Frankenstein an Analysis of Mary Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

It has "… taken on a life of its own independent of Mary Shelley's text, and indeed even independent of certain parts of her narrative." (Goodall 19) This has resulted in film and stage play versions of the novel.

The reason for this continuing popularity lies largely with the relevance of the themes; particularly with regard to the theme of man 'playing God' through his application of scientific knowledge and his need to manipulate and control nature. This then can be linked to many questions and issued of contemporary importance. One could, for example, take modern scientific attempts at cloning animals and the possibility of human cloning. The question arises whether science will create monsters in the future through scientific knowledge. As one critic notes; "The public debate on cloning continues to be littered with references to Frankenstein." (Goodall 19)

Furthermore, "Mary Shelley's story has been taken variously to illustrate the issues surrounding the Anatomy Act of 1832, the invention of the robot, the invention of the atomic bomb, the potentialities of the cyborg, and genetic engineering." (Goodall 19) the novel has also been used as a source in feminist debates, who argue that the poor state of the word today is directly related to the drive to conquer nature without taking heed of the consequences. The story of Frankenstein therefore expresses very modern fears and questions that still resound in the world today.

Bibliography

Britton, Jeanne M. "Novelistic Sympathy in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein." Studies in Romanticism 48.1 (2009): 3+. Questia. Web. 16 Feb. 2011.

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. Web. 16 Feb. 2011. (http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/frankenstein/section1.rhtml)

Frankenstein: Introduction. Web. 16 Feb. 2011.

(http://www.enotes.com/frankenstein)

Goodall, Jane. "Frankenstein and the Reprobate's Conscience." Studies in the Novel 31.1 (1999): 19. Questia. Web. 16 Feb. 2011.

James, Frank a.J.L., and J.V. Field. "Frankenstein and the Spark of Being." History Today Sept. 1994: 47+. Questia. Web. 16 Feb. 2011.

Nitchie, Elizabeth. Mary Shelley: Author of "Frankenstein." Westport,…

Sources Used in Document:

Bibliography

Britton, Jeanne M. "Novelistic Sympathy in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein." Studies in Romanticism 48.1 (2009): 3+. Questia. Web. 16 Feb. 2011.

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. Web. 16 Feb. 2011. (http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/frankenstein/section1.rhtml)

Frankenstein: Introduction. Web. 16 Feb. 2011.

(http://www.enotes.com/frankenstein)

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