Karl Marx Critique of Religion Essay

Excerpt from Essay :

All of Marx's ideas are based upon his value labor theory and surplus value concept in capitalism as the driving exploitation (McLellan, 2007, p.235).

Application of Marxism critique on Buddhism

Marxism on materialism is one Marxism aspect which is considered to be conflicting with Buddha-Dhamma. Buddha denounces materials while Marx proclaims it and Buddhism is considered non-materialist doctrine. Materialism that Marx means is not the one with physical, physiological or mechanical connotation or questions the conscious mind's reality. The stuff that the universe is composed of is not referred nor is it mechanistic materialism but rather dialectic materialism. Buddha's discourse refers concepts of materialism which are also not identical to the conventional materialism. The operative materialism aspect for Buddhism is the non-acceptance of survival after death. Regarding this question, there wasn't any rash by Marx to put forth his opinion and it's clear that dialectical materialism's philosophical theory by illustrated by Marx is neither denied nor affirmed by Buddhism. A case can be made for opposing between Marxism and Buddhism regarding the more banal materialism sense where by worldly goods importance is affirmed for human welfare. The middle way is the argument for Buddhism for both the layman and monk due to the respective lifestyles demands. Marx considered the characteristic of capitalism as accumulation for just the accumulation sake and therefore the distribution rule that is ideal communist state is one the each person is given according to his need. Reconciliation of these views can be found here also as can be noted the first social communist grouping was Buddha (Gunasekara, 1984).

The man physiology theory is another significant incompatibility aspect between Marxism and Buddhism especially the relation of human activity and human consciousness. A memorable statement is made by Marx in his Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy (1859) preface that the being of the man is not determined by his consciousness but their consciousness is determined by their social being. Earlier communist manifesto expressed the same idea. This is very opposite to Buddhism where by the mind is considered the fore-runner to all the conditions. The being is therefore determined by consciousness.

Both Buddhism and Marxism are considered as humanistic philosophies. From almost everything written by Marx his humanism is evident. Man was also considered as his destiny's arbiter. Humanism affirmation in both philosophies is components of criticisms of God and religion. A distinction between the two can be established by understanding that Marx theory's center is man in a society while only man is important for Buddha and the human situation essential aspects do not regard social economic scene as fundamental (Bramford, 1939, p.247).

Marxism is a philosophy which is of action and this is also true for Buddhism. Political and social actions are recommended by Marx because of their disparate views on humanism. Even though this sort of action is not decried by Buddha, he focuses on a higher ideal and type of happiness which is more fundamental. Accusations have been put against Buddha for his favor for contemplation rather than action both currently and in his time too. The consideration of ethics results from practice emphasis since action norms are laid down by ethics. There has been debate on the absolute ethics standards superficial rejection made by Marx (Gunasekara, 1984).

References

Bramford, P. (1939). Marxism: An Autopsy. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Callinicos, a. (1983). The Revolutionary Ideas of Karl Marx. NewYork: Bookmarks.

Elster, J. (1986). An Introduction to Karl Marx. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Gunasekara, V. (1984). Marxism in a Buddhist Perspective. Retrieved April 25, 2010, from http://uqconnect.net/slsoc/bsq/marxbud.htm

Leszek, K. (1976). Main Currents of Marxism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Machovec, M. (1969). Atheism and Christianity-Their Function of Mutual Challenge,

Concurrence 1(3), 188

Marx, K.(1974). On Religion. Padover, S. (Ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill

McLellan, D. (2007). Marxism After Marx. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Shlomo, a. (1968). The Social and Political Thought…

Sources Used in Document:

References

Bramford, P. (1939). Marxism: An Autopsy. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Callinicos, a. (1983). The Revolutionary Ideas of Karl Marx. NewYork: Bookmarks.

Elster, J. (1986). An Introduction to Karl Marx. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Gunasekara, V. (1984). Marxism in a Buddhist Perspective. Retrieved April 25, 2010, from http://uqconnect.net/slsoc/bsq/marxbud.htm

Cite This Essay:

"Karl Marx Critique Of Religion" (2010, April 26) Retrieved May 24, 2020, from
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/karl-marx-critique-of-religion-2281

"Karl Marx Critique Of Religion" 26 April 2010. Web.24 May. 2020. <
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/karl-marx-critique-of-religion-2281>

"Karl Marx Critique Of Religion", 26 April 2010, Accessed.24 May. 2020,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/karl-marx-critique-of-religion-2281

Advertisements