Depression an Analysis of the Thesis

Excerpt from Thesis :

The failure is rooted in the changing perception of the world and the individual's incomplete sense of place: the new generations in new societies like Australia or America lack a "shared cultural heritage or strong sense of identity" (Eckersley, S16).

Likewise, the spirituality that was of use to people in the medieval age is not of the same use in the modern world. People in America, for example, have ignored the used of spirituality in the treatment of depression, because they fail to see meaning in their suffering (Puchalski, p. 32). The Middle Ages saw a meaning to suffering: "the guiding concept of human potential fulfillment was the same for all medieval persons: salvation in heaven" (Baumeister, 1987, p. 166).

As the modern world became increasingly irreligious, it lost reason for suffering -- which in the religious age was a consequence of sin. Without the answers that religion and spirituality afforded, America, which was religious when founded, lost sight of heaven as a place of fulfillment. Fulfillment was placed in the here and now instead: Early in the 20th century, themes of alienation and of devaluation of selfhood indicated concern over the individual's helpless dependency on society. Since World War II, individuals have accommodated to the changed social realities but have continued to grope for ideals and means of self-definition and fulfillment" (Baumeister, p. 163). As a result, depression has been increasing in America.

Rationale for the Study

The benefit of spirituality to help clients cope with depression will help counselors gain more insight in the treatment of patients and enhance the relationship between patient and clinician (McClain et al., 2003, p. 1603). Since patients who struggle with depression often desire some sort of spiritual answer to their problems, inquiry into the study can be of use: "Growing data have provided empirical support for the hypothesis that spiritual well-being might help to bolster psychological functioning and adjustment to illness" (McClain et al., p. 1603).

Likewise, the project is important because it will benefit counselors by presenting them with new techniques and better enable them to get to know their patients; plus, it will benefit patients by granting them deeper insight into their problems and better help them to cope (Mueller et al., 2001, p. 1225). After all, "a survey of family physicians found that 96% believe spiritual well-being is an important factor in health" (Mueller et al., p. 1225-6). By emphasizing the spiritual aspect of human life, physicians can help people who suffer from depression alleviate their symptoms and realize a higher goal in life like the attainment of heaven as religious did in the medieval age or the religious beginnings of America.

Reference List

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders:

DSM-II. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.; 1968 [cited 2008-08-03]. Schizophrenia. p. 36 -- 37, 40.

Baumeister, R. (1987). How the Self Became a Problem: A Psychological Review of Historical Research. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 52(1), 163-176. Retrieved from http://www.kokdemir.info/courses/psk433/docs/How%20the%20Self%20Became%20a%20Problem.pdf

Eckersley, R. (1993). Failing a generation: The impact of culture on the health and well-being of youth. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 29, S16-S19. DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1754.1993.tb02254.x

Fox, M. (2001). Depression on the Rise. Retrieved from http://webpub.allegheny.edu/employee/r/rmumme/FS101/ResearchPapers/MeghanFox.html

Mathers CD, Loncar D. Projections of global mortality and burden of disease from 2002 to 2030. PLoS Med.. 2006;3(11):e442. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0030442

McClain, C. et al. (2003). Effect of spiritual well-being on end-of-life despair in terminally-ill cancer patients. The Lancelot 361, 1603-1607. Retrieved from http://www.fordham.edu/images/Undergraduate/psychology/rosenfeld/EndOfLifeDespair.Lancet..pdf

Mueller, P. Religious Involvement, Spirituality, and Medicine: Implications for Clinical

Practice. Mayo Clin Proc 76, 1225-1235. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.com/content/76/12/1225.full.pdf

Puchalski, C. (2001). Spirituality and Health: The Art of Compassionate Medicine.

Hospital Physician, 30-36. Retrieved from http://www.hpboardreview.com/pdf/hp_mar01_spirit.pdf

Schildkraut, JJ. The catecholamine hypothesis of affective disorders: A review of supporting evidence. American Journal of Psychiatry. 1965;122(5):509 -- 22. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.122.5.509

Williams, D.R., Sternthal, M.J. (2007). Spirituality, religion and health: evidence and research directions. MJA 186(10), S47-S50. Retrieved from https://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/186_10_210507/wil11060_fm.pdf

Sources Used in Document:

Reference List

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders:

DSM-II. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.; 1968 [cited 2008-08-03]. Schizophrenia. p. 36 -- 37, 40.

Baumeister, R. (1987). How the Self Became a Problem: A Psychological Review of Historical Research. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 52(1), 163-176. Retrieved from http://www.kokdemir.info/courses/psk433/docs/How%20the%20Self%20Became%20a%20Problem.pdf

Eckersley, R. (1993). Failing a generation: The impact of culture on the health and well-being of youth. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 29, S16-S19. DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1754.1993.tb02254.x

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