World War I Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

WWI Analysis Examining the Significance and Impact of WWI on U S History

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69598273

World War Analysis

WWI analysis examining the significance and impact of WWI on U.S. history

In the early 20th Century, a general fear existed that a huge war would break out due to the circumstances existing at that time and therefore every small incident was considered deadly. However the triggering factor was the assassination of Austrian Archduke Ferdinand in June 1914 resulting in World War I (WWI) or the Great War. WWI took place from 1914 to 1918 and major countries took part in it; war resulting in drastic consequences such as collapse of economies and death of millions of people. The two main groups fighting against each other were Triple Alliance and Triple Entente (also known as the Western Powers). The U.S. did not participate in the war in the beginning and tried its best to remain neutral. However, it was forced to join the Triple Entente when German…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

WWI the Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

Words: 1553 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55010445

WWI

The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife represented a culmination of several concurrent forces, all of which led to the outbreak of World War. The concurrent forces that led to World War One can be loosely grouped under the following categories: nationalism, imperialism, and militarism. Within each of these categories are ample sub-categories that can testify to the extent of forces that shaped the pre-war conditions throughout not just Europe but the entire world. World War One was a total war for many reasons: it involved serious civilian casualties on a horrific scale for all parties. The Great War also brought to light the impact of globalization on the global economy and political enterprise. Nationalism, imperialism, and militarism all played a part in shaping participation in World War One; the effects of which continue to reverberate.

As Marshall (2001) points out, "Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy were all…… [Read More]

References

Allan, T. (2003). The Causes of World War I. Chicago: Reed Elsevier.

Bosco, P., & Bosco, A. (2003). World War I. Infobase.

Heyman, N.M. (1997). World War I. Greenwood.

Marshall, S.L.A. (2001). World War I. New York: First Mariner.
View Full Essay

WWI and the Russian Revolution

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24086671

The makers of the peace settlement hoped to reduce the possibility of future conflict by taking away Germany's army and controlling its political system. This proved impossible, and only provoked more violence in the long run, as Germans grew more sympathetic to fascism as a result.

Third, why did the United States Senate reject the Treaty of Versailles? What objections did they have to the treaty, especially to the League of Nations? Why was the United States not ready for peace through collective security?

The United States at the time was still isolationist in its philosophy. It had come to participate in the war fairly late, and had little appreciation about how bloody and terrible it had been, through the system of trench warfare, for the major participating European powers. The U.S. still believed the Atlantic Ocean could protect itself from most major European conflicts, and it had felt less…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

WWI and WWII Sonar in Naval Warfare

Words: 4448 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19694347

Sonar Research and Naval Warfare: 1914-1954

During both World War I and World War II, there were a number of informational tactics used by the Navy in order to gain ground on enemy troops. One of those was sonar research, because it provided them with knowledge they would not have otherwise had (Hackmann, 1984). Sonar is not perfect, but a great deal of work has gone into it since its creation, and that has helped it to become a more valuable tool for Naval operations. Sonar is used for navigation, but also for communication and the detection of objects, primarily underwater (Urick, 1983). There are two types of sonar: passive and active. In active sonar, pings are sent out to search for other objects (Hackmann, 1984). Passive sonar does not send out a signal, but only listens for the pings and signals of others (Hackmann, 1984). Both have their place,…… [Read More]

References

Abbatiello, J. (2005). Anti-submarine warfare in World War I: British Naval aviation and the defeat of the U-boats. NY: Routledge.

Adamthwaite, A.P. (1992). The making of the Second World War. New York: Routledge.

Barber, J., & Harrison, M. (2006). Patriotic war, 1941 -- 1945. In Ronald Grigor Suny, ed. The Cambridge History of Russia, Volume III: The Twentieth Century. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hackmann, W. (1984). Seek & Strike: Sonar, anti-submarine warfare and the Royal Navy 1914-54. London: Her Majesty's Stationery Office.
View Full Essay

WWI & WW2 Comparing and

Words: 1852 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68215387

The U.S. emerged as a leading superpower and the sole nuclear power in the world, determined to play a leading role in international politics. The post-Second World War era saw the start of a prolonged Cold War in which the U.S. competed for political domination around the world with Soviet Communism until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990. The Second World War also helped the country to overcome the economic depression of the 1930s as its wartime industrial production stimulated its economy.… [Read More]

References

Arima, Y. (2003). "The Way to Pearl Harbor: U.S. Vs. Japan." ICE Case Studies:

Number 118, December, 2003. Retrieved on May 26, 2007 at http://www.american.edu/TED/ice/japan-oil.htm

Dwyer, J.J. (2004). "The United States and World War I." Lew Rockwell.com. Retrieved on May 26, 2007 at http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig3/dwyer3.html

Keylor, William R. (2007). "World War I." Encyclopedia Encarta Online. On May 26, 2007 at http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761569981/World_War_I.html
View Full Essay

WWI WWII or Nazi

Words: 928 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75308216

Nazi Germany

Nazi Propaganda and the Spread of Fascism

World War II was precipitated by the rise of fascism throughout Europe. As the mores of socialism began to take root in many parts of the continent, fascism emerged as a powerful counterpoint. For nations like Italy, Spain and Germany, the consequences of a sustained and devastating recession would be a coalescing of support behind strong, self-proclaimed and authoritarian leaders. Certainly, most notorious among them would be Adolph Hitler, whose Nazi party would first occupy Austria and Germany before ultimately pursuing a more global agenda. However, for our discussion, the primary interest is the degree of success that the Nazi party had in ultimately penetrating Germany with its values, ideals and policies. As the discussion here will show, propaganda would play a central role in the ability of the Nazi party to garner support and generate the impassioned loyalty of the…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

German Propaganda Archive. (2013). Es Lebe Deutschland. Bytwerk.com.

History Learning Site (HLS). (2012). Propaganda in Nazi Germany. Historylearningsite.co.uk.

Welch, D. (2011). Nazi Propaganda. BBC History.
View Full Essay

World War One Leadership Military Political

Words: 717 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85056402

leadership is crucial to successful political military campaigns. Close scrutiny of the military and political leaders of the First World War demonstrate how political leaders use methods like propaganda and ideology to forge their victories in the psyches of the people, helping military leaders achieve their goals by engendering trust, courage, and conviction in spite of tremendous hardships and even death. Similarly, the victories of military leaders become critical for effective political campaigns. Military leadership requires a different set of tools and tactics than political leadership but both are crucial for desirable outcomes.

One of the most successful political leaders during World War One ended up being Vladimir Lenin, who spearheaded the Bolshevik Revolution and ensured the enduring success of Soviet policies. Lenin's leadership skills far exceeded those of Czar Nicholas II, who failed to inspire the people of Russia in the way Lenin had, thus leading to the demise…… [Read More]

References

Lenin, Vladimir. Appeal for Revolt Issued by Lenin, 19 October 1917. Retrieved online: http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/lenin_19oct1917.htm

Lenin, Vladimir. Lenin's Proclamation of 7 November 1917. Retrieved online: http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/lenin_25oct1917.htm

Sir Douglas Haig's 2nd Despatch (Somme), 23 December 1916. Retrieved online: http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/haigsommedespatch.htm

Sir Douglas Haig's Final Despatch, 21 March 1919. Retrieved online: http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/haiglastdespatch.htm
View Full Essay

American and German Perspective in WWI

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73554165

World War I

The First World War began in the summer of 1914 with the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. The conflict lasted through late 1918, concluding with the treaty of Versailles. The war to end all wars, as it was commonly known, was dominated by trench warfare. Due to numerous advances in defense technology and a lack of tactical advances, both the Allied Nations and the Central Powers, were stymied by a lack of military advances. Early victories in France, by the German army, and in Serbia by the Austrian/Hungarian forces proved to be less than decisive, due to miscommunication between the two Central powers.

Not only was this the First war between so many great world powers, additionally this was the first war to be affected by, and ultimately fought, not only on the battle field but also in the press rooms. Due to expansion in…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

What Led to World War 1 And How Did it End for Different Nations

Words: 1449 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2248747

WW1

RUSSIA

In 1917 Russia suffered two revolutions, which resulted in a drastic change of leadership. Tsarist Russia became Lenin's Soviet Russia and the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk was signed shortly thereafter in March 1918 with Germany. The treaty gave Germany much: over a million square millions and 60 million people -- a third of Russia's population -- were annexed. Russia lost railroads, factories, the majority of its coal and iron -- but Germany was in no position to immediately profit from the treaty. The Western Front was calling. Russia gained some peace from the treaty, and could now focus on its internal problems resulting from the recent overthrow and the war effort. Leading up to the treaty, Imperial Russia had suffered devastating casualties and food shortages. The Bolsheviks called for an end to the war on the Eastern Front, and Germany supported this call, allowing Lenin himself to return to…… [Read More]

Reference List

Grebler, L. (1940). The Cost of the World War to Germany and Austria-Hungary. Yale Keynes, J.M. (1920). The Economic Consequences of the Peace. NY: Harcourt Brace.

Stone, O., Kuznick, P. (2012). The Untold History of the United States. NY: Gallery

Books.
View Full Essay

Effect of WWI on Literature

Words: 1616 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8625859

WWI and Literature

World War I was certainly one of the most productive periods in literature with millions of poets and authors emerging on the scene and each one contributing tremendously to the growth and progress of literature. It is quite strange that while WWI was a deeply disturbing and a largely horrifying experience for most countries, it inspired writers and poets around the globe and this resulted in significant growth of world literature.

In England alone, more than 2000 poets emerged during this period as Harvey (1993) elaborates: "From the very first week, the 1914-18 war inspired enormous quantities of poetry and fiction. The claim that three million war poems were written in Germany in the first six months of hostilities is difficult to substantiate, but Catherine W. Reilly has counted 2,225 English poets of the First World War, of whom 1,808 were civilians. For example, William Watson (then…… [Read More]

References

A.D. Harvey, First World War literature. Magazine Title: History Today. Volume: 43. Publication Date: November 1993.

Fussell, Paul. The Great War and Modern Memory. New York: Oxford UP, 1975.

Hemingway, Ernest. Complete Poems. Lincoln: U. Of Nebraska, 1983.

Granville Hicks, The Great Tradition: An Interpretation of American Literature since the Civil War. Publisher: Biblo and Tannen. Place of Publication: New York. Publication Year: 1967.
View Full Essay

Impact of WWI

Words: 975 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39166867

World War I

The Causes and How America Joined the War

The events that led to the causes of the first world war had its roots in the Balkans in late July 1914 and there are causes including political, territorial, and economic conflicts among the great European powers in the four decades leading up to the war. Militarism, a complex web of alliances, imperialism and nationalism were some of the other causes that led up to the First World War.

The root for the Second World War lay in the peace accords and the punishments that were meted out to the Germans after the First World War and the sense of humiliation and economic debacle following the end of the First World War.

The animosity between the Americans and the Germans started with the sinking of the Lusitania as she made her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York in…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Reconstructing the Occurrence of the WW1 and the Great Depression

Words: 1506 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61541414

World War I and the Great Depression

World War I

The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand on 28 June 1914 sparked the occurrence of the First World War. A Serbian nationalist called Gavrilo Princip murdered him as the heir apparent to the throne of Austria. However, other underlying factors that contributed to the rivalry between the Great Powers include the system of alliances, nationalism, domestic political factors, militarism, the Eastern question (The Balkans), and the crises before 1914. The main powers of Europe before 1914 were: (i) the Triple Alliance of Germany, Austria-Hungary and Italy (1882) and (ii) the Triple Entente of Britain, Russia and France (1907). In nature, the alliances were defensive, and this implied that major political disputes inevitably would lead to large and not small conflicts. Nationalism looked at eager people across the world who wanted to let the rest of the world know how strong and…… [Read More]

References

Giangreco, D. M. & Griffin, R. E. (1988). Airbridge to Berlin -- The Berlin Crisis of 1948, Its Origins and Aftermath. Background on Conflict with USSR.

Hiebert, Ray, and Roselyn Hiebert. (1970). The Stock Market Crash, 1929. New York, NY: Franklin Watts.

McElvaine, R. S. (1993). The Great Depression: America, 1929-1941. New York, NY: Times Books.

Parrish, M. E. (1992). Anxious Decades: America in Prosperity and Depression, 1920-1941. New York, NY: W.W. Norton.
View Full Essay

Great War World War One Ultimately Killed

Words: 981 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5878712

Great War

World War One ultimately killed 35 million people -- this alone might have merited its being called "The Great War," although to a large degree it was the astonishing way in which the deaths happened. On the first day of the Battle of the Somme alone, Britain suffered almost sixty thousand casualties. The ten-month stalemate of the Battle of Verdun resulted in seven hundred thousand (700,000) dead, with no discernible tactical advance made by either side (Tuchman 174). The immediate causes of World War One were complicated but fairly straightforward. Many of the long-standing political institutions of Europe were badly outmoded, in particular two of the oldest: the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the Ottoman Empire. Each of these institutions were the inheritors of previous large-scale imperial institutions (the Holy Roman Empire and the Byzantine Empire accordingly) which dated back nearly a thousand years -- and each was failing badly.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Karp, Walter. The Politics of War: The Story of Two Wars Which Altered Forever the Political Life of the American Republic. New York: Franklin Square Press, 2010. Print.

Tuchman, Barbara. The Guns of August. New York: Ballantine, 1962. Print.
View Full Essay

Imperialism and War WWI

Words: 1667 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40738769

First World War was the first-ever war that had brought great destruction and required greater involvement of many countries, most especially the European nations. Evidence of the impending world war started during the early 19th century, wherein colonization and strengthening of military power is the most prevalent activity of all European nations at that time. The World War I was said to have many causes, although the most important and more popular cause discussed by historians today is that the First World War started because of the rising imperialism among competing European nations. The war had two competing groups, the Triple Alliance and the Triple Entente. The Triple Alliance was composed of Germany, Austria- Hungary, and Italy, while the Triple Entente was made up of Great Britain, France, and Russia. These groups were not originally formed as a triad; rather, each nation became affiliated with each other before and during…… [Read More]

Bibliography

The Causes of the First World War." 05 April 2002. Student-Run Computing Facility Homepage. 9 July 2002 http://srcf.ucam.org/~mrs35/hist/html-nodes/subject-notes/firstww.html.

Coffman, Edward. "World War I." The World Book Encyclopedia Vol. 21. USA: World Book Inc. 1991.

Europe in 1914." 1 January 2002. Spartacus Educational. 9 July 2002 http://spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/TGfww.htm.

The First World War." 11 March 2001. Schools History.
View Full Essay

Causes of World War One

Words: 1893 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56235563

Wilson was one of the massive supporters of this League of Nations as he felt it would help in being responsible in preventing subsequent wars. One major aspect of the treaty of Paris in 1919 was that it contained the Treaty of Versailles, one which has a major goal of disciplining Germany and forcing a sense of punishment and finality of Germany. For instance, Germany lost many colonies and investments in lieu of this treaty and their ability to forge a military was crippled and limited to a fraction of its original size; the German air force was also similarly crippled. Germany was also further bankrupt in the reparations that it was ordered to pay -- the equivalent of $132 billion gold marks. These intense punishments were a major aspect of the treaty and were something that did cause a deadlock at certain points in the negotiating process (MacMillan, 195).…… [Read More]

References

Afflerbach, H. (2007). An Improbable War?: The Outbreak of World War I and European Political. New York: Berghahn Books.

Louis, W. (2006). Ends of British Imperialism. New York: I.B.Tauris.

MacMillan, M. (2007). Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World. New York: Random House Publishers.

MacMillan, M. (2009). The War that Ended Peace. New York: Random House Publishers.
View Full Essay

Impact of World War 1 And the Great Depression

Words: 438 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2471492

World War I upon the Great Depression on the federal role of American government

After the advent of the Great Depression and the presidency of Franklin Roosevelt, America shifted in its national emphasis from being an economically decentralized nation, with a capitalistic and 'hands off' attitude to the development of industry, to a more truly modern nation that took an active role in the lives and well being of its citizens. The American federal government also began to seek to exercise its moral influence upon the rest of the world. However, this shift from American isolationism towards those in need within America, as well as the needs of individuals abroad, did not come with some national soul-searching. The historian William E. Leuchtenburg writes in his text The Perils of Prosperity: 1914-32 that the economic advancement of the post World War I era, and America's less economically damaging late involvement in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gould, Lewis. America in the Progressive Era. New York Longman, 2000.

Leuchtenburg, William E. The Perils of Prosperity, 1914-32. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1958.
View Full Essay

Ideological Relationship Between WWI and WWII

Words: 1385 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18232482

ideological relationship between WWI and WWII. The writer explores the ideological relationship between the two wars and then moves into the arena of contrasting the differences between several war germane terms. The comparison includes Fascism and Nazism. There were three sources used to complete this paper.

Should the U.S. launch an attack on Iraq? Nations of the world have been lining up on both sides of this question for the last few weeks. The world is used to divisions when it comes to military action. World War One and World War Two both provided training grounds for the world nations drawing lines in the sand and choosing sides. The World Wars were ideologically related in several ways with the most important ideal being personal freedom.

Each of the world wars stood for freedom. The freedom to choose one's lifestyle and the freedom to choose one's government style and participants were…… [Read More]

References

Axel, Alan. The Complete Idiot's Guide to World War II. Alpha Books (October 23, 1998)

Calvocoressi, Peter. The Penguin History of the Second World War

Penguin USA (Paper);; (February 27, 2001)

Morrow, John. The Great War in the Air: Military Aviation from 1909 to 1921 Smithsonian Institution Press;; (May 1993)
View Full Essay

Foreign WWI Propaganda From Dutch Neutral Perspective

Words: 746 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74625101

perceptions of World War One propaganda from the Dutch, neutral perspective. The reception of this foreign propaganda can be measured in a number of different ways: via the culling of contemporary newspapers with editorials reacting to the propaganda, and with counter-propaganda materials such as pamphlets. Special attention will be given to pamphlets, posters, and other propaganda describing the 1914 invasion of Belgium by Germany, known colloquially as the Rape of Belgium.

Historical context will comprise the background section of the research report. It is necessary to highlight the specific issues that the propaganda material were designed to address in the public consciousness. The propaganda material will be analyzed in terms of its symbolism and composition, and there will be some mention also of the prevailing artistic sensibilities that influenced the artwork -- which cannot be taken out of its historical context. For example, many of the sketches used for the…… [Read More]

References

Abbenhuis, Maartje. The Art of Staying Neutral. University of Chicago Press.

Army Heritage Center Foundation. "Soldier Stories: Remember Belgium." Retrieved online: http://armyheritage.org/education-and-programs/educational-resources/soldier-stories/42-information/education-a-programs/170-remember-belgium

Duffy, Michael. "Battles: The Destruction of Louvain, 1914." First World War. Retrieved online:  http://www.firstworldwar.com/battles/louvain.htm 

Jacobi, Ava Caroline. "Into the Abyss: The Legacy of the 'Rape of Belgium' Propaganda." Retrieved online: https://repository.library.georgetown.edu/bitstream/handle/10822/555503/JacobiAvaThesis.pdf?sequence=2
View Full Essay

Treatment of Blacks During Combat in WWII vs In WWI

Words: 684 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31688934

There was an increase in the human right agencies that fought for the protection of their rights. Multiple efforts such as recognition of their contribution and minimal exposures to traumatic experiences were adopted to ensure their protection (Parker 113).

Gaines (58) recognized that significant variability is traceable in the roles of the human rights bodies in the World War I and II. The First World War was characterized by minimal activity of the black press. The World War II witnessed a significant change, as there was a transformation in the representation of the Africans taking part in the World War For example, the Second World War saw an increase in the black press that offered a forum for the expression of contemporary issues affecting Africans in the War. World War II also witnessed the transformation of civil right efforts with more focus on opposing discrimination of Africans on issues related…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gaines, K. "The Civil Rights Movement in World Perspective." OAH Magazine of History 21.1 (2007): 57-64

Parker, Christopher S. "When Politics Becomes Protest: Black Veterans And Political Activism In The Postwar South." The Journal of Politics 71.01 (2009): 113
View Full Essay

Effect of WWI on Jews and Germans

Words: 3140 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25856239

Germans and Jews After WWI

Germans and Jews After World War I

In World War I, more than 12,000 Jews lost their lives fighting for Germany (Flannery, 43). They were a large part of the culture there, and had intermingled as much as they were able to. However, despite the way they were involved in so much of what was taking place in the country, they were also never really accepted. After WWI, Germany's official position on Jews changed. Much of that took place because the German leaders did not want to take any blame for the problems that had caused them to lose out in the war. Because they wanted to make sure the people saw them in a good light, and they did not want to admit past mistakes, they looked for scapegoats. One of the main groups for that scapegoating was the Jewish people. Even though many…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anti-Semitism in History: World War 1. United States Holocaust Museum. United States Holocaust Memorial Council, 2014. Print. http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007166

While Anti-Semitism is nothing new in society, this article spells out clearly what was taking place in Germany after WWI and how that shaped the beliefs of the Germany people when it came to their feelings about Jews in their country.

Elon, Amos. The Pity of It All: A History of Jews in Germany, 1743 -- 1933. New York, 2002. Print.

The Jewish people in Germany never really had much of a chance to be a part of the country, at least not on a proper level. They were marginalized from the very beginning, and that only got worse after WWI, finally culminating in the atrocities of WWII.
View Full Essay

Balkan War Led to WWI

Words: 808 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44364193

Balkan War that led to World War I

There were several factors of the Balkan Crisis of 1914 that led to World War I. Generally, the European Crisis of 1914 is blamed on the "Great Power statesmen for their shortsightedness, incompetence, or failure to act in a timely or effective way to keep the peace" (Sowards 2001). However, it is important to consider the players involved in the conflict between the two states in the original Sarajevo crisis, Austria-Hungary and Serbia. Early in the crisis, when the Austrian, Hungarians, and Serbs made important decisions, "they consistently avoided compromise and risked war" (Sowards 2001). Two months passed between the murder of Franz Ferdinand and the "coming of the general war...plenty of time for calculation, caution and decision" (Sowards 2001). However, there were several successive events that took place during those two months.

On June 28, 1914, Gavrilo Princip, a nineteen-year-old student…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Duffy, Michael. "How It Began: The Causes of World War One." First World War.Com.

April 2002. http://athene.mit.csu.edu.au/~mrahma06/how%20it%20began.htm.(accessed 01-21-2003).

Sowards, Steven W. "Twenty-Five Lectures on Modern Balkan History." March 2, 2001. http://www.lib.msu.edu/sowards/balkan/lect15.htm.(accessed 01-21-2003).

Who started World War I?" February 6, 2002. http://history.acusd.edu/gen/classes/diplo177/warstart.html.(accessed 01-21-2003).
View Full Essay

Protestant Ref Imperialism and WWI

Words: 1290 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34222582

92). Pope Innocent X lamented the procedure, of course -- for it served to subvert the truths which the Roman Church strove to propagate.

Thus, the modern world was built not upon the majesty of kings and religion, but upon treaties and revolutionary ideals. The philosophical fruit of Protestantism would spring up in the age of Romantic/Enlightenment doctrine, which would produce the American and French Revolutions. "Liberty, equality, fraternity" would be the modern world's ethos -- in theory. However, capitalist ethics would undermine the romantic ideology. Imperialism -- for gold, God, and glory at the end of the medieval world -- would be based, in the modern world, upon sheer greed (as a principle). America defined this principle well with the notion of "manifest destiny," which by the end of the 19th century was expanded beyond the American frontier to encompass the whole globe.

The new Imperialism of America (and…… [Read More]

Reference List

Elliot, J.H. (2009). Spain, Europe and the Wider World: 1500-1800. Yale Universtiy

Press.

Haaren, J. (1904). Famous Men of the Middle Ages. New York, NY: American Book

Company.
View Full Essay

What Led to the US Entry to World War 1

Words: 1876 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10732355

United States entry into world war.

Taking nations from more than half the globe as partakers and victims, the first war broke out, 1914-1918, and that is known as World War 1 or the First World War. Until the World War II broke out, it was widely known as the war which had broken out which had the capacity to put an end to all wars, and commonly it was known as The Great War. In fact multiple factors produced the First World War. An International anarchy was seen all over Europe. On the eve of the World War I there were 25 sovereign states in Europe, each desiring to act on its own individual conscience. None of them was ready to submit to the interference or will of the other, as each of them held its pride high, thinking if they accepted the advice of any other state, their…… [Read More]

References

Bass, Herbert J., "America's Entry Into World War I." Chicago; Holt, Rinehart And Winston, 1964, p.14-17

Andrea, Alfred J., and Overfield, James H., "The Human Record." Boston; Houghton Mifflin Company, 1994, p.63-66

Pope, Stephen, and Wheal, Elizabeth-Anne, "The Dictionary of The First World War" New York; St. Marten's Press, 1995, p.24-27

Venzon, Anne Cipriano, "The United States in the First World War" New York; Garland Publishing, Inc., 1995, p.56-59
View Full Essay

What Caused World War 1

Words: 1373 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30090281

nations all over Europe made mutual defense treaties, which would pull them into war. These agreements implied that in case one nation was invaded, associated nations had to protect them. The following alliances existed prior to World War 1 (Kelly):

Japan and Britain

Russia and Serbia

France and Russia

Germany and Austria-Hungary

Britain and France and Belgium

The Triple Alliance was created in 1882 by Germany, Italy and Austria-Hungary. These three nations agreed to support one another in case of an attack from either Russia or France. France, in particular, felt intimidated by this alliance. The main aim of the alliance was to support collaboration against Germany's thought threat. After three years, Russia that was scared of the growth of the German Army, united with France and Britain, to create the Triple Entente (Triple Entente). Contrary to the Triple Alliance, the terms of the Entente did not need each nation…… [Read More]

References

"Archduke Franz Ferdinand assassinated - Jun 28, 1914 - HISTORY.com." History Canada -- Videos, TV Schedule & Watch Full Episodes Online. Web. 14 Oct 2015. .

"First World War.com - Feature Articles - The Planning of the War." First World War.com - A Multimedia History of World War One. Web. 9 Oct 2015.
Kelly, Martin. "Top 5 Causes of World War 1." Learn American History on About.com. Web. 9 Oct 2015. .

"Triple Entente." Spartacus Educational. Web. 14 Oct 2015. .
View Full Essay

Military Leaders World War 1 As Well as After the War

Words: 2606 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31230006

American Military Leaders

The fighting of the First World War (WWI) started during 1914 and ended on 1918. The Second World War (WWII) started a lot later in 1939 and ended in 1945. These are the biggest military conflicts in the history of humankind. In both wars, military alliances formed by groups of countries were involved. The First World War (World War I, the War to End All Wars, the Great War) mainly occurred in Europe. The fighting nations were categorized in two groups, 'The Allied Powers' and 'The Central Powers'. Germany, Turkey, Bulgaria and Austria-Hungary were in the Central Powers group[footnoteRef:1]. The Allied Powers group consisted of Britain, Italy, France, Japan, Russia and the U.S., which joined in 1917. In The Second World War (World War II), the warring groups were called 'The Allies' and 'The Axis'. Germany, Japan and Italy made up The Axis. The U.S., China, France,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Diffen. "World War 1 Vs. World War 11." Accessed May 18, 2016. http://www.diffen.com/difference/World_War_I_vs_World_War_II.

History.com. "Douglas Macarthur." 2009. Accessed May 18, 2016. http://www.history.com/topics/douglas-macarthur.

History.com. "Dwight D. Eisenhower." 2009. Accessed May 17, 2016. http://www.history.com/topics/us-presidents/dwight-d-eisenhower.

History.com. "George C. Marshall." 2009. Accessed May 18, 2016. http://www.history.com/topics/george-c-marshall.
View Full Essay

Bargaining Hypothesis and Its Impact on World War 1

Words: 2185 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42506360

Europe in the early 20th century was experiencing unprecedented change. The country was in the midst of technological revolution that was second only to the United States. The country was also flourishing due to intellectual capital being spread throughout the region. The industrial revolution was beginning to set root within the economy. New industries and methods of transportation arose from the industrial revolution. Trade was expanding as goods were able to be shipped more seamlessly than ever before. The overall economy also experience long periods of over 5% GDP growth through the early 20th century. Unfortunately, even with this great amount of prosperity, conflicts still arose. In particular, 1914 was a period of strong international conflicts between rival nations. In 1914 war broke out that would threaten citizens of Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and the Americas (Fromkin, pg. 5). In many instances, it was the economic prosperity of the…… [Read More]

References:

1) Fromkin, David. Europe's Last Summer. Who started the Great War of 1914? (2004)
View Full Essay

Pre World War One German Nationalism

Words: 1878 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74479719

Nationalism was a global trend by the time the Great War broke out. Each nation state developed its own national identity via the use of myths, symbols, and ideology that ranged from ethnic solidarity to political values. Nationalism in Germany became especially potent after the Franco-Prussian War, during which Bismarck wielded his political and military prowess in formidable ways. Crucial to winning the war campaign was a sense of national pride and identity, which Otto von Bismarck promoted through an idealized unity between disparate religious and cultural groups within the various German-speaking states. In addition to promoting a sense of regional identity, Bismarck also championed the vision of an epic, legendary, heroic German state grounded in a sense of power and prestige. Also characteristic to German nationalism was a sense of pride in the act of struggle itself, another point that Bismarck promoted through his speeches. German nationalism had been…… [Read More]

References

Bismarck, Otto von. The Imperial Proclamation, January 18, 1871

Otto von Bismarck: Letter to Minister von Manteuffel, 1856

Otto von Bismark: Nationalist Speech. April 1, 1895. Retrieved online: https://kquazza.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/blood-and-iron-nationalist-speech.pdf

Johann Gustav Droysen: Speech to the Frankfurt Assembly, 1848
View Full Essay

Lost Battalion WWI by Thomas

Words: 1375 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87060571

The heavy losses being experienced by the troops of the Lost Battalion were further exacerbated by misdirected friendly artillery fire that killed or wounded hundreds of the bewildered U.S. forces that was only stopped by Whittlesey's use of a carrier pigeon to call off the barrage (Coffman viii). It was during this low phase of the battle that the battalion earned its now-famous but misplaced moniker: "While the five-day siege was in progress, war correspondents picked up on the story of what was then miscalled the 'Lost Battalion.' Everyone knew where they were. The issue was whether or not the division could fight its way to them" (Coffman vi). The day-by-day first-hand descriptions of the battlefield and how the men of the Lost Battalion reacted to the deteriorating conditions were among the most vivid accounts in this regard, with American resolve and fortitude being eroded by hunger, desperation and aggravated…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Johnson, Thomas M., Fletcher Pratt and Edward M. Coffman. The Lost Battalion. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2000.
View Full Essay

Trench Warfare of WW1

Words: 2181 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52152309

Trench Warfare in World War I (WWI)

Trench warfare was used in World War I and they were forced to live in muddy, isolated conditions for months exposed to horrific elements, and inviting diseases like gangrene. During World War I many things changed, as lives were destroyed, dreams shattered, and many soldiers died or suffering immeasurable psychological and physical conditions.

WWI was the first time in history that war involved the use of new technology such as airplanes, tanks and submarines. However, for many WWI soldiers, trench warfare presents the most lasting image of World War I. Trench warfare caused many horrific deaths. In addition, many soldiers who participated in trench warfare had serious psychological and health problems by the time they returned home.

About Trench Warfare

Trench warfare is a type of warfare in which opponents of war "attack, counterattack, and defend from relatively permanent systems of trenches dug…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baggett, Blaine. (November, 1996). The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century Humanities, PBS.

Beyond Books. (2002). In the Trenches New Forum Publishers, Inc. Retrieved from the Internet at http://www.beyondbooks.com/bbx/login/bb/eur12login.asp?asplreq=http://www.beyondbooks.com/eur12/6c.asp.

Ellis, John. (1989). Eye Deep in Hell: Trench Warfare in World War I. John Hopkins University Press.

Hansen, Ole. (2001). The War in the Trenches. Raintree Publishing Co.
View Full Essay

Literary Resopnse to World War One

Words: 714 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74317857

Social Activism and Literature

Two of the major themes in 20th century American literature are war and social protest. The United States has been engaged in a steady series of wars since the beginning of the 20th century. With the carnage of the First World War, the horrors of the Second, the futility of Vietnam, many writers and artists contributed to the literature of protest with respect to war, and America's involvement in it.

Amy Lowell's September, 1918 is a good example of how writers reacted to the First World War. Its presentation of a wistful era where there is no war, juxtaposed against the current "broken world," illustrates the yearning that many had for a world without war. The First World War had essentially eliminated any romance that there was of war in society, and its brutality would spark this sort of response across the world. For the first…… [Read More]

References

Parini, J. & Cutter, M. (2009). Themes in Contemporary American Literature. Cengage.
View Full Essay

WWII Battle of Monte Cassino History Has

Words: 2237 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64322020

WWII: Battle of Monte Cassino

History has been known to repeat itself. Today in Iraq for example, United States and Allied troops are torn when drawing up plans to win the war in the holy land. The problems stem from their not being able to directly attack certain Muslim holy locations or shrines even though Iraqi insurgents are constantly utilizing these positions as sanctuaries and initiation points for waging battles against the allied forces or the new Iraqi government. During World War II, the Axis powers with Adolf Hitler and the Nazi army also attempted to use similar tactics to fend off attacks by Allied forces.

This report discusses the Battle of Monte Cassino and the pros and cons of the Allied Forces' actions during World War II. A historic shrine was completely destroyed by the events of the Allied forces during the Battle of Monte Cassino in the Italian…… [Read More]

References

Colvin, David, & Hodges, Richard (1994). Tempting providence: the bombing of Monte Cassino. History Today, Vol. 44.

Eagle19. (n.d.). The Battles for Monte Cassino and the Defense of the Gustav Line. Retrieved October 15, 2004, at http://www.eagle19.freeserve.co.uk/cassino.htm

Griess, Thomas E. (2002). The Second World War Europe and the Mediterranean. The West Point Military History Series.

Hapgood, David, & Richardson, David (1984). Monte Cassino: The Story of the Most Controversial Battle of World War II. Add City: Add Publisher.
View Full Essay

WWII Without a Doubt the Expansionist Policies

Words: 399 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96793550

WWII

Without a doubt, the expansionist policies of Germany, Italy and Japan and a direct attack by Japan on Pearl Harbor necessitated the need for America to enter World War II. However, the real question is not whether America should have entered World War II, but could it have prevented it from happening. As the world's new super power following World War I, America should have done more to restore stability to Western Europe, particularly Germany, a country saddled with huge reparation payments. And, the United States could have taken a more active role in the League of Nations to discourage aggression. Instead, America enjoyed the spoils of World War I and became isolationist in response to the Great Depression. Economic and political instability caused by World War I led the rise of fascism. The Nazi goals of reversing the Versailles Treaty and the establishment of a German Empire by…… [Read More]

Bibliography

'World War II." Wikipedia. Available: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II#Home_front (Accessed 3 May 2005).

"World War II.," Available: http://web.uccs.edu/history/student%20presentations/heidi/world_war_two.htm (Accessed 3 May 2005).

"World War II." Wikipedia. Available: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II#Home_front (Accessed 3 May 2005).

"World War II.," Available: http://web.uccs.edu/history/student%20presentations/heidi/world_war_two.htm (Accessed 3 May 2005).