Race and World War II: Essay

Excerpt from Essay :

All because of a racially fueled hatred that exaggerated the nature of the merciless war. This image of the cruelty and heartless Japanese is what eventually allowed the American people and government to justify the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

The racist attitudes clearly clouded the United State's commitment to defending Democracy, both abroad and within its own borders. One of the worst examples of this merciless prejudice was the removal of the Japanese from cities along the West Coast in Executive Order. The internment of hundreds of thousands of Japanese-Americans clearly threatened the mage of democracy here at home, in the U.S. borders. The research suggests that "after the American entry into the war against Japan, the U.S. military imposed curfews and other restrictions on persons of Japanese descent living on the West Coast, including both naturalized native American citizens, and eventually 'excluded' mot Japanese-Americans from certain Western areas, interning those who lived there in military camps further inland" (Primus 200). Reportedly, over 120,000 people were removed from their homes after Executive Order No. 9066 was issued in February of 1942 by then President Roosevelt (Daniels 1). Yet, this was a clear violation of American citizen's Constitutional rights. Actual American citizens were being held in internment camps because of their race. Critics of the United States decision to remove Japanese-Americans from their homes "implicitly and explicitly linked the American military policy toward Japanese-Americans with Nazi policy toward Jews" (Primus 203). Over 1,862 Japanese-Americans died in the camps of natural causes, with 5,918 new births of American citizens in internment camp conditions (Daniels 1). They had to suffer at the hand of their own country because they had different racial characteristics. In this is the worst atrocity of the war. A country betraying its own people to satisfy a racial hatred.

References

Daniels, Roger. "Executive Order No. 9066." Modern American Poetry. University of Illinois. Web. http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/g_l/haiku/9066.htm

Dower, John. War without Mercy: Pacific War. Random House Digital. 2012.

Lie, John. Multiethnic Japan. Harvard University Press. 2004.

Primus, Richard A. The American Language of Rights. Cambridge…

Sources Used in Document:

References

Daniels, Roger. "Executive Order No. 9066." Modern American Poetry. University of Illinois. Web. http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/g_l/haiku/9066.htm

Dower, John. War without Mercy: Pacific War. Random House Digital. 2012.

Lie, John. Multiethnic Japan. Harvard University Press. 2004.

Primus, Richard A. The American Language of Rights. Cambridge University Press. 1999.

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