Sociology Observational Analysis of Cultural Term Paper

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There is some suggestion on observation that many students of the dominant norm on campus do not engage in activities that might help Asian or other minority students feel as though they were members of a unique family or society with no racial or cultural boundaries. Rather, there is much in the way of stereotypical behaviors observed among the subtype population and the larger student body (Anderson & Taylor, 2006).

It seems however, many administrators, regardless of student behavior, are supportive of efforts by the subtype class to promote greater awareness among the dominant culture of cultural similarities. For example, in the environment explored, there are weekly meetings held as noted by flyers that suggest a "diversity" day be held bi-annually. On this day professors may interact with students and require subtypes and dominant typed students to interact with one another in focus group activities that require conversation, communication and mutual understanding.

If the campus were to increase its efforts at actually diversifying the student population on campus, and make efforts to recruit minority students from local, regional and national schools, the college would definitely demonstrate its inclination toward acceptance and diversity. This is not to say the subtype population does not have a duty to attend
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to however. On observation the subtype population seemed reserved and limited many of their communications to those that they new best. This typically meant other Asian students with whom they could identify with. It appears many consider themselves a victim of "cultural bias" as many students appear outnumbered in class, which may result in fears of discrimination or stereotyping (Andersen & Taylor, 2006; Shostak & McKay, (1971).

To help create change on campus, subcultures may want to offer the dominant culture opportunities to share their insights and cultural and ethical preferences. Likewise members of the dominant class can work to avoid establishing "normative" behaviors, and instead embrace the notion that all students are alike and have equal ability in learning. This may actually serve to encourage more students of the dominant class to enroll in more science, biology and engineering classes; likewise Asian students may feel encouraged to enroll in traditional classes including liberal arts, instead of focusing on the "norms" for their subtype, which on observation seem to include participating in many challenging classes, but few artistic or humanistic studies.

References

Andersen, M.L. & Taylor, H.F. (2006) General Sociology: Sociology in everyday life,

New York: Waveland Press, Inc.

Shostak, a.B. (1971), Sociology and student life: Toward a new campus selected readings for…

Sources Used in Documents:

References

Andersen, M.L. & Taylor, H.F. (2006) General Sociology: Sociology in everyday life,

New York: Waveland Press, Inc.

Shostak, a.B. (1971), Sociology and student life: Toward a new campus selected readings for introductory sociology. New York: David McKay.

Sociology

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