Drinking Alcohol Together With Tobacco Thesis

Excerpt from Thesis :

While each of these studies has reported a cardioprotective effect of alcohol, they differ over which type of alcoholic beverage provides the greatest benefit" (634).

Overlooked in many of these studies, though, is the fact that some people who categorize themselves as being one type of drinker compared to another may engage in other activities that are unhealthy from the outset (for instance, beer drinkers may be more likely to also be tobacco users) while others may engage in a wide range of healthy behaviors (for example, wine drinkers may not be smokers and may job or exercise regularly). As McGregor and his colleagues emphasize, "One inherent difficulty within these studies is that in the general population, drinkers distinguished as primarily wine, beer or spirits drinkers tend to differ in other important aspects. If, for example, wine drinkers are found to be healthier, it may be the result of a lifestyle that incorporates other health-conscious behaviors that may, in turn, also be cardioprotective" (634).

B.

Relaxation. The iconic image of the Archie Bunker-type plopping down in his easy chair after a hard day's work a popping open a beer to relax is repeated on countless situation comedies and in real-world settings throughout the country. In this context, small amounts of alcohol can have a relaxing quality that many people find pleasurable. Unfortunately, Archie Bunker typically becomes "Joe Six-Pack" and more recently, "Joe Twelve-Pack" because of the tolerance that builds up in people who consume alcohol who are then forced to drink more and more to receive the same level of effects over time. Moreover, as noted above, one of the symptoms of alcoholism is making a ritual of the practice, or becoming irritable when the time for drinking draws near, both of which may be reasonably associated with this behavior.

Conclusion

The jury is in and the vote was not even close. The research showed that alcohol consumption can and does result in a wide range of harmful effects on the human mind and body. While alcohol can result in a number of at-risk behaviors irrespective of the age of the drinker, younger people in particular appear to be especially susceptible to these dangers. Drinking alcohol to excess can result in damage to a number of organs, including the brain, and can cause blackouts and risky behaviors that can result in personal injury and even death. Assuming that people are fortunate enough to survive their initial experiences with the drug and escape severe injury, death or incarceration because of alcohol use, the eventual outcome may be a total dependence on alcohol in the form of alcoholism. Taken together, the risks associated with alcohol use were shown to far outweigh any potential benefits that can be gained and given the well publicized nature of these risks, the thinking person will avoid the practice altogher.

Works Cited

"Alcohol." 2009, Partnership for a Drug-Free America. [Online]. Available: http://www.drug free.org/Portal/drug_guide/Alcohol.

Booth, Brenda M., Joann, Kirchner, John Fortney, Robin Ross and Kathryn Rost, 2000, "Rural

At-Risk Drinkers: Correlates and One-Year Use of Alcoholism Treatment Services."

Journal of Studies on Alcohol 61(2): 267.

Mcgregor, Darcy, Robert P. Murray and Gordon E. Barnes, 2003, "Personality Differences

between Users of Wine, Beer and Spirits in a Community Sample: The Winnipeg Health

and Drinking Survey." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 64(5): 634-635.

Penick, Elizabeth C., Elizabeth J. Nickel, Barbara J. Powell, Barry I. Liskow, Jan Campbell,

Tamara M. Dale, Ruth E. Hassanein and Elizabeth Noble, 1999, "The Comparative

Validity of Eleven Alcoholism Typologies." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 60(2): 188.

Perkins, H. Wesley, 2002, "Surveying the Damage: A Review of Research on Consequences of Alcohol Misuse in College…

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

"Alcohol." 2009, Partnership for a Drug-Free America. [Online]. Available: http://www.drug free.org/Portal/drug_guide/Alcohol.

Booth, Brenda M., Joann, Kirchner, John Fortney, Robin Ross and Kathryn Rost, 2000, "Rural

At-Risk Drinkers: Correlates and One-Year Use of Alcoholism Treatment Services."

Journal of Studies on Alcohol 61(2): 267.

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