Trauma Essays (Examples)

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Problem Identification

Words: 1377 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1988235

Trauma centers, whether they are stand-alone facilities or a part of a hospital or other healthcare facility, play key roles in ensuring that people get proper healthcare when there is a man-made or natural disaster (Premier, 2012. Because trauma centers are so vital, they have to become well-established in the community (Trunkey & Potter, 2006). That can allow them to be prepared for almost anything, and they can work with the community once a disaster has occurred. This reduces the number of casualties from a disaster as much as possible, but no trauma center will be perfect or will be prepared to handle any eventuality. There is always room for improvement. Studies have shown that many of the trauma centers throughout the country are really not adequately prepared for a major disaster (Premier, 2012). That lack of preparedness will cost lives, but the funding is not available for new and…… [Read More]

References

Hillier, F.S., & Lieberman, G.J. (2005). Introduction to operations research. NY: McGraw-Hill: Boston MA; 8th. (International) Edition

Pidd, M. (2003). Tools for thinking: Modeling in management science. NY: J. Wiley & Sons Ltd., 2nd. Edition

Premier (2012). Emergency preparedness for healthcare facilities. Premier: Transforming Healthcare Together. Retrieved July 12, 2012, from https://www.premierinc.com/safety/topics/disaster_readiness/#top

Trunkey, D.D., & Potter, C.J. (2006). U.S. trauma center preparedness for a terrorist attack in the community. National Foundation for Trauma care, 1-43
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PTSD Treatment Modalities Evidence-Based Recommendations

Words: 4461 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17783376

Trauma-elated Disorders and ecommended Treatment

Clinical Presentation of Trauma-elated Disorders and ecommended Treatments

On January 13, 2015, Andrew Brannan, a 66-year-old Vietnam veteran was executed in Georgia for killing police officer Kyle Dinkheller in 1998 (Hoffman, 2015). At the time, Brannan had been living in a bunker on his mother's property without water or electricity and had stopped taking his medications. According to the Veterans Administration (VA), he was 100% disabled due to combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). He also suffered from bipolar disorder, had lost two brothers to a military plane crash and suicide, and lost a father to cancer. Veterans groups, death penalty critics, and mental health advocates, all petitioned the Georgia Supreme Court for a stay of execution unsuccessfully. The veterans groups were particularly interested in preventing the death of yet another veteran who developed severe psychiatric problems while serving his or her country.

Trauma in general…… [Read More]

References

APA (American Psychiatric Association). (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association.

Cook, J.M., Dinnen, S., Simiola, V., Bernardy, N., Rosenheck, R., & Hoff, R. (2014). Residential treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder in the Department of Veterans Affairs: A national perspective on perceived effective ingredients. Traumatology, 20(1), 43-9.

Dursa, E.K., Reinhard, M.J., Barth, S.K., & Schneiderman, A.I. (2014). Prevalence of a positive screen for PTSD among OEF/OIF and OEF/OIF-era veterans in a large population-based cohort. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 27, 542-549.

Ehring, T., Welboren, R., Morina, N., Wicherts, J.M., Freitag, J., & Emmelkamp, P.M. (2014). Meta-analysis of psychological treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder in adult survivors of childhood abuse. Clinical Psychology Review, 34(8), 645-57.
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Repress Yourself

Words: 892 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24401560

psychological trauma, and how does she relate it to repression? What evidence does she supply in support of her claim? Do you agree with her stance on this basic issue?

Slater, in her usual creative style, believes the current methods of dealing with psychological trauma to be ineffective in regards to the identifying a root cause. In fact, Slater believes the act of talking about a traumatic occurrence in an individual's life actually exacerbates the problem. Recollecting past events through constant conversation, Slater believes, does nothing to address the root cause of the problem. Further, by talking incessantly about this traumatic experience, patients may actually become more ill than they otherwise were. This is particularly important when patient are asks to revisit controversial areas in their lives in order to rid themselves of the traumatic event altogether. Slater is very quick to point out that conversation actually, emblazon fear within…… [Read More]

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Tim O'Brien the Truth of

Words: 936 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94935722



Furthermore, in environments that are highly conducive to trauma, such as war or a paramilitary educational institution that is predominantly filled with Caucasian males who are permitted to attack one another during a certain period in their careers, conventional morals can also become distorted .The differences of right and wrong that apply to the outside world, the world that was inhabited by people before they left it to take place in an environment highly dissimilar to the one that reality largely takes place in no longer apply. The following quotation from Mitchell in which he is describing this aspect of Vietnam demonstrates this fact. "The old rules riles are no longer binding, the old truths no longer true. Right spills over into wrong" (O'Brien, 276). Although O'Brien is making this statement about war, it applies into other realms conducive to trauma such as the Citadel, a traditionally all-male institution in…… [Read More]

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East Asian Culture the Health

Words: 4675 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45062768

(ACS Publication June 2006 A Growing Crisis In Patient Access to Emergency Surgical Care at (http://www.facs.org/ahp/emergcarecrisis.pdf)

Statement of Problem

There is a growing problem in the ability of individuals and communities to receive care, according to the American College of Surgeons, as the changing face of emergency care and medical care in general is putting patients at risk. The ACS and the AMA have both recently conducted professional surveys that indicate that the source of the problem is a lack of specialized surgical providers to cover existing trauma centers and a lack of those same staff members to help to establish new centers of care in areas, with the lowest numbers of provider services. (ACS Publication June 2006 A Growing Crisis In Patient Access to Emergency Surgical Care at (http://www.facs.org/ahp/emergcarecrisis.pdf)

The ACS Publication A Growing Crisis In Patient Access to Emergency Surgical Care stresses that the existing system is not…… [Read More]

Resources for Health 2006, 4:12 at http://www.human-resources-health.com/content/4/1/12

Fishman P.E. MD, Shofer, F.S. PhD, Robey J.L RN, BSN, Zogby, K.E. RN, BSN, Reilly, P.M. MD, Branas, C.C. MS, PhD, Pines, J.M. MD MBA, Hollander, J.E. MD. (October 2006), "The Impact of Trauma Activations on the Care of Emergency Department Patients With Potential Acute Coronary Syndromes" Annals of Emergency Medicine, 48: 4, pp. 347-353

Hofman, Primack, Keusch, & Hrynknow (Jan. 2005), "Addressing the growing burden of trauma and injury in low- and middle-income countries" American Journal of Public Health 95: 1 at http://hestia.unm.edu.libproxy.unm.edu/search/i0090%2D0036/i00900036/1,1,1,B/l856~b1044007&FF=i00900036&1,1,1,0/startreferer//search/i0090%2D0036/i00900036/1,1,1,B/frameset&FF=i00900036&1,1,/endreferer/

Hospital Survey Sheds New Light on Diversions" (July 2004) Emergency Medical Services, at http://hestia.unm.edu/search/temergency+Medical+/temergency+medical/1,25,31,B/l856~b1044565&FF=temergency+medical+services&1,2,1,0

Mock, C.M. & Jurkovich, G.J. (1999) "Trauma System development in the United States," Trauma Quarterly 14:3 pp. 197-209.
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Lucky by Alice Sebold Analysis

Words: 3376 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89361661

During her reorganization phase, her personality and the emotional support from other social units played a vital role. As a person, she was a survivor. She appeared to posses a character which made her endure the pain yet live through the moment. It was her resilience that made her go to public authorities even after she lost her case the first time. Alice always wanted to be somebody whose presence could be felt. This is the reason why she wanted to be Ethel Merman (2009, p.87). She was an actress and a singer whom according to her mother, had no talent but she managed draw the attention of audience solely on herself. Her personality made an exceptional role in letting her cope up with the trauma and also with getting her culprit punished in the later phase.

Another important factor which played a key role in her retaliation was her…… [Read More]

References

Boeschen, L.E., Sales, B.D.,&Koss, M.P. (1998). Rape trauma experts in the courtroom. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 4, pp. 414-432.

Burgess, a.W. & Holmstrom, L.L. (1974), Rape trauma syndrome. American Journal of Psychiatry, 131, pp.981-986.

Sebold, a. (2009), Lucky, Pan Macmillion Inc.

Raitt, F.E. & Zeedyk, S.Z. (1997), Rape trauma syndrome: Its corroborative and educational roles. Journal of Law and Society, 24(4), pp.552-568.
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Tori J Is a 12-Year-Old Girl Who

Words: 3375 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77838926

Tori J. is a 12-year-old girl who was removed from her family at the age of 8, when she was placed with a foster family. Although her foster mother discussed some episodes of violence and defiance in the home, Tori was not initially violent or defiant in school. However, she frequently failed to complete her assignments, instead spending hours simply looking into space. She also spoke frequently to social workers and school counselors about problems in her foster home including allegations that she was not being fed sufficiently, that they would not purchase school supplies for her, and that there was emotional and physical abuse in their current home. These allegations were reported and determined to be unsubstantiated, but allegations of emotional and physical abuse and neglect in her family home were substantiated. The children were removed because of physical abuse and neglect. Interviews with Tori J.'s older brother reported…… [Read More]

References

AllPsych. (2011). Antisocial personality disorder. Retrieved July 2, 2013 from:

http://allpsych.com/disorders/personality/antisocial.html

AllPsych. (2013). Borderline personality disorder. Retrieved July 2, 2013 from:

http://allpsych.com/disorders/personality/borderline.html
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Germans Post World War 2

Words: 3058 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75882937

Germans, Post World War 2

Evil, German attitudes through the Twentieth Century, and humanity

The Second World War has had a terrible impact on society as a whole and it is safe to say that it shaped the way that people perceived the idea of being human and of life in general. Michael Hanake's 2009 motion picture The White Ribbon discusses with regard to a series of events happening in a fictional German village during the era leading to the First World War. While the film discusses ideas that apparently have nothing to do with the Second World War or with the National Socialist ideology, an in-depth analysis would make it possible for someone to find parallels between many of the concepts it contains and values promoted in Nazi Germany.

Overview

Haneke's film provides viewers with the image of an apparently perfectly organized village in which everyone is well-acquainted with…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Schwab, Gabriele. Haunting Legacies: Violent Histories and Transgenerational Trauma. ( Columbia University Press, 13 Aug 2013)

Dir. Michael Haneke, The White Ribbon. Filmladen (Austria) X Verleih AG (Germany), 2009.
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Mental Health Problems Form a Larger Percentage

Words: 1554 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95566064

Mental health problems form a larger percentage of disability in developed countries more than other group of illnesses. Mental illness is exhibited by sustained and alterations in normal thinking, mood or behavior that is dominated with distress and impaired functioning CDC., 2012.

Care for mentally ill adults in communities is one of the biggest challenges in mental healthcare. Subsequently, the challenges are further compounded by the nature of intervention measures that are customized to manage, treat, and rehabilitate the condition of the mentally ill adults. It has been established that community care intervention programs have the potential of offering a wide array of services to mentally ill patients around the clock and this has led to the reduction in the number of patients being hospitalized. This paper discusses mental health problems in adult population and further proposes intervention measures for the group in a community setting.

Description of the Population…… [Read More]

References

Cattan, M., & Tilford, S. (2009). Mental Health Promotion: A lifespan approach. New York: McGraw-Hill International.

CDC. (2012). Mental Illness Surveillance Among Adults in the United States, from http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/su6003a1.html

Creek, J., & Lougher, L. (2011). Occupational Therapy and Mental Health. London: Elsevier Health Sciences.

Harkness, J., Newman, S.J., & Salkever, D. (2004). The Cost-Effectiveness of Independent Housing for the Chronically Mentally Ill: . Do Housing and Neighborhood Features Matter Health Services Research 39 (35), 1341-1360.
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Curriculum for Medical Training Intervention

Words: 897 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24921450

Medical trauma triage management requires skillful curriculum development, which in turn depends on an assessment of needs and an anticipation of potential barriers to implementation. The initial needs assessment has revealed required resources of about four or five medical services providers such as physician assistants and nurse practitioners. Support personnel may be provided, but an additional challenge will arise when implementing the curriculum in a real world setting such as a trauma center, emergency room, or intensive care unit. Adequate space and time must be carved out for the curriculum implementation, without disturbing standard operating procedures. At the same time, improving trauma triage management will ultimately facilitate patient service delivery and maximize care outcomes, goals that should continually be communicated to the institutional administration as well as all participants in the program.

Each phase of the ADDIE model, an industry benchmark for curriculum development, "requires constant evaluation," (Allen, 2006, p.…… [Read More]

References

Allen, W.C. (2006). Overview and evolution of the ADDIE training system. Advances in Developing Human Resources 8(4): 430-441.

Bass, E.B. (n.d.). Step 1: Problem identification and general needs assessment.

Swanson, R.A. & Holton, E.F. (2009). Training and development practices. Chapter 12 in Foundations of Human Resource Development.
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References for Culturally-Sensitive Treatment of PTSD

Words: 1730 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99781959

Culturally Competent Trauma Care

Allen, B., Wilson, K., & Armstrong, N. (2014). Changing clinicians' beliefs about treatment for children experiencing trauma: the impact of intensive training in evidence-based, trauma-focused treatment. Psychological Trauma: Theory, esearch, Practice, and Policy, 6(4), 384-389.

Despite a recent push towards more structured treatment protocols, many clinicians have taken an unstructured approach to the treatment of trauma in children, based upon a belief that children may be unable to verbalize or otherwise express their feelings about a trauma. This study focuses on whether training can change a clinician's approach in practice and suggests that intensive training can influence clinicians in their choice of therapeutic approach and guide them to use evidence-based therapies (EBT) that are highly structured. This research fails to discuss the impact that cultural upbringing may have on the willingness or ability of children to discuss trauma early in the treatment process. As a result,…… [Read More]

References

Allen, B., Wilson, K., & Armstrong, N. (2014). Changing clinicians' beliefs about treatment for children experiencing trauma: the impact of intensive training in evidence-based, trauma-focused treatment. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 6(4), 384-389.

Bernal, G., Jimenez-Chafey, M. & Domenech Rodriguez, M. (2009). Cultural adaptations of treatments: a resource for considering culture in evidence-based practice. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 40(4), 361-368.

Brady, K. & Back, S. (2012). Childhood trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder, and alcohol dependence. Alcohol Research: Current Reviews, 34(4), 408-413.

Couineau, A. & Forbes, D. (2011). Using predictive models of behavior change to promote evidence-based treatment for PTSD. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 3(3), 266-275.
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Efficacy of TF CBT with elementary aged children

Words: 3088 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38021854

treatment of any victim of trauma can be circuitous and nebulous at times due to the many factors, implications and issues involved. Even with that being the case, there are ways to do it, with time and directed effort being the key item to focus on. hen it comes to the subject of children, however, a good amount of care, diligence and alternative methods, at least as compared to adults, is necessary to heal and address the aftereffects and results of trauma. hat follows in this document is a summary of fifteen different sources that all focus on cognitive therapy for children after the latter has been exposed and subjected to trauma, whether it be acute or prolonged.

Annotated Bibliography

Chae, Y., Goodman, G. S., Eisen, M. L., & Qin, J. (2011). Event Memory and Suggestibility in Abused and Neglected Children: Trauma-Related Psychopathology and Cognitive

Functioning. Journal Of Experimental Child…… [Read More]

Walker, D. F., Reese, J. B., Hughes, J. P., & Troskie, M. J. (2010). Addressing Religious and Spiritual Issues in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Children and Adolescents. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, 41(2), 174-180.

doi:10.1037/a0017782

• One thing that becomes when working in counseling, psychology and with treatment of children is that adherence to procedure and guidelines is important. Even if there is the need for variation and customization along the way, it is still also important to follow the proper patterns and steps. Indeed, there is a step-by-step guideline for the treatment of children that have faced trauma and this absolutely pertains to cognitive behavioral therapy in particular. There are differing cultural and other cues that can be part of the process and one of those things is religion and spirituality. In some cases, the abuse itself centers on religion for one reason or another, such as when a clergy person is the abuser. Even when that is the case, a focus on and use of the pre-existing religious and/or spiritual facets of the child's psyche can be used to assist in recover and treatment in a cognitive behavioral realm.
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Psychoactive Substance Use and Abuse a Psychoactive

Words: 1656 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66395000

Psychoactive Substance Use and Abuse

A psychoactive substance refers to any chemical which both impacts the central nervous system and the way the brain functions. Psychoactive substances refer to stimulants (cocaine, methamphetamine, dextroamphetamine), sedatives and analgesics (alcohol, heroin), hallucinogens (PCP, psychoactive mushrooms). As stated in the DSM-III "psychoactive substance abuse is given the definition of being "a maladaptive pattern of use indicated by continued use despite knowledge of having a persistent or recurrent social, occupational, psychological or physical problem that is caused by the use [or by] recurrent use in situations in which it is physically hazardous" (Nordegren, 2002, p.11).

Social Effects

The social impact of psychoactive substance use and abuse on widespread scale is enormously detrimental to society. "In a 2005 report issued by the Department of Health and Human Services indicated that alcohol was associated with 100,000 preventable deaths each year and that it cost taxpayers nearly $185…… [Read More]

References

Aspen. (2011). The Impact of Trauma On Teenage Addiction. Retrieved from Crchealth.com:  http://aspeneducation.crchealth.com/articles/article-trauma/ 

Becvar, D. (2013). Handbook of Family Resilience. New York: Springer Science Publishing.

Dennison, S. (2011). Handbook of the Dually Diagnosed Patient: Psychiatric and Substance Use. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Dick, D., & Agrawai, A. (2008). The Genetics of Alcohol and Other Drug Dependence. Alcohol Research and Health, 111-118.
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Critical Incident Stress Management CISM

Words: 1341 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67422380

Compassion Fatigue and Secondary Trauma

It is now six months after the attack on the nuclear power facility and low level radiation release. The critical incident stress management plan has been an affect and long-term intervention strategies are now in place. However, it is now time to consider the effects of long-term stress from managing those that have stress related to the critical incident. This research will consider the effects of compassion fatigue on staff and secondary stress on those who have to treat first responders and in their families.

Symptoms of Secondary Trauma Among Family Members and Staff

The issue of secondary trauma among family members was addressed previously in the overall critical incident stress management plan. Family members were offered services when requested by them. At the time of the incident, supervisors were requested to schedule workers on rotating shifts with adequate time off for rest and stress…… [Read More]

References

Figley, C. (1995). Compassion Fatigue: Coping with Secondary Traumatic Stress. Routledge,

London, UK.

Clair, M. (2006, August). The Relationship between Critical Incidents, Hostility, and PTSD

Symptoms in Police Officers. Retrieved from http://idea.library.drexel.edu/bitstream/1860/1118/1/Clair_Mary.pdf
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Immigrant Experience and Its Psychological Toll Information

Words: 3416 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91176917

Immigrant Experience

And Its Psychological oll

Information Competency & Library Use

San Francisco, CA

he theoretical framework centers of the immigrant experience and how it changes the individual while navigating his or her new society. he topic statement seeks to explore these phenomena by focusing on the psychological experience and its relationship to violence and economics. he idea that the action of immigrating is profoundly disruptive on ideas of self-worth, identity and economic status are explored.

I address the various experiences of dislocation arising from migration. Distinctions are made between experiences of voluntary immigrants and refugees and asylum seekers and between legal and undocumented immigrants in their risk for trauma exposure and differential impacts of trauma in the context of immigration. Refugee status as inherently founded in trauma is analyzed, with a brief description of torture survivors among refugees. he issue of trafficked migrants is also discussed. What is core…… [Read More]

This dissertation is remarkable as it uses a post-traumatic stress framework to explore the acculturative experiences and offers means of reducing the challenges of the experience. Psychological health requisites for immigrants are compounded by pre-existing needs along with the pressure of residing in a new society. This work explores acculturative stress (AS) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in immigrants by performing a data analysis of the 2002 to 2003 National Latino-American and Asian-American Study. The key acculturative stressors were influenced family factors, challenges interacting with their new society as a result of language problems and social standing. In addition, the dissertation reports that Hispanics suffer from greater acculturative stress than Asians when gender, age, ethnicity, educational attainment and time in the U.S. are accounted for statistically.

Learning Experience

This course has been intellectually stimulating and thought provoking. I have gained significant insight into the field of research which will serve me well in my future endeavors. This course is unlike my other graduate studies as it forces one to take ideas and to ground them in evidence and scholarly work. I had completed some annotations before but not from online databases in this depth. In conducting the research, I found that I gathered much more material than was needed which helped expand my knowledge base even if I did not use the material in my work. This process of editing and deciding what to include helped me to apply critical inquiry and commit to my chosen research topic. Without a doubt, I feel much more confident in conducting scholarly research and formulating my ideas. A second value skill learned from this course is that I feel that I have the ability to conduct online research regardless of the subject matter. In addition, I have developed familiarity with APA formatting.
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Nature of Man Explored in

Words: 4562 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12218010

Faulkner masterfully weaves lives in and out of this fabric, demonstrating the importance of self-identity as well as social acceptance. Light in August, however, draws more attention to how the conflicts and differences between race, gender, and social constraints are destructive forces.

The birth of Lena's child "holds out the promise of a new age that transcends the social contradictions that Joe's violent tale bears witness to" (Lutz), according to Lutz. Furthermore, Faulkner looks toward the future with the birth of this child to this meek woman. Lena is comfortable with herself and she copes well hen others choose to judge her by her unwed status. This is a striking contrast to how Joe chooses to deal with how others perceive him. Lena may not be able to see the future but she is confident she can unearth some hope in it somewhere. Mrs. Hines response to the child suggests…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Faulkner, William. Light in August. New York: The Modern Library. Print. 1950.

LUTZ, JOHN. "Faulkner's Parable of the Cave: Ideology and Social Criticism in Light in August." The Mississippi Quarterly 52.3.1999.459. Gale Literature Resource Center.

Web. 1 Sept. 2010. http://go.galegroup.com

Perkins, Wendy. "Critical Essay on 'Light in August.'" Novels for Students. Ed. 2007. Gale
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Gender and Ageism Generations

Words: 1963 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50939560

People Face

The world consists of strong and weak both. And, naturally, the strong ones can use their authority however they like; often at the expense of the weak ones. Trauma is caused by undergoing a severe experience, which can totally shake up an individual. Different people respond to trauma in different ways; some get locked up in their silence, some get revengeful and defensive, while some wish to talk about it so that other people can know what they have been through. However individuals choose to deal with their trauma, it is bound to leave emotional scars that they often carry for very long; this can hinder their psychological, spiritual, and emotional development.

Diller (2014) states that trauma is an exceptional psychological experience that overwhelms the ordinary functioning of a human. Trauma does not just affect an individual alone; it also affects the people around him, because, trauma influences…… [Read More]

Reference

Diller, J. (2014). Cultural Diversity: A Primer for the Human Services. India: Cengage Learning.

Hatch, L.R. (2005). Gender and Ageism. Generations, 29, 19-24.

Mohan, T.N., Sartorio, J., Goldman, B., & Garcia, C.B. (2007) Poverty in America: born with a wooden spoon; welcome to poverty USA [Video tape]. (Available from Princeton, NJ: Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
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Mass Shooting Could Have Been Prevented The

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22227711

mass shooting could have been prevented. The key to knowing what to do in the future is to understand how to recognize signs of mental illness and stability. In this case, the gunman "had been expelled, possibly for behavioral problems." It is clear the school understood that this student had problems. Yet even after the expulsion, the school did not do enough to ensure Goh's mental stability. The issue was not necessarily bullying, as the headline suggests. Students might have been teasing Goh in a good-natured way. After all, a large number of Americans speak English as a second language and it would be odd for someone to get maliciously teased for it. Goh reacted in an extreme way because he was mentally unstable. He had suffered trauma (after the unresolved death of his brother) and had a history of behavioral problems. Students like him need monitoring, counseling and intervention…… [Read More]

References

"Japan tsunami reconstruction money 'misspent'," (2012). BBC. Oct 31, 2012 Retrieved online:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-20150364 

"Oikos University Shooting: Suspect In Deadly Attack Was Upset About Being Teased Over Poor English Skills, Police Say." Huffington Post. April 4, 2012. Retrieved online: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/03/oikos-university-shooting-teased-english-skills_n_1399680.html
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Sensitive Issues in Nursing -- Loss of

Words: 1892 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40863116

Sensitive Issues in Nursing -- Loss of Pregnancy

Nursing

At least 2.5 single spaced pages. Do not double space. Put answers in boxes. Each answer at least one solid paragraph, make boxes longer if necessary.

Format for Research Article Critique Name:

Directions: The purpose of this assignment is to review a research article and determine how it impacts nursing practice. Use this form to analyze the relevance of the research to nursing practice. APA format for the research critiques are required only for the citation for the article. The answers to the questions do not have to be written in APA format, but do need to be in complete sentences.

Caelli, PhD, K., Downie, PhD, J., & Letendre, A. (2002). Parent's experiences of midwife-managed care following the loss of a baby in a previous pregnancy. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 39(2), 127 -- 136.

Read the article. Write a one paragraph…… [Read More]

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Theory and Practice

Words: 1112 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96528828



As the sessions proceeded, the therapist debriefed the client with the aim of de-escalating her psychologically. This enabled the client to explore and express a feeling of guilt and perception that she had failed to give her best to maintain her job. During the debriefing process, it was evident that the client believed that she was responsible for her job loss. She had been experiencing notable difficulties maintaining concentration and sleeping. Ultimately, this led to significant distress in social function.

After a week, the client reported to the therapist that she felt that she was not alone in the first time. As a result, she reported that she no longer needed the sedative medication, but remained compliant to the prescribed medication. After a while, the client related her belief in her ability to apply for new job opportunities. It is evident that the client's experience achieved the diagnostic criteria for…… [Read More]

References

Hillman, J.L. (2012). Crisis intervention and trauma counseling: New approaches to evidence-based practice. New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers.

Wainrib, B.R., & Bloch, E.L. (2008). Crisis intervention and trauma response: Theory and practice. New York: Springer.

Ziegler, S.M. (2010). Theory-directed nursing practice. New York: Springer Pub. Co.
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PTSD and Substance Abuse on

Words: 1611 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99518156



Professionals should treat African-American females with PTSD with utmost support and therapy that is beneficial to the victim. Further, the issue of substance abuse must be addressed in a manner that is acceptable to the victim.

Treatment of problems associated with substance abuse and PTSD must be designed in a consistent way that provides a solution to both substance abuse and PTSD altogether. Although the professionals are required to focus more on treating PTSD, they must incorporate treatment of alcohol and substance abuse.

Prevention for relapses is of utter importance because they prepare the victim to enter state of soberness and cope with symptoms of PTSD. These symptoms have been reported to become worse as African-American females attempt to abstain from substance abuse.

For many African-American females with PTSD and substance abuse disorder, it is recommended that they consult the membership directories. This is an international society for PTSD that…… [Read More]

References

Adams, R. & Boscarino, J. (2005). Differences in mental health outcomes among Whites and African-Americans. Washington, DC: Human Kinetics.

Adams, R. & Boscarino, J. (2006). Predictors of PTSD and delayed PTSD after disaster.

Virginia: Pearson/Merrill/Prentice Hall.

Alcantara, C. & Gone J. (2007). Reviewing suicide in Native American communities. California:
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Japanese American's Psychological Problems Resulted From Internment

Words: 1782 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84480733

Psychological & Cultural Experience of the Victims of Japanese Internment

Executive Order 9066 was signed by President Roosevelt on February 19, 1942 ordering all Japanese-Americans and Americans of Japanese descent out of the Western United States and into "internment" camps in the Central region of the United States.

A public law was subsequently passed by Congress ratifying the Executive Order; Congress did not even deliberate on the passage of the law.

One hundred and twenty thousand people were ultimately incarcerated in ten internment camps without due process of law.

There, they were locked up behind barbed wire and lived in shacks unfit for human living. They were fed only at a sustenance level, and had no idea when or if they would return home.

They lost their jobs, their homes, their possessions, their pets, and their liberty -- not because of the hostile actions of a foreign power, but due…… [Read More]

December 3, 2002.  http://www.pbs.org/childofcamp/project/index.html .

Ina, Satsuki Dr. "Symposium Comments: Tule Lake Reunion Symposium."

Internment History." PBS: Children of the Camps. PBS Organization. December 3, 2002.  http://www.pbs.org/childofcamp/project/remarks.html .
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Emergency Centers I Expect to Find the

Words: 1002 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67883635

emergency centers, I expect to find the response performance of trauma centers in Connecticut to be well intentioned in their endeavor to rapidly and effectually reach out to survivors, but to be incapacitated by a host of hindrances. I, further, expect these hindrances to consist of inappropriate and delayed response to emergency situations I also expect to witness the inability to effectively manage, control, and supervise multiple processes. Most significantly, it is quite likely that delivery service will be distracted from focusing on patient and be diverted by the enormous complexity of tasks and responsibilities that are involved in their service.

Superb emergency preparedness necessitates an interdisciplinary approach to knowledge so that all parts of the service can be effectively accomplished: not only duties that focus on prevention but also decision-making, and a commitment to improving the life of the survivors. It is more than likely, given my research and…… [Read More]

References

Breakwell, G.S., Hammond, S., & Fife-schaw, C. (2000). Research methods in psychology. London: SAGE.

Brewer, M.B., Brown, R..J., Gilbert, D.T., Fiske, S.T., & Lindzey, G. (2003). The handbook of social psychology. Boston: McGraw-Hill.
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Class Standards

Words: 1270 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57903296

CLAS Standards

The widespread occurrence of Military Sexual Trauma requires an educational program to eliminate MSTs and deal with the difficulties created by MSTs that have or will occur. Some aspects of the victim, extended family, neighborhood and the Military itself can efficiently establish and enhance this educational program. Simultaneously, other aspects of the victim, extended family, neighborhood and the Military itself pose problems for this educational program. An effective educational program must therefore use and empower those positives while overcoming the negatives and acknowledging the existential realities that cannot be changed.

Approach to Health Education Program

A health education program for military victims of "unwelcome sexual attention including gender harassment, unwanted sexual attention, unwanted sexual attention, sexual coercion, sexual assault, and rape" (Street, Stafford, Mahan, & Hendricks, 2008, p. 409) should include the victim, extended family and neighborhood. It is not enough to simply work with a victim within…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cater, J., & Leach, J. (2011). Veterans, military sexual trauma and PTSD: Rehabilitation planning implications. Journal of Applied Rehabilitation Counseling, 42(2), 33-40. Retrieved January 18, 2012 from Proquest at http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=2388951171&sid=6&Fmt=6&clientId=29440&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Hyun, J., Pavao, J., & Klinerling, R. (2009). Military sexual trauma. PTSD Research Quarterly, 20(2), 13.

Rape Crisis Information Pathfinder. (n.d.). Coping skills. Retrieved January 18, 2012 from Street, A., Stafford, J., Mahan, C., & Hendricks, A. (2008). Sexual harassment and assault experienced by reservists during military service: Prevalence and health correlates. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 45, 409-420. Retrieved January 18, 2012 from  http://www.rehab.research.va.gov/jour/08/45/3/pdf/Street.pdf 

U.S. Department of Defense. (2010, March). Department of Defense fiscal year 2009 annual report on sexual assault in the military. Retrieved January 18, 2012 from U.S. Department of Defense Web site: http://www.sapr.mil/media/pdf/reports/fy09_annual_report.pdf
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Faludi Violent Effects of Disassociation

Words: 1938 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71896931

What is key about both of these quotations is the loss of identity that is endemic to both of them. The cadets who have survived the fourth-class system and who inflict ritualistic violence in the form of hazing on others have lost something of their true "selves," something that was stripped away to lead them to believe that they could rightfully engage in this sort of behavior to inflict pain upon others. Therefore, the cadets who are guilty of said violence are perpetuating it because they have lost their own identities through disassociation -- in much the same way that Seth lost most of the moments of his life to this same phenomenon.

In conclusion, several of Stout's ideas about disassociation both apply to and help explain the tradition of obedience in the violent, misogynistic rituals that take place at the Citadel. The similarities between the effects of disassociation and…… [Read More]

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Autonomy Abuse and the Hippocampus

Words: 2602 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67428134

Current brain imaging surveys and other experiments also present evidence that child abuse could permanently damage neural structure and the functioning of the developing brain itself (Carloff).

Cohen (2001) discusses the merits of art therapy with its innate therapeutic qualities, which simultaneously activate the nervous system, the brain, the endocrine and the immune system in a uniquely particular way to support effective clinical management. Psycho-neuroendoimmunology connects an unregulated stress response to health, with stress as the underlying neurological dynamics of psychological and behavioral symptoms. Stress triggers an adaptive sympathetic nervous system response aimed at maintaining an optional state of functioning. This nervous system regulates the fight, flight, or freeze response to stress, which in turn provides the energy for survival and temporarily sharpens memory and brain function. Nature intends the use of this sympathetic adaptive response for survival, but the external reality is that our daily lives or urban environment…… [Read More]

References

1. Al-Kurdi, H. (2006). Messing with Our Minds. Dirty Tricks, Inc. VOXNYC.  http://www.voxfux.com/features/mind_control_child_abuse_cover_up.html 

2. Bower, B. (1996). Small Hippocampus Linked to Higher Risk of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Science News: Science Service, Inc. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1200/is_n20_v149/ai_18319734

3. Brick, N.D. (2005). How Childhood Sexual Abuse Affects Interpersonal Relations. Smart News. http://members.aol.com/smartnews/howchildhoodsa.htm

4. Carloff, A. (2002). Child Abuse and Damage. Punkerslut.  http://www.punkerslut.com/articles/childabuse.html