Postpartum Depression And Its Treatment. Thesis

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They found this in other areas of women's lives, as well, such as reaching menopause and other stressful events that can often lead to the development of depression. Thus, if a family member or loved one suspects a new mother may develop postpartum depression, they could give her support, understanding, and help her to become more optimistic in her outlook to help ward off or deal with the disorder. Support from family members is also an important element of care after the baby is born, and the lack of it can help lead to depression. In conclusion, postpartum depression is a common disorder, and it can hit just about any new mother. In some cases, the symptoms disappear by themselves, but in severe cases, the woman should seek treatment from a professional that deals in these types of psychological disorders. Medication can help in some cases, and in other cases, treatment including talk therapy and discussion can help women conquer postpartum depression. This problem needs further research to uncover why it is so common and why some women suffer from it...

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In the meantime, anyone suffering from depression for more than two weeks after a baby is born should seek medical treatment and diagnosis for their symptoms.
References

Abrams, L.S., & Curran, L. (2007). Not just a middle-class affliction: Crafting a social work research agenda on postpartum depression. Health and Social Work, 32(4), 289+.

Editors. (2008). Depression during and after pregnancy. Retrieved 8 Dec. 2008 from the Women's Health.gov Web site: http://www.womenshealth.gov/faq/depression-pregnancy.cfm#a.

Grote, N.K., & Bledsoe, S.E. (2007). Predicting postpartum depressive symptoms in new mothers: The role of optimism and stress frequency during pregnancy. Health and Social Work, 32(2), 107+.

Mason, W.A., Rice, M.J., & Records, K. (2005). The lived experience of postpartum depression in a psychiatric population. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 41(2), 52+.

Simonds, S.L. (2006). Depression and women: An integrative treatment approach. New…

Sources Used in Documents:

References

Abrams, L.S., & Curran, L. (2007). Not just a middle-class affliction: Crafting a social work research agenda on postpartum depression. Health and Social Work, 32(4), 289+.

Editors. (2008). Depression during and after pregnancy. Retrieved 8 Dec. 2008 from the Women's Health.gov Web site: http://www.womenshealth.gov/faq/depression-pregnancy.cfm#a.

Grote, N.K., & Bledsoe, S.E. (2007). Predicting postpartum depressive symptoms in new mothers: The role of optimism and stress frequency during pregnancy. Health and Social Work, 32(2), 107+.

Mason, W.A., Rice, M.J., & Records, K. (2005). The lived experience of postpartum depression in a psychiatric population. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 41(2), 52+.


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