World Wars Essays (Examples)

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War Society Modern World War Has Been

Words: 1559 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21652108

War Society Modern World

War has been an integral part of the development of our civilization from the earliest times. It is estimated that there are more than 14,000 wars that have occurred since events began to be recorded and this has resulted in the death of billions of people. It was an essential part of the survival and behavior of human beings and the society at large. This attitude continued in our society and was even passed on from one generation to another. As modernization began to evolve, this behavior continued in the society, though the end result was different. During the last two centuries, war was used by countries as a brutal form of handling international relations. Differences with other countries were resolved through armed conflicts rather than peaceful negotiations and war was used as an instrument of foreign policies. Unfortunately, this has resulted in the death of millions of people who otherwise could have contributed to better living conditions today.

Reflections on past wars

As we reflect back on some of the wars that have taken place during the last five centuries such as the Napoleonic Wars, The Crimean War, the Boer War, World War I, World…… [Read More]

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World War II in the Context of History and Modern Warfare

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57416332

World War II in the Context of History and Modern Warfare

The 20th Century was simultaneously a Century of exceptional advancement and unsurpassed violence. Why was this a Century of incomparable violence? The quick answer is that we, as a human race, used many of our advancements to become far more efficient killers; where advancements of prior centuries allowed armies to kill tens of thousands, the advancements of the 20th Century enabled armies to kill tens of millions. The longer answer involves military technological revolutions, military inventions used in World War II, business methods that drastically increased war production, the transformation of national wealth to effective fighting power, and the conversion of civilian moral energies into the will to win. Keegan, Overy, Ferguson and Weinberg, in turn, either support those conclusions or, at the very least, do not deny them.

Analysis:

a. The Four Military Technological Revolutions

Knox and Williamson point to four military technological revolutions to date, each building on the developments of the prior military revolution. The first military technological revolution, occurring in the 17th Century, was dominated by the French, who made tactical, organizational, naval and general military reforms.[footnoteRef:1] The first military revolution also saw tactical reforms…… [Read More]

The First World War also resulted in vastly improved infrastructure. Marshall speaks of sophisticated transportation systems moved personnel and supplies in volume and speed that were unknown merely decades earlier.[footnoteRef:27] Keegan, Ferguson, Overy and Weinberg do not dwell on these transportation developments during World War I but Keegan, Overy and Weinberg speak of their extensive use by both the Allies[footnoteRef:28] and the Germans[footnoteRef:29] during World War II. [27 S.L.A. Marshall, World War I (New York, NY: Mariner Books, 2001), p. viii.] [28: Keegan, p. 100; Overy, p. 53; Weinberg, p. 116.] [29: Keegan, p. 116; Overy, p. 49; Weinberg, p. 143.]

For example, in approximately 2 weeks in August, 1914, French railway system was so sophisticated and efficient that it transported more than 3,700,000 troops and the Germans transported approximately 2,000,000 well-armed troops through their railway system in even less time.[footnoteRef:30] [30: Marshall, p. viii.]

Marshall also asserts that the enormity of this first "World War" required the construction of factories and training of manpower in the technical requirements for manufacturing arms and ammunition, tied intimately to technology but also requiring vastly improved efficiency in living accommodations and all the accoutrements, connections and transportation. For one example, as Essen, the Germans built the Krupp works, consisting of a city-within-a-city of 41,000 workers for the construction of heavy weapons and having its own streets, police force, fire department and traffic regulations.[footnoteRef:31] Marshall provides another example in Woolwich, England, in which one factory and all required materiel and workers were transported and assembled to churn out 30,000 rounds of ammunition each month and transport them.[footnoteRef:32] Weinberg also mentions the importance of the United States' manufacture of munitions during World War I.[footnoteRef:33] Keegan, Ferguson and Overy do not mention munitions factory developments through World War I but assert that the importance of such factories was recognized from the very early stages of World War II.[footnoteRef:34] Marshall also speaks of extensive railways built to transport forces, arms, supplies and artillery. One example is the construction of five new narrow-gauge railway lines across the Fifth Army's operation zone in the Verdun to transport weapons and ammunition to their positions.[footnoteRef:35] Keegan, Ferguson, Overy and Weinberg all speak of the importance of railways for both the Germans and the Allies.[footnoteRef:36] Necessity being the Mother of Invention, the necessities of a first World War led to markedly improved developments,
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WWI Analysis Examining the Significance and Impact of WWI on U S History

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69598273

World War Analysis

WWI analysis examining the significance and impact of WWI on U.S. history

In the early 20th Century, a general fear existed that a huge war would break out due to the circumstances existing at that time and therefore every small incident was considered deadly. However the triggering factor was the assassination of Austrian Archduke Ferdinand in June 1914 resulting in World War I (WWI) or the Great War. WWI took place from 1914 to 1918 and major countries took part in it; war resulting in drastic consequences such as collapse of economies and death of millions of people. The two main groups fighting against each other were Triple Alliance and Triple Entente (also known as the Western Powers). The U.S. did not participate in the war in the beginning and tried its best to remain neutral. However, it was forced to join the Triple Entente when German submarines sank ships in the Atlantic which had American citizens on it. There was needless killing and slaughtering and nearly 12 million died in Europe as a result of this war. Europe sustained a massive detriment due to the war and it broke into numerous new territories. Even though the…… [Read More]

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WWI the Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

Words: 1553 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55010445

WWI

The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife represented a culmination of several concurrent forces, all of which led to the outbreak of World War. The concurrent forces that led to World War One can be loosely grouped under the following categories: nationalism, imperialism, and militarism. Within each of these categories are ample sub-categories that can testify to the extent of forces that shaped the pre-war conditions throughout not just Europe but the entire world. World War One was a total war for many reasons: it involved serious civilian casualties on a horrific scale for all parties. The Great War also brought to light the impact of globalization on the global economy and political enterprise. Nationalism, imperialism, and militarism all played a part in shaping participation in World War One; the effects of which continue to reverberate.

As Marshall (2001) points out, "Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy were all creations of the mid-nineteenth century," (vii). Prior to the nineteenth century, the city-state model ruled supreme. In Italy, the classic Renaissance economic powers like Genoa and Venice found themselves suddenly embracing a national identity based on some common cultural elements that might not have been recognized a century before: including…… [Read More]

References

Allan, T. (2003). The Causes of World War I. Chicago: Reed Elsevier.

Bosco, P., & Bosco, A. (2003). World War I. Infobase.

Heyman, N.M. (1997). World War I. Greenwood.

Marshall, S.L.A. (2001). World War I. New York: First Mariner.
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WWII the United States Entered

Words: 1011 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71170487

Gradually, though, the war effort eroded the practical and theoretical underpinnings of racism in the United States. The war stimulated the domestic economy, particularly in the industrial and manufacturing sectors. Jobs were opening up rapidly, and because so many white men were fighting the war, many black men were available to work. "For black workers World War II opened up opportunities that had never before existed," (O'Neil 1). The same was true for women, as the war left gaping holes in the labor market that needed to be filled in untraditional ways. At the same time as the war exposed American prejudice, "World War II gave many minority Americans -- and women of all races -- an economic and psychological boost." (Harris 1). The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) was founded, and overall, the war "jump-started the civil rights movement" in the United States (Harris 1; "Identify the impact of World War II on minority groups in America. (U.S. History").

African-Americans might have been the largest aggregate non-white group in the United States, but the Second World War had a strong impact on other social and cultural groups including Asian-Americans, Native Americans, and Latin Americans. Native Americans fought in the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Harris, Michael. "How WWII Affected America's Minorities." Los Angeles Times. 13 June, 2000. Retrieved online:  http://articles.latimes.com/2000/jun/13/news/cl-40272 

"Identify the impact of World War II on minority groups in America." (U.S. History)." Retrieved online: http://share.ehs.uen.org/node/6217

O'Neil, William L. "Minorities and Women During World War II." Retrieved online: http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/WWII_Women/RA/NCraig/Minorities.html

Takaki, Ronald. Double Victory. New York: Time Warner/Little Brown.
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WWII History Making Decades WWII-Present

Words: 2515 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66978809

Diversity -- with the exception of homophobia -- was beginning to be commonly accepted and praised. Technology -- such as the use of DNA in criminology and the introduction of the PC -- was becoming more prominent in the lives of everyday Americans. In the Cold War, President Gorbachev asked for openness and economic freedom, while President Reagan asked him to tear down the Berlin Wall, which he did. However, the discovery of AIDS had a far more profound impact on the American people than any of these events. In 1981, the first case of AIDS was reported in the United Kingdom, and this eventually caused quite a crisis in the U.S., as it was first noticed among gay men, and then in women and children as well. People became scared because they were not sure what was causing the disease. Research continued throughout the 1980s, but the fear caused by the disease led some to believe it could be transmitted by normal -- rather than sexual or blood-to-blood -- contact. In addition, the appearance of the disease in gay men made many accuse the gay community of the disease and lead to hatred and fear of both gays and…… [Read More]

References

Dove, R. (1999). Heroes & Icons: Rosa Parks. Retrieved August 12, 2009, from Time:

http://www.time.com/time/time100/heroes/profile/parks01.html

"Fascinating facts about the invention of the Internet by Vinton Cerf in 1973." (2007,

May 30). Retrieved August 12, 2009, from the Great Idea Finder:  http://www.ideafinder.com/history/inventions/internet.htm
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WWII Battle of Monte Cassino History Has

Words: 2237 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64322020

WWII: Battle of Monte Cassino

History has been known to repeat itself. Today in Iraq for example, United States and Allied troops are torn when drawing up plans to win the war in the holy land. The problems stem from their not being able to directly attack certain Muslim holy locations or shrines even though Iraqi insurgents are constantly utilizing these positions as sanctuaries and initiation points for waging battles against the allied forces or the new Iraqi government. During World War II, the Axis powers with Adolf Hitler and the Nazi army also attempted to use similar tactics to fend off attacks by Allied forces.

This report discusses the Battle of Monte Cassino and the pros and cons of the Allied Forces' actions during World War II. A historic shrine was completely destroyed by the events of the Allied forces during the Battle of Monte Cassino in the Italian campaign of 1943-1944. The battle was one of the major turning points against Adolf Hitler and should therefore be completely justified. Capturing Rome was as critical to the efforts of the Allied Forces as was the D-Day invasion because Italy represented the southern gateway to Berlin. Once engaged, Monte Cassino…… [Read More]

References

Colvin, David, & Hodges, Richard (1994). Tempting providence: the bombing of Monte Cassino. History Today, Vol. 44.

Eagle19. (n.d.). The Battles for Monte Cassino and the Defense of the Gustav Line. Retrieved October 15, 2004, at http://www.eagle19.freeserve.co.uk/cassino.htm

Griess, Thomas E. (2002). The Second World War Europe and the Mediterranean. The West Point Military History Series.

Hapgood, David, & Richardson, David (1984). Monte Cassino: The Story of the Most Controversial Battle of World War II. Add City: Add Publisher.
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World War Two Weaponry Like

Words: 364 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61733332



Much of the credit for the successful defense of Britain was the result of the invention of round-based radar that enabled British Fighter Command to alert their interceptors of the approach of Nazi warplanes during the crucial Battle of Britain in

1940 (Bishop & McNab, 2007). By the end of the war, American fighters were equipped with the first air-to-ground missiles. Of course, of all the many inventions and developments in weaponry during the war, the most devastating and revolutionary was the atomic bomb developed by the U.S. that finally ended the war in the Pacific almost a year after victory in Europe (Ambrose, 2001).… [Read More]

References

Ambrose, S. (2001). The Good Fight: How World War II Was Won. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Bishop, C., McNab, C. (2007). Campaigns of World War II Day By Day. London, UK:

Amber Books.

Commager, H., Miller, D. (2002). The Story of World War II: Revised, Expanded & Updated from the Original Text by Henry Steele Commager. New York: Bantam
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WWI and the Russian Revolution

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24086671

The makers of the peace settlement hoped to reduce the possibility of future conflict by taking away Germany's army and controlling its political system. This proved impossible, and only provoked more violence in the long run, as Germans grew more sympathetic to fascism as a result.

Third, why did the United States Senate reject the Treaty of Versailles? What objections did they have to the treaty, especially to the League of Nations? Why was the United States not ready for peace through collective security?

The United States at the time was still isolationist in its philosophy. It had come to participate in the war fairly late, and had little appreciation about how bloody and terrible it had been, through the system of trench warfare, for the major participating European powers. The U.S. still believed the Atlantic Ocean could protect itself from most major European conflicts, and it had felt less anxiety about becoming involved in future European conflicts, as its economy and infrastructure were less damaged by the events of World War II. This was why the United States Congress rejected the League of Nations. It feared that the League was exactly the sort of type of entangling European alliance…… [Read More]

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WWII Without a Doubt the Expansionist Policies

Words: 399 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96793550

WWII

Without a doubt, the expansionist policies of Germany, Italy and Japan and a direct attack by Japan on Pearl Harbor necessitated the need for America to enter World War II. However, the real question is not whether America should have entered World War II, but could it have prevented it from happening. As the world's new super power following World War I, America should have done more to restore stability to Western Europe, particularly Germany, a country saddled with huge reparation payments. And, the United States could have taken a more active role in the League of Nations to discourage aggression. Instead, America enjoyed the spoils of World War I and became isolationist in response to the Great Depression. Economic and political instability caused by World War I led the rise of fascism. The Nazi goals of reversing the Versailles Treaty and the establishment of a German Empire by means of war and conquest had to be stopped.

On the home front, Franklin D. Roosevelt conveyed the message that the efforts of civilians to support the war through personal sacrifice was as critical to winning the war as the efforts of the soldiers themselves, and that the civilian…… [Read More]

Bibliography

'World War II." Wikipedia. Available: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II#Home_front (Accessed 3 May 2005).

"World War II.," Available: http://web.uccs.edu/history/student%20presentations/heidi/world_war_two.htm (Accessed 3 May 2005).

"World War II." Wikipedia. Available: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II#Home_front (Accessed 3 May 2005).

"World War II.," Available: http://web.uccs.edu/history/student%20presentations/heidi/world_war_two.htm (Accessed 3 May 2005).
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WWII to the 60s the

Words: 1427 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99114644

Wilson, a student of public administration, favored more governmental regulation and action during a time when large monopolies still existed. He saw the role of public administration as "government in action; it is the executive, the operative, the most visible side of government, and is of course as old as government itself" (Wilson 235). The pendelum swung, though, and the government was blamed for many of the ills that caused the Great Depression. Franklin Roosevelt, despite being called draconian, knew that he had to launch programs that would have a quick effect upon the struggling economy; resulting the New Deal -- a complex, interlocking set of programs designed to produce jobs, economic recovery, and fiscal reform of banking and Wall Street -- exactly what was needed, it seems to turn the Titanic in a new direction (Badger). Then, of course, came the war, which stimulated the economy like nothing else, but also created shortages and hardships. When the war was over, the social pressures were far different. There was a new level of expectation from the returning GIs, new technology that kept the world within one's living room, suburban growth, more technological jobs, and as the decades progressed Civil Rights,…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Badger, A. FDR - The First Hundred Days. New York: Macmillan, 2009.

Cooper, P. Public Law and Public Administration. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1988.

Fesler, J. "Public Administration and the Social Sciences: 1946-1969." Mosher, F. American Public Administration: Past, Present, Future. Washington, DC & Birmingham, AL: The University of Alabama Press, 1975. 97-142.

Halberstam, D. The Fifties. New York: Ballantine, 1994.
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World War II in Europe

Words: 1427 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23478242



By attacking from the North, Hitler effectively bypassed France's only real defense against invasion. Within two weeks, Paris was under Nazi control, and still seething from the harsh terms of the 1919 Treaty of Versailles that ended World War I, Hitler demanded that the surrender terms be signed in the very same spot as the armistice that ended that war, and in the very same railroad car, which he had brought out from its museum display for that purpose3. Belgium had surrendered to Germany without firing a shot, effectively dooming France to Nazi occupation, and nearly sealing the fate of more than a quarter million British troops sent to support Britain's ally, France. Only a last-

3. Hayes & Faissler p.444 minute scramble saved the British from capture, at the port city of Dunkirk, where the British used thousands of ships, boats, and dinghies to rescue them all and ferry them back to England after Belgium surrendered.. Italy, a Nazi ally, then declared war on France and Britain, hoping to be included in any post-war negotiations to her benefit4.

Hitler prepared to invade England from occupied France, and began a vicious and extensive aerial bombing campaign, using incendiary bombs on…… [Read More]

References

Commager, H.S., Miller, D.L. The Story of World War II: Revised, Expanded & Updated from the Original Text by Henry Steele Commager (2002)

Hayes, C., Faissler, M. Modern Times: The French Revolution to the Present (1966)

Kowalick, T.M. The Western Tradition Transcripts (1989)

Lukacs, J. The Last European War (1976)
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World War Turning Point Europe Significant Change

Words: 2238 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90985032

World War Turning Point Europe, Significant Change Occurred Emergence Legitimate Revolutionary Regimes

Self-Determination in Cuba

There are few who would dispute the fact that following the conclusion of World War II and prior to its revolution (which began in 1953 and concluded on January 1 of 1959) Cuba was a prosperous region of the world that was certainly worth fighting for. The country's leader prior to the ascendancy of Fidel Castro, Fulgencio Batista, had cleverly manipulated the assistance of a number of external forces, primarily that of the United States, to assist the country in achieving a degree of economic gain and modernity the likes of which were comparable to, if not surpassing, those of other parts of the world.

Its economic prowess may be demonstrated from the following quotation. "Cuba in 1958, prior to the government of the Communist Fidel Castro, paid its employees an average of $3.00 per hour, which was higher that year than that of Belgium ($2.70); Denmark ($2.86); France ($1.74; West Germany ($2.73); and comparable to the United States ($4.06)" (Epperson, 1985). In terms of standards of living, there is documentation to support the fact that among South American countries, Cuba was third in the…… [Read More]

References

Epperson, R.A. (1985). The Unseen Hand. Arizona: Publius.

Guevara, C. (2005). Cuba: Historical Exception or Vanguard in the Colonial Struggle? Retrieved from http://www.marxists.org/archive/guevara/1961/04/09.htm

Kapur, T., Smith, A. (2002). "Housing Policy In Castro's Cuba." Retrieved from http://www.jchs.harvard.edu/education/oustanding_student_papers/kapur_smith_cuba_02.pdf

Jones, L. (1966). Home. New York: William Morrow and Co.
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World War II the Use of Atomic

Words: 660 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94462779

World War II

The Use of Atomic Weapons on Japan in WWII

The Second World War officially began in 1939 with the evasion of Poland by Germany. The United States of America did not officially enter this international conflict of epic scale until the Japanese attacked American and European territories in the Pacific in 1941. The war persisted until 1945, culminating with the surrender of Japan and Germany to the U.S. & Allied Forces. During World War II, the world saw the first demonstrations of nuclear weapons -- atomic bombs. There were two infamous attacks on Japan by the U.S. On Nagasaki and Hiroshima, where the atomic bombs were dropped and caused unparalleled damage. The paper will provide a historical and political context within which to consider why the United States of America resorted to the use of atomic bombs upon Japan.

War campaigns waged by Germany and Japan were widely successful. Germany successfully invaded and conquered several critical European territories, providing them with substantial tactical advantage and a serious boost to their morale. Allied with countries such as Japan, who additionally saw military victories, the war was moving in their favor. Because WWII was one of the largest wars…… [Read More]

References:

Aviation History. (2006) World War II -- Second Atomic Bomb that Ended the War. Available from  http://www.historynet.com/world-war-ii-second-atomic-bomb-that-ended-the-war.htm . 2012 June 25.

Henretta. (2009) Chapters 23 -- 26. Provided.
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World War I Known at

Words: 3255 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87605902



Conscription

From the beginning of the war, there had been some variation in the Canadian attitude toward the conflict. Canada never questioned the legitimacy of the war and did not question the need for Canadian participation. There were differences of opinion, though, concerning how extensive the Canadian contribution should be. These variations affected the response to calls for enlistment and divided the country as the towns were more willing than the countryside, the prairies more willing than the Atlantic seaboard, and "it was observed that the proportion of enlistments achieved by any social group appeared to vary almost inversely to the length of its connection with Canada. On the one hand, the British-born -- the new arrivals with a large proportion of unattached males of military age -- gave the highest percentage of their numbers to the armed services, and, on the other hand, the French Canadians unquestionably gave the lowest percentage of theirs." Francophone Canada was not disposed to the war even before the conscription issue, and it certainly was not more disposed to it after. As one historian notes,

For most English-speaking Canadians the war came before all else; for the French it was subordinated to certain national…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ameringer, Charles D. Political Parties of the Americas, 1980s to 1990s: Canada, Latin America, and the West Indie.

Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1992.

Bothwell, Robert. History of Canada since 1867. Washington, D.C.: Association for Canadian Studies in the United States, 1996.

Boudreau, Joseph a. "Canada and the First World War: Essays in Honour of Robert "Canada and Worlod War I," the History of Canada (2007),  http://www.linksnorth.com/canada-history/canadaandworldwar1.html .
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World War I Like All

Words: 1716 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82623559

National debt and veterans benefits for example drove a permanent increase in taxes, although these were not as high as during the war. The country's international economic position was also permanently affected. Its pre-war status as a debtor country was permanently changed to a net creditor, in the order of $6.4billion. Also, the power as financial world leader shifted from London and the Bank of England to New York, with an enhancement of the Federal Reserve's role (World War I History). In general, it appears as if the war effort had a favorable impact on the U.S. economy. The devastating human and resource losses were offset by favorable economic factors. In this way, World War I changed the economic position of the United States both permanently and favorably.… [Read More]

Sources

Duffy, Michael. "The Causes of World War I." FirstWorldWar.com feature articles. March 27, 2004.  http://www.firstworldwar.com/origins/causes.htm 

U.S. Declaration of War with Germany, 2 April 1917" FirstWolrdWar.com primary documents. April 14, 2002. URL: http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/usneutrality.htm

Feldmeth, Greg D. "U.S. Involvement in World War I." U.S. History Resources. March 31, 1998. URL: http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/Bunker/3017/

Rockoff, Hugh. "U.S. Economy in World War I." EH.Net Encyclopedia, edited by Robert Whaples. September 30, 2005. URL:
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World War II Book Review

Words: 1603 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34700032

It is key to understanding the author's view of love and even her own status as a woman and as a thinker. Of course, the book can simply be read as a love story of infidelity and sexual liberty gone wrong in the face of an ever-changing political society in a state of national and European chaos. But the Mandarins de Beauvoir referred to were also the elite, the intellectual elites of Chinese society who held themselves above from the common peasants.

Thus, by calling her fellow Left Bank intellectuals 'Mandarins' De Beauvoir symbolically calls upon her fellow intellectuals to become part and parcel of the political fray, rather than wasting their energies with entangling personal alliances that can be just as dissipating as the betrayals of Vichy and the subsequent alliances that sapped the French nation of its own vital energies. She calls upon the intellectual Mandarins of French society not to form their own elite core of thinkers, but to unite with others who share their thoughts in a less complicated way than pure, cerebral existentialism and visceral sexual pleasures that are really of interest only to the personal lives of those who suffer their consequences.

The author…… [Read More]

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World War II Happen The

Words: 1724 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15911546

" Military History. [online]

available: http://militaryhistory.about.com/od/worldwarii/a/wwiieurcauses.htm.

Shevin-Coetzee, M. & Coetzee, F. (2010). The World in Flames: A World War II Sourcebook.

Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Snell, J.L. (1962). The Outbreak of the Second World War: Design or Blunder? Boston D.C.

Heath.

Carr, F.M. (2005, January 1). "World War I to World War IV: A Democratic-Economic Perspective." Journal of Economics and Economic Education Research, 6(1), p. 117.

Carr, p. 117.

Shevin-Coetzee, M. & Coetzee, F. (2010). The World in Flames: A World War II Sourcebook. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Hickman, K. (2012). "World War II Europe: The Road to War." Military History. [online] available: http://militaryhistory.about.com/od/worldwarii/a/wwiieurcauses.htm.

Hickman, p. 1.

Corum, J.S. (2004, Summer). "The Luftwaffe and Its Allied Air Forces in World War II: Parallel War and the Failure of Strategic and Economic Cooperation." Air Power History, 51(2), p. 4.

Corum, p. 4.

Corum, p. 5.

Bassett, R.L. (2009, Fall). "Sacred Causes: The Clash of Religion and Politics, from the Great War to the War on Terror." Journal of Psychology and Christianity, 28(3), p. 281.

Divine, R.A. (1969). Causes and Consequences of World War II. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, p. 9.

deMause, L. (2008, Summer). "The Childhood Origins of World War II and…… [Read More]

References

Bassett, R.L. (2009, Fall). "Sacred Causes: The Clash of Religion and Politics, from the Great

War to the War on Terror." Journal of Psychology and Christianity, 28(3), 281-289.

Carr, F.M. (2005, January 1). "World War I to World War IV: A Democratic-Economic

Perspective." Journal of Economics and Economic Education Research, 6(1), 117-121.
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WWI and WWII Sonar in Naval Warfare

Words: 4448 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19694347

Sonar Research and Naval Warfare: 1914-1954

During both World War I and World War II, there were a number of informational tactics used by the Navy in order to gain ground on enemy troops. One of those was sonar research, because it provided them with knowledge they would not have otherwise had (Hackmann, 1984). Sonar is not perfect, but a great deal of work has gone into it since its creation, and that has helped it to become a more valuable tool for Naval operations. Sonar is used for navigation, but also for communication and the detection of objects, primarily underwater (Urick, 1983). There are two types of sonar: passive and active. In active sonar, pings are sent out to search for other objects (Hackmann, 1984). Passive sonar does not send out a signal, but only listens for the pings and signals of others (Hackmann, 1984). Both have their place, and can be highly effective. Additionally, both were used by the Navy during WWI and WWII, in an effort to protect vessels from enemies and also locate enemy vessels that may become targets (Hackmann, 1984; Hackmann, 1986).

This paper seeks to provide information about sonar and how it was used…… [Read More]

References

Abbatiello, J. (2005). Anti-submarine warfare in World War I: British Naval aviation and the defeat of the U-boats. NY: Routledge.

Adamthwaite, A.P. (1992). The making of the Second World War. New York: Routledge.

Barber, J., & Harrison, M. (2006). Patriotic war, 1941 -- 1945. In Ronald Grigor Suny, ed. The Cambridge History of Russia, Volume III: The Twentieth Century. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hackmann, W. (1984). Seek & Strike: Sonar, anti-submarine warfare and the Royal Navy 1914-54. London: Her Majesty's Stationery Office.
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World War II and the

Words: 1799 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91851453

Today, the Americans fight different insurgent factions, who have limited weaponry, no air force, and no real large scale fighting tactics. Instead, they create havoc with roadside bombs and suicide bombers. Vietnam was fought on the scale of a world war, while Iraq is being fought on a much smaller scale. In addition, there was a draft in place during Vietnam, and no draft in place today, so our forces are stretched much thinner in Iraq and at home.

In contrast, many experts believe there are similarities between the two wars, but there are far more differences that keep the two wars very far apart in perspective. For example, there is no real Communist influence in Iraq; rather the country suffers from domestic unrest and insurgency, rather than large-scale intervention from other countries (except perhaps Iran). Thus, Americans are not fighting a "cold" war but rather a war supposedly based against terrorism and ending a repressive dictatorship. The fight in Vietnam was strictly against Communist domination of the area, and seems to have a much clearer purpose than the invasion of Iraq has given the people of the country. It remains to be seen whether Iraq becomes another embarrassment like…… [Read More]

References

Kagan, Frederick W. "Iraq Is Not Vietnam." Policy Review (2005): 3+.

Letters from Iwo Jima. Dir. Clint Eastwood. Perf. Ken Watanabe, Kazunari Ninomiya, Tsuyoshi Ihara, and Ryo Kase. Warner Brothers, 2006.

Lopez, George a. "A Quagmire? Vietnam, Iraq & Other Analogies." Commonweal 16 Jan. 2004: 11+.

May, Elaine Tyler. Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era. Revised ed. New York: Basic Books, 1999.
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World War II World War II Was

Words: 760 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28636080

World War II. World War II was a turning point in world history, and brought together many allies to fight strong opponents for world domination. The War was supposed to be the "last" world war fought, but other conflicts since that time show the world is still a volatile and unsettled place, and it seems there will always be wars fought in this world.

World War II was fought on two major fronts -- Europe and Asia. There was also fighting in North Africa, and many Pacific Islands. The initial war began in 1939 when German dictator Adolph Hitler invaded Poland. England and France had pledged to support Poland as Hitler continued to take over countries in Europe, such as Austria and Czechoslovakia in the late 1930s. When Hitler invaded Poland,

France and England issued ultimatums to Germany which were ignored, and the war had officially begun, even though actual fighting by England and France did not really begin until 1940 (Kitchen 6-11). Initially, the Soviet Union signed a pact with Germany, while England, France, and most of the European countries were allied against Germany. Later, Italy and Japan also became German allies.

Initially, the United States tried to stay…… [Read More]

References

Boatner, Mark M. Biographical Dictionary of World War II. Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 1996.

Divine, Robert A., ed. Causes and Consequences of World War II. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1969.

Kitchen, Martin. A World in Flames: A Short History of the Second World War in Europe and Asia, 1939-1945. London: Longman, 1990.
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World War II Broke Out Russia Was

Words: 2569 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38358365

World War II broke out, Russia was not prepared, nor did she manage to be the military threat she could have been, because the nation was weakened by lack of industrialization, the defeat by Japan in 1905, and a lack of support by the people for involvement in this new war. What seems clear is that Russia was not prepared when the war began and had to work to muster its army, provide war materials, and protect its own territory against the German advance. The fact that Germany was indeed stopped cold in Russia shows how well the Russians did their job, but the issue is why they did not do what they could before the war started given that the whole world could see war coming long before it reached Russia. More recently, though, the question of unpreparedness has been given a new look, and a new theory of what happened has been advanced.

Some critics blame what they call a "historical malady," referring to a long-standing Russian curse that caused the country to do poorly at the outset of all conflicts. Other critics blame native military incompetence, which they say was magnified by German betrayal and military skill.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

McTaggart, Pat. "Winter Tempest in Stalingrad." World War II 12(4)(November 1997), 30-36.

Raack, R.C. "Stalin's Role in the Coming of World War II: Opening the Closet Door on a Key Chapter of Recent History." World Affairs 158(4)(1996), 198-211.

Taylor, a.J.P. The Origins of the Second World War. New York: Athenaeum, 1985.

Tucker, Robert C. Stalin in Power. New York: W.W. Norton, 1990.
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World War II WWII Transformed the United

Words: 1343 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22535567

World War II (WWII) Transformed the United States Domestically

World War II was a global military conflict that, in terms of lives lost and material destruction, was the most tragic war in human history. It started in 1939 as a European conflict between Germany and an Anglo-French coalition but eventually grew to include most of the nations of the world. It ended in 1945, leaving a new world that was dominated by the United States and the U.S.S.R.

When the United States became involved with World War II, there were immediate and long-term changes in virtually every aspect of American life. Millions of men and women joined the military and saw areas of the world they would likely never have seen on their own. The labor demands of war industries caused millions more Americans to relocate, mainly to the Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf coasts, where most defense plants were located. When World War II ended, the United States was in better economic condition than any other country in the world.

Building on the economic base left after the war, American society became more affluent after the war than most Americans believed possible before or during the war. Public policy, such…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Encarta. World War. Encyclopedia Article. Retrieved from the Internet at http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761563737/World_War_II.html.

Sage, Henry. (March 23, 2004). The Postwar United States. The Library of Congress. Retrieved from the Internet at http://www.nv.cc.va.us/home/nvsageh/Hist122/topics/PostWorldWarIIDom.htm.

Stravelli, Gloria. (March, 2004). In unexpected ways WWII changed women's lives: Role in war effort helped shift societal perceptions and expectations. New Jersey: The Hub.

The New Georgia Encyclopedia. (2004). Civil Rights Movement. Retrieved from the Internet at http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/nge/ArticlePrintable.jsp?id=h-2716.
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Second World War Left the

Words: 1037 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36188101

In this sense, Stalin decided to extend his influence and to impose certain types of government in countries such as Poland, Hungry, or Romania. The same fate would have had Greece and Turkey as well, should the U.S. not have outlined the Truman Doctrine. It can be said that the doctrine itself was a reaction to the tendency of the soviets to extend their influence.

The Marshall Plan can be seen as the economic component of the Truman Doctrine. It was in fact a set of principles pointed out in 1947 at Harvard by Secretary of State George Marshall (American Rhetoric, 2008). This economic plan too was designed for cater for the economic needs of eastern countries as well, but seeing that the Russian side considered it to be the mere economic arm of the Truman Doctrine, it forced countries under its occupation to reject this reconstruction aid. In fact the financial support would have enabled states to come out of the recession they were facing after the war taking into account that Eastern Europe had been an important battle field in the entire confrontation. However, the adherence to such a plan also included the adoption of certain capitalist economic…… [Read More]

References

American Rhetoric. "The Marshall Plan 1947." American Rhetoric website. 2008. 30 Jan. 2008  http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/georgecmarshall.html 

The Avalon Project. "The Truman Doctrine." Yale University. 2008. 30 Jan. 2008 http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/trudoc.htm
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WWI & WW2 Comparing and

Words: 1852 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68215387

The U.S. emerged as a leading superpower and the sole nuclear power in the world, determined to play a leading role in international politics. The post-Second World War era saw the start of a prolonged Cold War in which the U.S. competed for political domination around the world with Soviet Communism until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990. The Second World War also helped the country to overcome the economic depression of the 1930s as its wartime industrial production stimulated its economy.… [Read More]

References

Arima, Y. (2003). "The Way to Pearl Harbor: U.S. Vs. Japan." ICE Case Studies:

Number 118, December, 2003. Retrieved on May 26, 2007 at http://www.american.edu/TED/ice/japan-oil.htm

Dwyer, J.J. (2004). "The United States and World War I." Lew Rockwell.com. Retrieved on May 26, 2007 at http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig3/dwyer3.html

Keylor, William R. (2007). "World War I." Encyclopedia Encarta Online. On May 26, 2007 at http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761569981/World_War_I.html
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World War II Describe the

Words: 660 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82192665

This is when they would go after some highest officials in the German and Japanese governments that knew about the atrocities. Under this approach they were publically making an example of these individuals and their involvement with these activities. This created the impression that the Allies were doing everything possible to hold ex-Nazis and Japanese officials accountable. (Plesch 101 -- 118)

However, beneath the surface is when the U.S. And Soviet Union, were cherry picking individuals that could help develop new weapons programs (most notably: rocket scientists). At the end of the war, the Germans had developed the V-1 and the V-2 rockets. These were loaded with a simple warhead and fired at England. Moreover, the Germans had been able to create the first jet aircraft. (Ward 34 -- 52)

After the war was over, the Allies were rounding up these scientists and were learning everything about these secret programs. The problem was the labor used to build many of these weapons often involved utilizing Jews and other individuals (who were considered to be slaves). These people came to work at the rocket factories from the death camps. The German scientists knew what was happening, as they had near total…… [Read More]

Reference

Plesch, Dan. America, Hitler and the UN. New York: IB Tarius, 2011. Print.

Ward, Bob. Dr. Space. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2005. Print.
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WWI WWII or Nazi

Words: 928 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75308216

Nazi Germany

Nazi Propaganda and the Spread of Fascism

World War II was precipitated by the rise of fascism throughout Europe. As the mores of socialism began to take root in many parts of the continent, fascism emerged as a powerful counterpoint. For nations like Italy, Spain and Germany, the consequences of a sustained and devastating recession would be a coalescing of support behind strong, self-proclaimed and authoritarian leaders. Certainly, most notorious among them would be Adolph Hitler, whose Nazi party would first occupy Austria and Germany before ultimately pursuing a more global agenda. However, for our discussion, the primary interest is the degree of success that the Nazi party had in ultimately penetrating Germany with its values, ideals and policies. As the discussion here will show, propaganda would play a central role in the ability of the Nazi party to garner support and generate the impassioned loyalty of the German people.

In particular, our attention is drawn to an image that is estimated to be from around 1930, depicting Hitler in a manner that at once glorifies the Nazi leader and displays the core tenets of fascism. The image, which can be found at the following link, shows the…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

German Propaganda Archive. (2013). Es Lebe Deutschland. Bytwerk.com.

History Learning Site (HLS). (2012). Propaganda in Nazi Germany. Historylearningsite.co.uk.

Welch, D. (2011). Nazi Propaganda. BBC History.
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World War I And Related

Words: 624 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62380097

All European nations suffered devastating postwar economic consequences, which further increased the reluctance to use military force to subdue Hitler. The United States enjoyed a postwar boom, given that none of the battles had been waged upon its own territories. But the Republican-dominated Senate refused to allow the U.S. To become a member of the League of Nations, and the absence of strong American leadership made the League ineffective as a peacekeeping force. Germany was also stripped of all of its colonies: the fact that many new nations were created in the redrawing of the map of Europe meant that many of the recently evolved national identities and infrastructures of new countries were quite fragile.

Although they were 'older' nations, Germany and Russia were particularly politically unstable, as a result of the conditions spawned by World War I. Despite its early exit from the War, Russia's economy was undergoing an enforced collectivization and industrialization program. Two defining ideological strains dominated Europe from the left and from the right -- fascism and communism. However, because of the shocking impact of the Russian Revolution, fears of leftism were far greater than fears of right-wing leadership. Communism identified itself openly as an international…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"German Revolution." Spartacus Schoolnet. April 14, 2010.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/GERrevolution.htm

"Wars and Battles, World War I." U.S. History. April 14, 2010.

 http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1334.html
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World War I And Its Effect on

Words: 989 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51192383

World War I and its Effect on the Middle East

The Europeans who had already colonized much of the area with post-World War I now spread further into the Middle East claiming further portions such as Arabia, Iraq, Syria, Libya, and Palestine. The Constantinople Agreement followed by many more including the Sykes Picot agreement over and again implemented covert agreements regarding lands that would go to each of the Allies. After the war, France received Lebanon and Syria (

) even though Syria herself preferred an American mandate (2), and Britain received land that included Palestine, Israel, Transjordan, and Iraq (3). The indigenous people themselves were never consulted regarding whom they wished to control them, and colonization, consequently, prompted Arabic nationalism.

Nationalism was, furthermore, created by the fact that the peace settlements imposed by the Allies after World War I broke up nation states and created others, confusing many who, originally believing that they would be provided with their own state, now found themselves minorities in an alien region (4). This random carving up of nation-states across borders despite historical and original geographic parameters alienated, confused -- and then angered many. Treatment of the indigenous inhabitants was also bigoted, intolerant…… [Read More]

Sources

Bloomberg.com. "U.S., U.K. Waged War on Iraq Because of Oil, Blair Adviser Says" Bloomberg.com, May 1, 2003

CBS.com. "Poll: Talk First, Fight Later." CBS.com, Jan. 24, 2003. Retrieved 1/17/2011.

DeNovo, J. American Interests and Policies in the Middle East (University of Minnesota Press, 1963)

Gelvin, J. History of the Modern Middle East (Oxford University Press, 2005)
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WWI When World War I

Words: 926 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12021802

..the spirit of ruthless brutality will enter itn every fiber of our national life" (Johnson 643).

Staying out, states Tindall & Shi 948), was "more easily said than done, not least for Wilson himself. Americans might want to stay out of the war, but most of them cared which side won. Ironically, because there were so many first- or second-generation immigrants from Germany and Ireland, the leaning was toward the Central Powers. However, "old-line Americans" mostly of British descent were sympathetic to the Allies.

Yet actions were to occur that made the final decision. In 1915, the Germans sank the British Cunard liner Lusitania with 128 Americans on board. The Americans were outraged and sent letters to no avail. Then U-boats sank a number of American ships and finally, the press published a secret telegram from the German Foreign Minister Arthur Zimmerman to the Mexican government proposing a German-Mexican offensive alliance against the U.S., where Texas and other territories would be given back to Mexico. The decision was made to enter the war.

World War I made a major impact on the world, that is still felt today. During and after the war, Japanese-American relationships grew increasingly strained. Also, the…… [Read More]

Books Cited

Johnson, Paul. History of the American People. New York: Harper Collins, 1997.

Tindall, George Brown and Shi, David. America. A Narrative History. New York:

Norton, 1984.

Zinn, Hoard. People's History of the United States. New York: Harper Collins, 1999.
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World War II Was Carried Out on

Words: 734 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1896411

World War II was carried out on the home front, how it was presented to the American people and conducted in America. World War II never really touched American shored, but it certainly made a difference in American lives.

On December 8, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed congress and asked them to declare war on Japan after their unprovoked attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on December 7. He called December 7 "a date which will live in infamy," and it brought Americans directly into the war, and their lives changed. As soon as Roosevelt declared war, thousands of patriotic and emotional Americans hurried to enlist and help fight the war. These young people were angry about the Japanese attacks, and they wanted to defend their country. Young men enlisted in the Armed Forces, and young women signed up as nurses, and even pilots, helping to ferry airplanes from one base to another, but never actually in combat.

When so many young people enlisted, there were many open jobs that had to be filled, and the women left at home filled many jobs that had traditionally been held by men. They worked in factories building the ships, planes, and weapons…… [Read More]

References

Daniels, Roger. "10 Bad News from the Good War: Democracy at Home During World War II." The Home-Front War World War II and American Society. Eds. O'Brien, Kenneth Paul and Lynn Hudson Parsons. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1995. 157-167.

O'Brien, Kenneth Paul and Lynn Hudson Parsons, eds. The Home-Front War World War II and American Society. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1995.
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World War II Called Out the American

Words: 383 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14096827

World War II called out the American troops, the country's economy could have been in grave danger had it not been for the untapped reservoir of human resources. Wives, mothers and sisters picked up where their husbands, sons and brothers left off. Not only were these women brave in their efforts to take on something as foreign as factory work, they also directly affected the outcome of the war. Conversely, without that call to action, women's roles in our society today would also be quite different.

Initially there was broad-based concern about women taking men's jobs, what would happen to the family structure and how society would deal with such a drastic change. However, it was a better solution than putting children to work as in the past.

There was no time to analyze or try and come up with a better solution. Women jump into industry with both feet and found the experience to be rather invigorating. With abundant opportunities to explore, women earned self-respect along with a paycheck. It was a time of new-found independence as well as bonding with their peers.

However, during these transitional years,…… [Read More]

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World War 2 Until the Modern Time in the U S

Words: 1206 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1800489

U.S. Economy Since World War II

economy is the largest in the world but has the most unequal distribution of wealth among all the developed countries of the world. The major reason for this inequality is that since the Second World War most U.S. governments have tended to favor the wealthy and the corporate sector while formulating their economic policies. Such "rich friendly" policies have become more pronounced since the early 1980s and continue to this day to the detriment of the society and the economy. This essay gives an overview of the post-World War II U.S. economy and outlines the ways in which various U.S. administrations have enacted policies favoring the corporate sector and the wealthy.

Background

The 18th century British economist Adam Smith advocated the benefits of a Laissez faire economy in his The Wealth of Nations (1776) by proclaiming that a "free economy" in which every individual pursues his own good, works for the benefit of everyone. These principles of a capitalist economy were adopted by almost all Western countries including the United States following the Industrial Revolution. The 19th century United States thus saw the rise of the "robber barons" -- an era in which industrial…… [Read More]

Works Cited

'Eisenhower, Dwight David." Encarta Online Encyclopedia 2004. December 17, 2004.

http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761554032_2/Eisenhower.html

"Harry S. Truman (1945-1953)" American President.org. 8/26/2004. December 17, 2004. http://www.americanpresident.org/history/harrytruman/

"How Unequal Are We, Anyway?." A Statistical Briefing Book. Inequality.org. July, 2004. December 17, 2004. http://www.inequality.org/facts.html
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World War II Drew to a Close

Words: 2281 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3306350

World War II drew to a close, and the planet was forced to recalibrate in unprecedented proportions, the United States began its long emergence as the most expansive super-power that had yet been known. Its influence that would compete virulently with the post-war Soviet influence for half a century, has since disseminated into every facet of the geopolitical theatre. As such, American support can operate as the determining factor in the success of a national agenda. Likewise, American dissent can be the stifling roadblock that sets nations adrift in failure and, consequently, resentment. So it's important to acknowledge that a nation's complaint of American neglect is more than just the bitter rhetoric of the disenfranchised. The emphasis placed on American approval and volition is fairly justified when one considers the weight and implication of the U.S. stance on any given topic. And it's certainly fair to say that American intervention has been as significant a factor in the Arab-Israeli conflict as have been the opposing belief structures characterizing the two sides. As such, it's also reasonable to suggest that, as present evidence would purport, Israel's ascension to power and success in spite of violent opposition from all of its borders,…… [Read More]

5. Maisel, David, The Founding Myths of Israel: Nationalism, Socialism, and the Making of the Jewish State, Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 1998.

6. Rabinovich, Itamar, Waging Peace, New York, NY, Farrer, Straus and Giroux, 1999.

7. Smith, Charles D., Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict, New York, NY, St. Martin's Press, 2001
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World War I On Politics

Words: 958 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22933742



With a profound sense of the solemn and even tragical character of the step I am taking and of the grave responsibilities which it involves, but in unhesitating obedience to what I deem my constitutional duty, I advise that the Congress declare the recent course of the Imperial German Government to be in fact nothing less than war against the Government and people of the United States....America is privileged to spend her blood and her might for the principles that gave her birth and happiness and the peace which she has treasured. God helping her, she can do no other." (Woodrow Wilson's war message)

United States' entry bolstered the Allied forces and gave them extraordinary power over the German Imperial army. With America's entry into the war, things suddenly changed as we were was no longer spectators. The response from the public was however not overwhelming since it had been made to believe that America wouldn't need to send its civilians to fight the war. Only 73,000 men out of a total of 10 million able-bodied men enlisted in the army.

The resentment grew consistently over the period of war and did not end with the end of war. It…… [Read More]

References

President Woodrow Wilson's War message" accessed online 14th April 2005:

http://bss.sfsu.edu/tygiel/Hist427/texts/wilswarmessage.html

John Bach McMaster. The United States in the World War: D. Appleton & Company. New York. 1918
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World War II Also Marked

Words: 2272 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99236996

The demonstration in Tiananmen Square showed that there were alrge semgnets of the population that wanted change, but Deng's response was to crush the movement with violence and to assert the supremacy ofm centalzied rule once more..

These actions show some of the difficulties of independence and of developing a new political structure when many adhere to older political structures and ideas. One response is to try to wipe out the old with violence, but regimes tend to become reactionary about their own ideas as well and to crush any opposition, real of perceived.

9. Arab unity has not materialized for a number of historical reasons related to the different ways in which the countries of the region have developed so that the leaders of some of the states are wary of other leaders, because of differences in economic structures in the various countries, and because of different reactions to the formation of Israel and to what sort of policy should be pursued to eliminate that state. Religious differences are also part of the mix, and some of the ancient antagonisms relate to conflicts such as those between the Sunni and the Sufi Muslim groups.

In addition, new conflicts develop…… [Read More]

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World War I And II

Words: 457 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66832139

David Fromkin's "A Peace to End All Peace." From the beginning, the review provides intriguing information, including the fact that the title relates to the ideal of "a war to end all wars." The ironic nature of this phrase has been the subject of discussion and occasional mirth for all the years after the war. I was delighted to find out the name of the originator of the term, British commander Archibald Wavell, since this is not something I knew before.

The review provides several pieces of interesting information, including the fact that the British, and particularly Kitchener, were largely ignorant about the social and cultural nature of the Middle East, making the British policy for this region largely ineffective at best and explosive at worst. Another piece of interesting information is the mistaken belief that a conspiracy was underway to undermine the position of the British in the Middle East. When this is taken into account, it appears that little has been learned from history. Even today, people tend to make assumptions without deeper investigation or even an attempt at critical thinking. This is evidenced by the many conspiracy theories that exist today and also by the way in…… [Read More]

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World War 2 Until the Modern Time in the U S

Words: 1514 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33221396

discrimination in U.S.

There are people still alive today who remember Jim Crow laws. Half a century ago, segregation of drinking fountains, public restrooms, public buses, and public schools was still legal. Fifty years ago blacks in many states could not make a living except to work in jobs that resembled slavery in their wages and work conditions. The Civil Rights movement ostensibly changed everything. Yet decades of political correctness and affirmative action have all but glossed over the deeply rooted problems of racism and other forms of injustice evident in the daily lives of many Americans. African-Americans are also not the only minority group to suffer from systematic discrimination. Half of all Americans -- black, white, rich poor -- experience daily discrimination at home and in the workplace. Less than a hundred years ago, women could not even vote. Suffrage created twice as many voters and like the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s, feminism promised to change the outlook for American women in general. Yet females still earn less money than their male counterparts and as a result many women of all colors live in poverty. Innumerable legal measures, from Brown v. Board of Education to Roe v.…… [Read More]

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World War One Leadership Military Political

Words: 717 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85056402

leadership is crucial to successful political military campaigns. Close scrutiny of the military and political leaders of the First World War demonstrate how political leaders use methods like propaganda and ideology to forge their victories in the psyches of the people, helping military leaders achieve their goals by engendering trust, courage, and conviction in spite of tremendous hardships and even death. Similarly, the victories of military leaders become critical for effective political campaigns. Military leadership requires a different set of tools and tactics than political leadership but both are crucial for desirable outcomes.

One of the most successful political leaders during World War One ended up being Vladimir Lenin, who spearheaded the Bolshevik Revolution and ensured the enduring success of Soviet policies. Lenin's leadership skills far exceeded those of Czar Nicholas II, who failed to inspire the people of Russia in the way Lenin had, thus leading to the demise of a long monarchic tradition. On 19 October, 1917, Lenin issued a proclamation proudly inciting the Russian people to revolt against the traditional social, economic, and political hierarchies in their nation. Speaking on behalf of the masses of poor people in Russia, Lenin refers to the "the need to hand…… [Read More]

References

Lenin, Vladimir. Appeal for Revolt Issued by Lenin, 19 October 1917. Retrieved online: http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/lenin_19oct1917.htm

Lenin, Vladimir. Lenin's Proclamation of 7 November 1917. Retrieved online: http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/lenin_25oct1917.htm

Sir Douglas Haig's 2nd Despatch (Somme), 23 December 1916. Retrieved online: http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/haigsommedespatch.htm

Sir Douglas Haig's Final Despatch, 21 March 1919. Retrieved online: http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/haiglastdespatch.htm
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World War I Had Devastating

Words: 1737 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35830852

The soldier is simply unable to live with this corruption. Instead, the narrator continues as his voice by proxy, indicting the society that caused the war and created the atrocity the killed the solder. Likewise, Graves is forever changed by his experience, losing the respect he used to hold for the values and norms of the society that caused the war and failed to understand the effect of the war upon all that was beautiful and young.

In concussion, Sassoon's and Graves's work compare well as commentaries and criticisms upon what both authors appear to regard as the atrocity of war. Sassoon's very brief work has its impact in this very brevity, while Graves's detail and individual focus achieves the same effect. Both protagonists are severely traumatized by their experiences. In both works, this trauma does not remain unaddressed. Both authors provide their central characters with a mouthpiece to denote the injustice against them and also the horror they witnessed and experienced during the war. In this way, the works are both an indictment of the society that created the war and would not take sufficient responsibility for its effects.… [Read More]

Sources

Buzzle.com. Siegfried Sassoon -- War Poet. 2010. Retrieved from  http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/7-27-2006-103706.asp 

Graves, Robert. Good-bye to All That. Providence: Berghan Books, 1995.

Sassoon, Friedrich. Suicide in the Trenches. Retrieved from http://community.livejournal.com/afoxhuntingman/3587.html
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WWII History

Words: 1470 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64637358

Cornlius Ryan, one of the finest writers of the history of World War II, was born in Dublin in 192. He worked as a correspondent from 1941 to 1945 and covered stories of the battles in Europe for Reuters and the London Daily Telegraph and in the final months of the Pacific campaign.

The first book written, published in 1959, was The Longest Day, that sold four million copies in twenty -seven editions and later in 1962 a film was made on it. However, it is said that The Longest Day was originally published in 1959 and since then it ahs reprinted several times.

Furthermore, another book was published in 1966 The Last Battle, while in 1974, he finished his third book A Bridge Too Far, though at the same time he was undergoing treatment for cancer that killed him in 1976.

Moreover, he was the author was a native of Ireland who later became an Air Force pilot and war reporter covering the D-Day landings as well as the advance of General Patton's Third Army across France and Germany. He published books, plays, screenplays, magazine pieces, and radio and TV scripts.

Background and Overview of the Book

The Longest…… [Read More]

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World War II Researchers Have

Words: 3825 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98107315

The WRITE initiative was a collaborative approach that drew upon industry, state, local governments as well as the EPA's Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory with the overall goal of developing more effective pollution prevention technologies that could assist the electronics manufacturing industry in developing a "crade to grave" approach to managing these products (Rappaport, 1999).

Besides these earlier efforts, in more recent years, increasingly rigorous laws and regulations have been implemented by the EPA with the goal of minimizing the impact of electronics and electrical device waste on the environment have began to make a major difference in recovering these toxic substances before they ever have a chance to become waste. For instance, pursuant to the above-mentioned Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, it is now illegal for companies in the United States to simply discard hazardous waste, including electronics and electrical devices, in normal trash receptacles (The importance of recycling computers, 2003). In this regard, Gaba (2008) reports that, "The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) establishes the so-called 'cradle to grave' program for the management of hazardous waste. Under Subtitle C. Of RCRA, hazardous 'solid waste,' as defined by the EPA, is subject to extensive controls on its storage, transportation,…… [Read More]

References

Brown, V.J. (2004). Electronics, lead and landfills. Environmental Health Perspectives,

112(13), 734.

Gaba, J.M. (2008). Rethinking recycling. Environmental Law, 38(4), 1053-1054.

Gebrewold, F. (1999). Current hazardous waste management and disposal practices among small quantity generators. Journal of Environmental Health, 57(2), 11.
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Nationalism Before World War I

Words: 1489 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85302243

World War I

Causes and Consequences of World War I

World War 1

(Causes, America's Contribution to the War, Role of President Woodrow Wilson, Treaty of Versailles Failure)

The First World War (1914-1918) or the Great War was fought between the Allies and the Central Powers. The Allies included 27 countries of which Russia, the United States of America, France, Japan and Britain are the most prominent. The Central Powers consisted of Turkey, Germany, Bulgaria and Austria-Hungary as the chief combatants. It is the greatest and most atrocious war brawled till date.

Causes

There were a number of causes that initiated the brutality of World War I Major causes include imperialism, nationalism, materialism and alliance systems. However, the immediate cause of the beginning of the War was the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the Royal Prince of Hungary and Bohemia. As he was killed by a Serbian nationalist in June 1914, war was declared on Serbia by Austria-Hungary. Later, Germany and Russia got involved in war as they were the allies of Austria-Hungary and Serbia respectively. To capture a clearer picture of the World War I, we must analyze the prominent causes mentioned above.

Alliances -- When two or more…… [Read More]

References

America in the Great War. (2000). Retrieved from  http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/snpwwi1.htm 

Wilson, Woodrow. (2009). The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. Retrieved April 15, 2011, from http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=117053275

World war one - causes. (2011, 01, 02). Retrieved from http://www.historyonthenet.com/WW1/causes.htm

World War I. (2009). The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. Retrieved April 15, 2011, from http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=117053630
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Changes in WWII

Words: 1752 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67033905

WW2 Momentum Shift 1942-1944

WWII

One of the events that rocked the world and consequently shaped the world was the WWII that commenced effectively in 1939 and ended in 1945. It is however worth noting that some of the conflicts that eventually ended up in the culmination of the WWII started much earlier. The WWII parse involved majority of the nations, including the powerful nations at that time taking sides and aligning themselves and their military and diplomatic allegiance to either the Allies or the Axis, each side forming their combined forces. The commanding forces in the Allies were France, Great Britain, Soviet Union, United States and to some little extent China (Rodye-Smith J., 2014). One the other side of the divide the Axis were Italy, Germany and Japan. This war was largely seen as a continuation of the WWI bearing the 20 years of unresolved disputes that emanated from WWI came back to haunt the same nations there after. The war culminated in the death of between 40 million people to 50 million from direct or indirect contacts with the firepower in the battle field. This paper will hence concentrate more on the later years of the WWII where…… [Read More]

References

Rodye-Smith J., (2014). World War II. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/648813/World-War-II

Rogole J.A., (2002). The Strategic Bombing Campaign against Germany during World War II. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from http://www.google.co.ke/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=10&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CGoQFjAJ&url=http%3A%2F%2Fetd.lsu.edu%2Fdocs%2Favailable%2Fetd-0413102-132317%2Funrestricted%2FRigole_thesis.pdf&ei=rnTVU7T2HOHj4QTl6YCwCA&usg=AFQjCNGr0G5t3esuMHkyG6efcmsHwe2lVg&sig2=f4uVuDX2XSnYn89JcB0wYA&bvm=bv.71778758,d.bGE

Yale Law School, (2008). The Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Chapter 7 - The Attacks. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from http://avalon.law.yale.edu/20th_century/mp07.asp
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American Business During World War II

Words: 770 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58325883

World War II -- Techniques Adopted by American Businesses to Expand War Production

During World War II, American industry geared up with several highly effective techniques. These techniques included but were not limited to: absorbing factories and workers idled by the Great Depression, building new factories in new geographical areas, attracting workers from rural areas to industrial areas, using blacks and women in significantly greater numbers, and using/improving mass production. Through these methods, U.S. industry met the military demands of World War II and made America rich by the war's conclusion.

American businesses expanded World War II production in several ways, discussed here in no particular order of importance. First, America used existing factories and built many new ones while it also used idle workers and attracted new ones. Post-Depression American was saddled with a significant number of unemployed workers and idle factories; however, by the summer of 1941, more than half of the American industrial workforce was under military orders,[footnoteRef:1] as war sped up the process of building up home industries.[footnoteRef:2] Private contractors eventually had huge government contracts to supply everything from combat boots to airplanes.[footnoteRef:3] Struggling to meet these demands, American industry underwent a fast and drastic buildup.[footnoteRef:4]…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Keegan, John. The Battle for History: Re-Fighting World War II. New York, NY: First Vintage Books Edition, 1996.

Overy, Richard. Why the Allies Won. New York, NY W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1997.

Weinberg, Gerhard L. A World at Arms: A Global History of World War II. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 1995.
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American and German Perspective in WWI

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73554165

World War I

The First World War began in the summer of 1914 with the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. The conflict lasted through late 1918, concluding with the treaty of Versailles. The war to end all wars, as it was commonly known, was dominated by trench warfare. Due to numerous advances in defense technology and a lack of tactical advances, both the Allied Nations and the Central Powers, were stymied by a lack of military advances. Early victories in France, by the German army, and in Serbia by the Austrian/Hungarian forces proved to be less than decisive, due to miscommunication between the two Central powers.

Not only was this the First war between so many great world powers, additionally this was the first war to be affected by, and ultimately fought, not only on the battle field but also in the press rooms. Due to expansion in communication abilities and increased ease in printing, information was able to be disseminated to an eager public in a timely fashion. With news being so readily available, and the public so eager for information, the amount of news coverage was astounding. During the course of the war news coverage from…… [Read More]

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Impact of WWI

Words: 975 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39166867

World War I

The Causes and How America Joined the War

The events that led to the causes of the first world war had its roots in the Balkans in late July 1914 and there are causes including political, territorial, and economic conflicts among the great European powers in the four decades leading up to the war. Militarism, a complex web of alliances, imperialism and nationalism were some of the other causes that led up to the First World War.

The root for the Second World War lay in the peace accords and the punishments that were meted out to the Germans after the First World War and the sense of humiliation and economic debacle following the end of the First World War.

The animosity between the Americans and the Germans started with the sinking of the Lusitania as she made her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York in September 1907. The ship was sunk after the German submarine U. 20 fired a torpedo into the ship's side. 1119 passengers of the 1,924 aboard died in the incident which included 114 Americans.

Later it was revealed that Walter Schwieger, the captain of the U-Boat that sank the Lusitania had…… [Read More]