United Negro College Fund Term Paper

  • Length: 5 pages
  • Subject: Teaching
  • Type: Term Paper
  • Paper: #78993489

Excerpt from Term Paper :

United Negro College Fund (UNCF) is the largest, oldest, most comprehensive, and most successful minority higher education assistance organization in America. They provide assistance in a variety of manners, including: operating funds and technology enhancement services its 38-member, historically black, universities and colleges, internships and scholarships for minority students at nearly 1,000 institutions, as well as faculty and administrative professional training ("About UNCF," 2004).

The United Negro College Fund has been in existence for more than 60 years. In this time, it has raised more than $2 billion that has assisted more than 300,000 students to attend college. They have distributed more money, in the assistance of minorities attending school, than any other organization, other than the United States government ("About UNCF," 2004).

Today, UNCF supports approximately 65,000 students at nearly 1,000 colleges and universities. 60%, of these students, are the first in their families to attend college. 62%, of these students, have family incomes of less than $25,000 per year. Their 450 scholarships and fellowships assist minority students at the undergraduate, graduate and doctoral levels of study ("About UNCF," 2004).

In addition, UNCF's support of its 38-member historically black universities and colleges helps these schools keep their tuition rates down. These colleges have tuitions that are 54% lower than comparable non-member schools ("About UNCF," 2004). Yet, it has not always been easy for UNCF. It has been a long road and the challenges they faced early in their history are almost a mirror image of those faced in the historic black empowerment struggle. Through early visionary leadership, UNCF grew from one man's idea to a multi-billion dollar philanthropic organization.

Introduction:

The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) is the largest, oldest, most comprehensive, and most successful minority higher education assistance organization in America. They provide assistance in a variety of manners, including: operating funds and technology enhancement services its 38-member, historically black, universities and colleges, internships and scholarships for minority students at nearly 1,000 institutions, as well as faculty and administrative professional training ("About UNCF," 2004).

The United Negro College Fund has been in existence for more than 60 years. In this time, it has raised more than $2 billion that has assisted more than 300,000 students to attend college. They have distributed more money, in the assistance of minorities attending school, than any other organization, other than the United States government ("About UNCF," 2004).

Today, UNCF supports approximately 65,000 students at nearly 1,000 colleges and universities. 60%, of these students, are the first in their families to attend college. 62%, of these students, have family incomes of less than $25,000 per year. Their 450 scholarships and fellowships assist minority students at the undergraduate, graduate and doctoral levels of study ("About UNCF," 2004).

In addition, UNCF's support of its 38-member historically black universities and colleges helps these schools keep their tuition rates down. These colleges have tuitions that are 54% lower than comparable non-member schools ("About UNCF," 2004).

Yet, it has not always been easy for UNCF. It has been a long road and the challenges they faced early in their history are almost a mirror image of those faced in the historic black empowerment struggle. Few states in the 19th and early 20th century supported black education, and as such, private black colleges were forced to struggle, without assistance. Through early visionary leadership, UNCF grew from one man's inspiration to combat this financial inequity to a multi-billion dollar philanthropic organization.

Early History and Struggles of UNCF:

Prior to the abolishment of slavery, black colleges and universities were working desperately to educate blacks. However, few states recognized this as a worthwhile endeavor, and as such, private black colleges were formed. These private black colleges outnumbered their public black brethren almost three to one. These schools often served a multitude of purposes, not only providing higher education, but also educating children and teaching adults just learning to read ("Roots that Run," n.d.).

However, as these efforts were private endeavors, for the most part, with little to no government support, often schools struggled financially. Financial challenges were compounded by the fact that these schools served one of the lowest economic societal classes of the time. In 1943, the president of what is now known as Tuskegee University, Dr. Frederick D. Patterson, decided to do something about this financial challenge.

Dr. Patterson advocated to his fellow black college presidents the need to raise money, collectively, for the assistance of struggling black students and…

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"United Negro College Fund" (2005, January 16) Retrieved January 18, 2017, from
http://www.paperdue.com/essay/united-negro-college-fund-61102

"United Negro College Fund" 16 January 2005. Web.18 January. 2017. <
http://www.paperdue.com/essay/united-negro-college-fund-61102>

"United Negro College Fund", 16 January 2005, Accessed.18 January. 2017,
http://www.paperdue.com/essay/united-negro-college-fund-61102