Computer Technology Applied to Dentistry Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :



The first such machine used for the procedures, the CEREC I, was used for manufacturing ceramic and cusp-protection onlays, three-quarter crowns, seven-eighth crowns, and veneers. The machine completed the etching, silanating, and adhesive cementing, and then conventional porcelain-polishing procedures were used to complete the process. The newer CEREC II system can create full-coverage ceramic crowns (Foerster 2). Beyond the greater technological ease, using such machines reduces the risk of tooth fracture between visits. Reduced treatment time and visits for impressions and provisional restorations reduces costs to the patient, and also to the military (Foerster 4). Most attractively for the military: "Finally, teeth can be restored without the services of a dental laboratory. This reduces the overall cost of the restoration and permits the restoration of teeth in remote locations where laboratory services may not be readily available" (Foerster.3).

The value of such technology is not limited to the military, of course. Dentists working in clinical settings without laboratory services with such technology can still conduct such restorative work, once the initial outlay for the technology is made. Dentists with patients on limited or no insurance plans, by reducing dental visits, can also keep costs under control. However, as the article makes clear, this cost reduction does not result in compromised care, rather it results in better care for the patient, and also eliminates the uncomfortable period during visits, before the procedure is completed. The bonding of the teeth is stronger than with previous methods (Foerster 2). "Besides the increased strength and durability, the coefficient of thermal expansion and the elastic modulus of this material are also much closer to those of tooth structure" (Foerster 2). There seem to be few downsides to the use of this technology, other than the initial expense of the machine, and the training required for personnel to operate such machines, but once this is accomplished, over time, the machines will essentially pay for themselves.

Works Cited

Foerster, Jeffrey G. "The Management of Endodontically-Treated Teeth Using a Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Assisted Manufacturing/Computer-Aided Design and Computer-integrated Manufacturing System." Military Medicine. Jan 1999. [16 Jul 2007] http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3912/is_199901/ai_n8843602

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

Foerster, Jeffrey G. "The Management of Endodontically-Treated Teeth Using a Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Assisted Manufacturing/Computer-Aided Design and Computer-integrated Manufacturing System." Military Medicine. Jan 1999. [16 Jul 2007] http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3912/is_199901/ai_n8843602

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