Scientific Revolution, Industrial Revolution, And Research Proposal

The new universe made room for God because the collective mind was opened to the notion of a divine entity controlling all aspects of the universe not just one corner of it. The Industrial Revolution can call Britain "home" (Craig 627) because at the time, Britain was the "single largest free-trade area in Europe" (627). Mechanical inventions spark the beginning of this revolution. In 1769, the spinning jenny was patented, which lead to the invention of a power loom. This increased demand for cotton with production jumping to twice as fast as before. The steam engine is another important invention of the Industrial Revolution and it connected to two "basic commodities of modern industrialization -- coal and iron" (Chodorow 718). Iron production was a basic element of modern development, as it "constitutes the chief element of all heavy industry and land or sea transport and is the material out of which most productive machinery has been manufactured" (Craig 629). Transportation emerged from the Industrial Revolution with the invention of the railroad. The first commercial railroad went public in 1825. (Chodorow 719) The invention of the railroad was "overwhelming" (719) because it answered a "universal need" of the people, "offering unprecedented opportunities for investment, and introducing greater speed into all commercial transactions" (719). The fact that we still utilize railroad in this day and age represents the importance and brilliance of...

...

This was not something they took lightly, as they believed the British government to be corrupt and leaning toward drpriving them of liberty. Such thoughts proved to be the inspiration behind a religious meaning for the Revolution. This movement away from British government caused splits, primarily within the Church of England, who was bound to support the king. When the United States decided to break free, they were making history. In short, declaring independence from Britain was an incredible but rewarding thing to do as it held the promise of the "priceless heritage of freedom' (156). The American Revolution strengthened the spirit of freedom from oppressive governments and it was an example of religious freedom for all people in all countries.
Works Cited

Bailey, Thomas and Kennedy, David. The American Pageant. Lexington D.C. Heath and Company. 1994.

Boorstin, Daniel. The Discoverers. New York: Random House. 1983.

Chodorow, Stanley, et al. A History of the World. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich

Publishers. 1986.

Craig, Albert, et al. The Heritage of World Civilizations. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. 2000.

Goldsmith, Mike. Galileo Galilei. New York:…

Sources Used in Documents:

Works Cited

Bailey, Thomas and Kennedy, David. The American Pageant. Lexington D.C. Heath and Company. 1994.

Boorstin, Daniel. The Discoverers. New York: Random House. 1983.

Chodorow, Stanley, et al. A History of the World. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich

Publishers. 1986.


Cite this Document:

"Scientific Revolution Industrial Revolution And" (2009, December 10) Retrieved April 17, 2024, from
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/scientific-revolution-industrial-revolution-16414

"Scientific Revolution Industrial Revolution And" 10 December 2009. Web.17 April. 2024. <
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/scientific-revolution-industrial-revolution-16414>

"Scientific Revolution Industrial Revolution And", 10 December 2009, Accessed.17 April. 2024,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/scientific-revolution-industrial-revolution-16414

Related Documents

Two of the most important proponents were the French philosophes, Montesquieu and Jean Jacques Rousseau, whose great contributions to the Enlightenment lead to the development of liberal democracy characterized among modern societies at present. Montesquieu's discourse, entitled, "The Spirit of the Laws," provided objective and insightful propositions for reforms as societies change from being traditional to modern. According to him, the process towards social progress should be accompanied with material progress,

' His ground-breaking "Principia Mathematica" published in 1687 argued that the universe could be explained completely through the use of Mathematics without resorting to theology or the scriptures; that the universe behaved in an entirely rational and predictable way explainable by the laws of physics. Newton thus argued, and proved his arguments by observation and the use of mathematics, that the universe was 'mechanistic' and behaved like a vast machine

Many inquiries were made into the universe, from how it worked to its creation, as well as the construction of a workable calendar and an understanding of numerous illnesses. These collective areas of discussion fall under the term of natural philosophy, or philosophy of nature. Before modern science was developed and widely used, natural philosophy was the prominent method of gaining knowledge. So dominant and involved was natural philosophy

history of human civilization, the Scientific Revolution emerged during the 17th century, which happened right after the Renaissance Period. The Scientific Revolution is the period in history wherein scientific methods and results where arrived at using experimentation and the use of scientific instruments such as the telescope, microscope, and thermometer (Microsoft Encarta 2002). The Scientific Revolution is attributed to Galileo Galilei, who proposed that the universe and its elements

The pioneering spirit of colonialism and of man's ability to make advances in stages of life primarily assigned to nature -- such as the aforementioned innovations in electricity and magnetism -- were all championed by the Enlightenment and carried over to the field of industry. Additionally, the Enlightenment helped provide some of the political context which helped to create environments in which the scientific and cultural achievements of the Industrial

Revolutions The history of modern human civilization reflects the gradual evolution of thoughts, ideas, political reform, and technological progress. At various times, specific periods of change were important enough to have been recorded as revolutions. Some of the most significant of these revolutions contributed to human history and societal development individually as well as in conjunction with other simultaneous or nearly simultaneous changes. The Scientific Revolution was responsible for fundamental changes