Life Skills Classes and Special Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

Every special needs student has different strengths and weaknesses. Under IDEA, the IEP is forms the educational standard for all special needs students. The IEP determines the course of their education, goals, and method of teaching. The standards are adjusted to the needs of the student. This differs from the nationalized standards that dictate the educational needs of the general population.

Quantitative assessment is the rule of assessment of the general population. However, assessment of the special needs population is largely qualitative. The problem in assessing the success of life skills classrooms must consider whether the individual goals of the students are being met. However, there are many variables that can impact this success. For instance, a student may develop unexpected medical conditions during the course of the year that impact the ability to meet IEP goals. These factors must be considered in order to make a fair assessment of the programs.

Research concerning the success of life skills classes was conducted in the same manner as for the general population. This contributed to the differences in the results obtained. Until valid assessment techniques are developed that take into account the heterogeneous nature of the special needs population, it is unlikely that this controversy will be resolved. Further research into this area needs to consider a qualitative, rather than a quantitative approach. In the days where inclusion rules, the idea that a population needs to be separated for research purposes may not be politically correct, but if one wishes to obtain valid research results this is exactly what needs to be done.

References

Bellini, S., Peters, J., Benner, L., & Hopf, a. (2007). A Meta-Analysis of School-Based Social kills Interventions for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Remedial and Special Education 28 (3), 153. Retrieved from Questia Database on April 20, 2008.

Bouck, E. (2004). Exploring Secondary Special Education for Mild Mental Impairment: A rogram in Search of Its Place. Remedial and Special Education. 25 (6), 367. Retrieved from Questia Database on April 20, 2008.

Coster, W. & Haltiwanger, J. (2004). Social-Behavioral Skills of Elementary Students with physical Disabilities Included in General Education Classrooms. Remedial and Special education. 25 (2), 95. Retrieved from Questia Database on April 20, 2008.

Heron, T. Welsch, R. & Goddard, Y. (2003). Applications of Tutoring Systems in Specialized object Areas: An Analysis of Skills, Methodologies, and Results. Remedial and Special education. 24 (5), 288. Retrieved from Questia Database on April 20, 2008.

Nevin, a., Malian, I., & Willimas, L. (2002). Perspectives on Self-Determination across the curriculum: Report of a Preservice Special Education Teacher Preparation Program. Remedial and Special Education. Volume: 23 (2), 75. Retrieved from Questia Database on April 20, 2008.

Turnbull, a., Wehmeyer, M. & Park, J. (2003). A Quality of Life Framework for Special education Outcomes. Remedial…

Sources Used in Document:

References

Bellini, S., Peters, J., Benner, L., & Hopf, a. (2007). A Meta-Analysis of School-Based Social kills Interventions for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Remedial and Special Education 28 (3), 153. Retrieved from Questia Database on April 20, 2008.

Bouck, E. (2004). Exploring Secondary Special Education for Mild Mental Impairment: A rogram in Search of Its Place. Remedial and Special Education. 25 (6), 367. Retrieved from Questia Database on April 20, 2008.

Coster, W. & Haltiwanger, J. (2004). Social-Behavioral Skills of Elementary Students with physical Disabilities Included in General Education Classrooms. Remedial and Special education. 25 (2), 95. Retrieved from Questia Database on April 20, 2008.

Heron, T. Welsch, R. & Goddard, Y. (2003). Applications of Tutoring Systems in Specialized object Areas: An Analysis of Skills, Methodologies, and Results. Remedial and Special education. 24 (5), 288. Retrieved from Questia Database on April 20, 2008.

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