Young Frankenstein Essays (Examples)

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Frankenstein the Classic Horror Novel

Words: 745 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64951108

The monster is evil, Victor is good, and so they are in conflict throughout the book.

The point-of-view in the novel is first person in both the letters by Captain Walton and the narration told by Victor himself. This helps make the reader feel like they are part of the action and experiencing events as they take place in the novel.

There are many themes in "Frankenstein," and one of the main plot lines is the fight between good and evil. However, there are other themes in the novel. One is Victor's quest for learning, which leads him to create something that is far beyond what he can control. Victor has a thirst for knowledge, he is creative, and his quest takes him down the wrong path. Another theme is the monstrosity of the monster. Because he is ugly and was created by such strange means, he is shunned and…… [Read More]

References

Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft. Frankenstein Or, the Modern Prometheus. New York: Collier Books, 1961.
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Frankenstein an Analysis of Mary

Words: 1625 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32354673

It has "… taken on a life of its own independent of Mary Shelley's text, and indeed even independent of certain parts of her narrative." (Goodall 19) This has resulted in film and stage play versions of the novel.

The reason for this continuing popularity lies largely with the relevance of the themes; particularly with regard to the theme of man 'playing God' through his application of scientific knowledge and his need to manipulate and control nature. This then can be linked to many questions and issued of contemporary importance. One could, for example, take modern scientific attempts at cloning animals and the possibility of human cloning. The question arises whether science will create monsters in the future through scientific knowledge. As one critic notes; "The public debate on cloning continues to be littered with references to Frankenstein." (Goodall 19)

Furthermore, "Mary Shelley's story has been taken variously to illustrate…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Britton, Jeanne M. "Novelistic Sympathy in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein." Studies in Romanticism 48.1 (2009): 3+. Questia. Web. 16 Feb. 2011.

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. Web. 16 Feb. 2011. ( http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/frankenstein/section1.rhtml )

Frankenstein: Introduction. Web. 16 Feb. 2011.

(http://www.enotes.com/frankenstein)
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Bride of Frankenstein This Is

Words: 1441 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81513844

It shows that children, who we expect to be innocent and trusting, can have a very dark side, and that can be horrifying, although I wouldn't really call this a "horror" film, either. I would call this a psychological thriller with a twisted ending. This film doesn't have a lot of the elements of many horror films, although Rhoda could certainly be seen as a monster stalking her prey, anyone who has something she wants. The real focus of the film is her mother, Christine, who can't face what her daughter has done, or do the right thing, such as turning her in to the authorities. Instead, she blames herself, tries to kill her daughter with sleeping pills, and then tries to commit suicide. No wonder the daughter has problems!

Like the other films, this film has a message, too, and it has to do with children and what they're…… [Read More]

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Frankenstein Offers a Great Analysis

Words: 1283 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16084218

The Monster's suffering was the root of all his murders, and Victor the cause of all his pain. It was at this point that the monstrosity of Victor's character is understood better, making Victor the greater monster in the story.

2.)

The poem "Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey" encompasses everything that the Romantic period had to offer. The physical aspect that the poem can portray, and the feeling that reading invokes makes this one of great substance and significance. The deep connection with Nature, is one that makes this poem a part of the Romantic Era's history, encapsulating a part of history in its lines.

The poem provides very rich description that invokes feeling; that is what the Romantic Period is all about. "Here, under this dark sycamore, and view / These plots of cottage ground, these orchard tufts, / Which at this season, with their unripe…… [Read More]

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Frankenstein War of the Worlds

Words: 899 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87874276

The rash, brash young soldier Claudio is betrothed to Hero, who adores him, but because of the male code of the military he has been raised to believe in, he tends to assume the worst of women rather than the best. On their wedding-day, he shames Hero unjustly, even though nothing in her manner indicates she has changed: "You seem to me as Dian in her orb, / as chaste as is the bud ere it be blown" (4.1). In this male-dominated society, where women are aliens and suspect, even the supposedly wise Don Pedro believes the slander at first: "hy, then are you no maiden" (4.1).

But mistrust and a refusal to sympathize with another are not limited to times of turmoil, or emotionally fraught relationships like marriage. Even the relationship of parent to child becomes perverted in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. The scientist and doctor is so determined to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Shakespeare, William. "Much Ado About Nothing." MIT Shakespeare Homepage.

11 Mar 2008.  http://shakespeare.mit.edu/much_ado/ 

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. Literature.org. 11 Mar 2008. http://www.literature.org/authors/shelley-mary/frankenstein/

Wells, H.G. The War of the Worlds. 1898. Web edition of the War of the Worlds.
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Compare and Contrast Billy Budd and Frankenstein

Words: 944 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50844205

Frankenstein -- illy udd

ILLY UDD & VICTOR FRANKENSTEIN:

TWO TRAGIC FIGURES

After a close reading of Mary W. Shelley's Frankenstein; Or, the Modern Prometheus, first published in 1818, and Herman Melville's novella illy udd, published around 1855, it is quite clear that the main characters, being Victor Frankenstein and illy udd, share some common attributes. oth are young, adventurous and full of curiosity and are caught up in a world that through their eyes is indifferent and hostile. ut most importantly, both of these characters are tragic figures, meaning that their lives end in nothing but death and disillusionment as a result of their own misfortune and emotional immaturity.

With illy udd, Melville created a very strange world similar to his earlier Moby Dick, but in illy udd, the main character experiences true tragedy based on the extremes found in human nature; illy udd is thus rather complex, being…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Melville, Herman. Billy Budd. New York: Penguin Books, 1986.

Shelley, Mary W. Frankenstein. New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1993.
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Was Frankenstein Born With His Identity or Was His Identity Created

Words: 713 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23802696

Frankenstein: An Identity Born or Created?

The title character in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein grew up in eighteenth-century Switzerland. In the character's own words, "No human being could have passed a happier childhood than myself" (33). Young Victor Frankenstein had loving parents, and siblings he adored. These early years proved to be a stark contrast to university life, where Victor was an eager student but very lonely. He threw himself into his work, becoming obsessed with natural philosophy and science. In a bold experiment, he gathered an assortment of human parts and stitched them together, curious as to whether he could create life. Victor was astounded to see that he did, indeed, create a living creature. The initial thrill he experienced at the success of his experiment quickly turned to horror as his creature escaped and began terrorizing the countryside. The creature was not born a monster, however. His identity was…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein: Or, The Modern Prometheus. Salem, Oregon: Bookbyte Digital,

n.d. Electronic Book.
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Doubling in Frankenstein Mary Shelley's

Words: 1723 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14594401



It is through Shelley's doubling between Frankenstein and the Monster, and herself and Frankenstein and the Monster, that Freud's uncanny and psychological concepts of the id, ego, and superego can be analyzed. Shelley demonstrates how an individual's outward appearance is not necessarily representative of their character and at the same time is able to come to terms with the psychological traumas that plagued her -- from losing her own mother at childbirth to losing her own children shortly thereafter. Furthermore, Shelley is able to demonstrate how an imbalance between an individual's id, ego, and superego can influence behavior and is also able to demonstrate how each of these is formed, either through instinctual behaviors, observations, and education. Ultimately, Shelley's understanding of the uncanny, and psychological constructs, paved the way for psychologists like Freud to investigate the constructs of fear and unease.

orks Cited

Freud, Sigmund. The Ego and the Id.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Freud, Sigmund. The Ego and the Id. 1923. Web. 2 May 2013.

-. "The Uncanny." 1919. Web. 2 May 2013.

Johnson, Barbara. "My Monster/My Self." Diacritics. Vol. 12. The Johns Hopkins University

Press, 1982, pp. 2-10. JSTOR. 2 May 2013.
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Compare and Contrast Frankenstein and Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Man's Dual Nature

Words: 2143 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18203766

Frankenstein and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in relation to man's dual nature

Frankenstein written by Mary Shelley when she was only nineteen years of age is considered to be one of the most fascinating novels in our literature. Such a fact is imaginatively approved in a strikingly fresh adaptation by Jonathan Pope for the Glasgow Citizens that takes off the congealed veneer of the horror film industry and makes out a truly attractive background of adventurism relating to scientific and philosophical levels. (Coveney, Frankenstein) Frankenstein relates to the duality of human nature and the manner in which humans are perceived by the society.

Mary Shelley is of the view that the treatment they attain due to societal perceptions will in the end draw out or contain some features of their nature. In brief, Frankenstein depicts the story of a scientific genius named Victor Frankenstein, whose studies made him to…… [Read More]

References

Augustine, James R. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Pearls of Wisdom Lecture. C School of Medicine. April 18, 1996. Retrieved from http://www.med.sc.edu/cma/PearlofWisdom3.htm Accessed on 22 June, 2005

Dean, Katie. Review of Frankenstein. 07 November, 2003. Retrieved from  http://trashotron.com/agony/reviews/2003/shelley-frankenstein.htm  Accessed on 22 June, 2005

Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Retrieved from http://www.newi.ac.uk/rdover/other/dr_jekyl.htm Accessed on 22 June, 2005

Fear and Fun. Retrieved from http://www.beloit.edu/~fyi/fearandfun/greenknights.htm Accessed on 22 June, 2005
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Modern Frankenstein

Words: 635 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48661480

Frankenstein

Taking the place of the clever but melancholy Dr. Frankenstein, would be an illustrious and famed plastic surgeon named Mars von Meinstein. With a billion-dollar practice located on the most expensive piece of real estate in Beverly Hills, Meinstein grows tired of over-charging spoiled wealthy women for tummy tucks, lip and face injections and liposuction. He becomes tired of improving the appearance of human life. Rather, he longs to create human life.

Meinstein becomes obsessed with the idea of creating the perfect woman. With a Masters degree in computer science and engineering as well, Meinstein becomes convinced he can fashion a computerized brain that can act as a cockpit for the rest of the body, adjusting the physical appearance of this human body to reflect the changing values of beauty which change with the times. For example, if bony, flat-chested figures become the hippest thing in beauty and fashion,…… [Read More]

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Character and Nature of Frankenstein's Creation the

Words: 2548 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36585000

character and nature of Frankenstein's creation, the monster. It aims to study the potential nature of the monster's evil deeds and to provide readers with understanding of the monster's "being" as told in the story. eing the creator of the monster, this paper also looks into the nature of Victor Frankenstein having to be able to create a monster that haunted his family, friends, and even his own life.

Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein, shows how humans tend to be influenced by the major factors in their lives, such as people and the environment that they are living in. The novel shows how constant rejection can cause someone to become a monster. It also stresses an idea of human injustice towards outsiders, as the monster experienced from humans.

Throughout this paper, I will attempt to point out some factors in the story that made the two characters, Frankenstein and his creation,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brasier, Keri. Psychoanalytical Panel.

1999. Class Uidaho. 13 Dec. 2002. http://www.class.uidaho.edu/eng321/_disc1/0000001c.htm

Collings, David. The Monster and the Imaginary Mother: A Lacanain Reading of Frankenstein.

Boston. Bedford Books of St. Martins Press. 1992.
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Ethics & Morality in Frankenstein

Words: 1398 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5433005

Victor inwardly becomes a monster himself." (Kain, par. 5)

On the other hand, ichard III was written by William Shakespeare. It is the story of ichard who secretly desired the throne of his brother. Although ichard is unattractive and considers himself as such, he is very charismatic. He has a strong personality and he is brilliant with his words and his arguments. In his desire for the thrown of his brother, King Edward IV, ichard was willing to kill anyone just to obtain it. Being intelligent and skillful, he was able to deceive the people around him in order to manipulate them. In order to get married, he manipulated Lady Anne. And then he used his political power by manipulating and deceiving the people around him to have his other brother, Clarence, executed. He used manipulated his older brother, Edward to feel guilty about Clarence's death. This contributed to the…… [Read More]

References

California State University, Northridge. 2007. 9 June 2009.

Donnelley, Connor. Conscience with the New Millenium. 8 June 2009 <  http://www.sma.org.sg/sma_news/3202/ethics.pdf >.

Hall, Richard, Dennis, Carolyn Brown, Chipman, Tere. The Ethical Foundations of Criminal Justice. New York: CRC Press, 1999.

Kain, Joseph. "The Human Situation in Creators of Life and Their Creations." Lehigh University Digital Library. 9 June 2009 .
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Sickness in Frankenstein Is One

Words: 1583 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99089224

He had built a wall around him that was preventing his normal interaction with people. This was causing real suffering and sickness. "hat then became of me? I know not; I lost sensation, and chains and darkness were the only objects that pressed upon me." (p.168) He loses interest in life even more when his dear ones are killed: "I had formed in my own heart a resolution to pursue my destroyer to death; and this purpose quieted my agony, and provisionally reconciled me to life." (p.169)

Sickness is thus a multifaceted theme in the novel. It serves many purposes. On the one hand, we see it as a force fighting against the evil ambitions of Victor and on the other, it can also be seen as a compassionate force trying to restrain Victor. It is all a matter of perception. Had Frankenstein understood why he was falling ill so…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anne K. Mellor, " Making a "monster": an Introduction to Frankenstein," the Cambridge Companion to Mary Shelley, ed. Esther Schor (Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2003)

The Mary Shelley Reader, eds. Betty T. Bennett and Charles E. Robinson (New York: Oxford University Press, 1990)
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Victor Frankenstein - Thematic Explorer

Words: 922 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87769835

With this confession, Victor is telling Walton that he is a broken man because of his inner desires to explore the unknown and by pretending that like God he has control over his own destiny and that of the creature he created. Thematically, Victor is relating that the pursuit of knowledge can often be a very dangerous affair.

At the point when the creature begins to show some movement upon the laboratory table, Victor realizes that he has made an abomination to nature. Later on, he relates a portion of what he calls his "wildest dreams": "I thought I saw Elizabeth, in the bloom of health... I embraced her, but as I imprinted the first kiss on her lips, they became livid with the hue of death... her features appeared to change, and I thought I held the corpse of my dead mother in my arms; a shroud enveloped her…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Shelley, Mary W. Frankenstein. New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1993.
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Nature in Shelley's Frankenstein Mary

Words: 1680 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31964037

The monster knows right from wrong and he choice is one of desperation. Victor never realizes the difference between right and wrong because it is not within his nature to do so.

Frankenstein will always be closely examined when it comes to matters of humanity because of its subject matter. Victor has every opportunity to do something good with his life and the most he can muster is achieving his own dreams of glory by attempting to recreate life. Despite his education and loving family, Victor swerves off the normal path and skids onto the freakish one. The monster he creates encompasses more goodness than he does but he cannot see this because he is just like the rest of humanity - unable to see beyond the monster's appearance. The monster tried everything within his power to remove himself from the freakish path that Victor placed him on and gain…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bloom, Harold. "An excerpt from a study of Frankenstein: or, the New Prometheus." Partisan Review. 1965. Gale Resource Database. http://www.infotrac.galegroup.comInformation Retrieved December 4, 2008.

Bloom on Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley." Bloom's Classic Critical Views. 2008. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Information Retrieved December 4, 2008. http://www.fofweb.com

Gould, Stephen. "The Monster's Human Nature." Natural History. 1994. EBSCO Resource Database. Information Retrieved December 4, 2008. http://search.epnet.com/

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. New York: Bantam Books. 1981.
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Analyzing Odyssey Dante Frankenstein

Words: 3056 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95647040

Depression in Adolescence

Depression in Adolescents

The link between symptoms, etiology, core biochemical processes, treatment outcome, and treatment response of affective (mood) disorders is yet to be adequately understood for allowing their categorization, such that it meets universal approval. Still, one has to make an attempt in this regard, and researchers propose a potentially-acceptable one, derived from extensive consultation.

In case of affective disorders, the basic disturbance is an affect (mood) change, typically extreme elation or depression (without or with related anxiety). An overall activity level change generally accompanies this change of mood, and a majority of other related symptoms either will be conveniently recognized in the context of these changes, or will be secondary to them. Most disorders have a tendency of repetition, and the commencement of individual bouts is usually linked to stressful circumstances or occurrences.

The key criteria of classification of affective disorders have been selected for…… [Read More]

References

Algon, S., Yi, J., Calkins, M.E., Kohler, C. And Borgmann-Winter, K.E. (2013). Evaluation and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Psychotic Symptoms. Current psychiatry reports. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3500659/

Christie, A. (2007). Childhood anxiety: Occupational disruption. New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, 54(2),31-39. Available at http://www.cin.ufpe.br/~fbcpf/PAMPIE/childhood%20anxiety%20Occupational%20disruption.pdf

Halverson, J. L. (1994-2016). Depression Differential Diagnoses. Medscape. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/286759-differential

Lewis, A. J., Bertino, M. D., Skewes, J., Shand, L., Borojevic, N., Knight, T., Lubman, D.I., Toumbourou, J.W. (2013, Nov 13). Adolescent depressive disorders and family based interventions in the family options multicenter evaluation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Available at: http://trialsjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1745-6215-14-384
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What Happens in the Middle of Frankenstein

Words: 778 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9664825

monster recalls his "birth," and tells Victor about how he learned to survive out in the world. His recollections are touched with innocence but also with something of that which is fallen in human nature. As he meets people, he finds that they all run away from him because of his ugliness. He finds a shack and spies on its occupants.

The occupants of this shack are not very happy: they are a young man and woman and an elderly man. They are poor like the monster, who is contributing to their problems by taking their food. The monster has a conscience, feels sorry for making their condition worse, and tries to improve it by bringing them firewood. From them he learns how to speak by mimicking the sounds they make. He also admires their grace and form while being shocked at the sight of his own misshapen nature.

When…… [Read More]

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Humor in America Evolution of

Words: 2916 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97706464

For example, the popular sitcoms Good Times and Sanford and Son showed working class neighborhoods and the problems of violence, crime, and social oppression, and yet how humor always finds its way into these character's lives.

The 1970s also brought about a new late night live comedy show, called Saturday Night Live. This show had its first run from 1975 to 1980, and made political humor the centerpiece of Saturday night television. The original cast consisted of Dan Aykroyd, John Belushi, Chevy Chase, George Coe, Jane Curtin, Garrett Morris, Laraine Newman, Michael O'Donoghue and Gilda Radner, a diverse mix of young comedians from around New York City. Saturday Night Live is famous for its portrayals of U.S. Presidents, from Gerald Ford to Barack Obama, and has helped to shape Americans impressions of how these presidents have reacted to events in the world. (Boskin, 46) Saturday Night Live created a demanding…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Boskin, J. (1997). Rebellious laughter: People's humor in american culture. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press.

Dudden, a. (1989). American humor. (p. 184). New York: Oxford University Press.
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Emilia Wife of Iago Do Not Learn

Words: 1306 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38138420

Emilia, Wife of Iago

Do not learn of him, Emilia, though he be thy husband.[footnoteRef:1] [1: Othello, Act II, Scene i.]

More than once, I think to myself how life could have been differed between that of my previous past to that which I have now. A woman whose prospects boiled down to nothing as important as marriage could not have many to begin with. But a husband whose soul blackens the very environment, whose tongue twists morality, whose plots send shivers down my little spine? No, even this I had not asked for, not one bit.

If my good mother was still alive, I would wager that her argument would play out as follows:[footnoteRef:2] [2: Theme: The hardships of mother-daughter relationships (Lucy by Jamaica Kinkaid)]

How now, Emilia, where is your sense? Was it really so bad to leave Mantua[footnoteRef:3], to head face-front to the catastrophe that is your…… [Read More]

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Role and Importance of the

Words: 5946 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47971090



Most individuals fail to appreciate life to the fullest because they concentrate on being remembered as some of the greatest humans who ever lives. This makes it difficult for them to enjoy the simple pleasures in life, considering that they waste most of their time trying to put across ideas that are appealing to the masses. While many did not manage to produce ideas that survived more than them, others succeeded and actually produced thinking that remained in society for a long period of time consequent to their death.

Creativity is generally regarded as one of the most important concepts in society, considering that it generally induces intense feelings in individuals. It is responsible for progress and for the fact that humanity managed to produce a series of ideas that dominated society's thinking through time. In order for someone to create a concept that will live longer than him or…… [Read More]

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Beowulf as a Hero Lesson

Words: 8817 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81934961

Your answer should be at least five sentences long.

The Legend of Arthur

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 9 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7A: Honor and Loyalty

1. Consider how Arthur's actions and personality agree with or challenge your definition of honor. Write a few sentences comparing your definition (from Journal 1.6A) with Arthur's actions and personality.

2. Write a brief paragraph explaining the importance or unimportance of loyalty in being honorable.

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 10 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7B: Combining Sentences

Complete the Practice Activity on page 202 of your text. After completing this activity, read over your Essay Assessment or another journal activity you've completed.

* Identify three passages that could be improved by combining two or more sentences with coordinating or subordinating conjunctions. Below the practice activity in your journal, write the original passages and the revised sentences you've created.

* Be sure to…… [Read More]

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Knowledge and Peril Explored in

Words: 2257 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55926262

He tells alton he was "surprised that among so many men of genius . . . that I alone should be reserved to discover so astonishing a secret" (37). Here Shelley illuminates the weakness of man with Frankenstein's inability to control himself in this situation. Shelley placed Frankenstein in this environment because he represented "modern scientist is search of the spark to animate lifeless matter" (right 14). Like Prometheus, he is penalized for "meddling in the work of the gods" (14). Shelley foreshadows the mood of the novel when she writes, "Frightful it must be; for supremely frightful would be the effect of any human endeavor to mock the stupendous mechanism of the Creator of the world" (Shelley xxv). Here Shelley is making a stand against certain aspects of knowledge. hile knowledge itself is not bad, the desire for knowledge to do great things for the sake of fame or…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Garrett, Martin. Mary Shelley. New York. Oxford University Press. 2002.

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. New York: Bantam Books. 1981.

Graham, Richard. The Masters of Victorian Literature, 1837-1897. London: Simpkin, Marshal

and Co. 1897.
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How Bronte and Shelley Develop the Theme of Abandonment in Their Novels

Words: 2509 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63849391

Abandonment in Shelley's Frankenstein and Bronte's Jane Eyre: a Comparison

Abandonment is a substantial theme in literature written by women. It appears in the poems of Emily Dickinson, in the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, and in the novels of the Bronte sisters -- uthering Heights and Jane Eyre. It is not a theme that is only addressed by women in literature, to be sure, but it is one that seems to be utilized most evocatively by them. This paper will provide a comparative analysis of two literary sources -- Shelley's Frankenstein and Bronte's Jane Eyre -- to show how abandonment can cause depression, deep emotions and despair, but how it can also open up new doors for an individual; it will show how unprofitable it can be and yet how beneficial to one's life it can also prove in the long run.

Jane Eyre is a romantic-gothic novel by…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. London: J. M. Dent, 1905. Print.

Linker, Damon. "Terrence Malick's profoundly Christian vision." The Week, 2016.

Web. 2 Apr 2016.

Macdonald, D. L.; Scherf, Kathleen, eds. Frankenstein: The 1818 version. NY:
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Enlightenment-Era Neo-Classical Works With Romantic Overtones 'Tartuffe

Words: 981 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55737002

Enlightenment-era, Neo-Classical works with Romantic overtones 'Tartuffe," Candide, and Frankenstein all use unnatural forms of character representation to question the common conceptions of what is natural and of human and environmental 'nature.' Moliere uses highly artificial ways of representing characters in dramatic forms to show the unnatural nature of an older man becoming attracted to a younger woman. Voltaire uses unnatural and absurd situations to question the unnatural belief of Professor Pangloss that this is the best of all possible worlds. Mary Shelley creates a fantastic or unnatural scenario to show the unnatural nature of a human scientist's attempt to turn himself into a kind of God-like creator through the use of reason and science alone.

"Tartuffe" is the most obviously unnatural of the three works in terms of its style. It is a play, and the characters do not really develop as human beings because of the compressed nature…… [Read More]

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Vindication of the Rights of

Words: 12319 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94246949

Ross (1988) notes the development of Romanticism in the late eighteenth century and indicates that it was essentially a masculine phenomenon:

Romantic poetizing is not just what women cannot do because they are not expected to; it is also what some men do in order to reconfirm their capacity to influence the world in ways socio-historically determined as masculine. The categories of gender, both in their lives and in their work, help the Romantics establish rites of passage toward poetic identity and toward masculine empowerment. Even when the women themselves are writers, they become anchors for the male poets' own pursuit for masculine self-possession. (Ross, 1988, 29)

Mary ollstonecraft was as famous as a writer in her day as her daughter. Both mother and daughter were important proponents of the rights of women both in their writings and in the way they lived and served as role models for other…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alexander, Meena. Women in Romanticism. Savage, Maryland: Barnes & Noble, 1989.

Burke, Edmund. Reflections on the Revolution in France. Indianapolis: Hackett, 1987.

Cone, Carl B. Burke and the Nature of Politics. University of Kentucky, 1964.

Conniff, James. "Edmund Burke and His Critics: The Case of Mary Wollstonecraft" Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 60, No. 2, (Apr., 1999), 299-318.
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Ethical Practice the Foundations of

Words: 2674 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51767911



The foundational ideas of the limits of science and medical ethics goes back a very long way and as it has evolved over the centuries, certain laws, rules, regulations and taboos have been put in place to protect the human race from that sometimes blurred line between scientific discovery and human existence. Medical ethics created a system, bound by the ideals of many that came before them to control this blurring and attempt to stand between sciences desire to discover and the public and individual's desire to remain safe and in control of one's own body. A long time medical ethicist discusses the history of medical ethics as one that was founded on the principles of the ancients, but that has now become one where medical ethicists are demanding concrete answers, even laws to guide and demand decisions regarding medical ethics be enforced. "My new colleagues were polite enough, to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adler, Robert E. Medical Firsts: From Hippocrates to the Human Genome. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2004.

Harvey, William. Lectures on the Whole of Anatomy: An Annotated Translation of Prelectiones Anatomiae Universalis. Trans C.D. O'Malley, F.N.L. Poynter, and K.F. Russell. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1961.

Jecker, Nancy S. "Knowing When to Stop: The Limits of Medicine." The Hastings Center Report 21.3 (1991): 5.

Marble, Annie Russell. The Nobel Prize Winners in Literature. New York: D. Appleton, 1925.
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Critical Literacy the Discourse of

Words: 981 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48385549



Changes in and to children's literature mirror, as well as construct, changes in social norms. For example, the 1908 book by Kenneth Grahame, Wind in the Willows, is a frolicking fantasy tale starring a cast of anthropomorphic animals. Themes of camaraderie, friendship, and adventure do not serve as vehicles for political discourse. When Jan Needle published Wild Wood nearly a century later in 1981, the author imbued the basic structure of Grahame's story with political awareness. Issues like social justice are explored in Wild Wood, issues that were not touched upon in Wind in the Willows. A similar vehicle of storytelling was used for a different literary function. Both 1908 and 1981 were times ripe for the exploration of labor issues and class-consciousness, and it is in many ways ironic that Needle would have been more overtly political than his forebear.

There seems to have been a deliberate awakening of…… [Read More]

References

"Children's Book of the Year Awards." Retrieved online: http://cbca.org.au/awards.htm

DAWCL. Website retrieved:  http://www.dawcl.com/introduction.html 

Leland, C., Harste, J., Ociepka, A., Lewison, M. & Vasquez, V. (1999). Exploring critical literacy: You can hear a pin drop. Language Arts, v77 n1 p70-77 Sep 1999.

Shor, I. (1997). What is critical literacy? Journal for Pedagogy, Pluralism, and Practice. Retrieved online: http://www.lesley.edu/journals/jppp/4/shor.html
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Importance of Humanities in the Professions

Words: 1384 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16381150

Humanities

Importance of the humanities in the professions:

A comparison of "Paul's Case," Muriel's Wedding and Andy Warhol's rendition of Marilyn Monroe

The modern concept of 'celebrity' is that anyone can be famous, provided that he or she embodies an ideal of glamour, using material trappings like clothing and possessions to show his or her 'specialness.' This is a common method of 'selling' a particular product in business.

The idea is paradoxical -- on one hand, celebrities are special, on the other hand the media suggests everyone can be a celebrity and 'famous for 15 minutes' if they buy the right item.

This can be seen in "Paul's Case" by Willa Cather, about a boy who feels as if he is above his classmates.

Paul desires to have a celebrity-like status, based upon his perceptions of himself as having innately refined tastes.

But this costs money, and Paul is unwilling…… [Read More]

References

Andy Warhol's Marilyn prints. Web Exhibits. Retrieved October 11, 2011 at  http://www.webexhibits.org/colorart/marilyns.html 

Cather, Willa. Paul's case. Retrieved October 11, 2011 at http://www.shsu.edu/~eng_wpf/authors/Cather/Pauls-Case.htm

Muriel's Wedding. (1994). Directed by P.J. Hogan.

Saari, Rob. (1996). "Paul's case": A narcissistic personality disorder. Studies in Short
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Egyptian Box Chapter 1 Introduces the Main

Words: 1603 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41860927

Egyptian Box

Chapter 1 introduces the main character, Tee Woodie, a young girl who has just moved to a Southwestern town from her home in Maine after her parents inherited an antique shop from her late-Uncle Sebastian. She is watching a movie about a Princess named Maryam who is in love with a "djinn" or genie, and she clearly imagines being in this film. When it ends, she reluctantly goes outside, but runs into a door on the way out and falls face down on the floor. As she waits outside for her father to pick her up, the narrator reveals that she is unhappy in this town and with her parent's deciding to move there. From her point-of-view, all the antiques in the store are junk, and she is happy not to deal with it at all.

Figurative Language: Tee is watching the movie screen "in a trance," eating…… [Read More]

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Clueless Movie vs Emma Novel

Words: 1483 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76163583

Because of the differences in their social status to Robert/Travis', they cannot conceive of Harriet/Tai's attraction to and ultimate love for him, the one due to his wealth and the other due to his habits. This change is necessary for the sympathies of the audience to remain intact. Had Cher objected to Travis simply on the grounds of his financial standing, the audience would not have any sympathy for her. But because he is a stoner and somewhat stupid, her desire to find Tai someone better makes some sense. In Austen's time, class and money were everything; people could be cut off for marrying beneath them, so such a seemingly shallow stance on Emma's part would have been not only understood, but expected.

Character is by no means the only -- or even the most important -- adjustment that Heckerling made in adapting Emma into the movie Clueless. The entire…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Emma. New Milford: Toby Press, 2003.

Green, Lindsay. Emma, by Jane Austen, and Clueless, Directed by Amy Heckerling. Sydney: Pascal Press, 2001.

Guney, Ajda and Yavuz, Mehmet Ertug. "The Nineteenth Century Literature and Feminist Motives in Jane Austen's Novels." New World Sciences Academy, Vol 3, Iss. 3 (2008). 523-31. Accessed via Ebsco Host 9 November 2008. http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?vid=11&hid=6&sid=49eaeb54-778c-4498-ba7a-4cd389bb44d2%40sessionmgr104&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=a9h&an=33019184

Macdonald, Gina and Macdonald, Andrew. Jane Austen on Screen. Boston: Cambridge University Press, 2003.
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Myths - The Other Side of Wonder

Words: 1529 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35257919

Myths - "The Other Side of Wonder"

Like the empty sky it has no boundaries, yet it is right in this place, ever profound and clear.2

So run the lines from Cheng Tao, describing signifying, identifying myths - always there explaining existence and every facet of life, explaining the reason behind every man's actions:

So, myths.

For what is a myth? Lillian Hornstein3 describes it best. "A myth is the traditional tale common to the members of a tribe, race, or nation, usually involving the supernatural and serving to explain some natural phenomena. Given as an example is the tale of Persephone, daughter of Demeter, abducted by Hades and brought to the underworld but allowed to return to earth and visit her mother for six months. Thus, we have the varied alternations of the season on earth.

Shall we consider the social-cultural effects of myths positive or negative?

To the…… [Read More]

13 Mervill pp. 8-9

14 Mervill on Aristotle, pp. 25-30

15 Beehler, Roger and Alan, Drengson. The Philosophy of Society. London: Methiren and Co., 1978
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Career of Boris Karloff -

Words: 1785 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66121681

One of the most unique performances of Karloff's career was narrating the Dr. Seues cartoon "How the Grinch Stole Christmas."

In his personal life, Karloff enjoyed playing Cricket, and was actually quite good at it. Karloff was the coach of the UCLA cricket team. He also liked to hike. His wife was not an actress, and they had one daughter together, Sara Jane born in 1938. Karloff was kind-spiritied and generous, donating large amounts of money to charities for children. He was also a charter member of the Screen Actor's Guild, and was quite active in the movement to get safer working conditions for movie actors in the 1930s. After many successful films, he returned to theatrical acting on roadway in 1942, when he starred in the first production of "Arsenic and Old Lace." He also appeared in live performances of "The Linden Tree" and "Peter Pan," in 1951, and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Skidoo et al. "Boris Karloff." Wikipedia. 6 November 2004. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Karloff
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Romantic Monster The Human Within

Words: 4437 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60474246

Yet, we also see that he still does not understand the true origin of the beast -- the human within. The fact that he dies before he is successful, yet the monster obviously goes off to end his own fate, indicates that the evil both originated, and eventually died with him -- the true source from which it sprang.

Victor Hugo's Hunchback: An Illustrative Device

In Victor Hugo's Hunchback of Notre Dame, there exists a strikingly similar theme -- if different in form. Although it is definitely true that Hugo's famous Quasimodo is a bit more innocuous than the Frankenstein monster, he nonetheless evokes a certain horror if only in appearance. Yet, much like in Shelley's work, Hugo brings out the monster that is human nature within the other character's interactions, motivations, and actions in the story.

There is little question that Hugo fully intended Quasimodo to evoke horror in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baldick, Chris.

In Frankenstein's Shadow: Myth, Monstrosity, and Nineteenth-Century Writing.

Ebbs, Robert. "Monsters." Essays. 1998. Retrieved from Web site on July 7, 2005  http://www.feedback.nildram.co.uk/richardebbs/essays/monsters.htm 

Hugo, Victor. The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Online version. Retrieved from Web site on July 7, 2005  http://www.online-literature.com/victor_hugo/hunchback_notre_dame/
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Communication in the Media Specifically

Words: 2616 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16924345

The "Halloween" films that continue to be so popular are prime examples, but just about any horror film made within the past three decades follows basically the same formula, they have just gotten increasingly sexual and violent, as society has continued to embrace the genre. There are literally hundreds of other graphic examples, such as "Saw," an extremely violent film that has spawned six other films, and the examples of so many films being released in 2009. These films do not celebrate the woman, they demean her, and the fact that they are celebrated by society is troubling and agonizing at the same time.

Some of the films that empower women into the hero roles include "Terminator 2," the "Alien" series, "Misery," and other films glorify or at least acknowledge the female predator or warrior, offering up a different view of women as successful anti-heroes. However, most of these films…… [Read More]

Bibliography

England, Marcia. "Breached Bodies and Home Invasions: Horrific Representations of the Feminized Body and Home." Gender, Place & Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography; Apr2006, Vol. 13 Issue 4, p353-363.

Graser, Marc. "Production Houses Pump Out the Horror." Variety. 2008. 10 March 2009. http://www.variety.com/article/VR1117994266.html?categoryid=1019&cs=1&query=horror+films.

Iaccino, James F. Psychological Reflections on Cinematic Terror: Jungian Archetypes in Horror Films. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 1994.

Lally, Kevin. "For the Love of the Movies." Film Journal International. 1999. 10 March 2009. http://www.filmjournal.com/filmjournal/esearch/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1000692252.
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Analysis of a Critical Theorist Take on Education

Words: 1853 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62288309

Freedom in the Classroom

The first chapter asks why theory, especially Critical Theory, matters in today's classrooms. The very first chapter essentially sets the stage for the kind of "freedom" that is aimed at achieving in the classroom: freedom from "historical norms" such as marriage being between a man and a woman (Hinchey, 2010, p. 1). Granted, this is just an example of the way ideas become entrenched in society, and Hinchey proceeds to apply this observation to the ways in which schools become bogged down by accepted norms -- such as the use of standardized text books, the division of work into subjects, and the amount of time spent in a class room as opposed to outside of it. The purpose of this chapter is to draw attention to the cultural habits that keep us from questioning conventional attitudes about the way things are done -- especially when it…… [Read More]

References

Hinchey, P. (2010). Finding Freedom in the Classroom. NY: Peter Lang Publishing.
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Underground the Books That Emerged During the

Words: 1423 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63130359

Underground

The books that emerged during the first half of the 19th century and some a little later as well belonged to the romantic age of literature that demonstrated a deep fascination for the dark side of human nature. Starting with such books as Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, this age is known for some of the unique characters it gave us including the protagonist of Notes from Underground. This book despite its theme of natural vs. unnatural is essentially romantic in its views and characterization style. This is clear from the fact that while Romantic period was known for its intense appreciation of nature, it also exhibited a heightened interest in the occult, the gothic and the strange phenomena. The non-adherence to classic rules and norms had given rise to creativity freedom that led to the development of strange new themes such as the one we encounter in the Frankenstein. In…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED:

1. Peter L. Thorslev, The Byronic Hero: Types and Prototypes, 1962.

1. Fyodor Dostoevsky. Notes from the Underground. Accessed online from  http://www.online-literature.com/dostoevsky/notes_underground/1/
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Byron and Polidori John Polidori's

Words: 1927 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4826402

Giaour is cursed to be a vampire as punishment, while Ruthven seems to revel in the power and the role this gives him. He also describes women as adulteresses and worse and treats them as fodder for his needs on every level. Aubrey notes this and does not like it, but he also does not manage to escape from the man or his way of life. In the end, his own sister is destroyed by this man, just as was Ianthe and countless others.

Of course, Giaour also indulges in illicit sex with Leila, certainly illicit in the Muslim social order, though it would be in Europe as well. Leila's relationship with Hassan would also be seen as illicit in Europe, though, which is why Byron makes the point of noting that this sort of arrangement was more common in the past than it is in his own time. In…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Byron, Lord. "The Giaour." In Three Oriental Tales, Alan Richardson (ed.). New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2002.

Polidori, John. "Vampyre." In Three Gothic Novels, E.F. Bleiler (ed.). New York: Dover, 1966.
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Saman Letter to Ayu Utami

Words: 1281 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96288509

Yet this same nation justified slavery for more than a century after the rest of the world denounced it as cruel and barbaric. Your description of the Suharto regime is rich enough to allow readers a glimpse into that which they need to know about how much farther we as human beings need to go until true equality and true peace are made manifest. Unfortunately our pace of progress is woefully slow, but you are part of the solution.

It is time to rid the world of the dual scourge that is patriarchy and the exploitation of the poor. Both patriarchy and the exploitation of the poor have the same root cause: abuse of power. In Saman, you show how abuse of power can itself be subverted.

One of the reasons you need to keep writing novels is that you are already making an impact. A good sign is the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bodden, Michael H. "Seno Gumira Ajidarma and Fictional Resistance to an Authoritarian State in 1990s Indonesia." Indonesia 68. Oct 1999.

Caslin, Sinead. "Feminism and post-colonialism." The Imperial Archive. Retrieved: http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofEnglish/imperial/key-concepts/feminism-and-postcolonialism.htm

Itoh, Makoto. "The Japanese Economy Reconsidered." Palgrave, 2000.

Marching, Soe Tjen. "Descriptions of Female Sexuality in Ayu Utami's Saman." Journal of Southeast Asian Studies." Journal of Southeast Asian Studies. Feb 1, 2007.
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American Horror Film Editor Gregory

Words: 728 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16212856

While the characters and situations may not be extremely complex, there are things that bind the films together and make them attractive to the viewer. For example, some films, such as "osemary's Baby," "The Exorcist," and "The Eyes of Lara Mars" use sexual situations in the film to add to the feeling of horror and anticipation about what is to come. Most use very graphic violence, but others create characters that are intriguing and larger than life to get their message across (think of "Frankenstein" and even "Carrie").

Another interesting aspect of this book was the idea that not all horror films contain graphic horror at all. One author maintains films such as "Vertigo" are actually horror films because they manipulate some "problem of vision" within them (Kawin 103). Thus, this definition opens up an entire new batch of horror films if the viewer looks at them with another eye…… [Read More]

References

Waller, Gregory A., Ed. American Horrors: Essays on the Modern American Horror Film. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois Press, 1987.
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Film History

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movie industry in America has been controlled by some of the monolithic companies which not only provided a place for making the movies, but also made the movies themselves and then distributed it throughout the entire country. These are movie companies and their entire image revolved around the number of participants of their films. People who wanted to see the movies being made had to go to the studios in order to see them. They made movies in a profitable manner for the sake of the studios, but placed the entire industry under their control and dominated over it. The discussion here is about some of those famous studios inclusive of that of names like Metro Goldwyn Mayer, Culver, RKO, Paramount Studios, Warner Bros, 20th Century Fox, Walt Disney Studios, Universal Studios, Raleigh Studio, Hollywood Center Studio, Sunset Gower Studio, Ren-Mar Studios, Charlie Chaplin Studios and now, Manhattan Beach Studio.…… [Read More]

"What better way to annoy the Hollywood liberals than to remind them every single day that

George W. Bush is STILL the President?" Retrieved from https://www.donationreport.com/init/controller/ProcessEntryCmd?key=O8S0T5C8U2 Accessed 15 September, 2005

"What's interesting about the business is that it's no longer the movie business" Retrieved from  http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/hollywood/picture/corptown.html  Accessed 14 September, 2005
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Rur and AI More Human

Words: 1955 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69929903

Kubrick himself suggested the baton be passed onto Spielberg due to that director's unique abilities.

The play was originally-based Brian Aldiss's short story "Supertoys Last All Summer Long," on which a.I. is based, in 1983 (Corliss 1-3). In the Kubrick formulation, the world is a lot darker and Gigolo Joe is much more aggressive. According to Corliss in the "Joe was much more aggressive, more twisted." Here he is, in Spielberg's word, David's "scoutmaster." Spielberg did this to solve many of the problems Spielberg had with the text, Joe being one of the biggest problems. By softening things and making them more human and less dark, he provided solution to the problem (Ibid 1). The Flesh Fair and Rouge City are vintage Kubric and remained a part of the body of the work. Garish scenery completes this menagerie Spielberg identifies himself with the abandoned child (ibid 2).

It is the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Corliss, Richard. Time 17 June 2001: 1-3. Web. 3 Nov 2010.


Horakova, Jana. "The (Short) Robot Chronicle. On the 20th Century Cultural History of Robots.." Proceedings (2006): pp. 241-248. Web. 3 Nov 2010. .

Capek, Karel. R.U.R . Gloucestershire, Great Britain: Echo Books, 2009.
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Film Auteur Theory in Tim

Words: 2585 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61136258

Gotham is a dark place, which manifests evil in the character of the Joker (Jack Nicholson). Bruce Wayne, Batman, is the force with which evil must reckon. Batman, however, has his own dark side, which is manifest in his costume, his gothic style mansion, and the technology he employs to combat the Joker and other criminal elements.

In this film, Burton needed only a few big name and talented actors -- Jack Nicholson (the Joker), Michael Keaton (Bruce Wayne aka Batman), Billy Dee Williams (Harvey Bent), and Kim Bassinger (Vicky Vale) to attract that audience that might otherwise have opted out of a comic book to film production. Yet the actors in this instance by virtue of their talent need minimal direction, and that allows Burton to focus on the structure of the film. The film is not structured around the actors, but the actors fill the structure of the…… [Read More]

Reference List

Dudley, Andrew (1984). Concepts in Film Theory, Oxford University Press.

Caughie, John (1982). Theories of Authorship: A Reader, Routledge, New York, New

York.

Valicha, Kishore (1988). The Moving Image: A Study of Indian Cinema, Orient
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Bishop Kyle Raising the Dead

Words: 1511 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35207531



Evolution of the Zombie

An element which was not examined in great detail by Bishop was the evolution of the "undead" creatures of which zombies are one of many. It would appear that Hollywood is always evolving new concepts in terms of these creatures, so much so that the idea of the zombie begins to become blurred. For example some films, most notably 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later have toyed with a concept which is very similar to that of the zombie, but is induced by a virus. The creatures in these movies are not technically zombies as they have never died, they have simply changed into flesh-eating monsters. In addition, Shaun of the Dead takes the traditional conventions of the zombie film, but adds an element of comedy, creating what is arguably a new style of film. It would therefore appear likely that given the popularity of…… [Read More]

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James Fenimore Cooper the Life

Words: 1897 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79388459

According to Mctiernan (1997), "James Fenimore Cooper's the Spy is interesting precisely because no genre had yet hardened around spying when he wrote it. Cooper relies instead on the conventions of other genres -- primarily, the domestic romance and the historical adventure, which, unlike spy fiction, did not evolve in part to justify the dishonesty and covert manipulation central to espionage" (3).

As noted above, Cooper was also able to draw on the inspiration of an unspoiled American wilderness that few people today can imagine without his help. It is this aspect of Cooper's early works, perhaps, that continue to make them popular today just as they did in his own time. As Ringe (1962) advises, though, this is unfortunate because Cooper matured as a writer over the years and some of his best work was during the last part of his career. "Ironically, Cooper is best known for what…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Becker, May Lamberton. "Introduction" to the Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757. Cleveland, OH: World Publishing, 1957.

Davis, Randall C. (1994). "Fire-Water in the Frontier Romance: James Fenimore Cooper and 'Indian Nature.'" Studies in American Fiction 22(2): 215.

Dekker, George and John P. Williams (Eds.). James Fenimore Cooper: The Critical Heritage. London: Routledge, 1997.

Mctiernan, Dave. (1997). "The Novel as 'Neutral Ground': Genre and Ideology in Cooper's 'The Spy." Studies in American Fiction 25(1): 3.
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Stanley Kubrick the Madness of

Words: 4124 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16699303

Strangelove, put him over the top" (p. 61). The learning curve was clearly sharp for Kubrick, and he took what he had learned in these earlier efforts and put this to good use during a period in American history when everyone was already ready to "duck and cover": "The film's icy, documentary-style aspect served not only to give the movie its realistic edge that juxtaposed nicely with its broad satire, the style introduced the essential Kubrick setting" (Sharrett, 1999, p. 61).

According to Mcdouglas (2003), Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and a Clockwork Orange were all later listed by the American Film Institute as being among the top one hundred American films of cinema's first century. In addition, "Each of these films provoked heated debate and each was a box-office success" (Mcdouglas, 2003, p. 2). The popular response to Kubrick's movie, 2001, in particular, was the result of an…… [Read More]

References

Badley, L. (1995). Film, horror and the body fantastic. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Booker, M.K. (1999). Film and the American left: A research guide. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Cook, D.A. (1996). A history of narrative film. New York W.W. Norton.

Falsetto, M. (2001). Stanley Kubrick: A narrative and stylistic analysis. Westport, CT: Praeger.
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Integrated Counseling There Are Many

Words: 3907 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79621522

CBT integrates theory, i.e. The tenets of psychotherapy, with practical, behavior modification exercises. This, in turn, creates real tangible results. As Cooper writes, "If, on the one hand, you look at the particular therapies that have been shown to be effective for particular psychological problems -- as advocates of empirically supported treatments have done -- there is no question that the evidence base is strongest for CBT. hile, for instance, there are scores of high quality controlled trials demonstrating the effectiveness of CBT for depression17, there are just a handful of studies demonstrating the same thing for person-centred therapy. And while CBT has been shown to be effective for numerous psychological difficulties -- such as phobias, panic, PTSD, bulimia, sexual problems and deliberate self-harm -- there is little equivalent evidence for the vast array of non-CBT practices18 (2008).

CBT is an approach that has been empirically proven to be successful…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (n.d.). The Free Dictionary By Farlex. Retrieved from  http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/cognitive-behavioral+therapy 

Cooper, M. (2008). The Facts are Friendly. Therapy Today.net. Retrieved from http://www.therapytoday.net/article/15/8/categories/

Gelso, C., Fretz, B. (2001) Counseling Psychology Second Edition. Orlando, FL:

Harcourt, Inc.
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Van Gogh in Search of

Words: 6470 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18823907

On the contrary, if I had been able to be a clergyman or an art dealer, then perhaps I should not have been fit for drawing and painting, and I should neither have resigned nor accepted my dismissal as such. I cannot stop drawing because I really have a draughtsman's fist, and I ask you, have I ever doubted or hesitated or wavered since the day I began to draw? (Van Gogh, Letter to Theo, April 1882).

That he was a talented artist was undeniable. Yet, art was no substitute for religion, and, further still, art was no direct avenue to sanctifying grace. Van Gogh's increasing sense of alienation and feeling of despair would continue unabated -- evidenced by he and his brother Theo's inability to live together for long; the inability of his dream of an artists' collective (the artistic equivalent of a kind of monastic community) to come…… [Read More]

Reference List

Fritillaries. (2006). Musee d'Orsay. Retrieved from http://www.musee-

orsay.fr/en/collections/works-in-focus/painting/commentaire_id/fritillaries-17564.html?tx_commentaire_pi1[pidLi]=509&tx_commentaire_pi1[from]=841&cHash=4a0a47f91d

Garrigou-Lagrange, R. (1938). The Three Ways of the Spiritual Life. London: Burns

and Oates.
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Feminism 19th and Early 20th Century America

Words: 1283 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51152133

Feminism 19th and Early 20th Century America

riting and women's roles were unavoidably mixed in the late 1800s and early 1900s. It was a time in which many women protested their restrictions through novels, poetry, pamphlets, and speeches. By analyzing those creations, readings can begin to understand the lives of those forward-looking women. In their own time, people dismissed them as inconsequential complainers. Minority authors, like blacks and lesbians were even more ignored. However, by learning about their work, we can learn about the daily life of the social classes to which they belonged.

Many people feel that our socioeconomic status limits our understanding of others (McClish and Bacon). Because our understanding is limited by our own viewpoint from our socioeconomic status, patriarchal societies tend to limit self-expression to that which is compatible with the patriarchy. As a result, it's important to remember to ask questions based one's own experience,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Markley, A.A. "Laughing That I May Not Weep": Mary Shelley's Short Fiction and Her Novels." Keats-Shelley Journal (1997): 97-124.

McClish, Glen and Jacqueline Bacon. "Telling the Story Her Own Way": the Role of Feminist Standpoint Theory in Rhetorical Studies." Rhetoric Society Quarterly (2002): 27-55.

Ross, Christine. "Logic, Rhetoric, and Discourse in the Literary Texts of Nineteenth-Century Women." Rhetoric Society Quarterly (2002): 85-109.
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Women's Education 1840s an Analysis of Women's

Words: 888 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33826392

Women's Education 1840s

An Analysis of Women's Education in the 1840s

Women in both Britain and America were set to receive greater attention in the realm of academia in the 1840s than they had in decades prior. The Bronte sisters had both begun their writing careers that same decade and Elizabeth Gaskell's first novel was published at the end of it. Mary Shelley had been writing for nearly three decades already -- Frankenstein being published a year after the death of Jane Austen. Women of letters had obviously received an education -- but from where? This paper will look at women's education in the 1840s and show how it was changing.

Changes

Jane Sherzer (1916) notes that "in West Virginia, in Southern Indiana and Illinois there were no schools for the higher education of women up to 1840" (p. 1), however, she adds that "early in 1840, in Indiana there…… [Read More]

Reference List

Sherzer, J. (1916). The Higher Education of Women in the Ohio Valley. Ohio Archeological and Historical Quarterly 25(1): 1-22.

Solomon, B.M. (1985). In the Company of Educated Women. Yale University Press.

Tennyson, A.L. (1847). The Princess: A Medley. Boston, MA: Ticknor and Fields.
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Night of the Living Dead

Words: 3547 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72385823

Even in shots that might be steady, such as the sheriff is standing and talking to his men, frequent cuts are used in place of slow zooms or pans to shift the eye's focus.

Ramero uses scale to great advantage in this sequence to help build a sense of detachment from all the humans character. his detachment of course feeds into the audience's ability to accept the lesson that "we're them." his sense of scale begins with the very distant helicopter, which is so small and isolated on the screen. his proceeds to showing the hunters as tiny, wrong-ways-up specks on the ground. It is impossible to tell from the air whether the hunters are men or zombies, because they are so distant. his distant scale cuts into a close shot of the hunters walking, with the helicopter in the background. At this point the shots begin to become more…… [Read More]

This is the moment at which the audience is most strongly drawn in as a force to observe the historical horror and recognize that "we're them." Not only has the audience's favorite character been killed by humans instead of by zombies, but additionally he is being treated like "meat" even by the humans. This is the deep significance of the hunters carrying meat hooks rather than (for example) crowbars: humans just like zombies consider those they have destroyed to be nothing more than meat. Humans, like zombies, kill and eat living beings, and the meat hooks which pull out Ben would otherwise be used for other carcasses of other beings humans had killed. Of course, this is not just a message about vegetarianism. It is a message about the way in which humans objectify each other and this leads to racial violence and holocausts.

This movie very bravely dares to go against the racial conventions of its day in casting a black lead, and dealing subtly and metaphorically with the damage done to him. This sequence in particular, which shows white men dragging a brave and noble black man through the fields to be burned surely had strong connotations in 1968 in the middle of civil rights battles and race riots. That George Ramero claims the casting was totally color-blind may indicate either that this subtext was created after the casting, or that somehow evolved unnoticed by the director himself. However, it is certainly present for the audience in this scene. If nothing else, the audience must face its own racial position in its feelings regarding the life and death of Ben, and the very recognition of such human violence reinforced the central message that zombies and humans are more alike than they are different.

In conclusion, this sequence is probably the single most important one in the movie, though of course it cannot stand alone without all the foreshadowing and characterization that proceeds it. In this scene, through plot and genre twists, through tricks of technique and lighting, and through the careful manipulation of the audience, Ramero creates what is probably the single most memorable and influential sequence in zombie film history.
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Michael Bay Is One of

Words: 2036 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20029684

" (Vaziri T.) www.vfxhq.com/1998/armageddon_review.html"

On the other had there is also praise for the ways in which some of the special effects in the film are achieved. This applies to the sequence in which Shanghai is destroyed when the impact of the asteroid creates a sense of depth. This effect is created by a combination of matte paintings, miniature buildings and computer regenerated items. (Vaziri T.)

The critique of the films in terms of the special effects centers on the fast cutting style of ay's direction. The critics state that the lightning changes and fast shots, similar to musical videos, leave the audience wanting more. The director is continually cutting away to different scenes and sequences. This is a critique that is put forward time and again. There are also criticisms of the way in which the special effects are manipulated and directed. Again this refers to the pace and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Curtis, Bryan. The Bad Boy of Summer: Michael Bay vs. his critics. 2005. Accessed October 23, 2005.

JAMES, CARYN. REVIEW; Take Action and Blood; Sprinkle With Laughs

1995. NY Times. Accessed October 24, 2005. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=990CEEDF1F3AF934A35757C0A963958260

Miller Prairie. ARMAGEDDON: INTERVIEW WITH MICHAEL BAY. 1998. Star Interviews
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Horror Final During the Second

Words: 1850 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17510247

Because of Haynes use of dolls, I was much more interested in Karen's story; I most likely would not have been interested in the film if it simply approached her story from the same perspective as other filmmakers.

Horror films can be subdivided into various subgenres. Rosemary's Baby, for instance, may fall into the category of Satan-inspired films due to the fact that in the film, Rosemary is used as a surrogate to Satan's child. What is interesting about this film is that it relies heavily on the viewers' perception of Satan since the entity is never actually shown and neither is his child. Not showing what Rosemary and Satan's child like forces the viewer to imagine what it must look like based on how he is described, which makes it much more frightening because this image is based on the viewers' psyche and feeds off of what they are…… [Read More]

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Class and Economic Concerns in the Films

Words: 1764 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10482254

Economic Concens in Film

Metopolis, Invasion of the Body Snatches and La Jetee span fou decades, although the latte two could be consideed examples of Cold Wa science fiction. Metopolis was set duing the Weima Republic, although cetain scenes wee eeily pophetic of Nazism, but in eality the city itself could also have been New Yok o any othe uban cente of the futue. Fo diecto Fitz Lang, the city was a symbol of Fodist mass poduction and mass consumption, with the wokes down below butalized by povety, hunge and dull, outine, obot-like jobs, while at the same time, the middle and uppe classes above wee also dehumanized by mindless hedonism and nihilism, o dull, confomist cleical and administative wold. Dehumanization was also a majo theme of La Jetee, in which the suvivos of a nuclea holocaust live undegound, lacking even the basic necessities of food, wate and medical cae,…… [Read More]

references to these. Only superficially does the world of Santa Mira still resemble an American town, since the main work of its residents had become production and distribution of seed pods, which they distributed to surrounding towns. In this work, they were like a totalitarian hive of worker bees or ants, having only the instinct to survive. Of course, they also had to eliminate any internal dissent by converting everyone in town to creatures like themselves, with Dr. Miles Bennell and his lover Becky Driscoll as the last human holdouts. They attempt to escape, with everyone in town pursuing them, although Miles loses Becky when she falls asleep and turns into one of 'them'. Only at the very end did Miles manage to convince the humans on the outside that they are in grave danger and that the authorities must be called in to deal with Santa Mira before this alien virus spreads completely out of control.

Both Body Snatchers and Metropolis have happy endings, even though these feel more than a bit contrived, while La Jetee is grim from start to finish. Civilization survives in the first two films, even though the real question might be whether such a society should have survived at all. Lang's vision of middle class charity and humanitarianism bringing about a reconciliation of capital and labor looks very unlikely given the extreme divisions presented between the underground and aboveground worlds in that film. Nazism restrained class conflict mainly by abolishing organized labor and leftist political parties, and using police state methods against all dissent, and history shows that the workers only received justice and a fair share of the social pie when they were politically well organized and able to vote. La Jetee does not even make a pretense that civilization is being saved, since what little of it survived the Third World War resembled an underground Nazi concentration camp, with prisoners experimented upon and exterminated to suit the needs of their overlords. Both of these films reflect grimmer European historical circumstances that Body Snatchers, which is certainly a disturbing and creepy film by American standards, but with a Hollywood ending in which the hero saves the day in the end. Although the world of the pod people in Santa Mira still looks like Middle America on the surface, they have all been infected by some alien virus that turns their town into a totalitarian police state run by zombies, robots and clone, lacking human individuality, desires and emotions. In fact, their all-American town was starting to look too much like something in Germany and Russia, which is why it hard to be destroyed in the end.
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Dark Spirituality as a Symbol of Female

Words: 3949 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45179724

Dark Spirituality as a Symbol of Female Frustration:

Voodoo Gothic and the Mill on the Floss

George Eliot's The Mill On the Floss is arguably one of the most widely read novels of the Victorian period. Although many differ as to just why this is the case, one thing is clear -- what was once a rather straightforward tragic tale, tinged with the time's popular romantic/gothic influence, has become a bastion of feminist criticism. Although many readers, especially those contemporary to the work's publication, expressed strong disappointment with the fate of Maggie -- especially at the end of the novel, the advent of feminist criticism brought many readers to begin to strongly identify with the fate, and the message, George Eliot was trying to convey. (Jacobus 62) Maggie Tulliver's representation of the tragedy of intellectual womanhood mired in the doom of repressive Victorian society -- is particularly satisfying. For these…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ashton, Rosemary. "The Mill on the Floss: A Natural History." Twayne's Masterwork Studies. Boston: G.K. Hall & Co. 1990

Byatt, A.S. "The Placing of Steven Guest." Appendix, the Mill on the Floss, Middlesex, Blays Ltd., St. Printing; Penguin Classics. 1979

Carlisle, Janice. "The Mirror in the Mill on the Floss; Toward Reading of Autobiography Discourse." Studies in the Literary Imagination. Vol 23:Issue 2. [EBSCO] Masterfile

Eliot, George, Christ, Carol T. (ed.) The Mill on the Floss: the Norton Critical Edition. Berkley: University of California Press, 1994.
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Barth Lity Hello My Name Is Fadi

Words: 2993 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18978718

Barth, LITY)

Hello, my name is Fadi Awwad. Apologies for the late submission -- for some reason the due date was not showing on my Blackboard! The most recent book I read that really subverted the concept of Freytag's Triangle was probably The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon. In the spring semester 2014, I wrote a research paper on Pynchon for a course on postmodern narrative here at UHV. Pynchon is considered the postmodern novelist par excellence, so it is no surprise that The Crying of Lot 49 subverts traditional narrative structure.

Pynchon's short novel tells the story of a California housewife, Mrs. Oedipa Maas, who is given the duty of being executor for the estate of an ex-lover, Pierce Inverarity, who has just died. The central plot of the novel, however, hinges on whether Oedipa has inadvertently discovered the existence of a vast conspiracy called "The Trystero"…… [Read More]

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The Ideals of Grotesque

Words: 2750 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92832846

Grotesque

If one goes back to Plato and examines what the Greek philosopher had to say about beauty and truth, one discovers the foundation of the transcendental spirit in the est. The Greek philosophers -- Socrates, Plato, Aristotle -- more or less constructed the philosophical lens for how to portray ideals such as unum, bonum, verum -- the one, the good and the true. Beauty was viewed from within this framework, as another aspect of the transcendental quality of goodness and truth. Plato, through his Socratic discourse, sought a way to examine and define the sense of beauty and truth from a universal and transcendent perspective, a theme that Keats would echo centuries later when he stated that "Beauty is truth, truth beauty" in his "Ode on a Grecian Urn," a Romantic Era poem. Thus, for centuries, this has been a topic that philosophers and artists have explored: How are…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adorno, Theodor. Aesthetic Theory. Ed. Gretel Adorno and Rolf Tiedemann. Trans.

Robert Hullot-Kentor. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1997. Print.

Araki, Nobuyoshi. Sentimental Journey. 1991. Print.

Goldin, Nan., 1987. Exhibit. Recontres d'Arles.
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Metaphysical Poetry Journal Exercise 3 1A

Words: 3452 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67044569

The Lord will lead one to safety always. One can simply believe in something higher to get the meaning of this; it doesn't have to be Jesus. Psalm 127, contrarily is confusing because it states that unless the Lord builds the house, it is built in vain. This seems to be more literal, but I do get the idea. Unless the people building the house are doing it with the love of the Lord in their hearts, or building it for him, then what is the point?

Didactic poetry can be quite comforting as seen in Psalm 23 or it can be much too literal and seen as both confusing and condescending. Psalm 127 isn't very instructive spiritually speaking, unlike Psalm 23.

Updated Proverb: A broken toe can hurt, but a broken heart can kill.

Metaphors: Obscure or Illuminate? Didactic literature with its use of metaphors can sometimes obscure the…… [Read More]

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Tomas Alfredson's 2008 Film Let

Words: 1085 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 683937



Recognizing that the film's title functions on both of these levels is important because it reveals how Alfredson deploys common vampire tropes in novel ways which serve to elevate the emotional content of the film, so that the "rules" surrounding vampires become metaphors for the emotional development both characters undergo. Thus, following Hakan's death, Eli goes to Oscar and he invites her into his room at the same moment that she implicitly invites him into her life, revealing to him the first explicit hints that she is something other than a twelve-year-old girl. From this point on, the two work to protect and comfort each other while providing each other with the confidence and companionship they need in order to be happy. Oscar confronts his bullies, and after a period of initial unhappiness, Eli gains a friend who accepts her as a vampire.

Though Eli initially has far more agency…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anderson, John. "A Boy and His Ghoulfriend: Beyond the Genre." Washington Post 07 Nov

2008, n. pag. Print.
dyn/content/article/2008/11/06/AR2008110603248.html>.

Ebert, Roger. "Let the Right One In." Roger Ebert. Sun Times, 12 Nov 2008. Web. 7 Dec 2011.
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Landscape Neoclassical Painting One Unifying

Words: 372 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71913508

"

Discussion 2

Until the 19th century, nature in art was usually, if present at all, merely the in background of portraits. History and human beings were considered the true, fitting subjects of art. However, as nature began to retreat from everyday life with the rise of technology, artists began to look on nature as a source of inspiration. As nature became rarer, artists gave nature more significance and importance -- nature became more symbolically significant, even as 'real' nature was being overrun by factories, cities, and railroads. Rather than something to be tamed, nature was now something precious. But although human beings may not be present in all Romantic depictions of nature, human thoughts about nature clearly are -- an artist always paints his or her own point-of-view, not a literal representation of nature. Even in the most realistic depictions of nature, the artist is always selective in what…… [Read More]