Migration Essays (Examples)

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Effects of immigrants on the UK economy

Words: 1095 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81350460

Migration, Employment and UK Economy

Point 1: Perception and Reality do not always align

Duffy and Frere-Smith (2013) published their report on perception versus reality where immigration\'s impact on the UK labour market are concerned. The report highlighted several gaps between perception and reality, such as the composition of immigrants being largely asylum-seekers (most are students), and the fact that concerns about immigration have been rising recently. They also highlight that concerns are often surrounding impact on public service and benefits, but ignore positive elements like the tax contribution and economic benefits of immigrants.

This study supports the findings of Dustmann and Preston (2007), which held that residents of the UK were mostly concerned about the impacts of immigrants in terms of paying taxes and using the welfare system. They found two areas where such concerns were disconnected from reality. One being that such concerns were outsized in proportion to…… [Read More]

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Mexican Religion in the U S A

Words: 1849 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6920132

S. were Protestant and that 18% of them mostly converted from Catholicism (Weiss and Solis 2007). The Hispanic population increased by 28% from 2000 to 2005. The survey identified the reasons why Hispanics would not assimilate and integrate easily or smoothly into the non-Hispanic religious culture in the U.S. Many Hispanics have a different approach to religion. They are generally more devout than non-Hispanics. This attitude derives from a mystical experience and understanding of their faith. This faith, in turn, connects powerfully to their language and original customs. Their identity links more with the community than that of the Anglo-Saxon church of the U.S. The Pew study interviewed approximately 4,000 Hispanics nationwide. The broad differences between Hispanics and non-Hispanics in the practice of their religious faith in the U.S. included denominations, faith experience, choice of place of worship, and the use of the Spanish language. About 68% of Hispanic adults…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Althoff, Andrea. Migration and Transformation of Latino Religious Identities in the U.S.

Calvin College, 2007. Retrieved on March 7, 2008 at http://www.calvin.edu/henry/schedule/althoff.pdf

Dow, James W. The Growth of Protestant Religions in Mexico and Central America.

Oakland University, 2003. Retrieved on March 7, 2008 at http://personalwebs.oakland.edu/~dow/personal/papers/meso/sssr_2003/e_connected.pdf
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Socially-Constructed Societies and Cultures Among Transmigrants and

Words: 1270 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8248085

Socially-constructed Societies and Cultures Among Transmigrants and Transnationals: The Case of United States Migration History

Migration, as a social activity, is a vital element considered not only for its importance in determining specific aspects of a country's socio-demographic characteristics, but in determining the psycho-demographic characteristics of societies and cultures within that country. Indeed, it is evident that apart from serving as a catalyst in changing the social structure of societies, migration also helps change and bring dynamism to a the norms, traditions, and values held important by a society and culture. Take as an example the history of migration in the United States. Historical events such as the first and second World Wars have triggered the sudden increase in migration of people from different countries in the world. Furthermore, migration also increased as an effect of the economic and political stability of the U.S., as compared to other countries in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Castles, S. And M. Miller. (1993). The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World. London: Macmillan Press Ltd.

Kennedy, P. And V. Roudometof. Transnationalism in a global age. In Communities across Borders: New immigrants and transnational cultures. (2002). P. Kennedy and V. Roudometof (Eds.). NY: Routledge.

Massey, D. Why does immigration occur? A Theoretical Synthesis. In The Handbook of International Migration: The American Experience. (1999). C. Hirschmann, P. Kasinitz and J. DeWind (Eds.). NY: Russell Sage Foundation.

Matthews, K. Boundaries of diaspora identity: The case of Central and East African-Asians in Canada. In Communities across Borders: New immigrants and transnational cultures. (2002). P. Kennedy and V. Roudometof (Eds.). NY: Routledge.
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Gender Perspectives on Globalization

Words: 3434 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51347655

Gender Perspectives on Globalization

The social impact of globalization: case of Indian nurses migration

The globalization advent can be dated back to the post WWII era leading to the cold war period where countries increasingly chose the nations that they aligned their diplomatic, political and economic allegiances to. This trend was informed by the global economic trends that prevailed after the WWII and the need for economic allies in order for a country and to some extent a region to survive. The World Bank (2014a) advances globalization as the increased interdependence of countries on each other due to the ever increasing finance, trade, human resources and ideologies at the global level. It is characterized by the significant increase in the international trade patterns and the establishment of cross-border investments and these are noted to be the two major characteristics of globalization as sated by Mrak M. (2000:Pp3-6) and these cannot…… [Read More]

References

Costinot A. Donaldson D., (2012). Ricardo's Theory of Comparative Advantage: Old Idea, New Evidence. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from http://economics.mit.edu/files/7536

Gill R., (2011). Nursing Shortage in India with special reference to International Migration of Nurses. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from http://www.google.co.ke/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=8&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CFUQFjAH&url=http%3A%2F%2Fsocialmedicine.info%2Findex.php%2Fsocialmedicine%2Farticle%2Fdownload%2F517%2F1088&ei=GEF2VJeBA4Ldao7_grgG&usg=AFQjCNF2NHcvOH9zERhetMyAYZN1uKua2A&sig2=VzqxICFENaDFRwkKDJ8YeA&bvm=bv.80642063,d.bGQ

Nagarajan R., (2010). India tops with 56,000 migrant doctors in OECD countries. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/India-tops-with-56000-migrant-doctors-in-OECD-countries/articleshow/7154050.cms

Senior K., (2010). Wanted: 2.4 million nurses, and that's just in India. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/88/5/10-020510.pdf
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Migratory Cetaceans and Their Relation

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88104772



In the fall, they migrate from the summer feeding grounds, heading south along the coast of North America to Mexico, to the calving and nesting waters of the Sea of Cortez, where they seek shelter and the calmer waters of Scammon's Lagoon, at Baja, California. Calves are born in the shallow lagoons and bays from early January to mid February. Then the north bound journey begins in mid February to May, the Eastern North Pacific stock of gray whales can be seen migrating with newborn calves along the west coast of America. The new born calves have a pebbly appearance, like a slate gray 'dill pickle" -- this is an easy visual to identify them. Thanks to the whalewatch industry, that began in the 1970's, this is one of the best documented whale species on earth.

2) Humpback whale migration

During the summer months, humpbacks spend the majority of their…… [Read More]

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Air Traffic

Words: 28110 Length: 110 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54322150

air traffic has continued to increase and it now constitutes a considerable proportion of the travelling public. The amount of long-hour flights has increased significantly. Based on the International Civil Aviation authority, air traffic can be anticipated to double amid till 2020. Airline travel, especially over longer distances, makes air travelers vulnerable to numerous facets that will impact their health and well-being. Particularly, the speed with which influenza spreads and mutates, via transportation routes, is the reason why the influenza pandemic is considered to be a huge threat to the human population. Pandemic is a term, which is used for a virus or microbe when it spreads over a large area, in severe cases even the whole world and large number of people start getting affecting by it (CDC, 2009).

In the past 300 years, there have been ten significant influenza pandemics outbreaks that have taken place in this world.…… [Read More]

References

Airports Council International (2009) Airport preparedness guidelines for outbreaks of communicable disease. Available at: http://www.airports.org/aci/aci/file/ACI_Priorities/Health/Airport%20preparedness%20guidelines.pdf (Accessed: 28 November 2011)

Bouma, G.D. (2002) The research process. 4th edn. Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

Brigantic, R., Delp, W., Gadgil A., Kulesz, J., Lee, R., Malone, J.D. (2009) U.S. airport entry screening in response to pandemic influenza: Modeling and analysis. Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B7578-4W2M6SG1&_user=10843&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000000150&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10843&md5=44685b11dd53d74a8ef85a4f03e185f2 (Accessed: 28 November 2011)

Bush, George W. (2003a). Homeland security presidential directive -- 5: Management of domestic incidents. Available at: http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2003/02/20030228-9.html (Accessed: 28 November 2011)
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Traditional Se Asian Bamboo Flutes

Words: 28549 Length: 95 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64807002

The organization of the five chapters in the study includes:

Chapter I: Chapter I includes the design of the study, the study's research problem and three research questions, study objectives, the scope and limitations of the study, significance of the study of DNA, research methodology and philosophy of the studies from different related literature.

Chapter II: During Chapter II, the researcher presents information to address the first research question; presented in the introduction for the thesis: What evidence points to the origin of flutes in SEA? During Chapter II, the researcher relates the kinds of flute in SEA that have been passed on from one generation to the next and their physical structure hich attributes scale, sound, expressions, melody, and rhythm. In Chapter II, the researcher also discusses the studies on ethnic groups of SEA and their flutes, and additionally notes studies on history of geology and aboriginals' migration map…… [Read More]

works cited:

Purple highlight means reference from his thesis, chapters 1-5

Blue highlight means reference from his raw research that was sent (17 files)

Yellow highlight means that writer could not find reference; one of the 17 files received

Gray highlight means writer found this source
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Medical Nursing

Words: 1796 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6008465

Medical Nursing

Medical l Nursing

The United States has the largest number of professional nurses in the world totalled 3 millions approximately. Despite the available large number of professional nurses, there is still imbalance between the supply and demand for nurses in the United States. Demand for the professional nurses has outnumbered the supply. Typically, critical nursing shortage has become a serious issue in the United States, and the production capacity is lagging based on the estimated future needs. The concept of nursing shortage refers to the situation where the demand for nurses outnumbers the supply. The worsening nursing shortage in the United States has created the demand for more nurses to fill the gap. Many private and public sectors healthcare leaders have advocated for the serious solution to boost the supply of nurses. One of the solutions advocated is that the U.S. should facilitate the migration of foreign graduate…… [Read More]

References

Aiken, L.H. (2007). U.S. Nurse Labor Market Dynamics Are Key to Global Nurse

Sufficiency. Health Service Research.42(3):1299-1320.

Brush, B.L. Sochalski, J. & Berger, A.M. (2004). Imported Care: Recruiting Foreign Nurses

to U.S. Health Care Facilities. Health Affairs. 23(3):78.87.
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Submitted to the Faculty of the Division

Words: 2247 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17098672

Submitted to the Faculty of the Division of the International Relations and Diplomacy

In Candidacy For The Degree Of Master Of Philosophy

A number of developments are challenging the national identity and interests of Western European countries. Primary among these are the supranational integration and sovereignty sharing that is occurring between the European Union (EU) member state governments and the EU governance organs, the ongoing inward migration of peoples from the global South and East into EU countries, as well as the continued elaboration and application of human rights, which is of particular importance to potential migrants and EU residents of non-European origin. The existence of increasing migratory flows and a growing number of settled immigrant communities demands a policy response from the EU and its member states to address the situation of immigrant minorities "particularly with regards to the rights to be (or not to be) conferred upon them"…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Freedman, Jane. 2003. Gender and Insecurity: Migrant Women in Europe. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Publishing Company.

Geddes, Andrew. 1995. "Immigrant and Ethnic Minorities and the EU's 'Democratic Deficit'." Journal of Common Market Studies 33:197-217.

Guiraudon, Virginie. 2000. "European Integration and Migration Policy: Veretical Policy-making as Venue Shopping." Journal of Common Market Studies 38:251-71.

Huysmans, Jef. 2000. "The EU and the securitization of migration." Journal of Common Market Studies 38:751-78.
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Puerto Ricans - Culture and

Words: 2448 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97469000

The genetic factors were also excluded as having a major influence in the medical condition according to studies that showed that genetic factors that may influence the illness are overcome in proportion of 3:1 by environmental factors (uaranaccia, 1981, 11).

In her study, Laura onzales points out that Puerto Rican migrants are keeping in close contact with their relatives, friends and acquaintances from the islands, traveling back and forth, being engaged in what Christenson had defined as a "circulatory migration"(onzales, 2008, 2). The fact that the first language on the Puerto Rican Island is Spanish, English being widely taught in schools, but as a second language, made things harder for the older generations who migrated to the mainland. On the other hand, in a city like New York, one of the most targeted cities for the Puerto Rican migrators, Spanish is one of the languages "most commonly heard" after English,…… [Read More]

Guarnaccia, P. 1981. Puerto Ricans, Asthma, and the Health-Care System. Medical Anthropology Newsletter, Vol. 12, No. 2 (Feb., 1981), pp. 9-17

Landale et al. Migration and Infant Death: Assimilation or Selective Migration among Puerto Ricans? American Sociological Review, Vol. 65, No. 6 (Dec., 2000), pp. 888-909

Zayas, L.H. Palleja, J. 1988. Puerto Rican Familism: Considerations for Family Therapy. Family Relations, Vol. 37, No. 3 (Jul., 1988), pp. 260-264
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Families in a Global Context

Words: 2653 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18759597



At the same time, the Japanese parent will likely encourage the child's freedom, especially in the early stages of life, while the American parent will tend to correct from early stages of development any misbehavior or errors. With the relationship mother-child, the Japanese mother will tend to emphasize less the development of the communication side for the child and will prefer a more symbiotic relationship (Ibid. page 71).

4. A family can best be defined through some of the main characteristics it has. However, one should also known that there are some general characteristics that everyone accepts as to what a family is and several others that are only accepted by groups of individuals as to what the family is. As such, both aspects need to be taken into consideration and discussed.

First of all, the family is judged to be the fundamental unity cell of society. From this perspective,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Roopnarine, Jaipaul. Gielen, Uwe. 2005. Families in Global Perspective. Pearson.

2. Ehrenreich, Barbara, Hochschild, Arlie Russell. 2002. Global Woman. Henry Holt and Company
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Workings of the Sharecropping System

Words: 3383 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86732366

his League advocated the peaceful and friendly expansion and recognition of African-American culture and roots in Africa. It also helped pave the way for more militant African-American advocacy groups that found their way into popular African-American culture and society during the Harlem Renaissance. he Universal African Legion also had affiliate companies and corporations, which gave African-Americans more cultural, economic, and political clout and representation during this time period. Garvey was a crucial figure in the uniting of African-Americans toward the singular goal of improving their cultural and social conditions inside the U.S.

he New Negro movement was an over-arching hopefulness that African-American culture and society could successfully flourish in the post slavery era. Garvey played a major role in helped to culturally establish the African-American agenda of upward social mobility and desegregation (Locke, 1997). he Harlem Renaissance was a movement with limited scope that took place during the 1920's and…… [Read More]

The Black Power Movement emerged as a separate approach to the issues of civil rights and racial inequality. Those who were frustrated with the status quo, and with the slow progress of the non-violent philosophy, were often quick to back the more militant wing of the Black Power Movement. Some African-Americans felt very strongly that in order to change the status quo there needed to be a real physical threat from African-Americans looking to secure their fair share of power and liberty in America (Cone, 1997). Nowhere was this more apparent than with the Black Panther Movement. These people believed that the power that had been stolen by the whites during and after slavery needed to be forcibly taken back. The national response to this movement was one of fear, and many people saw the Black Panther Movement as illegitimated by the violence they so often advocated.

The Black Power slogan enjoyed a multitude of functions. It functioned as a call to arms for the Black Panthers while also helping to solidify black capitalism and intellectual attitudes in America during this time period. Many consider the Black Power movement to be a direct reaction or result of the Civil Rights Movement, and felt as though stressing Black Nationalism and pride at every level was, to a lesser degree, successful in changing the attitudes of Americans toward African-Americans (Cone, 1997). The impact of this movement can still be seen today. The culturally popular and change-affecting "Black is Beautiful' movement came from the Black Power movement, as did many of the cultural, social, and political attitudes that modern day African-Americans hold relative to their perception of their place in society (Cone, 1997). The Black Power movement helped to define "blackness" as a positive identity, instead of something to be ashamed of. It often functioned as a rallying cry for African-Americans caught up in the struggle for cultural equality directly after the Civil Rights Movement.

Cited: Cone, JH. (1997). Black Theology and Black Power. Orbis Books: Maryknoll, NY.
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Economies of Developing Countries Many

Words: 585 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17014889



Harris and Todaro (1970) admit that a limitation of the Todaro model is that assumes potential migrants are risk neutral agents. In fact, they may well prefer a certain expected rural income vs. An uncertain expected urban income. In the real world, risk aversion could make them choose the rural option or to wait for an offer of higher urban income to make the risk of uncertain employment prospects worth their while. ut, Harris and Todaro (1970) argue that they could easily adapt their model to reflect risk aversion and would still reach the same conclusions.

In summary, policies aimed at reducing urban unemployment can actually raise urban unemployment rather than reduce it as the Todaro paradox demonstrates. According to Todaro and Smith (2002), there are important conclusions to be drawn from the Todaro model of rural-urban migration including:

Creating urban jobs does not solve the urban unemployment problem because…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Harris, John, R., and Todaro, Michael, P. "Migration, Unemployment & Development: A Two-Sector Analysis." American Economic Review Mar 1970: 60(1):126-42.

Riadh, Ben Jelili. "Rural-Urban Migration: On the Harris-Todaro Model." http://www.arab-api.org/cv/riyadh-cv/pdf/Riadh3.pdf

Todaro, Michael P. And Smith, Stephen C. Economic Development, 8th edition. Boston: Peason Addison Wesley, 2002.
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Secretary of State Transition From

Words: 3207 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60713404

Not all people who own guns are criminals nor will they end up using their gun, but it does feel better to know that in a worst case scenario situation, one will be able to fight back on even grounds.

Gun regulation is not about banning guns, but about controlling who has access to them. As proposed by the President, background checks are essential when it comes to being able to own a gun (Simon 2013). This is no way violates any sense of privacy or freedom and right to bear arms. It just assures the public that those who do have access and ownership of these powerful weapons will not use them in a hurtful or harmful way, nor will they, most importantly, hurt our children. Although it is difficult enough to protect children at home, no longer do children have that security and safety that used to be…… [Read More]

References:

LaFranchi, Howard. "Big Heels to Fill': What John Kerry Signaled to State Dept. On His First Day ( Video)." The Christian Science Monitor. The Christian Science Monitor, 04 Feb. 2013. Web. 12 Feb. 2013. .

Elementary School Rampage - CBS News. (n.d.). Breaking News Headlines: Business, Entertainment & World News - CBS News. Retrieved February 7, 2013, from http://www.cbsnews.com/2718-201_162-2046/elementary-school-rampage/

Simon, Mallory. "Gun Debate: Where Is the Middle Ground?" CNN. Cable News Network, 01 Feb. 2013. Web. 12 Feb. 2013. .

"Inaugural Address." Fifty-Seventh Inaugural Ceremonies to Swear-in the President of the United States. Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies, 21 Jan. 2013. Web. 12 Feb. 2013. .
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Ida Mae Brandon Gladney an Unfortunate Blemish

Words: 2181 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86987847

Ida Mae Brandon Gladney

An unfortunate blemish in America's past has been the harsh treatment of African-Americans by the white members of the population. Harsh racial prejudices were most rampant in the American south where African-Americans were deprived the right to vote, were forcibly segregated from the white community, and could be beaten, raped, and murdered on the slightest provocation. For all these reasons, many African-Americans fled the south and migrated into the northern states. Although African-Americans were still treated poorly in many parts of the north, it was far better for them than what they had experienced in the southern states. In Isabel ilkerson's book The armth of Others Suns written in 2010, the author explores what it would have been like for African-Americans who left the oppression of the south in order to find relative freedom from persecution in the north. The book features the stories of three…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gotham, Kevin. "Racialization and the State: the Housing Act of 1934 and the Creation of the Federal Housing Administration." Sociological Perspectives. (43:2). 2000. 291-317. Print.

Gregory, James. The Southern Diaspora: how the Great Migrations of Black and White

Southerners Transformed America. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2005. Print.

Oshinsky, David. "Freedom Trains." The New York Times. New York Times Company, 2010.
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Genetic Diversity

Words: 715 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65189179

Genetic diversity: Discuss the issues related to genetic diversity: mutations, sexual reproduction, migration, and population size.

Under most circumstances, when "an individual possesses a trait or traits that allow it to compete better for food, shelter, mates, and nesting sites, then that individual will produce more offspring because it is better nourished, is better protected, lives longer and has mate(s) with which to reproduce more offspring" (Furr n.d.). Thus, if a species produces a spontaneous mutation which is beneficial for the species' survival, the mutated organism will live, grow, and reproduce and pass on the mutation to successive generations. The mutation may survive as a heterogeneous allele, but if the mutation is common enough or the mutation produces enough offspring, eventually the useful mutation will manifest itself in greater and greater numbers in the population. "Sexual reproduction allows the genetic information of two parents to recombine to form a new…… [Read More]

References

Chapter 6. Mendelian genetics in populations II: Migration, genetic drift and non-random

Mating. (n.d.). Buffalo State University. Retrieved:  http://faculty.buffalostate.edu/penaloj/bio405/outline6.html 

Furr, Susan H. (n.d.). Sources of genetic diversity: A web learning experience.

University of Arizona. Retrieved: http://biology.arizona.edu/sciconn/lessons2/Furr/GeneticDiversity/GeneticDiversityHome.htm
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Neo-Classical Growth Model States That

Words: 1569 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3693629

A context of economic stability strengthens the country's status in the world, increases the value of the national currency and attracts foreign investors. But there should also exist a certain level of flexibility in order to encourage investors to open businesses within the country. Foreign investors need both security but also the promises of adaptability and flexibility, which will help them conduct organizational operations.

Stability should be offered by most industries and sectors, as well as national institutions. Among the sectors which reveal increased importance in offering stability are the financial sector and the banking sector. The financial sector, supervised by the country's central bank, must be stable as to develop and implement fair financial regulations, maintain an appropriate value of the national currency and reduce inflation. The banking sector has to be stable as to offer numerous credit and savings opportunities for entrepreneurs.

eferences

Benito, C.A., Neo-Classical Growth Model,…… [Read More]

References

Benito, C.A., Neo-Classical Growth Model, Development Economics Sonoma State University, retrieved from www.sonoma.edu/users/b/benito/econ403/units/NeoClassical.ppton February 7, 2008

Elbaum, B., Lazonick, W., 1984, the Decline of the British Economy: An Institutional Perspective, the Journal of Economic History, Volume 44, Number 2

Gourvish, T., 2000, Entrepreneurship in Britain 1870-1914 - Failure or Adaptation, London School of Economics, Retrieved at http://www.dieboldinstitute.org/paper3b.pdfon February 7, 2008

Meade, J.E., 1962, a Neoclassical Theory of Economic Growth, Retrieved at http://www.economyprofessor.com/economictheories/neo-classical-growth-theory.phpon February 7, 2008
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Mysteries of Chaco Canyon

Words: 604 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24697536

Chaco Canyon

"The Mysteries of Chaco Canyon," narrated by Robert Redford, explores the mysteries surrounding the Pueblo site at Chaco Canyon. The film begins with a brief narration about how the original migration of people to the area of Chaco Canyon was for them to seek a special place to be the "center of our world." Therefore, there is deep spiritual and metaphysical significance in the actual physical, geographical location of the buildings. This is in spite of the fact that the area is unsheltered from the elements, which deliver temperature and weather extremes that can be inhospitable to life. It took 250 years to complete the massive construction project, and to build in architectural elements that would serve as an astronomical indicator such as the shaft of light that appears only at certain times a year. Four themes the film covers include the difference between archaeological and oral traditions;…… [Read More]

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Globalization Has Made Access to

Words: 1463 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30419250

This has been represented through both advertisement campaigns highlighting individual beauty and greater media attention to those who do not bear resemblance to traditional images of beauty. In "sex, lies and advertising," it is evident that the use of magazines and other advertising mediums are the direct correlation to why so many women feel that they need to change themselves. These images however all false in nature since they do not accurate depict what the feminine form and beauty is. There is no strong conflict of interest between women's magazines and beauty products because the idea of beauty is now so deeply entrenched in social and cultural frameworks those magazines will not shake the desire of women to want to be beautiful. Furthermore, the prevalence of women's magazines only makes the problem appear more subliminal and give people the false sense of acceptance that is not in fact present.

All…… [Read More]

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Demographics of Brazil There Are

Words: 1149 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48751175

un.org)." However, the CIA estimated that in 2004 there were "30.66 deaths/1,000 live births, with 34.47 deaths/1,000 live births among males, and 26.65 deaths/1,000 live births among females (www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/br.html)."

AIDS

AIDS plays a role in the demographics of the Brazilian population. In 2003, the CIA estimated that the "adult prevalence rate of HIV / AIDS was 0.7%, the number of people living with HIV / AIDS was 660,000 and the number of deaths that year from HIV / AIDS was 15,000 (www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/br.html)."

One important point about the population data is that when Brazil performed its census in August 2000, it "reported a population of 169,799,170. That figure was about 3.3% lower than projections by the U.S. Census Bureau, and is close to the implied undernumeration of 4.6% for the 1991 census. Estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS, and this can…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Country at a Glance. Brazil: Health. (accessed 22 April 2005). www.un.org/).

D'allegro, Joseph. "Brazil Attracting U.S. Insurers' Interest." National Underwriter Life & Health-Financial Services Edition. (1999): 25 October.

Encyclopedia: Demographics of Brazil. (accessed 22 April 2005). http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Demographics-of-Brazil).

Migration and Urbanization. (accessed 22 April 2005). www.mongabay.com/reference/country_studies/brazil/29.html).
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Ethnic Conflict in Xinjiang An

Words: 3057 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29028426

In this sense, "During the 1950s and 1960s, especially after the falling-out between hina and the former Soviet Union, the hinese government actively relocated Han hinese to frontier provinces such as Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia, and Heilongjiang, in order to consolidate the border in light of possible military threat from the Soviets"

. Therefore, the decision to intervene in the ethnic composition of the region was not only a choice related to the national identity of the country but also to geostrategic aspects.

After the end of the old War, the region remained of importance for hina form the perspective of the national identity as well as crucial natural resources, which include oil reserves. From this perspective, massive investments have been conducted in the region, stating the official reason to be the reduction of the disparities between the regions of hina. In this sense, "Rich in natural gas, oil, and warm…… [Read More]

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Saudi Female Expats in Paris

Words: 4635 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85319948

It is through interviews and analysis; we will see how these individuals feel about the new cultures and regulations around them. Living in a new place, these individuals can very easily let go of the limitations they were under before. Therefore, their answers will give a sound idea of what sort of struggle they are experiencing with the new culture and how to retain their self and identity.

Limitations.

This study was only carried out on eight students and that is the major limitation of this research project. As stated before, half of the sample size is directly from Saudi Arabia and the other half has lived in countries such as well. Despite these differences, there are other factors such as economic class, religious sect, education and family structure that make each of these individuals different one from another. Due to these differences, the generalization created from this sample set…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Balbo, Marcello. "Social and spatial inclusion of international migrants: local responses to a global process." (2009): Print.

Giddens, Anthony. Modernity and self-identity. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1991. Print.

Goffman, Erving. The presentation of self in everyday life. Woodstock, N.Y.: Overlook Press, 1973. Print.

Islam101.com. "The Utility of Islamic Imagery in the West." 1960. Web. 17 May 2013. .
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Sociology Needs to Be Specified by the

Words: 1641 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42615329

Sociology

(Needs to be specified by the writer)

When referring to the mechanisms of life and society, one can assume that the most trustful key for understanding the given world with all its issues and particularities is the scientific Sociology, based on research which further leads to elaborated theories. With no intention of underestimating its importance, the current paper work focuses on an alternative method of providing a complete view over social facts: movies.

Along with literature, movies represent a projection of the real world in the fictional area. y presenting an issue from an artistic point-of-view, a good movie not only provides a good understanding of an issue for the large masses of citizens, but it is also a very efficient method for drawing attention to a particular problem that the society faces. A well done movie uses symbolism in order to highlight relevant points, together with an intense…… [Read More]

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4. Chavez Leo Ralph. The Latino threat: constructing immigrants, citizens, and the nation. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2008