Behaviorism: History, Development, And Current Research Paper

Excerpt from Research Paper :

Skinner also proposed a full social model of an ideal society based on his principles of behaviorism.

The growth of cognitive psychology (aided in no small part by advances in neuroscience and medicine) has served to both discredit many behaviorist claims and to bolster the theory in the eyes of some through an incorporation of cognitive theories (Graham 2010; Mills 1998). Focusing explicitly on how the mind processes, stores, and retrieves information -- exactly the kind of "mental states" rejected by early behaviorists -- cognitive psychology at first seemed directly opposed to behaviorism (Graham 2010). There has actually been an incorporation of the two theories by some, however, where cognitive processes join other influences on behavior (Mills 1998).

In modern applications of behavioral theory, certain philosophical elements and conclusions have become especially important. In one emerging view of behaviorism, the concept of a teleological view is increasing important, and...
...This view has been applied not only to general psychological theory and explanations but also to fairly specific constructs of social interaction and conflict, thus attempting to do something somewhat akin to Skinner in theorizing that there is a "key" to understanding human behavior that could, once discovered and properly utilized, lead to the creation of a more utopic society based on a near-total understanding of how behavior and thus psychology is created and influenced (Rachin 2010).

These claims are not really as extreme as they sound, but they are still generations off if they will ever come to pass at all. Behaviorism will undoubtedly be challenged and transformed in those ensuing generations and beyond, as it continues to evolve today. The collection of published works referenced here -- from an article in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, a published textbook on behaviorism, and an original research article on modern behaviorism -- represents the continuation of a diverse and compelling interest in this area of psychology. As more scholars emerge to contribute to the theory, it will only grow and evolve faster. It is hoped that the above paragraphs assist in this growth in whatever slight manner.

References

Graham, G. (2010). Behaviorism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Accessed 25 September 2011. http://seop.leeds.ac.uk/entries/behaviorism/#6

Mills, J. (1998). Control: A History of Behavioral Psychology. New York: NY University Press.

Rachin, H. (2010). Teleological Behaviorism and the Problem of Self-Control. In…

Sources Used in Documents:

References

Graham, G. (2010). Behaviorism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Accessed 25 September 2011. http://seop.leeds.ac.uk/entries/behaviorism/#6

Mills, J. (1998). Control: A History of Behavioral Psychology. New York: NY University Press.

Rachin, H. (2010). Teleological Behaviorism and the Problem of Self-Control. In Self-Control in Society, Mind, and Brain. New York: Oxford University Press.

Cite This Research Paper:

"Behaviorism History Development And Current" (2011, September 26) Retrieved March 4, 2021, from
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/behaviorism-history-development-and-current-45781

"Behaviorism History Development And Current" 26 September 2011. Web.4 March. 2021. <
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/behaviorism-history-development-and-current-45781>

"Behaviorism History Development And Current", 26 September 2011, Accessed.4 March. 2021,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/behaviorism-history-development-and-current-45781