Mary Shelly and the Birth Annotated Bibliography

Excerpt from Annotated Bibliography :

This would serve as a basic blue print for future science fiction author Ivan Asimov. The article was useful because it highlights a change that is taking place. Where, the world of literature is changing and evolving from the traditional writings of the past to embrace new a genre. In many ways, Frankenstein serves a bridge between the literature of the past and science fiction.

Glausiusz, Josie. "The Spark of Frankenstein." Discover 23.8 (2002): Print. 20 Mar. 2010.

In the article the Spark of Frankenstein, it talks about how the lab scene was influenced by Mary Shelly's husband (Percy Shelly), who was working under Dr. James Lind. They were conducting experiments showing how electricity can cause a dead frog's leg to twitch. Then in 1816, after visiting Lord Byron's villa near Geneva, she had the background for her masterpiece. This is useful; because it highlights what factors helped Shelly, determine the setting of the novel. In many ways, the beginning of the novel is what initially grabs the reader. As they can see that something is different, despite the appearance that everything is normal.

Morton, Tim. "Modern Criticism." A Routledege Source Book on Mary Shelly's Frankenstein. New York: Routledge, 2002. 80 -90. Print.

In the chapter Modern Criticism, it talks about how there are a number of different themes that Shelly is attempting to point out in the novel. These would include: changes in medicine / science, the structure of society itself and race / colonialism. Where, the chapter points out how all of these different underlying meanings are: illustrated throughout the novel through the use of a variety of symbols. This is useful; because it highlights how Shelly is criticizing the society she lives in. While at the same time, showing how views and thoughts are changing. In many ways, one can infer that Shelly's work of literature was an awakening for women in Western society. Meaning that over time, the subtle meanings that she points out will become focal points for women on the issue of equality.

Clearly, Mary Shelly's Frankenstein is highlighting a shift that is taking place within society itself. The above pieces of literature point out these changes, by providing a subtle criticism through the use of symbols. Over the course of time, these ideas would become some of the criticisms that many women would have about Western society. This is how events shaped the underlying theme in the birth of Frankenstein.

Bibliography

Badalamenti, Anthony. "Why Did Mary Shelly Write Frankenstein." Journal of Religion and Health 45.3 (2006): 419 -- 439. Print.

Duncker, Particia. "Marry Shelly's After Lives: Biography and Invention." Women a Cultural Review 15.2 (2004): 230 -- 249. Web. 20 Mar. 2010.

Freedman, Carl. "Hail Mary: On the Author of Frankenstein and the Origins of…

Sources Used in Document:

Bibliography

Badalamenti, Anthony. "Why Did Mary Shelly Write Frankenstein." Journal of Religion and Health 45.3 (2006): 419 -- 439. Print.

Duncker, Particia. "Marry Shelly's After Lives: Biography and Invention." Women a Cultural Review 15.2 (2004): 230 -- 249. Web. 20 Mar. 2010.

Freedman, Carl. "Hail Mary: On the Author of Frankenstein and the Origins of Science Fiction." Science Fiction Studies 29.2 (2002): 253 -- 264. Print.

Glausiusz, Josie. "The Spark of Frankenstein." Discover 23.8 (2002): Print. 20 Mar. 2010.

Cite This Annotated Bibliography:

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