Traumatic Brain Injury Essays (Examples)

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Traumatic Brain Injuries

Words: 1419 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90509481

patients diagnosed with TBI cope better with counseling and outreach programs when dealing with new or abnormal behaviors?

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) may result in social and emotional defects (such as delayed word recall) that result in frustrating and embarrassing moments for the victim. Of all counseling and intervention programs, rehabilitation therapy (CT) is the one that is commonly used and, therefore, this literature review will conduct a meta-analytic search (focusing on quantitative studies within the last five years) in order to assess the efficacy of CT in helping TBI individuals with their social and emotional skills and perceptions.

The essay identified and reviewed seven randomized trials of language, emotional and social communication cognitive rehabilitation. Inclusion terms were that participants had to possess sufficient cognitive capacity to be included in a group and impairment in emotional and social skills was evidenced either by a questionnaire or by the clinician's reference.…… [Read More]

Reference

Bell, K et al. (2011) Scheduled Telephone Intervention for Traumatic Brain Injury: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 92, 1552 -- 1560

Bornhofen, C., and S. McDonald. 2008a. Treating deficits in emotion perception following traumatic brain injury. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 18(1): 22-44.

-- -- . 2008b. Comparing strategies for treating emotion perception deficits in traumatic brain injury. The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation 23(2): 103-115.

Chard, K et al. (2011) Exploring the efficacy of a residential treatment program incorporating cognitive processing therapy-cognitive for veterans with PTSD and traumatic brain injury, Journal of Traumatic Stress, 24, 347 -- 351,
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TBI and PTSD

Words: 2919 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87152391

Anthropologist working with the VA

Definitions / Interests / Key Problems and Issues

Previous Work Performed by Anthropologists in this Area

The Employment Situation, Current Salaries and Opportunities for Advancement

ibliography of the most important books, chapters and articles

Relevant professional organizations, ethics statements and newsletters

Names / locations of PAs and others working in the content area locally and elsewhere.

Relevant Laws and Regulations

Relevant international / domestic organizations, private and public

Other helpful information you think about on your own

The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan had a dramatic impact on the way someone sees themselves and the world around them. This is because many veterans have been forced to serve multiple tours and are still dealing with the lasting experiences from them. Two of primary injuries most are suffering from are post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TI). Anthropologists are seeking to understand the…… [Read More]

Bibliography of the most important books, chapters and articles.

2014. Summary. BLS. Electronic document, http://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/anthropologists-and-archeologists.htm. accessed April 3, 2012

Driscoll Patricia

2010. Hidden Battles on Unseen Fronts. Drexel Hill: Casemate.

Elliot Marta
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Traumatic Head Injury on Sexual

Words: 2181 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46307191

Physical dysfunctions caused by traumatic brain injury which are not properly addressed, such as erectile dysfunction, can cause an extreme dip in male sexual frequency.

Another way in which sexual function is affect by traumatic brain injury is through chemical changes caused by rain damage. Primary dysfunctions include hormonal changes which then result in sexual dysfunctions, (Aloni & Katz, 1999). Hormonal changes due to injury are experienced by both male and females. These changes can be caused by injury to specific brain structures in charge of producing and regulating specific hormone levels.

Changes in hormone levels can also be caused by the various medications prescribed to traumatic brain injury patients. "H2-antihistamines and stereotonegic agonists were found to decrease libido," according to Aloni and Katz in their 1999 work, "A Review of the Effect of Traumatic Brain Injury on the Human Sexual Response," (Aloni & Katz, p. 276). Only female experienced…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aloni, Ronit and Katz, Shlome. "A Review of the Effect o Traumatic Brain Injury on the Human Sexual Response." Brain Injury. Vol. 3. Number 4. p. 269-280. 1999.

Bianci-Demichel, Francesco and Ortigue, Stephanie. "Toward an Understanding of the Cerebral Substrates of a Woman's Orgasm." Neuropsychologia. Vol 45. Number 12. P. 2645-2659. 2007.

Blumer, D and Waler, a.E. "The Neural Basis of Sexual Behavoir." Psychiatric Aspects of Neurological Disease. P. 199-216. 1974.

Elliott, Mike Laurel. "Head Injury." Brain Injury. October 1996.
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Cognitive Effects of Brain Injury and Disease

Words: 3403 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5754060

Cognitive Effects of Brain Injury and Disease

The care of patients with brain injury and diseases has improved substantially over the last thirty years. Nonetheless, the acute cognitive effects caused by brain injury are still a problem for the survivors. Such impairments are substantial contributors to functional disability after brain injury and reduce quality of life for affected persons and their families (Schultza, Cifub, McNameea, Nicholsb; Carneb, 2011). Accordingly, it is important for clinicians providing care to persons with brain injury to be familiar with the cognitive squeal of such injuries, their neuropathophysiologic bases, the treatment options that may alleviate such problems, and their effects on functional ability and quality of life.

Literature eview: Cognitive Effects

The anatomy, pathophysiology, and cognitive sequel of brain injury and diseases vary as a function of cause of brain injury. Accordingly, identification of the specific cause of injury and other relevant factors (e.g., age,…… [Read More]

References

Aaro, Jonsson C., Smedler, AC., Leis, Ljungmark M., & Emanuelson, I (2009). Long-term cognitive outcome after neurosurgically treated childhood traumatic brain injury. Brain Injury: ISSN: 1362-301X, Vol. 23 (13-14), pp. 1008-16. doi:10.3109/02699050903379354

Cozzarelli, Tara A. (2010). Evaluation and Treatment of Persistent Cognitive Dysfunction Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. LCDR USPHS. Journal of Special Operations Medicine. Volume 10, Edition 1.pg 39-42. Retrieved from:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed 

Howard, RS., Holmes, PA & Koutroumanidis, MA. (2011). Hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. Practical Neurology [Pract Neurol], ISSN: 1474-7766, Vol. 11 (1), pp. 4-18; PMID: 21239649. doi:10.1136/jnnp.2010.235218

Kinnunen, Kirsi Maria., Greenwood, Richard., Powell, Jane Hilary., Leech, Robert., Hawkins, Peter Charlie., Bonnelle, Valerie., Patel, Maneesh Chandrakan., Counsell, Serena Jane., and Sharp, David James (2011). White matter damage and cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury. Brain A Journal Of Neurology. 134; 449 -- 463. doi:10.1093/brain/awq347
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Effect of Brain Injuries on Cognitive Functioning

Words: 1373 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53488360

Applied Behavioral Analysis on How Brain Injuries Impact One's Cognitive Ability Levels

How Brain Injuries Impact One's Cognitive Ability Levels

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) has considerable impacts on the normal functioning or operation of the brain. In most cases, brain injuries damage nerve cells to an extent that these cells no longer transmit information to each other in the ordinary manner. Brain injuries are usually divided into three major categories i.e. mild, moderate and severe depending on the extent of neurological damage that takes place. Given their impact on neurological functioning, brain injuries have impact on one's cognitive ability levels. Some of these impacts include cognitive disabilities, depressive symptoms, life satisfaction, and effect on life roles at different development stages and ages. Therefore, the extent with which brain injuries affect a person's cognitive ability levels is an important topic of study. Is there a direct link between brain injuries…… [Read More]

References

Juengst, S.B., Adams, L. M., Bogner, J.A., Arenth, P.M., O'Neil-Pirozzi, T.M., Dreer, L.E., & Wagner, A.K. (2015, November). Trajectories of Life Satisfaction after Traumatic Brain Injury: Influence of Life Roles, Age, Cognitive Disability, and Depressive Symptoms. Rehabilitation Psychology, 60(4), 353-364. Doi: 10.1037/rep0000056

Massy. J. S., Meares, S., Batchelor, J., & Bryant, R.A. (2015, July). An Exploratory Study of the Association of Acute Posttraumatic Stress, Depression and Pain to Cognitive Functioning in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Neuropsychology, 29(4), 530-542. Doi: 10.1037/meu000192

McDonald, S., Gowland, A., Randall, R., Fisher, A., Osborne-Crowley, K., & Honan, C. (2014, September). Cognitive Factors Underpinning Poor Expressive Communication Skills after Traumatic Brain Injury: Theory of Mind or Execution Function? Neuropsychology, 28(5), 801-811. Doi: 10.1037/neu0000089

Meyers. N. M., Chapman, J.C., Gunthert, K.C., & Weissbrod, C.S. (2016, January). The Effect of Masculinity on Community Reintegration Following TBI in Military Veterans. Military Psychology, 28(1), 14-24. Doi:10.1037/mil0000097
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Psychology & Nbsp general Taumatic Brain

Words: 5753 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54980300

The accident occurred while the actress was taking a skiing lesson. She initial experienced no symptoms from her fall, but later complained of a headache and was taken to a local hospital. Reports indicate that her fall was not very spectacular and occurred at a low speed on a beginner run. She was not wearing a helmet at the time of the accident. (Quinn, 2009)

However, while it is true that sometimes there are no immediately obvious signs of a severe brain injury, at other times there are.

Severe Traumatic Brain njury

The symptoms of a severe traumatic brain injury (which can result in permanent neurological damage) include a number of cognitive problems including inability to concentrate, problems with memory, problems in focusing and paying attention, ability to process new information at a normal rate, a high level of confusion, and perseveration, which is the action of doing something over…… [Read More]

In describing the course of their patients, experienced clinicians who use HBOT to treat patients with brain injury, cerebral palsy, and stroke refer to improvements that may be ignored in standardized measures of motor and neuro-cognitive dysfunction. These measures do not seem to capture the impact of the changes that clinicians and parents perceive. Caregivers' perceptions should be given more weight in evaluating the significance of objective improvements in a patient's function. Unfortunately, studies have not consistently measured caregiver burden, or have assessed it only by self-report. Studies in which the caregivers' burden was directly observed would provide much stronger evidence than is currently available about treatment outcome. (AHRQ Publication Number 03-E049, 2003)

In other words, this somewhat alternative treatment produces results that are more meaningful to the injured person and his or her caregivers.

I have focused here primarily on the biochemical end of treatments for those with traumatic brain injury because it is this level of treatment that offers the long-term possibility of the greatest level of treatment. Such treatments as are described here have the chance to cure traumatic brain injury. But until these are perfected, every other kind of treatment and therapy -- from drug treatments to speech therapy to the love of friends -- will remain priceless.
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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Quantitative

Words: 1934 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94683735

Similarly, researchers should be aware of the consequences of halo, prejudice to the leniency or seriousness of fundamental trend and position or propinquity of deviation from the pace that can artificially increase reliability of measure devoid of improving reaction correctness or validity. (Williams, and Poijula, 2002).

Limitations/Strength and Weaknesses

The following conditions might have affected the results of the present study:

1. The sample will not be random,

2. all demographic information will be self reported and not verified,

3. all the subjects for the study came from 3 local Kansas mental health facilities located in South Central Kansas,

4. all data for the BDI-II is self reported,

5. data is for individuals with specific DSM-IV diagnosis,

6. data is for individuals who are currently seeking treatment for the specified DSM-IV disorders (Schiraldi, 2000)

major strength is that respondents will be selected from ? number of different places for better…… [Read More]

References

Schiraldi, Glenn. (2000) Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Sourcebook. McGraw-Hill; 1 edition p. 446

Williams, Mary Beth and Poijula, Soili (2002) the PTSD Workbook: Simple, Effective Techniques for Overcoming Traumatic Stress Symptoms. New Harbinger Publications; 1 edition. p. 237

Foa, Edna B. Keane, Terence and Friedman, M. Matthew J. (2000) Effective Treatments for PTSD: Practice Guidelines from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies. The Guilford Press; 1 edition. p. 388

Wilson, John P. And Keane, Terence M. (1996) Assessing Psychological Trauma and PTSD. The Guilford Press; 1st edition. p. 577
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Affecting of Internet to Our Brains

Words: 837 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62021574

Internet Psychology

Introduction and Theory

Cognitive psychology is an area of scientific research that explores the human mental processes and their impact on human behavior. Using cognitive psychology, researchers can study a variety of subjects including how people perceive the world, how those perceptions impact behavior, and how both emotions and thoughts influence behavior. The article "Familiarity and prevalence of Facebook use for social networking among individuals with traumatic brain injury" uses a cognitive psychology perspective to study behavioral responses and changes in persons who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.

Traumatic brain injury is associated with social isolation and withdrawal, which in turn leads to depression and other serious mental health issues. For this reason, it is important to study ways to mitigate the tendency toward social withdrawal. Because Facebook can be used to connect with people in a non-threatening way, from the safety of one's own home, the…… [Read More]

Reference

Tsaousides, T., Matsuzawa, Y. & Lebowitz, M. (2011). Familiarity and prevalence of Facebook use for social networking among individuals with traumatic brain injury. Brain Injury 25(12): 1155-1162.
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Head Injuries and Resultant Deafness

Words: 1992 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98340917

(Walls, Hendricks, Dowler, Hirsch, Orslene and Fullmer, 2002). The animal will serve as a vital link between John Q. And the world around him, helping to be independent and to have quality time to himself and allow him to travel on his own.

There is a need, too, to emphasize that services are available to the family as individuals, and in a group setting, to confront and work through the issues that upcoming months, perhaps even years of hardship as a result of John Q's physical injuries will mean to them as a family and as individuals. The focus must be a positive one, for research has shown that positive and hopeful attitudes impact an individual's ability to recover faster and more fully (Schmidt, Vickery, Cotugna, and Snider, 2005).

esearcher Thoughts

esearching the conditions and needs of a family and individual as cited above, created a sense of caring and…… [Read More]

References

http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27755753

Christensen, a. & Uzzell, B.P. (Eds.). (1994). Brain Injury and Neuropsychological Rehabilitation: International Perspectives. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Retrieved February 8, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27755753

(1994). CHAPTER TWO Pharmacological Treatments for Brain-Injury Repair: Progress and Prognosis. In Brain Injury and Neuropsychological Rehabilitation: International Perspectives, Christensen, a. & Uzzell, B.P. (Eds.) (pp. 17-33). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Retrieved February 8, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27755811

(2003). Conversation and Brain Damage (C. Goodwin, Ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. Retrieved February 8, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104810903 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5009630086
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Positive Effects of Music in Brain Injured Patients

Words: 1594 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33172784

Music

The field of music therapy is an emerging one in medical practice. Nevertheless, there is a growing body of research to support the use of music therapy in a wide range of instances, one of which includes patients who are suffering from brain injury. This paper will review some of the literature on the subject in an attempt to understand how music affects the brain and is therefore useful in therapy.

Music Therapy

The idea of music therapy is ancient, and was extolled by the likes of Plato. The Roman god Apollo was god of music and medicine, further cementing the link between the two in estern civilization. Non-estern cultures were also known to use music to attempt to heal people. Certain forms of music could drive out evil spirits or demons, according to the lore of many cultures. It is from these myriad traditions that the modern use…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bradt, J., Magee, W., Dileo, C., Wheeler, B. & McGilloway, E. (2010). Music therapy for acquired brain injury. Wiley. Retrieved April 28, 2013 from http://ssh.snvtest.com/wp-content/uploads/articles/06_Music_Therapy_For_Brain_Injury.pdf

Formisano, R., Vinicola, V., Penta, F., Matteis, M., Brunelli, S. & Weckel, J. (2001). Active music therapy in the rehabilitation of severe brain injured patients during coma recovery. Annals of the Instituto Superiore di Sanita. Vol. 37 (4) 627-630.

Hamilton, L., Cross, J. & Kennelly, J. (2001). The interface of music therapy and speech pathology in the rehabilitation of children with acquired brain injury. Australian Journal of Music Therapy. Vol. 12 (2001) 13-20.

Thaut, M.H., Gardiner, J.C., Holmberg, D., Horwitz, J., Kent, L., Andrews, G., Donelan, B. And McIntosh, G.R. (2009) Neurologic music therapy improves executive function and emotional adjustment in traumatic brain injury rehabilitation. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1169, 406-416.
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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder PTSD in an Era

Words: 669 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36273121

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

In an era of American history which will likely be defined by the disastrous decision to launch two foreign wars simultaneously -- which resulted in the nation's volunteer military force suffering tens of thousands of casualties in a decade of continuous combat -- public health experts here at home have become increasingly aware that the battle never really ends for those who have suffered through episodes of extreme stress and trauma. The diagnosis rate of post-traumatic stress disorder has risen at a steady rate for several consecutive years, both because of the medical community's growing understanding of its underlying causes, and the active removal of social stigmas regarding mental illness. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV Text evision (DSM-IV T), "diagnostic criteria for PTSD include a history of exposure to a traumatic event that meets specific stipulations and symptoms from each…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders

(4th ed., text rev.). Washington, D.C.

Bugental, D.B., Ellerson, P.C., Lin, E.K., Rainey, B., Kokotovic, A., & O'Hara, N. (2002). A

cognitive approach to child abuse prevention. The Journal of Family Psychology,
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Combat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Words: 1389 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31962980

Computer games were also effective in the treatment of people who underwent automobile accidents. Apparently, something as simple as computer games can serve as a therapy method for people suffering from PTSD. hile some might believe that such therapy techniques are not effective, patients were reported to display intense physical responses to them. Still, because therapists were quick to react to such demonstrations, matters were rapidly resolved and patients were exhibiting fewer symptoms as a result. By adapting the Health Belief Model to the needs of PTSD sufferers therapists succeeded in treating them. The patients did not show reluctance in being subjected to such methods of treatment, as they trusted that it would assist their psychological condition (Burke, Degeneffe & Olney).

Both the Social Cognitive Theory and the Health Belief Model are effective in treating people suffering from PTST. They differ through the fact that the former is applied indirectly…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Bhagar, H.A. & Schmetzer A.D. (2007). Pharmacotherapy of Combat-Related Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association 10.4.

2. Burke, H.S. & Degeneffe, C.E. & Olney, M.F. (2009). A New Disability for Rehabilitation Counselors: Iraq War Veterans with Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. The Journal of Rehabilitation 75.3.

3. Stein, D.J. & Hollander E. (2002). Anxiety Disorders Comorbid with Depression: Social Anxiety Disorder, Post-Traumatiac Stress Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. London: Martin Dunitz.
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Split Brain Surgery History and

Words: 1334 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43762548

The figure is somewhat lower for left handers, approximately 70%" (Hemisphere specialization, 2010, Macalester University).

The fact that some people's right hemispheres do possess the ability to 'speak' enabled further illuminating results to be generated by studying split brain patients: in the case of one split brain operation patient 'Paul,' for example, Paul's right hemisphere was able to express itself alone: "Paul's right hemisphere stated that he wanted to be an automobile racer while his left hemisphere wanted to be a draftsman" (Behavior, 2010, Macalester University). It was as if Paul's different hemispheres had different personalities, even different political opinions. The left side of the brain controls the right side of the individual's body and the right side controls the left hand. Paul wrote with his right-dominated left hand that he wanted to be a presumably exciting occupation -- and that he hated ichard Nixon. The left side, using the…… [Read More]

References

Behavior of split brain patients. (2010). Macalester University. Retrieved April 5,

2010 at http://www.macalester.edu/psychology/whathap/ubnrp/Split_Brain/Behavior.html

A brief history of split brain experiments. (2010). Macalester University. Retrieved April 5,

2010 at http://www.macalester.edu/psychology/whathap/ubnrp/Split_Brain/Pioneers.html
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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Treatment

Words: 3310 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69891712

g., when there are deaths of several soldiers or emergency workers of a unit). Combat is a stressor that is associated with a relatively high risk of PTSD, and those interventions that can potentially diminish this risk are very important. But what is not clear in the above is how much the debriefing provided is more a form of stress management for the ?critical incidents? that are very much part of warfare, as opposed to interventions for those psycho- logically traumatized and at risk of PTSD. People in the military are exposed to stressors other than combat, and these may be traumatic (Atwater, 2009). eports of soldiers who were involved in body recovery in the Gulf War provide important insights. This is a high-stress situation, linked to vulnerability to posttraumatic morbidity.

Asnis, et al. (2004) reported that soldiers of one group who had been debriefed were compared with another, which,…… [Read More]

References

Army News Service. (2007). Army launches chain teaching program for PTSD, TBI education.

Atwater, Alison. (2009). When is a Combat Veteran? The Evidentiary Stumbling Block for Veterans Seeking PTSD Disability Benefits, 41 ARIZ. St.

Asnis, G.M., Kohn, S.R., Henderson, M., & Brown, N.L. (2004). SSRIs vs. non-SSRIs in post traumatic stress disorder: an update with recommendations. Drugs, 64(4), 383-404.

Bergfeld, C. (2006). A dose of virtual reality: Doctors are drawing on video-game technology to treat post-traumatic stress disorder among Iraq war veterans. Business Week.
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PTSD Treatment Modalities Evidence-Based Recommendations

Words: 4461 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17783376

Trauma-elated Disorders and ecommended Treatment

Clinical Presentation of Trauma-elated Disorders and ecommended Treatments

On January 13, 2015, Andrew Brannan, a 66-year-old Vietnam veteran was executed in Georgia for killing police officer Kyle Dinkheller in 1998 (Hoffman, 2015). At the time, Brannan had been living in a bunker on his mother's property without water or electricity and had stopped taking his medications. According to the Veterans Administration (VA), he was 100% disabled due to combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). He also suffered from bipolar disorder, had lost two brothers to a military plane crash and suicide, and lost a father to cancer. Veterans groups, death penalty critics, and mental health advocates, all petitioned the Georgia Supreme Court for a stay of execution unsuccessfully. The veterans groups were particularly interested in preventing the death of yet another veteran who developed severe psychiatric problems while serving his or her country.

Trauma in general…… [Read More]

References

APA (American Psychiatric Association). (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association.

Cook, J.M., Dinnen, S., Simiola, V., Bernardy, N., Rosenheck, R., & Hoff, R. (2014). Residential treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder in the Department of Veterans Affairs: A national perspective on perceived effective ingredients. Traumatology, 20(1), 43-9.

Dursa, E.K., Reinhard, M.J., Barth, S.K., & Schneiderman, A.I. (2014). Prevalence of a positive screen for PTSD among OEF/OIF and OEF/OIF-era veterans in a large population-based cohort. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 27, 542-549.

Ehring, T., Welboren, R., Morina, N., Wicherts, J.M., Freitag, J., & Emmelkamp, P.M. (2014). Meta-analysis of psychological treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder in adult survivors of childhood abuse. Clinical Psychology Review, 34(8), 645-57.
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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Risk of

Words: 2054 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14834415

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and isk of Dementia among U.S. Veterans

According to Yaffe et al. (2010), Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is a prevalent psychiatric syndrome linked to increased mortality and morbidity rates. This condition is among the most prevalent amid veterans returning from combat. Among veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq, the prevalence of post traumatic stress disorder is estimated to be about 17% (Seal et al., 2009). Veterans returning from Vietnam have a twenty to thirty percent rate. Past studies have confirmed that PTSD is linked to increased health care consumption and an augmented danger of developing a variety of other medical conditions among veterans such as dementia. The risk factors that link PTSD to increased rates of dementia include head injuries, depression or medical comorbidities.

This work highlights the findings of the study carried out by Yaffe et al. (2010). The project specifically focuses on the conclusions…… [Read More]

References

Bernadette M.M. & Ellen F.O. (2011). Evidence-based practice in nursing and health care: a guide to best practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Deurenberg, R. (2009). A practical guide to Pubmed/Druk 1/ING. London: Bohn Stafleu van Loghum.

Gerrish, K., & Lacy, A. (2013). The research process in nursing. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Glasziou, P.G., Mar, C.D. & Salisbury, J. (2009). Evidence-Based Practice Workbook. John Wiley & Sons.
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Ectopic Heterotopic Brain Tissue Extracranial Brain Tissue Without

Words: 4119 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48161127

ectopic/heterotopic brain tissue. Extracranial brain tissue without direct connection to the brain itself may be an isolated cutaneous embryonic defect that is usually located on the occipital or parietal area of the scalp. Most of the time these are harmless and can be removed. These often are called heterotopic brain tissue or cutaneous ectopic brain tissue or (CEB).

ECTOPIC OR HETEROTOPIC BRAIN TISSUE

Extracranial brain tissue that is directly connected to the brain itself may be an isolated cutaneious embryonic defect. These are usually located on the occipital or parietal areas of the scalp. They are often called heteropic brain tissue or cutaneous ectopic brain (CEB) (Janniger 1). Most of the time these are simple defective tissue that can easily be removed from the scalp. However, there are several different types of ectopic brain tissues and some of these can be signs of underlying central nervous system problems. Each of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aplasia Cutis Congenita" Available Online at  http://www.keratin.com/af/af006.shtml 

Drolet, Beth Ann & Clowry, Lawrence. "The Hair Collar Sign: Marker for Cranial Dysraphism" Pediatrics Aug 1995 Part 1 of 2 Vol. 96 Issue 2 p. 309

Drolet BA, Clowry L. Jr., McTigue MK, Esterly NB. "The Hair Collar sign: Marker for Cranial Dysraphism" Pediatrics 1995 Aug 1996 (2 pt 1): 309-13

Fuloria, Mamta M.D. & Kreiter, Shelly M.D. "The Newborn Examination: Part I" American Family Physician Jan 1, 2002 Vol. 65 No. 1 www.aafp.org/afp
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Head Injuries in Rural Areas the Canadian CT Rule and New Orleans Criteria

Words: 573 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31438559

Concussion

The complex issue of providing adequate care and preventative testing to a population that is increasingly unable to afford the rising expenses associated with such care remains a substantial problem in the United States, and directly impacts care provided for cases of head traumas in rural areas. The Canadian CT Head Rule (CCHR) and the New Orleans Criteria (NOC) are two clinical decision making methods for determining when the expense of a CT scan is warranted following a head trauma, though indications for the use of either testing procedure differ. Despite widespread and successful use elsewhere, the CCHR is not widely used in the United States and is especially under-utilized in rural areas, leading to rising expenses and the mistreatment of traumatic head injuries. Equipment shortages and other facility limitations in rural hospitals and clinics further complicates treatment for head injuries, and sheer geographic distance to facilities means that…… [Read More]

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Traumatic Long-Term Memory

Words: 2263 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73666051

Traumatic Long-Term Memory and related issues of forgetfulness. The differentiation of current competing theories under review regarding Traumatic Long-Term Memory are explored and critiqued. This research paper also explains the differences between the theories and their positive / negative contributions toward improving human memory.

Long-Term Memory is memory that has been consolidated or stored so that it is available after distraction (Long, 1996). It represents the storehouse of information that has been consolidated and made relatively permanent. Although the limbic system is the essential structure initiating consolidation, the actual memory stores are throughout the nervous system. Their location is a function of the brain structures involved in processing the information (Long, 1996).

Receptors to projection cortex have very little storage capability as they are used to process all information for that modality and thus are subject to interference. The sensory association cortex is more important for, at this level, patterns…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson. (1995). In Pettijohn, T. (1998). Psychology: A Connectext. (4th Ed.). USA:

Dushkin / McGraw-Hill.

Bjork & Bjork. (1992). In Pettijohn, T. (1998). Psychology: A Connectext. (4th Ed.). USA:

Dushkin / McGraw-Hill.
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People Help Themselves An Interdisciplinary

Words: 12988 Length: 47 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92004923

The study will also be important to those in the future, because scientists have not yet found ways to cure these chronic illnesses or correct some of these problems that are seen today, and therefore it stands to reason that there will be more people in the future who will have to face the same problems as those with chronic illnesses and traumatic injuries today.

Scope of the Study

The scope of the study is relatively large, simply because there has been a great deal written about chronic illness and injuries from the perspective of the physician and from the perspective of the patient. Both sides are important, although the focus here will remain largely on the patient perspective. Because there are so many people today that suffer from a chronic illness or traumatic injury, much study has been done about these individuals. Despite these studies, however, not a lot…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, B.L. (2002). Biobehavioral Outcomes Following Psychological Interventions for Cancer Patients. Journal of Counsulting and Clinical Psychology, 70(3), 590-610.

Brannon, L., & Fiest, J. (2004). Health Psychology: Vol.. An Introduction to Behavior and Health (Fifth ed.) Belmont CA: Thompson/Wadsworth.

DiMatteo, M. (2004). Social Support and Patient Adherence to Medical treatment: A Meta- analysis. Health Psychology, 23(2), 207-218.

Eitel, P., Hatchett, L., Friend, R., Griffin, K.W., & Wadhwa, N.K. (1995). Burden of Self-Care in Seriously Ill Patients Impact on Adjustment. Health Psychology, 14(5), 457-463.
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Hospital Has This Dilemma That

Words: 1083 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79402442

These are just some of the expenses. Treating this man for free, more so, may open the door for more 'deserving cases', and then where does one draw the line. And a further ethical dilemma: if the care system agrees to treat the man for free, its debt may be so steep that it will be the paying customers who will, eventually, have to pay the price.

Identified alternative courses of action and explained expected consequences.

The health care system could return the man to Mexico and to his family, but this would aggravate the man's station. In terms of traumatic brain injury, any lapse in treatment spells crucial damage to the patient's brain.

Another option is that once danger to life is over, the patient could be moved to an ordinary hospital ward where his care would be less expensive and he could spend time recuperating. This, nonetheless, would…… [Read More]

References

Hardman, J.M., & Manoukian, a. (2002). Pathology of head trauma. Neuroimaging Clinics of North America, 12, 175 -- 87.

Saatman, K.E, & Duhaime, a.C. (2008). Classification of traumatic brain injuries for targeted therapies. Journal of Neurotrauma, 25, 719 -- 38.

WGBH Educational Foundation. (n.d.). The Hippocratic Oath: Modern version. Doctors' Diaries. Retrieved on January 30, 2011 from: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/doctors/oath_modern.html

Holder, S. (2008). Traumatic brain injury -- the medical insurance maze. Head and brain injuries. Retrieved on January 30, 2011 from: http://www.headbraininjuries.com/brain-injury-medical-insurance
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Organization Assessment Good Shepherd Medical

Words: 1323 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8650987



For example, because different etiologies require corresponding therapeutic designs and mechanisms (Spector, 2000; Steefel, 2002), specific support group makeup must consider the need to develop different strategies and methodologies for the following types of patients at a minimum if support groups are to provide equal benefit to all patients:

Elderly Patients and Lifelong Laborers - This group typically presents with psychological issues in the realm of a direct link between their sense of purpose and self-worth and their ability to continue to function productively in their community. Their need for acute medical and ancillary services, particularly in the Longview/East Texas community are often precipitated by chronic physical deterioration from a lifetime of relatively hard labor. Therefore, support group rehabilitation services must address the issues of self-esteem as a function of vocational productivity and lifestyle changes necessitated by medical conditions.

Prime-of-Life Victims of Traumatic Injury - This group typically presents with…… [Read More]

References

Clark, C., Robinson, T. (2000). "Multiculturalism as a Concept in Nursing" Journal of the Black Nurses Association, 11(2), 39-43.

Spector, R. (2000). Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness (5th ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Stanhope, M., Lancaster, J. (2004). Community and Public Health Nursing (6th ed.)

St. Louis: Mosby.
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Stroke Is Widely Regarded One of the

Words: 2569 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54959389

Stroke is widely regarded one of the leading causes of deaths in the U.S. Indeed, recent statistical figures paint a grim picture with regard to the number of people who suffer a stroke in the U.S. each year. In basic terms, strokes are triggered by an interruption of blood flow into the brain. In this text, I concern myself with the physiological processes associated with stroke. In so doing, I will amongst other things define the disease and the body systems it affects, its causes, manifestation, and complications. Further, I will also discuss the hereditary or familial factors commonly associated with stroke.

Stroke: An Overview

In basic terms, stroke is said to be "an abrupt onset of neurological functions caused by a sudden reduction of cerebral blood flow, which is due in turn to either an ischemic occlusion or a hemorrhagic episode" (Gulini, Gianelli, Quaglia, and Marrucci, 2000, p. 239).…… [Read More]

References

Eisenberg, M.G., Glueckauf, R.L. & Zaretsky, H.H. (Eds.). (1999). Medical Aspects of Disability: A Handbook for the Rehabilitation Professional (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company.

Gulini, M., Gianelli, M., Quaglia, W. & Marrucci, G. (Eds.). (2000). Receptor Chemistry Towards the Third Millennium. Amsterdam: Elsevier Science.

Huether, S.E. & Mccance, K. (2012). Understanding Pathophysiology (5th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Science.

Mohr, J.P., Grotta, J.C., Wolf, P.A., Maskowitz, M.A., Mayberg, M.R. And Kummer, R.V. (2011). Stroke: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management (5th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Health Sciences.
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Hemingway Analysis the Returning of Soldiers From

Words: 2978 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60519256

Hemingway Analysis

The Returning of Soldiers from Combat in America

"Soldiers Home"

Although Earnest Hemmingway's, "Soldiers Home" (187) was written in 1925, and the war at that time was different, there are several things in the story that still ring true today for servicemen. In "Soldiers Home" (187) Krebs, the main character in the story goes through some changes while he is away fighting in the Marine Corps. Krebs was a young man from Kansas who is in college at the time that he is drafted into the Marine Corps. So he leaves his friends and family to go overseas to fight for his country, as do the young men and women of todays armed forces. As told by the author Krebs fights in some of the toughest battles that were ever fought, "Belau ood, Soissons, Champagne St. Mihiel, and The Argonne Forrest" (187), he feels out of place when…… [Read More]

With Krebs not really trusting his parents, and his loss of love as well the author shows the reader several issues that can affect a soldier returning home from combat. Along with the loss of interest in relationships, and not having a reason to interact with the towns people or even listen to his parents, they all show some of the struggles facing returning servicemen and women then and today, and that they have faced upon their return from foreign places where they have been busily waging war for the entire twentieth century (Associated Content)

The problems with the American soldier returning home from combat are worse than people may think. They go a lot deeper than people may think. They can range from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Traumatic Brain Injury, hearing loss, anxiety, depression, and even isolation. These are the problems that are unseen by society and have been written about since at least 1925. Hemingway's story is not prescient or "ahead of its tie" because it recognized and described the issues of coming home from war in ways that can be identified with modern diagnoses and that reflect modern experiences. Instead, it is the simple commonality of the experiences of warfare that existed in the First World War and that still exist in today's military conflicts that makes this work still relevant. The fact that Hemingway so accurately describes a case of post Traumatic Stress Disorder doesn't matter nearly as much as the fact that this disorder still exists, and for the same reasons it existed nearly a hundred years ago. Until mankind learns to end warfare, traumas like those experienced by Krebs and by real soldiers in ongoing wars will continue to lead to the development f psychological disorders like PTSD as described in "Soldier's Home" and by countless servicemen and servicewomen that have served honorably in places of combat today.

As Krebs returns home from war in 1919, he is faced with issues of being back in the civilian society. Whether a soldier fought in World War I, World War II, Vietnam, Desert Storm, Somalia, or Iraq and Afghanistan, the problems of the returning veteran are handled the same then as they are now personally, within the soldier and with the general public.
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Nurses Role in Mental Health

Words: 1457 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46952024

Making available recovery program treatment besides collaborating with partnership to leverage resources and knowledge is a role that I perform in efforts of helping clients access care. I am also involved in continual community-based quality improvement programs that are designed to support care access and quality.

B. Veteran Centered Care

With respect to centered care, I normally assist with provision of alternatives to inpatient care for mental health linked problems. Additionally, I make CVT available for weekend and evening hours. As a MHICM practitioner, I perform various administrative and clinical functions for clients and my team. Clinical tasks entail stress and crisis management, group therapy, advocacy and treatment planning. I also ensure that patient preferences with respect to appointments and mental health care providers are maintained.

C. Performance Measures

I offer administrative and clinical supervision for my team besides facilitating cohesiveness communication, education programs and systems concerning community-based services. Given…… [Read More]

References

Committee on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation initiative on the future of nursing.(2011). The future of nursing: Leading change, advancing health. New York: National Academies Press

Daniels, R., & Nicoll, L.(2011). Contemporary medical-surgical nursing, Volume 1. New York: Cengage Learning.

Sullivan-Marx, E.(2010). Nurse practitioners: The evolution and future of advanced practice. New York: Springer Publishing Company.

Thonicroft, G. (2011). Oxford textbook of community mental health. London: Oxford University Press.
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Children's Hospital for My Alternate

Words: 700 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56411096

The RN really became a part of the educational team, tailoring her assistance to the child to the classroom environment. In fact, because much of the education seemed tailored towards teaching the students basic life-skills information, such as the weather, the nurse was able to really interact with the child's education.

The best part of the experience was observing the inherent joy in children. From an outsider's perspective, the children in this school had very few reasons to express joy or feel happiness. Almost all of them had significant physical challenges in addition to mental retardation. None of these children has a childhood even approximating normalcy. However, many of the children seemed happy. In fact, it was seeing the joy that a small action could bring to these children was very uplifting. In fact, one particular child seemed especially joyful. Because of privacy concerns, I was not able to access…… [Read More]

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Incidence of Falls Accidental or

Words: 2747 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60439775

Incontinence is another condition not frequently intimated to their doctor. Less than a third of them actually report falls despite the availability of initiatives and measures, which can address falls. These include home-based exercises, home environment assessment, cataract surgery, medication review and Vitamin D and calcium supplements (CFA).

Falls Prevention Intervention

Studies reveal the importance of physical activity in preventing or reducing the risk of falls among older persons in the community and at home (Rose 2007). There is, however, limited evidence at present that physical activity benefits very weak ones in care facilities. Physical activity promises benefit to healthy older adults against the risk of falls. Those at moderate risk, on the other hand, will gain more from structured exercise programs aimed at risk factors, which can be manipulated or changed. They can be adjusted to progress according to the individual's capabilities and earlier physical activity experience. And those…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Cripps, R. 2001, 'Deaths from falls in the elderly top 1,000-year,' Australian Institute of Health and Welfare [Online] Available at http://www.aihw.gov.au/media-release=detail/?id=6442464404

CFA 2011, 'Fall rates need to fall further,' Continence Foundation of Australia [Online]

Available at  http://www.continence.org.au/news.php/38/fall-rates-need-to-fall-further 

Ory, M.G. et al. 2009, 'Implementing and disseminating on evidence-based program to prevent falls in older adults, Texas, 2007-2009,' Preventing Chronic Disease [Online]
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Connection Between Combat Exposure and Drug and Alcohol Abuse

Words: 1857 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80593052

Combat and Substance Abuse

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as a consequence of combat experience, is believed to be a significant risk factor for substance abuse. This theory has been undermined to some extent by recent findings which suggest mental illness, apart from PTSD, may be a stronger predictor. Although combat-related PTSD may significantly contribute to the prevalence of substance abuse among veterans, the dominant substance abuse risks are the same for both civilians and combat veterans. This conclusion suggests than combat may represent a minor risk factor for substance abuse.

The Association between Combat and Substance Abuse

Veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are faced with many of the same problems that previous combat veterans have had to face, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). While most veterans suffering from these conditions will successfully cope with the challenges they face through treatment and social…… [Read More]

References

Adamou, Marios C. And Hale, Anthony S. (2003). PTSD and the law of psychiatric injury and England and Wales: Finally coming closer? Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry Law, 31, 327-332.

Bagalman, Erin. (2011). Suicide, PTSD, and substance use among OEF/OIF veterans using VA Health Care: Facts and figures. Congressional Research Service. Retrieved 10 Jan. 2013 from http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R41921.pdf.

National Center for PTSD. (2011). PTSD and substance abuse in veterans. PTSD.VA.gov. Retrieved 10 Jan. 2013 from http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/ptsd_substance_abuse_veterans.asp.

Nooner, Kate B., Linares, L. Oriana., Batinjane, Jessica, Kramer, Rachel A., Silva, Raul., and Cloitre, Marylene. (2012). Factors related to posttraumatic stress disorder in adolescence. Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, 13(3), 153-166.
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Neuroplasticity Memory and Learning Neuroplasticity

Words: 556 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9714362

It is also thought to be the process responsible for the observation that blind individuals (for one example) tend to develop exceptional abilities in their other senses to compensate for the additional burdens on cognition.

Cross model reassignment refers to the full-scale replacement of certain types of sensory input for entirely different types. The process by which the blind learn to read Braille provides an example of cross model reassignment whereby it is believed that unused regions of the brain normally dedicated to receiving and processing visual stimuli are transformed into neurological structures capable of processing sensory input from the fingertips.

The ole of Neuroplasticity in Memory and Learning:

Generally, neuroplasticity lies at the root of all human cognitive processes and learning. It is precisely the ability of neurons to form complex interconnected pathways and networks consisting of large numbers of linked neurons that allows the brain to incorporate experiences…… [Read More]

References

Schwartz, J., Begley, S. (2002). The Mind & The Brain: Neuroplasticity and the Power of Mental Force. New York, NY: Harper Perennial.
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Physiotherapy Management of Whiplash Associated

Words: 11600 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60308009

, 1992, Bogduk 2002), cevical taction (Olson 1997), acupunctue (Fattoi et al., 1996), tanscutaneous nevous stimulation (Foley-Nolan et al., 1990) and myofascial tigge point's teatment (Hong and Simmons 1993) have been poven to impove movement and function following whiplash injuies.

The tuto suggested that I should put this entie section on the whiplash guidelines in the peliminay liteatue eview chapte. It should also include discussion about my thoughts on the guidelines. she suggested that as this entie poject is about studies done afte the publication of the guidelines a lage pat of the pelimnay liteatue eview should have a discussion and citique of the guidelines. The Clinical Guidelines fo the Management of WAD: In 2002 physiotheapists identified whiplash injuy as a pioity aea fo clinical guidelines. The Chateed Society of Physiotheapists (CSP) esponded to this by foming a Guidelines Development Goup (GDG) to develop the document. A systematic eview of…… [Read More]

references for treatment moderate the effect of treatment. Immediately prior to randomization, treatment preference ratings were collected from each patient and
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Project Proposal Implementation

Words: 1565 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48585845

iPads for PTSD

There is a high incidence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among veterans of the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. The United States' all-volunteer forces have been engaged in combat for ten years and many military members have completed multiple tours. Some individuals are more susceptible than others (Corbett, 2002). Although sufferers of PTSD are in the minority of those returning from war zones, numbers are still sufficiently high to tax the military's health care system. There are simply not enough mental health professionals to meet the need.

Online counseling and special PTSD apps for smart phones and tablet computers have been demonstrated as effective solutions, at least in part. Military officials stress that neither online counseling nor apps replace one-on-one treatment in a clinical care setting. However, they can be beneficial to sufferers and provide some intermediate relief until actual treatment can be provided.

Project Proposal…… [Read More]

References

Corbett, A. (2002). Some brains more vulnerable to war trauma. Science Now 10/15/2002.

Retrieved 1 October 2011 from Academic Search Premier.

Gravely, A. A, Cutting A., Nugent, S., Grill, J., Carlson, K., and Spoont, M. (2011). Validity of PTSD diagnoses in VA administrative data: Comparison of VA administrative PTSD diagnoses to self-reported PTSD checklist. Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development 48(1), pp. 21-30. DOI: 10.1682/JRRD.2009.08.0116.

Hayes, J., Wakefield, B., Andresen, E., Scherrer, J., Traylor, L., Wiegmann, P., Denmark, T.,
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Solomon N Mckee A And Garcia-Barry S

Words: 743 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75426168

Solomon, N., McKee, A. And Garcia-Barry, S. (2001). Intensive voice treatment and respiration treatment for hypokinetic-spastic dysarthria after traumatic brain injury. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. (10) 51-64.

What was the problem or question the authors were asking?

A young man who had sustained massive brain trauma was examined to see which method would help him to breath and speak properly again.

What research or background information was described?

The efficacy of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT) was explored and tested in terms of a patient twenty months after the sustainment of a major injury. LSVT is "an intensive 4-week program that focuses on increased vocal effort" (Solomon 2001,-page 51). It has proven to be successful in helping patients with Parkinson's.

c. Therefore, what was the purpose of the present article?

To see whether or not the LSVT would help a young man with traumatic brain injury (tbi) and…… [Read More]

Currently affiliated with Courage Center, Minneapolis, MN

Submitted on February 18, 2000

Accepted on November 20, 2000
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Measures Wanted Assess Missing Research - Research

Words: 679 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82282728

measures wanted assess? Missing research - research? Avoid critical questions elements made argument clear? Elements research extremely poignant offered validity claims? Claims broad research size? Claims understated? Limitations research? leap erroneous conclusions opinion - addressed concerns claims? researchers biased-based study, funders, connections, specialities? research questions research bring merit research investigation? reasons claims made?

DeJong, Gerben, Ching-Hui Hsieh, Koen Putman, andall J. Smout, Susan D. Horn, & Wenqiang Tian. (2010). Physical therapy activities in stroke, knee arthroplasty, and traumatic brain injury rehabilitation: Their variation, similarities, and association with functional outcomes. Physical Therapy, 91(12) 1826-1837.

Physical therapy is prescribed for a variety of conditions, spanning from knee surgery to traumatic brain injury. However, although the patient populations subjected to PT may vary, there is a certain uniformity of treatment prescription and goals of outcome. According to DeJong (et al., 2010) "certain rehabilitation principles" are thought to "generalize across populations. For example, we…… [Read More]

Reference

DeJong, Gerben, Ching-Hui Hsieh, Koen Putman, Randall J. Smout, Susan D. Horn, & Wenqiang Tian. (2010). Physical therapy activities in stroke, knee arthroplasty, and traumatic brain injury rehabilitation: Their variation, similarities, and association with functional outcomes. Physical Therapy, 91(12) 1826-1837.
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Sergeant Lost Within Author Daniel Bergner 2008

Words: 620 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50173662

Sergeant Lost ithin," author Daniel Bergner (2008) explains the situation of an American soldier who received brain damage while on active duty serving in the Marine Corps. The man has lost the ability to speak and can only communicate to others with grunts and with the movement of his eyes following his devastating injury in Iraq. Shuvon Phillip was in a Humvee when an anti-tank mine exploded. Although Phillip did not receive any injury from shrapnel, his brain within the skull was jarred to the point where irreparable damage occurred to his brain tissue. Phillip is not a unique case. According to the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, around 900 soldiers have returned from Iraq with these kinds of brain injuries (Bergner 2008). Each of these cases of traumatic brain injury (T.B.I.) is different and the degree to which the brain has been impaired is also unique. Some are…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bergner, D. (2008). The sergeant lost within. The New York Times.

Huffman, K. (2012). Neuroscience and biological foundations. Psychology in Action, 10th

Edition. John Wiley & Sons. 51-92.
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Critical Incident Stress Management CISM

Words: 1464 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97335938

Cave Paintings

Complementary and Alternative Medicine and CISM in Diverse Populations

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as often referred to as integrated medicine. This term refers to therapies used to enhance health that fall outside the realm of conventional or "western" medical therapies. Southern Medical therapies are often limited to pharmaceutical drugs, surgery, and other interventions that directly affect the body. CAM therapies can simply refer to culturally-based medical practices that are not part of mainstream medicine in the United States. ecently, the trend is toward using CAM therapies along with evidence-based Western medical practices. This research will explore CAM interventions for diverse populations within the scope of the CISM plan.

CAM Interventions for prevention of Stress and esilience

One of the most widely accepted areas for the use of CAM interventions is in the area of stress reduction, depression, anxiety, chronic pain, and other conditions that are common symptoms…… [Read More]

References

Ahn, A., Ngo-Metzger, Q., & Legedza, A. et al. (2006). Complementary and Alternative Medical

Therapy Use Among Chinese and Vietnamese Americans: Prevalence, Associated Factors, and Effects of Patient -- Clinician Communication. American Journal of Public Health. 96 (2), 647-653.

GoodTherapy.org (2011). Complimentary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). Retrieved from http://www.goodtherapy.org/complementary-alternative-medicine.html

Kutch, M. (2010). Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Treating Mental Health Disorders. Retrieved from  http://repository.lib.ncsu.edu/ir/bitstream/1840.16/6044/1/etd.pdf
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Deployment on Military Families Cause Deployment Effect

Words: 1366 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51479252

Deployment on Military Families

Cause (Deployment) Effect (Stress on Families / Children)

The stress on military families when the father or mother is deployed -- whether the deployment is to a war zone or to another place -- can be very intense and psychologically stressful. There is a great deal of literature on what military families experience before, during, and after deployment, and this paper provides several peer-reviewed articles that discuss and assess the situations that military families must deal with during deployment. Thesis: families left at home when a military parent is deployed face social and psychological issues that do not necessarily end when that parent returns from deployment; however, there are strategies to reduce the stress once the parent returns home from the deployment.

The Literature -- Psychological Adjustment for Children

The psychological adjustments that children must make -- especially children with "…preexisting psychological conditions" such as depression…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hinojosa, Ramon, Hinojosa, Melanie Sberna, and Hognas, Robin S. "Problems with Veteran-

Family Communication During Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom

Military Deployment." Military Medicine, 177.2 (2012): 191-197.

Lincoln, Alan, Swift, Erika, and Shorteno-Fraser, Mia. "Psychological Adjustment and Treatment of Children and Families With Parents Deployed in Military Combat." Journal
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Veteran Access to Healthcare Services as He

Words: 2338 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 182065

Veteran Access to Healthcare Services

As he stood on the steps of the U.S. Capitol's East Portico in early 1865, President Abraham Lincoln articulated what would become the motto of the Department of Veterans Affairs, "To care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan." This lofty goal, though, has not been fulfilled in recent years and millions of combat veterans returning from tours of duty in Afghanistan and Iraq are experiencing debilitation injuries such as posttraumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injuries without being provided adequate access to the healthcare services for which they are eligible. To its credit, the Department of Veterans Affairs has taken a number of steps to help improve access to healthcare services for its veteran population, but reports from across the country confirm that tens of thousands of eligible veterans are still being denied timely access to…… [Read More]

References

Burke, H.S., Degeneffe, C.E. & Olney, M.F. (2009). A new disability for rehabilitation counselors: Iraq War veterans with traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder. The Journal of Rehabilitation, 75(3), 5-7.

Gates, R.M. (2009, January 27). Submitted statement to the Senate Armed Services Committee.

U.S. Department of Defense Speeches, 37.

Medical centers. (2011). Department of Veterans Affairs. Retrieved from http://www.va.gov / health/MedicalCenters.asp.
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Iraq and Afghanistan War Combat Psychology

Words: 2550 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24339581

Psychological aspects of combat

Extreme high-stress incidents can trigger a number of possible experiences and responses including intrusive thoughts slow-motion time, sharper focus, dissociation, visual clarity and temporary paralysis. The occurrence of 'dissociation,' which is a disconnection from emotional and physical reality, might be a sign of danger for the start of post traumatic disorder or PTSD. One of the common and seldom discussed matters is the loss of bowel and bladder control that occurs during intense moments and it's also used as an exemplification by Grossman of the reluctance that people feel in talking about their natural reaction towards the fight against their condition (Grossman and Christensen, 2007).

According to some studies, there were far number of psychiatric calamities as compared to the physical casualties during the Second World War. 98 per cent of the individuals participating in the war would emotionally breakdown after no more than 60 continuous…… [Read More]

References

Grossman, D. And Christensen, L.W. (2007). On Combat: The Psychology and Physiology of Deadly Conflict in War and Peace. 2nd ed. PPCT Research Publications. Retrieved from:  http://www.beyondintractability.org/bksum/grossman-on-combat 

Hoge, C.W., Castro, C.A., Messer S.C., McGurk, D. Cotting, D.I. & Koffman, R.L. (2004). Combat duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, mental health problems, and barriers to care. New England Journal of Medicine, 351, 13-22. Retrieved from: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa040603#t=articleTop

Litz, B.T. (2006). A Brief Primer on the Mental Health Impact of the Wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. A National Center for PTSD Fact Sheet. Retrieved from:  http://www.ptsd.ne.gov/pdfs/impact-of-the-wars-in-afghanistan-iraq.pdf 

Williamson, V. And Mulhall, E. (2009). Invisible Wounds: Psychological and Neurological Injuries Confront a New Generation of Veterans. Iraq and Afghanistan veterans of America. Retrieved from: http://iava.org/files/IAVA_invisible_wounds_0.pdf
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Neurological Factors Related to Criminal

Words: 630 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69008780

These problems can stem from genetic factors, but can also come about with other events of abuse, neglect, and violence in young children. Diseases, such as ADHD, Autism, as well as others can also bring about these problems that cause low performance and the child needs special services to learn appropriate functioning. oys with low neuropsychological performance and family adversity showed four times the aggression levels of boys with only one of the factors, accounting for 70.2% of all violence committed by the cohort of the study (Raine, 2002).

For example, a child with ADHD can be extremely hyper, depending on the degree of ADHD that causes problems with how the hyper activity is handled. It is easy for a parent who does not know how to handle the hyper child to become frustrated. If there are other environmental factors, such as alcohol and drugs, the problems can become worse…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brain injury rate high for young delinquents. (2008). Crime Times, 14(4).

Raine, a. (2002). Biosocial studies of antisocial and violent behavior in children and adults: A review. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 30(4), 311-2-6.
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Military Retirees Are Entitled to

Words: 12717 Length: 46 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18599361



First of all only a scant few of these Veterans groups will acknowledge the "promise" of free health care; for the most part these groups will tout the benefits already promised by the Veterans Administration and assert that cuts in these benefits are the same a broken promise-or contractual breach in legal terms. The idea of the United States military making a "promise" or forging a legally binding agreement between individual veterans or groups of veterans is barred by the United States Constitution. As will be demonstrated in the Literature eview, specific Constitutional language from Article I give Congress and only Congress the express authority to make laws and regulations pertaining to the armed forces. Therefore, the idea the military breached a contract with service members is, ultimately, inherently inaccurate. Combining the lack of specific language within the materials provided by any governmental agency with the clear language of the…… [Read More]

References

.... (n.d.). The RETIRED MILITARY ADVOCATE. The RETIRED MILITARY ADVOCATE. Retrieved November 29, 2010, from  http://mrgrg-ms.org/ 

Best, R. (2003, August 7). Military Medical Care Services: Questions and Answers. Congressional Research Service, 1, 1-17.

Birkey, a. (2010, July 21). Fraudulent vets charity raised big money in Minnesota. The Minnesota Independent, p. 3.

Burrelli, D. (2008, August 12). Military Health Care: The Issue of Promised Benefits. Congressional Research Service, 1, 1-14.
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Rogers Case Study Using Person

Words: 1282 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5572398

As human beings we have an "idea" or concept of who we are and what we really should be, hence we create an Ideal Self that we constantly strive for, often in vain. If the perceived self, our own self-image, is not aligned with the actual self, how we really are, there will always be personality problems and dysfunction as one relates to one's self and the rest of the world. (Kail & Wicks 1993) In Carl's case this is certainly exacerbated by his TBI.

In some sense if a human being grows in a very healthy and psychological and socially secure and protected environment, congruence should naturally be achieved. If he or she has felt the unconditional positive reinforcement that ogers advocates, than congruence should be an outcome of certainty. (Vander Zanden 2003) However, even with the best of growth comes change and the self you are today may…… [Read More]

References

Demorest, Amy. 2005. Psychology's Grand Theorists: How Personal Experiences Shaped Professional Ideas. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Kail, RV, & Wicks-Nelson, R. 1993. Developmental Psychology. 5th ed. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Vander Zanden, James W. 2003. Human Development. Crandell, L.T. & C.H. Crandell & Thomas L., Eds.. New York: McGraw Hill.
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Therapeutic Hypothermia Th Literature Review

Words: 1253 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19017647

" This study found that a simple, external cooling protocol could be implemented easily "overnight in any system already treating post-resuscitation patients" and had an 89% success rate in reaching optimal temperature -- however, only 27 patients made up the study (Busch 2006: 1277).

A more recent, 2009 study by Castren (2009) "Scandinavian clinical practice guidelines for therapeutic hypothermia and post-resuscitation care after cardiac arrest" found the TH technique ineffective because even experienced physicians were unaware of "optimal target temperature, duration of cooling and rewarming time" and were only able "to predict the clinical outcome correctly in only 52% of the patients" (Castren 2009: 280). Supporters of the therapy admit that a lack of knowledge and training has made widespread implementation of TH problematic. In one Canadian study by Kenneday, J. et al. (2010),"The use of induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest: a survey of Canadian emergency physicians," only one half…… [Read More]

References

Busch, M. (2006). Rapid implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in comatose out-of-

hospital cardiac arrest survivors. ACTA Anaethesiol Scandinavica, 50 (10): 1277-1283.

Castren, M. (2009). Scandinavian clinical practice guidelines for therapeutic hypothermia and post-resuscitation care after cardiac arrest. ACTA Anaethesiol Scandinavica, 53 (3): 280-288.

Eisenburger, Philip, et al. (2001). Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Current Opinion in Critical Care, 7: 184-188.
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Communications in a Business Setting Compromise the

Words: 3226 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49574590

communications in a business setting compromise the work of that business, a solution must be found for the benefit of the company and of all who work there. Problems can arise when employees whose tasks require written communications skills are deficient in those skills. Problems can arise also when employees are expected to both understand and explain matters verbally and nonverbally.

The cure for the first problem could be as simple as sending the employee in question for writing instruction.

The cure for the second is, however, much less straightforward. The problem might arise because of the use, or misuse, of strategic ambiguity either by the employee exhibiting the problem, or by managers and colleagues who deal with her. Or it might be caused by an unrecognized personal problem of the employee, for example, a drinking/drugs problem or a cognitive disability of short or long duration. This paper looks at…… [Read More]

References

Ames, Genevieve M., Joel W. Grube, and Roland S. Moore. 'The relationship of drinking and hangovers to workplace problems: an empirical study." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 58, no. 1 (1997): 37+.

Cooper, Lynn O. "Listening competency in the workplace: a model for training." Business Communication Quarterly 60, no. 4 (1997): 75+.

Crombie, Winifred, and Helen Samujh. "Negative messages as strategic communication: a case study of a New Zealand company's annual executive letter." The Journal of Business Communication 36, no. 3 (1999): 229.

Krider, Diane S., and Peter G. Ross. "The experiences of women in a public relations firm: a phenomenological explication." The Journal of Business Communication 34, no. 4 (1997): 437+.
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SBAR Analysis of a Vietnam Veteran

Words: 932 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55610150

individual health history and examination of a 61-year-old American male Vietnam veteran, "Mr. John Veteran" using the SBAR approach. Mr. Veteran is married, with two adult children and three grandsons, aged 4, 7 and 12 years by his older daughter who is a registered nurse in an intensive care unit; his younger daughter is a senior in college majoring in business administration (she received a full scholarship to a private college). Mr. Veteran earned his bachelor's degree in organizational leadership at a small midwestern university. Although Mr. Veteran continues to work full time as a paralegal, he advises that he intends to "semi-retire" when he turns 62 years next year and becomes eligible for Social Security payments. Mr. Veteran smokes two packs of cigarettes a day and drinks beer on occasion, but does not take drugs, even for severe pain, because he is worried about becoming addicted to them.

Although…… [Read More]

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Impact of Post Deployment on Family Life

Words: 3156 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35927024

Post Deployment on Family Life

It is stated in a Defense Watch document entitled "Post-Deployment Stressful for Many Veterans" that deployments are not only stressful for members of the armed forces but as well deployments are "also very stressful on the families who've had to create a daily routine without their deployed soldier." (Defense Watch, 2010) The spouse of the individual deployed naturally must take on many more responsibilities in the home including those related to "…finances, household repairs, disciplining of children, and other day-to-day activities." The result is that many spouses are overwhelmed by responsibility and this produces a great deal of "anxiety, stress, and occasionally, substance abuse." (Defense Watch, 2010) In contrast, the impact is quite the opposite with the spouse left behind thriving on the extra responsibility and at the time the deployed spouse returns home, the spouse who was left with all the responsibilities at home…… [Read More]

References

Post-Deployment Stressful for Many Veterans (2006) Defense Watch. Military.com Soldiers for the Truth (SFTT) 20 Feb. Retrieved from:  http://ptsdcombat.blogspot.com/2006/02/defensewatch-post-deployment-stressful.html 

Karney, Benjamin, et al. (2008) Invisible Wounds: RAND Health Working Paper. Center for Military Health Policy Research. Retrieved from: http://www.litagion.org/pubs/working_papers/2008/RAND_WR546.sum.pdf

Network of Care for Service Members, Veterans & Their Families (2010) Retrieved from:http://montgomery.md.networkofcare.org/veterans/library/detail.cfm?id=2113&cat=443

Finley, E., Pugh, M.J.; and Jeffreys, M. (2010) Talking, Love, Time: Two Case Studies of Positive Post-Deployment Coping in Military Families. Family Life Journal. 20 Jan 2010. Retrieved from:  http://www.journaloffamilylife.org/militaryfamilies
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Comprehensive Analysis of Memory and Forgetting

Words: 27179 Length: 100 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93076981

Memory and Forgetting: A Comprehensive Analysis

Memory loss is a huge problem in an aging population.

No substantive cure for memory loss.

Forgetfulness does not always accompany aging.

Different types of memory loss:

Forgetfulness

Dementia

Alzheimer's

Confusion

The memory impairment that comes with aging may be due to confusion as well as memory loss.

Memory loss and forgetfulness may be preventable.

There are a number of different approaches to reducing forgetfulness

Background music

Categorization

Control

Daily behavioral changes

The goal of the paper began as a meta-analysis of efforts aimed to reduce forgetfulness

Too many promising approaches to aiding memory impairment to engage in a traditional meta-analysis

Look at the theoretical overlap of different known approaches that may enhance or impair memory

F. Not engaging in a meta-analysis of a single therapy because single therapies do not have therapeutic efficacy.

G. Examine the hypothetical overlap between various treatment modalities

II.…… [Read More]

References

Bottiroli, S., Rosi, A., Russo, R., Vecchi, T. & Cavallini, E. 2014. 'The cognitive effects of listening to background music on older adults: processing speed improves with upbeat music, while memory seems to benefit from both upbeat and downbeat music.' Front Aging Neurosci, vol.6. pp. 284-. Available from: [November 11, 2014].

Cairney, S.A., Durrant, S.J., Jackson, R., & Lewis, P.A. 2014. 'Sleep spindles provide indirect support to the consolidation of emotional encoding contexts.' Neuropsychologia, vol. 63, pp. 285-92.

Cowan, N. (2008). What are the differences between long-term, short-term, and working memory? Prog Brain Res, 169, pp.323-338. doi: 10.1016/S0079-6123(07)00020-9

Lo, J.C., Dijk, D.J., & Groeger, J.A. 2014. 'Comparing the effects of nocturnal sleep and daytime napping on declarative memory consolidation. PLoS One, vol. 9, no. 9, e108100. Available from: . [4 November 2014].
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Mind and Human Behavior Theories

Words: 4187 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33968140

Mind and Human Behavior

Define and discuss a particular theory of consciousness

Consciousness can be best grasped in context as a facet of an interactive wakeful state wherein most cognitive processing occurs non-consciously. However, on combining non-conscious and conscious processing in the wakeful state, how can we differentiate one from the other, how can consciousness be defined, and what purpose does it serve? The conclusions drawn with respect to the former question critically influence how the latter question is answered. What property makes a state non-conscious rather than conscious? This section will support the argument that, out of all possible answers commonly put forth (i.e., accessibility, intentionality, reflexivity, subjectivity), the element-- reflexive, auto noetic-consciousness -- is the only one observed solely in the state of consciousness (Peters, 2013).

The Quantum Theory of Consciousness

The consciousness issue has opposed traditional approaches, in which the human brain is perceived as a computer…… [Read More]

References

Albensi, B.C. and Janigro, D. (2003).Traumatic brain injury and its effects on synaptic plasticity. Brain Inj. 17(8): p. 653-63.

Anderson, J. R. (1990). Cognitive psychology and its implications. New York: Freeman.

Cerasoli, C. P., & Ford, M. T. (2014). Intrinsic Motivation, Performance, and the Mediating Role of Mastery Goal Orientation: A Test of Self-Determination Theory.JournalOf Psychology, 148(3), 267-286. doi:10.1080/00223980.2013.783778

Eccles, J. S., & Wigfield, A. (2002).Motivational beliefs, values, and goals.Annual Review of Psychology, 53, 109-132.
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Depressed Fracture Linear Fracture Skull Include Procedure Pathology

Words: 842 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37781228

Skull Fracture

PATHOLOGIES AND PROCEDURES

The skull is hard, resilient and provides excellent protection to the brain (Heller, 2012; Khan, 2013). ut a severe head injury caused by a blow or impact can fracture the skull and even injure the brain. Damage to the brain can be in the form of damage to the nervous system tissue and bleeding. It can also be in the form of blood clots under the skull that can press against brain tissue. A simple fracture breaks the bone without damaging the skin. A break on the cranial bone, which resembles a thin line, without splinters, depression or distortion is called a linear skull fracture. A break with a depression towards the brain is called a depressed skull fracture. And a break in the bone with splinters or loss of skin is called a compound fracture. Causes of all these fractures are head trauma, falls,…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Best Practice (2011). Skull fractures. BMJ Evidence Centre: BMJ Publishing Group,

Limited. Retrieved on September 25, 2013 from http://www.bestpractice.bmj.com/best_practice/monograph/398/treatment/step-by-step.html

Heller, J.L. (2012). Skull fractures. MedlinePlus: Adam, Inc. Retrieved on September 26,

2013 from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000060.htm
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Measuring Occupational Performance Outcomes Using

Words: 3323 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13115220

Do not sit on the bottom of the tub, this causes too much bending of the hip. Use liquid soap to avoid dropping the bar of soap. A long-handles bath sponge will help in bathing below the knees."

The necessary precautions for the post-operative housekeeping process, according to the Center for Patient and Community Education (2009), "sit for rest breaks as needed. Slide objects along the countertop rather than carrying then. Use a utility cart with wheels to transfer items to and from the table. Attach a bag or basket to your walker or wear a fanny pack to carry small items. Use a long-handled reacher to reach objects on the floor. emove all throw rugs and long electrical cords to avoid tripping in your home. Watch out for slippery/wet areas on the floor." (Center for Patient and Community Education, 2009) Certainly watch out for slippery floors if pets are…… [Read More]

References

Case-Smith, J. (2003). Outcomes in hand rehabilitation using occupational therapy services. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 57, 409-506

(2009) Center for Patient and Community Education in association with the Department of Outcomes Management and the Communications & Marketing Department at California Pacific Medical Center. http://www.cpmc.org/learning/documents/rg-thr-home.html

Cipriano, L.E., Chesworth, B.M., Anderson, C.K., & Zaric, G.S. (2007). Predicting joint replacement waiting times. Health Care Management Science, 10(2), 195. Retrieved from  http://search.proquest.com/docview/227985557?accountid=13044 

Cleveland Clinic (2011) Total Hip Replacement. http://my.clevelandclinic.org/services/hip_replacement/or_overview.aspx
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Sociology -- Research When Someone

Words: 353 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96102795

It is something that has to be addressed and dealt with, especially with troops coming back from overseas with all kinds of brain injuries and other problems. The Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) is one of the best places to get the job guidance and assessment that a person with a brain injury needs so that person can go on to be a more productive member of society. A correlation study was utilized in this particular article so that the assessments and other concerns could be addressed and it could be determined which of them had something to do with how easily a person could be employed and how much that person made, and which ones did not. Although some of the variables were more significant than others when it came to whether a person could be gainfully employed and perform at a level equal to those without a brain injury,…… [Read More]

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Children Learning in the Classroom

Words: 623 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19981722

Next, estwood explains how educators must compartmentalize lesson plans as to minimize the amount of information the student must cognitively digest. The smaller the lesson plans, the greater chance that child has at retaining that information. It is large lesson plans filled with complex amounts of information which provides an environment which the memory challenged child will undoubtedly fail.

Another key method for improving learning abilities in children with memory issues is the use of visual material to help aid recall. Visual cues are one of the most efficient ways to improve recall in children with memory loss. By relating necessary information to a picture or object which is less likely to be forgotten, the child will be able to associate the two and therefore remember one with the other. Teachers must also encourage their students to associate information with visual cues which are most familiar with each individual student,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Westwood, Peter. (2003). Students with physical disabilities and sensory impairments.

Commonsense Methodology for Children with Special Needs: Strategies for Regular Classrooms. RoutledgeFalmer. New York. Pp. 36-54.
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Emerging Social Work Crisis for Veterans and Their Families

Words: 2224 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95173111

careers, many social workers will encounter individuals who are veterans of active duty military service. Like other client populations, veterans may experience issues with their day-to-day living requirements that require assistance, but these individuals may also experience a wide range of problems that are unique to service in the armed forces. This paper reviews the relevant literature to determine how current social work policies in the United States address issues of inequality, oppression or social justice for military veterans, the social work staff's ability to provide quality social work services, and ethical issues that affect social work values and practice in this area. An analysis concerning alternative approaches that social work and others could advocate or organize on behalf of veterans is followed by an assessment of which models of advocacy (Jannson or Hayes & Mickelson) are currently being used with this client population. Finally, a summary of the research…… [Read More]

References

Adams, C. (2013, March 13). Millions went to war in Iraq, Afghanistan, leaving many with lifelong scars. McClatchy Newspapers. Retrieved from  http://www.mcclatchydc.com/ 

2013/03/14/185880/millions-went-to-war-in-iraq-afghanistan.html#storylink=cpy.

Franklin, E. (2009, August). The emerging needs of veterans: A call to action for the social work profession. Health and Social Work, 34(3), 163-169.

Haynes, K.S. & Mickelson, J.S. (2000). The debate. In Affecting social change: Social workers in the political arena (pp. 23 -- 39). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
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Looking at Psychology of Violence

Words: 3967 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96457880

violence and aggression. First, different aspects of violence, such as diversity and culture, gender and psychosocial aspects are discussed. And, the ethical and legal dimensions of mandatory reporting of child and elder abuse are looked into. The emerging technologies in the field of psychology are also discussed in relation to the topic of violence and other forms of deviant behavior. Lastly, correlations of the causality and violence prevention interventions are given.

MFT: Psychology of Violence

The history of the world is mired with incidences of violence. Violence traces its origins back to prehistory, and there is barely a community, society or individual that has never experienced or witnessed some form of violence. A single incidence of violence can be powerful and unbearable whether it is terrorism, war, suicide, homicide or even systemic injustices (structural violence -- whereby there are access barriers to health care, social justice, or some other type…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, C., & Bushman, B. (2002). Human Aggression. Annual Review of Psychology, 52, 27-51.

Duxbury, J., & Wright, K. (2011, March 7). Should nurses restrain violent and aggressive patients? Retrieved from Nursing Times: http://www.nursingtimes.net/nursing-practice/specialisms/mental-health/-should-nurses-restrain-violent-and-aggressive-patients/5026793.article

EIGE. (2015). What is gender-based violence. Retrieved from European Institute for Gender Equality: http://eige.europa.eu/gender-based-violence/what-is-gender-based-violence

Felson, R., Deane, G., & Armstrong, D. (2008). Do theories of crime or violence explain race differences in delinquency. Social Science Research, 624-641.
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Teachers performance and learning outcomes

Words: 9267 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21485460

Learner in Monitoring His/Her Own Learning Progress

The following are various ways I use to make learning effective by helping the pupil to monitor their own learning. These approaches encourage positive relationships in the class environment and enhance the emotional well-being of the learners. They also encourage learners to participate in the class activity. Effective application of these qualities depends on how well I have combined them with pedagogical skills and other appropriate behavior management strategies that are tailored for the learners in focus. This section describes a number of these pedagogical skills (Cooper & Cefai, 2013).

Pedagogical skills

As an effective teacher I take my time to plan lessons in detail. This planning ensures that the learning needs of a diverse class are taken into consideration. The details include auditory and visual approaches to the delivery of content. It also aims at encouraging learners to actively participate in the…… [Read More]

References

Afasic. (2016). Language Disorder - Receptive Language Disorder. London: Helplines Partnership.

Cooper, P., & Cefai, C. (2013). Understanding and Supporting Students with Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties. Malta: European Centre for Educational Resilience and Socio-Emotional Health.

Mary Magee, Q., David, O., Cynthia, W., Tom, H., & Dehaven, B. (2000). Teaching and Working with Children Who Have Emotional and Behavioral Challenges. . Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research - Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice.

Ministry of Education - Province of British Colomb. (2011). A Guide for Teachers - Supporting Students with Learning Disabilities. Ministry of Education.
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Technology Chapter 9 Read Mary Mcclain

Words: 1083 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2762374

Hopefully the school she chooses to attend will have similar resources. Some sources Mary may find useful include the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) website [www.ada.gov], the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, which has resources for people who have suffered traumatic brain injury [http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/tbi/tbi.htm].

References

Beard, L.A., Carpenter, L.B., & Johnston, L. (2011). Assistive technology: Access for all students. 2e Kindle edition. Columbus, Ohio: Merrill.

Speaker. 2011. Softonic International. Retrieved from http://speaker.en.softonic.com/

ask 2: Identify 4 web sites that you will continue to utilize as an educator for A or UDL assessment or planning. Please specify why you prefer to use them.

Closing the Gap Solutions [www.closingthegap.com] is an affordable subscription-based resource -- $37.50 per year after a fourteen-day free trial. he site has an electronic journal with articles explaining the use of various Assistive echnology devices and strategies. A searchable resource directory allows the user to search…… [Read More]

The U.S. Department of Education's IDEA website [http://idea.ed.gov] is designed as a "one-stop shop" resource. It features news articles, links to events, a document archive, and many major topics of interest to special educators and anyone who works with this student population. Like the website above, there is the capability for submitting questions. It can be reassuring to have someone to ask when one cannot find the answer being sought. The website is continually updated, so there is new information all the time. When teaching students and families to be advocates, it is a source that a teacher can highly recommend.

A teacher should always be familiar with the offerings of the state department of education website. In the case of California, there is a comprehensive section on the use of assistive technology [http://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/se/sr/astvtech.asp]. The site explains assistive technology and the law, and provides a number of links with basic AT resources. As with two of the other sites mentioned, there is a point of contact for users with questions.

All four websites will be useful in my career as a teacher; they provide professional resources I can use and also ones I can recommend to colleagues and families. The sites are dynamic, adding new content as laws change and more information becomes available.
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Victim Advocate Explain How Your

Words: 770 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1981684

However, I was simply unaware that the problem was so huge. To know that today's global slave trade is far larger than the slave trade was at the height of the Atlantic Slave trade if horrifying. Even more horrifying is the fact that many slaveholders are in Western countries where slavery has long been illegal, and these slaves are hidden away and may never be detected. Three forms of human trafficking that I noticed were smuggling-related trafficking, where immigrants seeking to come to the United States are instead diverted into sweat shops and forced to work as laborers, the sex-slave trade, and the domestic labor slave trade. Most troubling to me was child trafficking. Honestly, after watching the videos, I went beyond them to further examine the problem. I found a wide variety in numbers, but consistently saw that between 100,000 and 300,000 children in the U.S. are at risk…… [Read More]

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Changes Terrorism Has Brought to the United States

Words: 3084 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47110667

Terrorism Has Changed the United States

The United States has experienced considerable threats of terrorism in the past decade similar to other parts of the world. This threat has largely emerged from the fact that groups like Al-Qaeda and other terror organizations have continued to pose a significant threat to the United States homeland. Despite the success that the country has achieved in eliminating terror groups and organizations like al-Qaeda, affiliate and extremist groups continue to pose a major threat to the United States. The increase in terrorist activities and incidents in the recent past have contributed to various measures adopted by the United States as well as other countries towards combating terrorism. These efforts have significantly transformed the United States and other countries around the globe with regards to security measures, immigration, and foreign policy.

The Threat of Terrorism to the United States

The United States wasn't officially involved…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gellman, Barton, and Greg Miller. "Black Budget' Summary Details U.S. Spy Network's Successes, Failures and Objectives." The Washington Post. The Washington Post, 29 Aug. 2013. Web. 14 Apr. 2015. .

Green, Matthew. "How 9/11 Changed America: Four Major Lasting Impacts." Online Posting. The Lowdown - Decoding the News. KQED Newsroom, 10 Sept. 2014. Web. 14 Apr. 2015. .

Jenkins, Brian M. "How a Decade of Terror Changed America." RAND Corporation - Objective Analysis, Effective Solutions. RAND Corporation., 30 Dec. 2009. Web. 14 Apr. 2015. .

Plumer, Brad. "Nine Facts about Terrorism in the United States since 9/11." The Washington Post. The Washington Post, 11 Sept. 2013. Web. 14 Apr. 2015. .
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Treatment for the Homeless

Words: 5851 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27753025

Homeless Mental Health

Mental health is an issue that is deemed to be very under-treated and very under-diagnosed within the United States. Beyond that, there are populations that are much more at risk than others. A good example would be the prison population where drug use and mental health issues are both rampant. However, there is another group that is highly stricken and very vexing and difficult to treat and that would be the homeless. Indeed, many people that are homeless are in that position due to mental health issues. Mental health is often not the only issue involved as comorbidity can exist with substance abuse. However, mental health will be the focus of this report. Facets of the homeless with mental health that will be focused upon within this report will include issues like diversity, ethics, values, social justice, diagnosing of patients, initiation/termination of care, aftercare, and the broader…… [Read More]

References

Belcher, J. R. (1988). Rights vs. Needs of Homeless Mentally Ill Persons. Social Work, 33(5), 398.

Chambers, C., Chiu, S., Scott, A., Tolomiczenko, G., Redelmeier, D., Levinson, W., & Hwang,

S. (2014). Factors Associated with Poor Mental Health Status Among Homeless Women

With and Without Dependent Children. Community Mental Health Journal, 50(5), 553-
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Suicide and How it Impacts Military Families

Words: 2840 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62023833

Suicide and How it Impacts Military Families

Description of the Case or Problem

As the number of suicides amidst the U.S. Armed Service members have constantly increased in the past decade, so has the rate of survivors affected by military suicide, leading to loss of life. Whenever a loved one loses their life as an outcome of suicide, the resulting trauma and shock might compromise the survivors' physical and mental health. This leaves the victims more susceptible to a more agonizing and intricate grief process. Those individuals bereaved by suicide are at an increasing danger of also committing suicide. Peer encouragement, a recognized recuperation method from addictions and sickness, has been clinically monitored to be broadly used by the suicide loss survivors. esearchers have given minimal interest to effective interventions for the victims of suicide loss in the general U.S. population; less is recognized regarding the efficiency of peer support…… [Read More]

References

AFSP. (2014, August 8). President Obama Announces Executive Actions to Address Veteran and Military Suicide. Retrieved from American Foundation for Suicide Prevention: https://www.afsp.org/advocacy-public-policy/policy-news-updates/president-obama-announces-executive-actions-to-address-veteran-and-military-suicide

American Association of Suicidology. (2010). Survivors of suicide fact sheet. Retrieved from American Association of Suicidology: http://www.suicidology.org/c/document_library/get_file?folderId=232&name=D

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. (2010). Survivor research: AFSP and NIMH propose research agenda. Retrieved from American Foundation for Suicide Prevention: http://www.afsp.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.viewpage&page_id=2D9DF73E -BB25-0132-3AD7715D74BFF585

Cerel, J., Padgett, J. H., Conwell, Y., & Reed, G. A. (2009). A call for research: The need to better understand the impact of support groups for suicide survivors. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 39(3), 269-281.
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Memory Models and Assessment the

Words: 851 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45547878

More generalized assessments include the Wechsler Memory Scale, created by the founder of the IQ test of that name, which offers a generalized assessment of different memory types (sensory, short, and long-term) and is most appropriate for adults.

In general, two basic types of neuropsychological memory tests exist. "In almost all objective tests, quantitative results are compared with some normative standard, including data from groups of non-brain injured persons and groups of persons with various kinds of brain injury. If the norms are based on age and educational achievement, valid comparison can be made between an individual's performance and that of persons in known diagnostic categories as well as persons who do not have a diagnosis of brain injury. Qualitative assessment of neuropsychological tests provides a look at the processes an individual may use in producing the quantitative scores. Analysis of the pattern of performance among a large number of…… [Read More]

References

Human memory: Atkinson-Shiffrin Model. (2010). IPFW. Retrieved February 9, 2010 at  http://users.ipfw.edu/abbott/120/AtkinsonShifrin.html 

SCATBI. (2010). Academic Therapy. Retrieved February 9. 2010 at  http://www.academictherapy.com 

Swiercinsky, Dennis. (2001). Neuropsychological testing. Brain Source. Retrieved February 9,

2010 at http://www.brainsource.com/nptests.htm
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Identifying and Controlling Violent Health Care Patients and Employees

Words: 3181 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67821106

Controlling Violent Health Care Patients and Employees

This is a paper discussion on the identification and control of violence amongst health care patients and employees. It has 11 sources.

An Introduction to Violence

Violence has become a common feature of our society found in every area of the nation from quiet neighborhoods in the suburbs to the urbanized cities of the U.S. To make the matter worse, the media including radio, TV, private cable networks, have become a part of the culture that promotes the concepts of violence, if there is no violence exhibited in either every day programs then these programs, including those of children are presumed to be a failure. Hence, it would not be wrong to assume that our entire culture has been virtually gripped in a sphere of violence to which there is no end.

This culture of violence continues despite the fact that the sociologists…… [Read More]

References

Erickson L. Williams-Evans SA. Attitudes of emergency nurses regarding patient assaults. J Emerg Nurs. 2000; 26(3):210-215.

Felton JS. Violence prevention at the health care site. Occup Med. 1997; 12(4):701-715.

Hegal MT, Ferguson RJ. Differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) to reduce aggressive behavior following traumatic brain injury. Behav Modif. 2000; 24(1):94-101.

Levin PF, Hewitt JB, Misner ST. Insights of nurses about assault in hospital-based emergency departments. Image J. Nurs Sch. 1998; 30(3):249-254.
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Visual Agnosia

Words: 668 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72332330

Prosopagnosia

Agnosia is a clinical term that describes a condition where the individual fails to recognize certain types of objects in specific sensory domains (Farah, 2004). This failure of recognition cannot be due to some type of a sensory impairment or to an expressive language impairment. Visual agnosia is a specific agnosia for visually -- based stimuli. People who have the different types of visual agnosias can actually see the object, but they are not able to identify the object (Farah, 2004). A visual agnosia can be very specific and limited to an aspect of vision such as color, movement, or specific types of objects. The fact that a visual agnosia can be very specific supports the theory that various areas in the visual cortex are specialized for particular types of functions (Farah, 2004). One of the most interesting visual agnosias is called prosopagnosia, which is a difficulty in recognizing…… [Read More]

References

Bate, S. (2011). Understanding facial recognition difficulties in children: Prosopagnosia management strategies for parents and professionals. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental

Health Nursing, 18(6), e17-e18.

Farah, M.J. (2004). Visual agnosia. Cambridge, MA: MIT press.

Hatfield, R.C. (2013). The everything guide to the human brain. Avon, MA: Adams.
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Campbell's Notion of the Heroic Monomyth

Words: 1405 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49166444

Campbell's Notion Of The Heroic Monomyth

Dear Alexander,

I am hope you had a happy seventh birthday. Remember to make wise decisions in your youth so when you get to be my age you will be successful. Anyway, how I miss those days as a White House Consultant for all Optical questions and concerns, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) eye care coordinator and overall Supervisor of the Optometry Clinic, with the Department of Medicine. However, since my stay in the closing days of the Iraq War, it has been difficult.

As you have already seen on the news, I was hand-selected to assist the optometrist who provided VIP eye coverage at the White House Medical Clinic. However, what you don't know is that I was shipped out to the war zone the very next day. I have to admit, my reputation precedes me. As a SGT, I took on the task…… [Read More]

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Mental Health for Military Personnel

Words: 714 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15504681

National Council for Behavioral Health (n.d.) points out, at least thirty percent of active duty military personnel suffer from a serious mental health disorder that requires treatment, but less than half of these individuals receive treatment. However, there are a variety of state and national mental health services specifically for individuals and families affiliated with the military. The state of Washington maintains a list of mental health resources including family resources for military and veteran families (Washington Mental Health Care esources, n.d.). The state of California's Department of Health Care Services (n.d.) offers a similar set of resources including suicide prevention hotlines for homeless veterans. The California Department of Veterans Affairs (n.d.) draws attention to the range of state and federal resources available, including those that are funded under the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA), Proposition 63. The primary resource for service members and their families is the Department of…… [Read More]

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Impact of Rehabilitation Services on the Independent Living of Individuals With Low Vision

Words: 1551 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77063

Low Vision Literature Review

The impact of low vision on a person's quality of life can be devastating… people with low vision can improve their quality of life through rehabilitation services to teach them how to use their remaining vision more effectively. Using a variety of visual aids may bring them back or help them keep their independence (Kupfer, 1999 as cited in indsor & indsor, 2001).

Low vision or vision loss has been operationally defined most commonly as that associated with macular degeneration due to age that accounts for more than half of all reported cases of visual impairment. There are other known causes of vision loss that include but may not be limited to corneal degeneration, eye injuries, traumatic brain injury, brain tumors, stroke, toxoplasmosis, optic atrophy, glaucoma, retinal dystrophies, retinal detachment, retinopathy of prematurity, achormatopsia and histoplasmosis (indsor & indsor, 2001). Moreover, visual impairment is described as…… [Read More]

Works cited

Alliance for Eye and Vision Research. (1995). A vision of hope for older Americans' progress and opportunities in eye and vision research. An official report to the White House Conference on Aging. Alliance for Eye and Vision Research.

American Optometric Association. (1997). AOA Clinical Practice Guidelines Care of the Patient with Low Vision. St. Louis: American Optometric Association.

Kupfer, K. (1999). Announcing the National Low Vision Education Program. National Eye Institute.

Scott, I., Smiddy, W., Schiffman, J., Feuer, W., & Pappas, C. (1999). Quality of life
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Cognitive Disabilities and Family Cognitive

Words: 1674 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83568746



One area that was missed in the literature was the effectiveness of various intervention strategies in reducing stress in families with persons with disabilities. It is not known what interventions have been tried and which ones were most effective in helping families to build coping mechanisms and reduce stress. This is the obvious next step into developing a thorough understanding of the topic area.

This literature review revealed several key trends into research regarding families and cognitive impairment. This area continues to be an area of interest. However, the focus seems to be shifting from a psychological perspective into a sociological based approach. There is much more interest in recent years regarding the issues of cognitive disability and its impact on society at large. In the area of persons with cognitive disability, having families of their own, politics will play a factor in the direction of research in the future.…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, V., Catroppa, C., & Haritou., M. et al. (2005). Identifying factors contributing to child and family outcome 30 months after traumatic brain injury in children. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. 76(3):401-408,

Family Village. (2006). Cognitive Disability/Mental Retardation. Retrieved April 9, 2009 from http://www.familyvillage.wisc.edu/lib_cdmr.htm

Feldman, M., Varghese, J., Ramsay, J., & Rajska, D. (2002). Relationships between social

support, stress, and mother-child interactions in mothers with intellectual disabilities.
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Major Depression

Words: 4777 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90936662

Clinical Depression

Major depressions or unipolar depressions are some of the names by which the term Clinical depression is known, which is a type of depressive disorder. To explain, it is a condition that is to be diametrically observed, in the sense that the expert does not count on a patient's self-report but checks for indications of depression that can be noticed and recognized. (Schatzberg, 2002) Clinical depression is a term that explains a situation serious enough to require medical, that is expert help and may even require pharmacological involvement. Clinical depression, as stated by various medical sources, survives for a period of two weeks and is usually not impetuous because of any external being or thing.

In a year, clinical depression affects at least 19 million American individuals. Not considering whether the individual is young or old, man or woman, regardless of race or income any body can be…… [Read More]

References

Abeles, Norman & Victor, Tara (2003) Unique Opportunities for Psychology in Mental Health Care for Older Adults, Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice V10 N1

Denton, Donald D. (2003) Beating Depression: The Journey to Hope. American Journal of Psychiatry; 160: 1533-a-1534-a

Fink, Max (2003) Dealing With Depression: A Commonsense Guide to Mood Disorders. American Journal of Psychiatry; 160: 1365-1366

Frank, Ellen & Kupfer. David J. (2003) Progress in the Therapy of Mood Disorders: Scientific Support. American Journal of Psychiatry; 160: 1207-1208
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D E A Tell Me and I'll

Words: 1742 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52948107

These were followed by positive school climate, administrative support, collegial support and collegial friendships. At the bottom of the list were salary and benefits. Conversely, lack of administrative support, role conflict, and difficulty working with colleagues were the main causes of attrition.

In order to provide high quality programs for children with disabilities, and ensure that they make good progress toward attaining their goals and meet increasingly rigorous academic standards, the recruitment and retention of qualified, committed and talented teachers is essential.

eferences

Chambers, C. (2008, December). Special education challenges. District administration. etrieved November 19, 2010, from http://www.districtadministration.com/viewarticle.aspx?articleid=1778

Chinese Proverbs (NDI). Thinkexist.com. etrieved November 19, 2010, from http://thinkexist.com/quotation/tell_me_and_i-ll_forget-show_me_and_i_may/10546.html

Code of Federal egulations. (1999, July 1). Child with a disability. Code of federal regulations §300.7(c) (10). etrieved November 19, 2010, from http://www.nectac.org/idea/300regs.asp

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (2010). K-12 academics. K12academics.com. etrieved November 19, 2010, from http://www.k12academics.com/us-education-legislation/individuals-disabilities-education-act-idea

Peterson, J. (2007). A…… [Read More]

References

Chambers, C. (2008, December). Special education challenges. District administration. Retrieved November 19, 2010, from http://www.districtadministration.com/viewarticle.aspx?articleid=1778

Chinese Proverbs (NDI). Thinkexist.com. Retrieved November 19, 2010, from  http://thinkexist.com/quotation/tell_me_and_i-ll_forget-show_me_and_i_may/10546.html 

Code of Federal Regulations. (1999, July 1). Child with a disability. Code of federal regulations §300.7(c) (10). Retrieved November 19, 2010, from  http://www.nectac.org/idea/300regs.asp 

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (2010). K-12 academics. K12academics.com. Retrieved November 19, 2010, from  http://www.k12academics.com/us-education-legislation/individuals-disabilities-education-act-idea