the nature of those differences and how they can affect business relations between the two countries. There are also significant differences in the economies of each country and again it is valuable for managers to understand these differences and how they may affect the business dealings between English companies and Chinese ones.

This report will analyze the differences between England and China from a number of perspectives. The first component of the report will focus on the macro-level environmental differences between the two, using the PESTLE framework as the basis of the analysis. The second component of the report will focus on the business culture of the two nations, including Geert Hofstede's…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

BusinessMate.org. (2009). What are Fons Trompenaars' cultural dimensions? Business Mate. Retrieved April 15, 2011 from  http://www.businessmate.org/Article.php?ArtikelId=5 

Bradsher, K. (2010). China leading global race to make clean energy. New York Times. Retrieved April 15, 2010 from  http://www.nytimes.com /2010/01/31/business/energy-environment/31renew.html

CIA World Factbook. (2011). China. Central Intelligence Agency. Retrieved April 15, 2011 from  https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/ch.html 

CIA World Factbook. (2011). United Kingdom. Central Intelligence Agency. Retrieved April 15, 2011 from  https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/uk.html
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Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Words: 2212 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65853290

Once again, research reveals a healthcare setting where professionals are supposed to be trained to help those with mental deficiencies. But something is wrong here. This is not comparable with Cuckoo's Nest, but it reflects bad management, which leads - at the very least - to poor service at the patient level, and at worst, brutal abuses of the kind that were seen in Cuckoo's Nest.

Doctors, nurses and medical students in nursing and doctor training are pivotal actors in the fight to detect, prevent, and somehow manage substance abuse among patients; that is a given when it comes to mental health services across the board. But in London a recent study reveals that "...many doctors and nurses can have a negative attitude towards the management of drug and alcohol problems" of patients and of their own community of professionals (O'Gara, et al., 2005, p. 328). Doctors themselves "are at…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Associated Press. (2008). "Chinese paper: Gov't critics sent to mental wards."

International Herald Tribune. Retrieved December 7, 2008, at http://www.iht.com.

Gold, Stanley. "One flew over the cuckoo's nest." Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 37.1 (2003): 115-118.

O'Gara, Colin, Keaney, Francis, Best, David, Harris, Jennifer, Boys, Annabel, Leonard,
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Ashis Nandy

Words: 681 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61342238

threat posed to it by the estern Secular or Christian orld View

Is fundamentalism an expression of cultural regression? Or is it an act of creative nationalism? Truly, religious and nationalist fundamental can manifest itself in both guises. On one hand, during the dissolution of the former Soviet Union, the fundamentalist expression of religion became a creative response of liberation in the eyes of the many whom had been oppressed by the Soviet, communist, and fundamentally anti-religious regime. On the other hand, fundamentalism can also be used to express fears of estern economic and cultural domination, rather than to express an alternative political voice.

For instance, for a woman to wear the veil in a once-Muslim Soviet republic was an act of transgression against a state, a state that would punish her for behaving according to her religious beliefs with heavy penalties. To learn the language of the Koran rather…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Huntingon, Samuel. "The Clash of Civilization." 1993.  http://www.alamut.com/subj/economics/misc/clash.html 

Kurtz, Lester. Gods in the Global Village. U of Chicago Press, 1995.

Nandi, Ashis. The Savage Freud and Other Essays on Possible and Retrievable Selves. Delhi; London: Oxford UP, 1995. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 1995.
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Exploring Desire and Morality in Nietzsche's Twilight of the Idols

Words: 1957 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97907121

Nietzsche's Twilight Of The Idols

Nietzsche mischaracterizes the Christian tradition when he states that "the Church fights passion by cutting it out." The Catholic Church has never dogmatically opposed passion, but it has opposed sin. Nietzsche is writing out of the naturalist, Romantic tradition. He is a believer in self-determination, of the will to power. He views natural instincts and natural desires as justified and in no need of Redemption. His conflict with the Church is that the Church views man as having a fallen human nature in need of redemption, which is offered through the Blood of Jesus Christ. Nietzsche rejects this view: he sees man in line with what Rousseau taught -- that what is natural is good. The Church, for example, preaches against lust because this is disordered passion. Ordered passion, according to the Church, would be sexual love between husband and wife. If one or the…… [Read More]

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Power and Leadership as Exemplified

Words: 3319 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59992679

The fact that Lysistrata's "came to power" by virtue of her own leadership abilities which were recognized and celebrated by their peers rather than having them thrust upon her from above is pointed out by Ober (1989), who reports, "The Athenians' demonstrated concern with native intelligence, their distrust of elite education, and their respect for the authority of the elders are parodied by Aristophanes, who mimics rhetorical topoi in the speech of Lysistrata, the female demagogue:

Listen to my words

I am a woman, but I'm smart enough

Indeed, my mind's not bad at all.

Having listened to my father's discourses

And those of the older men, I'm not ill educated. (Lysistrata 1123-27 quoted in Ober at 182)

Indeed, Lysistrata's leadership qualities were clearly demonstrated in her ability to organize the women of Athens to show the warring men of the city just who in fact had "the power" suggests…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abusch, T. (2001). "The development and meaning of the epic of Gilgamesh: An interpretive essay." The Journal of the American Oriental Society, 121(4): 614.

Black's Law Dictionary. St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Co., 1990.

Brodie, Thomas L. Genesis as Dialogue: A Literary, Historical, & Theological Commentary. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.

DeLashmutt, Gary. (2007). "Genesis 1:1-2:4 -- the Beginning of Our World." Xenos Christian Fellowship. [Online]. Available: http://www.xenos.org/teachings/ot/genesis/.
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Experts Believe That the Battle

Words: 2392 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70592033

Thucydides was an Athenian, but had very little reason for offering a distorted view of the war that was eventually won by Sparta.

Jackson states, "Thucydides was an active participant in Athens for a time, he had a network of contacts, while banished to Thrace he observed the war there first hand, and as an Athenian exile he traveled along the Peloponnese" (Jackson, p.175). Thucydides wrote of a Sparta that used an eight deep fighting stance against the Athenians who could not, or did not, adapt to a style that would lead to victory when battling against that type of tactic.

Other army tactics began to be used after the Peloponnesian ar, many of which were introduced by the Spartans in order to maintain their military might. One such tactic would play a key role in the battle of Leuctra.

Of particular relevance to Leuctra, however, was the battle of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cawkwell, G.L. (1983) the Decline of Sparta, Classical Quarterly, Vol. 33, Issue ii, pp. 385-400

Hind, a. (2006) Weaponry: It took a humiliating major defeat to convince the Spartans to adopt the bow and arrow, Military History, Vol. 23, Issue 1, pp. 12-14

Jackson, M.W., (2007) Cracking the Thucydides code, Antioch Review, Vol. 65, Number 1, pp. 173-184

Walker, M., (2001) Bush's Choice: Athens or Sparta, World Policy, Vol. 18, Number 2, pp. 1-9
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Berlin's Two Concepts of Liberty

Words: 1362 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66901646

"

With this statement Berlin aims to make the point that those who have freedom have achieved it by exploiting others, and, at the same time, by placing those individuals within certain categories of social and economic degrees of freedom, to which they themselves are not subject.

Despite his high rhetoric which goes on for over 30 pages, Berlin does conclude that he is of the opinion that no matter whether liberty is negative or positive, it is, nonetheless, important, should be available to all, and simply because values are compromised does not mean that they are not eternal or secure. The reader, thus assumes by the end of the commentary that Berlin is indeed of the opinion that liberty is of the utmost importance to a functioning society.

Critique

There are various critiques upon Berlin's work. The one to be examined here will be that of oberto Toscano who…… [Read More]

References Consulted:

Isaiah Berlin Virtual Library - berlin.wolf.ox.ac.uk

The New York Review of Books -  http://www.nybooks.com/contributors/isaiah-berlin/ 

Philosopher and political thinker Sir Isaiah Berlin -  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/24540.stm 

Isaiah Berlin on pluralism -  http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~vl/notes/berlin.html
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Policy Formulation in a World

Words: 5010 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31469771

This balkanization is partially driven by the lack of integration between various segments of itself, and this is primarily a technological limitation. Yet the far broader and more difficult challenge in this regard is the segregating of knowledge not just for profit, but for lasting competitive advantage between nations. On the one hand there is the need for competitive differentiation in company's offerings, yet in others including the sharing of primary research in medicine and biomedical fields and stem cell research there is the ethical responsibility to share these insights gained to foster solutions to the world's most pressing medical problems. M. Van Alstyne and E. Brynjolfsson, researchers on the growth patterns and threat of Internet balkanization from MIT, remark in their conference paper from a 1996 conference that the balkanization of science is a significant threat. The two MIT researchers cite the studies they have completed showing how despite…… [Read More]

References

ESRI (2006). Environmental Systems Research Institute. Retrieved from the Internet on July 14, 2006. (www.esri.com)

Gates Technology Foundation (2005). Interviews and on-site visits with GIS planners and network technicians while donating servers, laptops, and desktop computers for a major PC manufacturer. Onsite interviews in Seattle, Washington. April, 2005.

HHS (2006). Federal Register Data on Poverty Line Statistics by size of household. January 24, 2006. See table 1 of this document.

Pew Center for Internet Research (2006). Key statistics downloaded from the Internet on February 14, 2006. http://people-press.org/
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Korean History Culture and Society

Words: 3140 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23080999

academic and popular discourse on East Asia, Korea has a long, strong, and unique history. The culture of Korea has evolved over the last several millennia to become one of the world's most distinctive, homogenous, and intact. Being surrounded by large and ambitious neighbors has caused Korea to have a troubled history, evident in the most recent generations with the division between North and South. The division between North and South Korea is the first time the peninsula has been divided since its initial unification in the mid-7th century CE. Until the Korean War, the people of Korea have been bound together by common language, customs, and political culture. No significant minority culture or linguistic group has made Korea its home, and although Korea has been invaded and encroached upon by others, it has also never been an expansionist or imperialistic culture either.

The Korean peninsula has been inhabited since…… [Read More]

References

Armstrong, C.K. (2015). Korean history and political geography.

Eckert, C.J., Lee, K., et al. (1991). Korea Old and New. Korea Institute, Harvard University Press.

"Hidden Korea," (n.d.). PBS. Retrieved online:  http://www.pbs.org/hiddenkorea/history.htm 

Nelson, M.N. (1993). The Archaeology of Korea. Cambridge University Press.
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Cultural Cues of Eastern and Western Schools in Today's World

Words: 1756 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14860448

Education in the East and West

The difference between education in the East and the West is primarily a difference in culture. Today, cultural differences are less pronounced than they were a century ago. Globalized society has seen cultures meld and melt into one another, so that in many senses the East resembles the West in more ways than one (Igarashi). However, deeply rooted cultural cues still represent a fundamental reason for existing educational differences between the East and the West. This paper will describe these differences and show why they exist.

Medieval Guilds were important to production standards in the time of the Renaissance. For example, "in places where guilds were strong, they exercised strict oversight over training" (Hansen). In fact, the education and apprenticeship of the Renaissance was a highly skilled exercise that began at the youngest age and often required more than a decade of training.

Western…… [Read More]

Li, Jin. Cultural Foundations of Learning: East and West. UK: Cambridge, 2012.

Print.

Li's book is very helpful in understanding the differences between Eastern and Western education: it highlights cultural influences in the West, from the Greeks, and in the East, from Confucius and Buddha, etc. It looks at how religion and science have both played a part in where East and West are educationally speaking.
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East vs West Germany the

Words: 730 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94316589

West Germany sustained what many call an "economic miracle" rebuilding after the war. Their social market economy allowed for individuals to be entrepeneurial and yet be socially responsible to the state. With so much rebuilding necessary, but an entire Western Europe and the United tates ripe for importing and exporting, the economic future of the West was in high gear (Erhard, 2000). In contrast, East Germany as a client state to the oviet Union, was part of the large buffer zone Moscow set up between themselves and the West. Because so much of the GDP either went back to Moscow or to run the tasi, economic growth was typically stagnant, and there was little motivation for increased production or free spirit workers (Leonhard, 2000).

This also bled over politically; West Germany had free elections, East Germany's a ruse and the ruling elite chosen by Moscow. ocially, West German standards of…… [Read More]

Sources of Twentieth Century Europe (pp. 338-41). New York: Macmillan.

Wise, M. (1998). Capital Dilemma: Germany's Search for a New Architecture of Democracy. Princeton: Princeton Architectural Press.
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Iraq Exit No Exit America's

Words: 2522 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29384696

S. from the preparation and supervision of the coming elections . . . during this period, the training of Iraqi forces might, of necessity, remain a coalition task, but it ought to be monitored and supervised by the U.N." (Hoffmann & Bozo, 113)

It is clear though that at this juncture, the world community is not yet prepared to take control of the operation. The presence of U.S. forces is a reality prompted by the aggressive lead in to war and the obligations thereby created. And quite certainly, no nation or organization has stepped up to take the lion's share of responsibility which the U.S. has taken for contending with Hussein and his legacy. Thus, Obama's plan does not fully withdraw troops, instead maintaining a significant American presence that suggests the war is not truly yet ended. Accordingly, his 'exit' plan "would leave in Iraq a residual force of as…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Ewens, M. (2006). Casualties in Iraq. AntiWar. Online at  http://antiwar.com/casualties/#count .

Hoffmann, S. & Bozo, F. (2006). Gulliver Unbound: America's Imperial Temptation and the War in Iraq. Rowman & Littlefield.

The Nation. (2009). Obama's Iraq Exit. Thenation.com.

Perle, R. (2002). Statement Before the House Armed Services Committee. American Enterprise Institute.
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Patriotic Act Arguments for and Against the

Words: 3462 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70325965

Patriotic Act

Arguments for and against the Patriot Act

The unusual events surrounding the creation and passing of the Patriot Act make it a suspect bill in many eyes. However, major media reports like this one: "Fifty-nine percent in an ABC News/ashington Post poll favor continuing the additional investigative authority in terrorism investigations that was granted to the FBI starting in 2001. President Bush urged such an extension of the Patriot Act today" (Langer) insist that there are others who support it and promote it as a protection against the kind of terrorism that was seen on 9/11. For supporters the idea of sacrificing civil liberties for security measures such as the TSA is, while unfortunate, a necessary evil. Those who oppose it, like alternative media journalist Ryan Dawson and Sen. Ron Paul, decry it as government intrusion. This paper will give arguments for and against the Patriot Act and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brand, Rachel. "Reauthorization of the U.S.A. Patriot Act." 20 Jan 2010. The Federalist

Society. Web. 24 Sep 2011. <  http://www.fed-soc.org/publications/detail/reauthorization-of-the-usa-patriot-act >

Celente, Gerald. "Gerald Celente Predicts Ron Paul Can Win in 2012." 3 May 2010.

YouTube. 24 Sep 2011.
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Social Contract Would Observe the Law as

Words: 1987 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65503436

social contract would observe the law as well as the institution to enforce that law. y the enforcement of that law, those covered could expect justice to be done to them and everybody else. In times of trouble, such as when burglars or other criminals attack, one could call the police for help. Those covered by the contract need neither to fear such unjust attacks nor to take the law into their own hands. The weak need not fear the strong.

The deal for those covered by the social contract is that they join individual forces and resources with others who also want peace and equality, so that their own goods may not be taken from them unjustly, either. And because there are more people who want their goods and other rights protected than those who want a free-for-all all the time, there would be more people who would join…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Locke, John. (2003). Two Treatises of Government. Lonang Library: Lonang Institute. http://www.lonang.com/exlibris/locke

Rawls, John. (1999). A Theory of Justice. Revised. Cambridge: Bellknap Press

Taylor, Bobby. (1987). Rosseau's "Social Contract:" a Critical Response. The Freeman: The Foundation for Economic Education, volume 37, number 1

Wikipedia. (2001). Jean Jacques Rosseau. The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. http://www.utm.edu/rsearch/iep/r/rousseau.htm
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Homeland Security

Words: 2038 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34045118

Pat Proctor of Kansas State University was published in the peer-Reviewed Journal of Strategic Security in 2012.

The point of this article is not so much posing a question but presenting a proposal. The proposal is directed at the United States, suggesting in strong terms how the United States (and presumably its allies) could and should engage in "…mass politics" which Proctor calls "war without violence" (Proctor, 2012, 47). The theme of the article is the remarkable transformation that has taken place in Arab countries (called the "Arab Spring") such as Egypt, Tunisia, Syria, Libya and elsewhere in the Middle East.

The hypothesis / thesis and central argument is very clearly stated in this piece. The thesis is that the United States needs a new strategy for persuading the Muslim world "…to reject the salafist jihadism idea" without further exacerbating the tensions that already exist between the est and the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cook, David. 2009. Islamism and Jihadism: The Transformation of Classical Notions into an Ideology of Terrorism. Totalitarian Movements and Political Religions, 10.2, 177-187.

Moghadam, Assaf. 2008. Defining and confronting the Salafi Jihad. Middle East Strategy at Harvard. Retrieved August 22, 2012, from https://blogs.law.harvard.edu.

Proctor, Pat. 2012. War Without Violence: Leveraging the Arab Spring to Win the War on Terrorism. Journal of Strategic Security, 5.2, 47-64.
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Social Control as Displayed in the Handmaid's Tale By Margaret Atwood

Words: 1174 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30543666

Margaret Atwood set out to depict a society in the future, one that in her eyes had characteristics that needed to be solved from the present. This novel is dystopian in nature which presents a dysfunctional society in the future as seen in the eyes of the author. It is however instrumental to note that most of the works of fiction that are set in the future, are actually meant to help correct the current vices or giving a precautionary note to the society. Here, the republic of Gilead, fictitiously described represents the regions where women suffer under male dominance like Africa, Iran, India, Guatemala and Germany (Danita Dodson). This novel is set in Gilead which is an imaginary society of the future with a woman called Offred being the protagonist in the novel. It narrates a dystopia in which the freedom of women is restricted by men dominated society…… [Read More]

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Globalization and Its Effects on

Words: 579 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62410752



There are also the occurrences where rapid expansion has also led to an exceptionally high level of conflict and turmoil as well. The culture clash in India between American and Indian outsourcing companies is a case in point. And whole the Indian government welcomes the investments of western nations, the impact on their culture and the strict controls Indian ministries of commerce have put into place are designed to guard against foreign nations taking too much control of the country's economy. The detrimental effects of these factors is a rapidly changing social fabric and set of value sin the fastest growing Indian cities, where many move to in the hope of getting a lucrative position with a western company. Too often this leads to a loss of the local culture and also a continual struggle for sovereignty of these high-growth regions of the country. Bangalore and Mumbai city ministries are…… [Read More]

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U S Ignorance of Stalin's Crimes

Words: 6893 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3919657

In many ways, Russia is still recovering from it, trying to deal with the fact that only a few decades ago, it inflicted on itself one of the worst holocausts in human memory" (Hochschild, 1993). Therefore, the purges were used on the one hand to discourage the people and the elites in particular from establishing a dissident opposition or a negative pole of power that could have countered the Soviet regime.

Also, another possible justification of the way in which the Soviet regime acted in that period was the complete elimination of the possible negative influences from the old regimes or more precisely of the opposing forces in Russia. More precisely, "the decade of the 1930s saw the renewal of the Soviet leading stratum. During the period the.regime progressively unburdened itself of its legacy of class prejudice and rose to its full totalitarian posture" (Unger, 1969, 2). The regime of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beichman, Arnold. "Pulitzer-Winning Lies." The Daily Standard. 2003. http://www.theweeklystandard.com/Content/Public/Articles/000/000/002/791vwuaz.asp

Bernard, Henri. Le communisme et l'aveuglement occidental (Soumagne, Belgium: editions Andre Grisard, 1982)

Boris Bajanov, Avec Staline dans le Kremlin. Paris: Les editions de France, 1930, pp. 2 -- 3.

Connor, Walter D. "The Manufacture of Deviance: The Case of the Soviet Purge, 1936-1938." American Sociological Review, Vol. 37, No. 4, 1972, pp. 403-413.
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China Waiting by Ha Jun

Words: 2021 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9465180

The nature and intent of their friendship was questioned, and they a promise was extracted from them both that they would have no abnormal relationship until Lin was divorced and they were married. It was implied and understood clearly that "abnormal" meant "sexual" and that if they broke this promise, their careers and futures would be in jeopardy. This incident shows the way that Chinese society viewed sex and marriage. Sexual intercourse was a very private thing that a woman reserved for her husband and a man and woman reserved only for marriage. Anyone who was caught to violate this practice was judged to be immoral and would be harshly criticized and even ostracized by the community.

The way that Manna's career in the army is described is redolent of the discrimination that women faced. The reasons for this discrimination changed somewhat during the twenty-year span of the novel, but…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Jin, Ha. Waiting. (1999) United States: Wheeler Publishing, Inc.
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Market Society and the Public Sphere

Words: 1350 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55410408

Market Society and the Public Sphere

My journal text comes to illustrate the utmost significance of globalization viewed as the force molding and shaping the current world. It describes the multidimensional aspect of globalization that influences and encompasses all facets of life through an integrated network. Currently, globalization is the buzzword in media articles, daily talks of media people and talks of politicians. There is no aspect of life that is not influenced or affected by globalization (Tober, 2006, 33). However, many people find it difficult to reflect on this phenomenon. This is because the term is applied in so many aspects leading to its ambiguity in defining it according to my text.

Numerous volumes of work have written about globalization in numerous fields such as political, science, business, economics, sociology and many more. This has made the term globalization lack a precise cogent theory and definition. This is seen…… [Read More]

References

Barnet, R. & Cavanagh, J. (2004). Global dreams: imperial corporations and the new world order. New York: Simon & Schuster

Hass, R. (2003). The corporation without boundaries. The new paradigm in business: emerging strategies for leadership and organizational change. New York: Tarcher/Perigee.

Kapstein, B. (2004). Governing the global economy: international finance and the state.

Cambridge. MA: Harvard University Press
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U S Foreign Affairs the Causes

Words: 1447 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43963551

Perhaps that more timely international cooperation could do better to save innocent people.

Stephanie Power covers a period from 1915 to 2001 with the increasing capacity of U.S. response to genocide. While in 1915, nothing could be done about the urkish genocide in Armenia, the U.S. role increased constantly to the ones played at the end of the 20th century in Yugoslavia and with the role in Saddam's Iraq. Perhaps such examples can help develop preemptive action towards genocide that can be acted upon in the future.

4. Between 1939 and 1941, Germany had started the war in Europe with its attack on Poland, on September 1, 1939, preceded by a series of aggressive actions such as the remilitarization of the Rhineland and the annexation of Austria and Czechoslovakia. With Great Britain and France declaring war on Germany, armed conflict proceeded in Europe with the rapid German victories over Poland,…… [Read More]

The Treaty of Versailles saw the creation of the League of Nations as the organization that would attempt to guarantee world peace. Wilson, however, could not convince the U.S. Senate to join the League of Nation, mainly because the Senate saw this as a limitation of U.S. right to declare war on other countries. Lack of support and U.S. non-adherence to the organization are possibly some of the low points of Wilson's foreign policy.

On the other hand, Wilson was also active in his attempts to establish solid democracies in Latin America and towards stabilizing these countries. U.S. interventions in Mexico, Nicaragua, Haiti or Panama marked the period of WWI as well.

Cushing, Lincoln. 1997. 1898-1998 Centennial of the Spanish - American War. On the Internet at http://www.zpub.com/cpp/saw.html.Last retrieved on August 16, 2007
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African Studies Racial Policy The

Words: 2852 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34202767

Of course, a separation of the races meant really the preservation of white superiority at the expense of those formerly enslaved. The law mandated distinct facilities for hites and Blacks. Everything from schools, to transportation, movie theaters, hotels, and even public restrooms were carefully segregated. Few Black only facilities approached white ones in quality or amount of money expended on their upkeep. Black public schools were notoriously inferior as were hospitals and other essential services. As arguments about the disparities became more apparent toward the mid-Twentieth Century, the South sought to defend its segregationist policies by - in the case of medical schools - expanding and consolidating its physician training facilities so as to avoid providing more facilities for Blacks. A plan was actually floated, not to increase Black enrollment at the South's twenty-six medical colleges, but rather to consolidate all training of Black medical personnel at a single facility.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=7745289

Boskin, Joseph. Into Slavery: Racial Decisions in the Virginia Colony. Philadelphia J.B. Lippincott, 1976.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=113156830

Louw, Eric P. The Rise, Fall, and Legacy of Apartheid. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2004.
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Cold War and Beyond World

Words: 1260 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71355125

Telecommunications made it easier to transfer ideas and information instantly and without the delays that hindered previous efforts at military and strategic intervention. Similarly, the barriers to international trade had largely been lifted. The seeds of the World Trade Organization had already been laid by the end of the Second World War. Finally, the United Nations and other trans-national governing bodies would become legitimized sources of power. Nations who could climb on board stood a chance and those who could not join in faced a perilous century of poverty and political disenfranchisement. America directly contributed to the imbalance of power that would ensue throughout the 20th century.

Being a bully seemed to come easy to the Americans. Armed with what had become the largest and most well-endowed military in the world, the United States forged a path toward hegemony almost effortlessly. As if it were trying to be the world's…… [Read More]

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Arguments for Limiting Free Speech

Words: 623 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21176640

limiting free speech ID: 53711

The arguments most often used for limiting freedom of speech include national security, protecting the public from disrupting influences at home, and protecting the public against such things as pornography.

Of the three most often given reasons for limiting freedom of speech, national security may well be the most used. President after president, regardless of party has used national security as a reason to not answer questions that might be embarrassing personally or would show their administration as behaving in ways that would upset the populace. Although there are many examples of government apply the "national security" label to various situations, perhaps some of the stories that are associated with the Iran-Contra issue best display what government uses limitations on free speech for. In horrific tangle of lies double and triple dealing that resulted in the deaths of many Nicaraguans, the egan administration sought to…… [Read More]

References

Curtis, M.K. (1995). Critics of "Free Speech" and the Uses of the Past. Constitutional Commentary, 12(1), 29-65. Retrieved August 5, 2005, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.

Dan, W. (1989). On Freedom of Speech of the Opposition. World Affairs, 152(3), 143-145.

Reflections and Farewell. (2002). Social Work, 47(1), 5+. Retrieved August 5, 2005, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.
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Internet the Globalization of the

Words: 1813 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25210521

S. stays one step ahead of the hackers. This is not easy, but the DoD could not have possibly thought it would be.

Proper defenses, enhanced offensive capabilities and strategies to reduce risk by taking some sensitive data offline will all work to deliver better results in e-spionage of the United States. The Internet has become globalized, and nothing can take that back. That there are threats as the result of globalization is nothing new -- it is simply another arena for age-old international political traditions. How we manage the threats and take advantage of the opportunities is the most important aspect to this problem -- and this means proper isolating and neutralizing of viral threats. By addressing the issue of e-spionage effectively, the Internet can still be viewed as a net benefit for the United States.

orks Cited:

Callaham, J. (2012). New Internet Explorer vulnerability used to deliver "Poison…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Callaham, J. (2012). New Internet Explorer vulnerability used to deliver "Poison Ivy" trojan. Neowin.net. Retrieved November 30, 2012 from  http://www.neowin.net/news/new-internet-explorer-vulnerability-used-to-deliver-poison-ivy-trojan 

Grow, B., Epstein, K. & Tschang, C. (2008). The new e-espionage threat. Business Week. Retrieved November 30, 2012 from http://www.businessweek.com/stories/2008-04-09/the-new-e-spionage-threat

Richmond, S. (2012). German government warns users off Internet Explorer. The Telegraph. Retrieved November 30, 2012 from  http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/microsoft/9552462/German-government-warns-users-off-Internet-Explorer.html 

Chaudhury, D. (2009). China's e-spionage. India Today. Retrieved November 30, 2012 from  http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/China%C3%A2%E2%82%AC%E2%84%A2s+e-espionage/1/34510.html