Mexican Religion In The U.S.A. Term Paper

Length: 6 pages Sources: 6 Subject: Mythology - Religion Type: Term Paper Paper: #6920132 Related Topics: Migration, Hilton, Oakland, Religion And Society
Excerpt from Term Paper :

S. were Protestant and that 18% of them mostly converted from Catholicism (Weiss and Solis 2007). The Hispanic population increased by 28% from 2000 to 2005. The survey identified the reasons why Hispanics would not assimilate and integrate easily or smoothly into the non-Hispanic religious culture in the U.S. Many Hispanics have a different approach to religion. They are generally more devout than non-Hispanics. This attitude derives from a mystical experience and understanding of their faith. This faith, in turn, connects powerfully to their language and original customs. Their identity links more with the community than that of the Anglo-Saxon church of the U.S. The Pew study interviewed approximately 4,000 Hispanics nationwide. The broad differences between Hispanics and non-Hispanics in the practice of their religious faith in the U.S. included denominations, faith experience, choice of place of worship, and the use of the Spanish language. About 68% of Hispanic adults were Catholic. About 29% of attendees of worship said they spoke in tongues as against only 11% of non-Hispanics. Around 45% of them said they had received or seen divine healing, as compared...

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Roughly 66% of them preferred places of worship with a Spanish-speaking priest or pastor, a Spanish-language service and a predominantly Hispanic congregation. Approximately 42% of third-generation Hispanics expressed the same choices (Weiss and Solis).

Bibliography

Althoff, Andrea. Migration and Transformation of Latino Religious Identities in the U.S.

Calvin College, 2007. Retrieved on March 7, 2008 at http://www.calvin.edu/henry/schedule/althoff.pdf

Dow, James W. The Growth of Protestant Religions in Mexico and Central America.

Oakland University, 2003. Retrieved on March 7, 2008 at http://personalwebs.oakland.edu/~dow/personal/papers/meso/sssr_2003/e_connected.pdf

Espinosa, Gaston. History and Theory in the Study of Mexican-American Religions.

Chapter 3, 2003. Retrieved on March 7, 2008 at http://phil-rlst.claremontmckenna.edu/PDF/MexicanAmericanHistoriography.pdf

Hilton, Ronald. United States: Religion and Mexican-Americans. WAIS Forum: World

Association of International Studies, 2002. Retrieved on March 7, 2008 at http://www.stanford.edu/group/wais/USA/us_religionandmexicanamericans1602.html

Murray, Bruce. Latino Religion in the U.S.: Demographic Shifts and Trends. NHCLC:

National Hispanic Leadership Conference, 2006

Weiss, Jeffrey and Diane Solis. Hispanics Leaving…

Sources Used in Documents:

Bibliography

Althoff, Andrea. Migration and Transformation of Latino Religious Identities in the U.S.

Calvin College, 2007. Retrieved on March 7, 2008 at http://www.calvin.edu/henry/schedule/althoff.pdf

Dow, James W. The Growth of Protestant Religions in Mexico and Central America.

Oakland University, 2003. Retrieved on March 7, 2008 at http://personalwebs.oakland.edu/~dow/personal/papers/meso/sssr_2003/e_connected.pdf
Chapter 3, 2003. Retrieved on March 7, 2008 at http://phil-rlst.claremontmckenna.edu/PDF/MexicanAmericanHistoriography.pdf
Association of International Studies, 2002. Retrieved on March 7, 2008 at http://www.stanford.edu/group/wais/USA/us_religionandmexicanamericans1602.html


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