Land Use and Traffic Characteristics 'Discussion and Results' chapter

Excerpt from 'Discussion and Results' chapter :

Additionally, policy makers and politicians have to take into account the viewpoints and sensitivities of their constituencies given that voters are most certainly impacted by transportation developments as residents, motorists, commuters, and taxpayers. Unpopular projects pushed through over vocal protests will very likely produce a backlash at the ballot box. Indeed, promoting a particular transportation project can be a political campaign in and of itself.

Similarly, paying for city transportation projects is a political endeavor because it involves utilizing the public funds. Project financing can come from many different sources. There are user fees such as vehicle registration fees, fuel taxes, and public transit fares; non-user funds including property, sales, and income or payroll taxes; special benefit fees such as traffic impact fees, service charges, and tax increment financing; debt financing such as bonds; private financing like developer funding and negotiated investments; and special revenue streams such as a lottery and advertising fees. Each type of funding comes with positive and negative consequences, and they impact various constituencies, who may be the providers of the funds depending on the financing method(s) used, in different ways (Benz, 1999, pp. 301-302). It is because of real or perceived injustice concerning the distribution of the positive and negative consequences across constituencies that is at the heart of the "lack of consensus" regarding the public budgeting process. No one wants to feel as though they are paying more than their fair share or that they are paying for something they personally will not use. Planners and policymakers must make every effort to maximize the collective gain and appropriately distribute the funding pains when structuring project financing.

References

Benz, G.P. (1999). Financial and economic considerations. In J.D. Edwards (Ed.),

Transportation planning handbook (2nd ed.) (pp.239-338). Washington, D.C.: Institute of Transportation Engineers.

Patriksson, M. (1994). Traffic assignment problems: Models and methods. Utrecht: VSP

International Science.

Weiner, E. (2008). Urban transportation planning in the United States: History, policy, practice

(3rd ed.). New York: Springer. Retrieved from http://www.springerlink.com/content/978-0-387-77152-6/contents/

Sources Used in Document:

References

Benz, G.P. (1999). Financial and economic considerations. In J.D. Edwards (Ed.),

Transportation planning handbook (2nd ed.) (pp.239-338). Washington, D.C.: Institute of Transportation Engineers.

Patriksson, M. (1994). Traffic assignment problems: Models and methods. Utrecht: VSP

International Science.

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