Aboriginal Essays (Examples)

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Australian Social History

Words: 2540 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43763601

Aboriginal Activism in Australia

The seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were the centuries of new exploration; the scientific discoveries had allowed Europeans to build better ships and navigation system and to explore the new worlds. The French, British and panish explorers were more successful in these endeavors. They not only found new lands but were able to exploit the small local population of Natives to control the land. North America is perhaps the most significant example of this. The British first went as explorers, then traders and in the end easily managed to control the lands, building their own colonies. It was the advanced technology of the Europeans that played a significant part in their control of the "New Worlds."

Australia in this respect is no exception. It is said that the Aboriginals came to this part of the earth some 50,000 years ago and they came from the neighboring islands…… [Read More]

Sources:

Reynolds, Henry. 1996. After Mabo, What About Aboriginal Sovereignty?, Australian Humanities Review, at http://www.lib.latrobe.edu.au/AHR/archive/Issue-April-1996/Reynolds.html

Paisley, Fiona. 1997. Race and Remembrance: Contesting Aboriginal Child Removal in the Inter-War Years, Australian Humanities Review, at http://www.lib.latrobe.edu.au/AHR/archive/Issue-November-1997/paisley.html

Stanton, Sue. 1999. Time for Truth: Speaking the Unspeakable - Genocide and Apartheid in the 'Lucky' Country., Australian Humanities Review, at http://www.lib.latrobe.edu.au/AHR/archive/Issue-July-1999/stanton.html

Miller, James. 1985. Koori - A Will to Win: The Heroic Resistance, Survival and Triumph of Black Australia. Angus & Robertson, Sydney.
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Ethical or Social Justice

Words: 3148 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8427475

Aboriginal people are the Indians who live in Canada. Over the years, they have been characterized by poor living conditions, low social status, poverty, discrimination, and social injustices. Government organizations should be on the front ensuring proper treatment and social justice for the Aboriginal people. ed Cross is an example of non-profit organization, which seeks to improve the status of the Aboriginal people, regardless of their social status and with equal treatment to all, as discussed in the paper.

Non-profit organization aims at providing services to the public, while profit organizations aim at profit maximization. Public interest comes first, for the non-profit organization, rather than their interests. The ed Cross is recognized as the non-profit organization, and it is chartered by the U.S. congress. It provides services worldwide, and the general population during times of disaster and the workforce is predominantly volunteers.

ed Cross society

Nonprofit organizations have to be…… [Read More]

References

Journal of Education Controversy:. (1997). The Give Away Spirit.

Australia, N.L. (1992). Australian Public Affairs Information Service. Australia: National Library of Australia.

Ciconte, B.J. (2011). Fundraising Basics: A Complete Guide. Atlanta: Jonnes and Bartlett Learning.

Crooks, C.T. (2007). Engaging and Empowering Aboriginal Youth. Chicago: Trafford Publishing.
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Ritual Knowledge Is Transmitted in

Words: 1973 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44293621

Furthermore, under most circumstances, these variations in Muslim belief do not have a negative impact on how Muslims interact; instead, they manage to live peacefully side-by-side in most settings. This may have to do with the idea that all Muslims believe that the Quran (Qur'an, Koran) is the holy text for Muslims. They believe that the Quran reflects the word of God. "For Muslims, the text of the Koran is entirely the work and word of God. It is possible for a Muslim to hold that the Koran uses symbolic language and is describing the essence of things, not their technical form, but it is difficult to hold that the Koran reflects the views of our more distant ancestors" (Sedgewick 2006, p. 40).

Mohammed plays a central role in Islam. He is the most important prophet and many facets of modern day Islam are based, not simply on the Quran,…… [Read More]

References

Hassan, R 2008, Exploring Islamic consciousness, Inside Muslim minds, Melbourne University

Press, Carlton, Vic, pp. 24-61.

Jupp, J 2009, Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islanders in the Encyclopedia of religion in Australia, Cambridge University Press, Port Melbourne, pp.69-118.

McBrien, R 1982, the nature and use of power in the church, Proceedings of the annual convention, 37, CTSA Editorial Offices, Yonkers, NY, pp.38-49.
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Edition of the Globe and

Words: 2861 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54692015

We have seen in the past how such agreements are put aside by governments, especially in the United States, in those instances where the natural resources become the focus of business.

However, the agreement does return to the aboriginals the hope that they might create for themselves an economy that sustain them and it provides an opportunity for them to recreate themselves in a modern world, but to practice life in a way that is compatible with their own traditions. The challenges they face socially and economically are large and only time will tell if they are as overwhelming for a people who have lost much of what their ancestors had as they are large.

The article does not say whether or not the financial package is one that is lump sum or disbursed over a period of years, and that would make a difference as to what might be…… [Read More]

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Torres Strait Islanders Torres Island

Words: 2927 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45682052

However, it is not culturally sensitive and says nothing about the desire to work with in cultural norms and traditions.

This article does not attempt to portray the aboriginal people in any particular way. It attempts to remain neutral in its portrayal of the Torres Strait Islanders. This article recognizes that Islanders in rural areas have different needs than those living in urban areas. The government will provide funding for implementing this plan. It is an excellent plan, but could be made better by the inclusion of cultural sensitivity within the programs that it outlines. The plan promises to give aboriginals better access to public programs. This suggests that access is inadequate at the current time.

4. Culture

acisimnoway (2008). Australian Communities: Torres Strait Islander People. etrieved February 28, 2008 at http://www.racismnoway.com.au/classroom/factsheets/53.html.

This article explains the language and cultural traits of the Islander, both on and off the island. It…… [Read More]

References

Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2006). The 2004-05 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (NATSIHS). Retrieved February 27, 2008 at http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS//PrimaryMainFeatures/4715.0?OpenDocument.

Ban, P., Mam, S., Elu, M., Trevallion, I. & Reid, a. (1993). Torres Strait Islander family life. Family Matters. No.35 August 1993, pp.16-21. Retrieved February 28, 2008 at http://www.aifs.gov.au/institute/pubs/fm1/fm35pb.html.

Batrouney, T. & Soriano, G. (2001). Parenting Torres. Family Matters. No. 21. Winter 2001.

Commonwealth of Australia (2007). National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 2003-2013. Department of Health and Aging. Publication Number: P3-2106., Retrieved February 27, 2008 at http://www.health.gov.au/internet/wcms/publishing.nsf/Content/6CA5DC4BF04D8F6ACA25735300807403/$File/nsfatsihimp2.pdf.
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Abo Fem Towards Hearing and

Words: 1420 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77718654



It is in this way that fiction from female aboriginal Canadian writers both empowers the authors and their people and brings to light better understandings of what native Canadians have faced and must continue to face. One native scholar on the subject has been quoted as saying, "our task…is two fold. To examine the past and culturally affirm toward a new future" (Armstrong, in Acoose 227). It is not simply a rumination on past injuries that this literature provides, but a way of analyzing the past that allows for forward movement.

It is also impossible to consider the literature produced by members of this community as pure fictions, but rather some historical knowledge is necessary to fully appreciate the intricacies and events of stories like in Search of April Raintree. The largely negative nature of the events of the novel and the rapidity with which they take place is easily…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Acoose, J. "The Problem of 'Searching' for April Raintree." In Search of April Raintree. Winnipeg: Penguis Publishers, 1999.

Groening, Laura Smyth. Listening to Old Women Speak: Natives and alterNatives in Canadian Literature. Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2004.

Mosionier, Beatrice Culleton. In Search of April Raintree. Winnipeg: Penguis Publishers, 1999.

Perreault, Jeanne. "In Search of Cheryl Raintree, and Her Mother." In Search of April Raintree. Winnipeg: Penguis Publishers, 1999.
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Residential Schools in Canada for the Aborigines

Words: 989 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60780150

Aboriginal Education in Canada

GOVERNMENT ROLE IN ABORIGINAL EDUCATION IN CANADA

What do you believe was the goal of the Canadian government and church in planning and running residential schools? Why?

Schooling is considered one of the key aspects that bring about change in any society. Even before the establishment of the residential schools, schooling was something that was taking place in the country of Canada. As the only process that can change the structure and capacity of the human intellect and exposure, schooling is vital in Canada. Initially, the indigenous Canada was facing myriad challenges in accessing education. Schooling became a weapon that was also used by the Christian movement in a bid to reinforce the prospects of reaching out to many people with the gospel of Christianity. As with the Canadian indigenous people, much was needed to reinforce the spread of this Christianity that came with schooling (Regan,…… [Read More]

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Aborigines Society As Every Human Society Has

Words: 2082 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6439936

Aborigines Society:

As every human society has ways of governing itself, Australian government started thousands of years ago following the settlement of the Aboriginal people in the continent. Unlike the other European settlers, Aboriginal people had very different ways of organizing and governing themselves. Despite of the various Aboriginal cultures in the throughout Australia, there are similar features shared among most Aboriginal cultures. Some of the common features of the Aboriginal societies revolve around family organization, trade, travel, home, art, and education. The Aboriginal people have occupied Australia for approximately 40,000 years even though very little is known regarding them for this duration of time. However, the Aboriginal people have experienced major changes in their culture, identity, and society since 1788 due to various factors.

History and Culture of the Aboriginal People:

Aboriginal people, identity, culture, and society has been characterized by two different aspects i.e. one showing great continuities…… [Read More]

References:

Albrecht, P.G.E. (2012, February 3). Who is An Aborigine? Retrieved August 3, 2012, from http://www.quadrant.org.au/blogs/bennelong-papers/2012/02/who-is-an-aborigine/page:printable

"Aboriginal Society." (n.d.). Skwirk.com.au -- Interactive Schooling. Retrieved August 3, 2012,

from  http://www.skwirk.com/p-c_s-1_u-97_t-236_c-792/aboriginal-society/nsw/aboriginal-society/australian-democracy/australia-before-1788 

"Aboriginal Societies: The Experience of Contact." (n.d.). Australian Law Reform Commission.
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Pearl Gibbs Pearl Mary Gambanyi Gibbs 1901-1983

Words: 2326 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84332682

Pearl Gibbs

Pearl Mary (Gambanyi) Gibbs (1901-1983) was one of the major political activists supporting Aboriginal rights in Australia from the 1920s all the way to the 1970s. The highlights of her work include organizing the key -- pickers strike in 1933, being involved in organizing the Day of Mourning in 1938, speaking for the Committee for Aboriginal Citizen ights, calling for Aboriginal representation on the New South Wales board, being the organizing secretary for the new Melbourne-based Council for Aboriginal ights, establishing the Australian Aboriginal Fellowship in 1956, being the first and only female member of the NSW Aboriginal Welfare Board in 1954, and establishing the Australian Aboriginal Fellowship in 1956 (Gilbert, 1983; Goodall, 1983; Goodall, 1988; Horner, 1983). This list of accomplishments is just a scratch on the surface of the life of this amazing political activist and leader. Her activism for the rights of Indigenous peoples was…… [Read More]

References

Attwood, B. (2003). Rights for Aborigines. Sydney: Allen and Unwin.

Attwood, B. & Magowan, F. (2001).Telling stories: Indigenous history and memory in Australia and New Zealand. Sydney: Allen and Unwin.

Celermajer, D. (April 22, 2005). The stolen generation: Aboriginal children In Australia human rights dialogue: "Cultural rights." In Carnegie Council for Ethics and International Affairs. Retrieved November 3, 2012, from http://www.carnegiecouncil.org/publications/archive/dialogue/2_12/section_1/514

Commonwealth of Australia (2012). Recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the Constitution: Report of the Expert Panel. Retrieved November 3, 2012 from http://www.youmeunity.org.au/uploads/assets/html-report/index.html.
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Ideal Psychotherapy for Childhood Abuse in Adults

Words: 2724 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79564366

Social Work Practice Within Aboriginal

Building attached case study Lisa, describe discuss social work practice approach aboriginal innovative practice modalities a cultural context. This assignment refining approach practice integrating theories practices learned required readings.

ABOIGINAL AND INNOVATIVE SOCIAL WOK PACTICE APPOACH

Concepts in Social Work Practice within Aboriginal and Cultural Framework

In trying to attend to a client's challenges in psychology, it is imperative to provide an environment that is sufficiently safe where a client can talk and explore their problems (Brave Heart, 2004). This measure is adequate for many clients but not sufficient for all especially so when it comes to cases involving aboriginal persons. For the aboriginal clients, an understanding of adaptation difficulties and the inter-generation aspects is necessary to provide a wholesome resolution to the challenges at hand. This paper presents a discussion on the ideal approach in social work for the case of Lisa, who had…… [Read More]

References

Brave Heart, M.Y.H. (2004). The historical trauma response among Natives and its relationship to substance abuse: A Lakota illustration. In E. Nebelkopf, & M. Phillips (Eds.), Healing and mental health for Native Americans: Speaking in red. Lanham, MD: AltaMira Press.

Briere, J. (2002). Treating adult survivors of severe childhood abuse and neglect: Further development of an integrative model. In J.E.B. Myers, L. Berliner, J. Briere, C.T. Hendrix, T. Reid, & C. Jenny (Eds.). The APSAC handbook on child maltreatment, 2nd Edition. . Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.

Burns, D. (1999). The feeling good handbook. United Kingdom: Penguin Group.

Burton, L., Westen, D., & Kowalski, R.M. (2012). Psychology. Milton, Qld. Australia: John Wiley and Sons.
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Cree's Opposition to the James

Words: 2991 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82822455

In fact, environmentalists were often dismissed during that time period. Moreover, environmental regulation was seen as an area of concern for each individual country, so that other countries would rarely, if ever, provide international pressure for environmental issues. However, the growing body of scientific literature about the environment changed the game between the 1970s and the 1980s/1990s. For example, when the James Bay Project was first conceived, it was considered a very green source of electricity because it lacked emissions and other hallmarks of pollution. The reality, however, is that the project resulted in incredible environmental damage:

It has been shown that environmental impacts of the first phase include: methyl mercury contamination of water in reservoirs and downstream rivers and mercury accumulation in fish; reversal of the natural seasonal flow pattern of rivers; conversion of La Grande estuary from a saltwater environment to a freshwater one because of regulated peak…… [Read More]

References

Bethune, D.N. (1997). Environmental Damage and Aboriginal Health. Retrieved February 21,

2010 from NIICHRO

Website: http://www.niichro.com/Environ/Enviro4.html#anchor378148

Coffee, H. (1992). James Bay Hydroelectric Project Hits a Dam. Retrieved February 21, 2010
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Indigenous Studies Colonization Can Negatively

Words: 1334 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18600663

In addition the Europeans that colonized Australia believed that their culture was superior and the aboriginal culture would somehow disappear in a short period of time. hen this did not occur drastic steps were taken to assimilate indigenous people. These steps included taking aboriginal children away from their families to be raised in white society.

Certainly this type of violent and reckless interaction led to great fear and panic because a way of life that had existed for thousands of years began to vanish. Such stressors were passed down from generation to generation. Stress is a dangerous emotion because it can cripple to immune system and also cause people not to have the will to properly take care of their health.

Government policy and exclusion

According to McCalman et al. (2005) the types of government policies adapted as a result o colonialism has also contributed to poor health amongst indigenous…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aboriginal health issues. http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/aboriginal_health_issues-open

Anderson, I.,&Whyte, D. (2006). Australian Federalism and Aboriginal Health. Australian Aboriginal Studies, 2, 5-16.

McCalman, J., Morley, R., & Mishra, G. (2008). A health transition: Birth weights, households and survival in an Australian working class population sample born 1857 -- 1900. Social Science & Medicine, 66, 1070-1083.

McCalman J., Smith L., Anderson I., Morley R., Mishra G. (2009) Colonialism and the health transition: Aboriginal Australians and poor whites compared, Victoria, 1850 -- 1985. History of the Family 14-253 -- 265
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Proposal to Philanthropists

Words: 1947 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15180946

edit of Smithers proposal

Public description of your project?

The Aboriginal Healing Foundation was thus established in 1998, originally with an eleven-year mandate scheduled to expire on March 31, 2009. This time frame reflected the original establishment of the foundation as part of a governmental policy of restitution for past abuse and its intergenerational effects: it was supposed that the conditions and the psychological welfare of the affected portion of the population could be substantially ameliorated within that specific time frame, but also reflected a sense that the original population for whom the funds represented a form of reparation were already dying. Unfortunately, problems like alcoholism tend to linger on well beyond the initial policies of abuse and neglect -- for this was official government policy, for which the Aboriginal community would receive official federal redress -- and it is for this reason we turn to the Smithers Foundation: the…… [Read More]

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Canadian Labour in The Honest

Words: 1489 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72652970

For the aboriginal population of British Columbia, industrialization and capitalism threatened and later undermined traditional ways of life. Trading was soon replaced by wage labour systems. Shifting from barter to a labour market unraveled the essential social institutions of traditional aboriginal society. Potlatches once served as a "bulwark which enabled the aboriginal people to resist acculturation," (p. 252). Lutz, unlike Kealey or DeLottinville, examines the effects of colonialism on industrialization. Colonial power structures legitimized the social hierarchies that form the backbone of capitalist infrastructure.

The ways capitalism transformed traditional aboriginal society from being barter-based to being wage labour-based closely resemble the ways capitalism transformed traditional European skilled labour culture. As Kealey points out, the European artisan model of labour persisted until the Industrial evolution. Skilled labourers like coopers and smiths once apprenticed their work, entering into careers that offered a high degree of control over the means of production and…… [Read More]

References

DeLottinville, P. "Joe Beef of Montreal: Working-Class Culture and the Tavern, 1869-1889." In Canadian Working Class History: Selected Readings, pp. 190-214.

Kealey, G.S. "The Honest Workingman and Workers' Control: The experience of Toronto Skilled Workers, 1860-1892." In Canadian Working Class History: Selected Readings, pp. 112-142.

Lutz, J. "After the Fur Trade: The Aboriginal Labouring Class of British Columbia 1849-1890" in Canadian Working Class History: Selected Readings, pp. 235-259.
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Female Characters Things Fall Apart

Words: 1494 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76996058

"ould you like a white woman ongee?" Jimmie asked. "Don't seem ter make their cow-cockies happy, having white woman for 'is wife. hy else he come after black girls? Must be sum'pin to white women we ain't been told" (p. 11). The implication drawn from ongee is that aboriginal females are sexier than white women, but Jimmie is sexually attracted to the white woman.

On page 12 ongee describes an aboriginal woman who "Yawns for men and not with her mouth. She weeps for men and not with her eyes. She drinks men down, she is cave for men," he said, laughing. In Caledonian that Saturday night Jimmie "suddenly" was "pouring himself without joy into one of the women" while laying in the long grass so police wouldn't see them. The next time readers confront an image of an aboriginal females (p. 20) Jimmie "lay down with a scrawny gin…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. New York: Anchor Books, 1994.

Hickling-Hudson, Anne. "White construction of black identity in Australian films about

Aborigines. Literature Film Quarterly 18.4 (1990): 263-275.

Keneally, Thomas. The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith. New York: The Viking Press, 1972.
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Margaret Preston Aim to Modernise

Words: 1907 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88134910

He expeimentation with new techniques and the fact that she was unafaid to ty new things with he at helped he populaity immensely. Peston's elationships to famous atists and the pomotion of he wok in aea magazines wee also unique and offeed a lage vieweship audience.

Not eveyone enjoys looking at Peston's wok, but she had definitely held a stong pesence in Austalian society thoughout he lifetime, as well as since he death. Peston definitely new exactly what she wanted to do thoughout he life and wasn't afaid to implement unusual and new techniques into he wok. He studies of both Aboiginal at and Japanese at seems to have influenced much of the at she poduced.

He use of publicity sets Peston apat fom othe atists duing that time peiod. As a woman atist who was making he way independently finally, Peston appealed to women thoughout Austalia by poducing he…… [Read More]

references to Aboriginal art . Australia: Art Library.

McPhee, J.A. (1982). Australian decorative arts in the Australian National Gallery . Australia: Australian National Gallery.

Nice, R. The Australian scarf / Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales. New South Wales: Greenway Gallery.

Butel, E.R. (1986). Margaret Preston: the art of constant rearrangement . New South Wales: in association with the Art Gallery of New South Wales.

The art of Margaret Preston, Margaret, 1875-1963 . (1980). Adelaide: Art Gallery Board of South Australia.
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Video Crossing the Line the

Words: 1599 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96395088

In some countries, bed numbers began to drop before the introduction of the drugs. In others, bed numbers actually increased despite this introduction. The drugs also have been used on a variety of populations that were not deemed to be mentally ill (such as people with learning difficulties and older people). The drugs were only relevant in giving psychiatric staff more confidence in dealing with community-based patients; they do not explain the policy of deinstitutionalization. At the end of the twentieth century deinstitutionalization has become a dominant mental health policy goal in most Western democracies (Sax, 1984).

Conclusion

However, this formal goal has become clouded by evidence that the gradual reduction of large institutions has been replaced by a scattering of smaller ones 'in the community' (Roe, 1976). Also, most countries still have legal statutes to coercively remove madness from community set- tings. The extent of this continued coercive control…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gale, F. 2007 A changing Aboriginal population. In F. Gale and G. Lawton (eds), Settlement and Encounter: Geographical studies presented to Sir Grenfell Price, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 65-88.

Smith, L. 2006 The Aboriginal Population, The Australian National University Press, Canberra.

CDHHS 2004, The National Aboriginal Health Strategy: an evaluation, Commonwealth Department of Health and Human Services, Canberra.

Roe, M 1976, 'The establishment of the Australian Department of Health: its background and significance', Australian Historical Studies 17(67):176-92.
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Controversial Than a Person Could Ever Imagine

Words: 2008 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99532861

controversial than a person could ever imagine. Historical interpretations must be questioned so that faulty historical thinking can be identified. One of the most complicated aspects in historical interpretations is that they are precisely that -- interpretations. This means that people cannot help but look back at history through the lens of today's history; this affects interpretation and today's interpretation will be different than yesterday or tomorrow's interpretation because it will be a completely different time. Historians have a very difficult job because they must be able to take in information and interpret it in responsible ways. Historians need the humility to listen and trust others and the courage to interpret (Cathcart 1995, p. 16)

In studying the past, historians use primary and secondary sources as well as oral history. A primary source is considered to be something that is created by a person who witnessed an event. Examples of…… [Read More]

References:

Attwood, B. 1996. 'Teaching Historiography.' Australian Historical Association Bulletin, No.

82, pp. 43-46.

Cathcart, M. 1985. 'Symposium: Why History?' Australian Book Review, pp. 16-18.

Reynolds, H. 1984. 'The Breaking of the Great Australian Silence: Aborigines in Australian
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Educational Equality in Canada Canada's

Words: 2862 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64920592

436-437). In other words, official commitment to multiculturalism is just a smoke screen for many Canadian officials who believe that the Euro-Canadian way of doing things is the norm.

The limits of multiculturalism in practice are also visible in the treatment of Canadian citizens and immigrants who have dark skin color. According to Kelly (1998), African Canadians are routinely "racialized" and "othered" (that is, they are put outside of the dominant group). The manner in which African Canadians are unable to become fully-fledged Canadians even if they are born in Canada was succinctly explained by Marlene Nourbese Philip, an African Canadian essayist: "Being born elsewhere, having been fashioned in a different culture, some of us may always feel 'othered,' but then there are those -- our children, nephews, nieces, grandchildren -- born here, who are as Canadian as snow and ice, and yet, merely because of their darker skins, are…… [Read More]

References

Fieras. A & Elliot. J (2010a) Chapter 10, Multiculturalism in Canada: "Living together with differences." In Unequal relations: An introduction to race, ethnic, and Aboriginal dynamics in Canada (6th ed) (p283-308).

Fieras. A & Elliot. J (2010b) Chapter 11, "Institutional Inclusiveness: Putting Multiculturalism to work." In Unequal relations: An introduction to race, ethnic, and Aboriginal dynamics in Canada (6th ed) (p309-343; 362-374).

Kelly, J. (1998) Under the Gaze: Learning to be Black in White Society. Fernwood publishing, Blackpoint Nova Scotia.

Millar. J. (1996a) Chapter 13, "Our greatest need today is proper education": Winding down the system. In Shingwauk's vision: A history of Native residential schools (p377-405; 526-535) Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
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Communication Diversity This Is the

Words: 1935 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83120658



17. Johann calls you and says that Billy smells and he needs a shower. If you don't move Billy to another ward, Johann will sign himself out. Explain in details what you would do to resolve this cross cultural situation.

I would tell Johann that we are doing all we can to ensure Billy's hygiene and that if his body odor continued to bother Johann that we can move him to another room or ward in the hospital.

18. There seems to be a language and cultural barrier that's blocking effective communication occurring between these two gentlemen. Considering they are both your clients, what strategies would you put in place to improve this situation?

The best way to remedy the situation would be to introduce the two patients to each other. A handshake, some eye contact, and small personal interactions can go a long way toward eliminating prejudices and stereotypes…… [Read More]

References

Australian Indigenous HealthInfo.net (2008). Retrieved Feb 29, 2008 at  http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/ 

Department of Education and Training (2005). "Racism No Way." Retrieved Feb 29, 2008 at http://www.racismnoway.com.au/library/cultural/

Indigenous Peoples of Australia: Health." Retrieved Feb 29, 2008 at http://www.ldb.org/oz_h.htm
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Mabo Case a Lesson in History The

Words: 2155 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31201172

Mabo Case

A Lesson in History:

The Mabo Case and Its Legacy

The Mabo Case, or Mabo v. Queensland, as the case is formally known, refers to a judgment given by the High Court on June 3, 1992. This judgment ruled that the land title of Indigenous Peoples (i.e. The Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders) would be recognized as common law by Australia. This meant that the doctrine of terra nullis, or land belonging to nobody, was annulled and the indigenous people in question could possess and occupy the land as they wished, and according to their own customs.

Despite this favorable and internationally applauded outcome, however, the reality has not been as uncomplicated. The fact of the matter is that though the Mabo case was a revolution in Australian law and brought the country in line with other remaining common law countries, such as he United States, Canada and…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

1. Amankwah, H.A. (1994). Mabo and international law. Race and Class (35:57). Retrieved Janaury 12, 2012.

2. Howitt, R. (2006). Scales of Coexistence: Tackling the Tension between the Legal and Cultural Landscapes in Post-Mabo Australia. Macquarie Law Journal (6). Retrieved January 12, 2012.

3. No Author. (2012). Mabo v. Queensland. Convict Creations. Retrieved January 12, from .

4. Pelczynski, S. (2012). The High Court Recognition of Native Title - The Mabo Judgment and Its Implications. Action for Aboriginal Rights. Retrieved January 12, from .
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Structural Inequality & Diversity Root

Words: 5575 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73975506

" (Dafler, 2005) Dafler relates that for more than thirty years children who were 'half-caste' "were forcibly removed from their families, often grabbed straight from their mother's arms, and transported directly to government and church missions." (Dafler, 2005) This process was termed to be one of assimilation' or 'absorption' towards the end of breeding out of Aboriginal blood in the population. At the time all of this was occurring Dafler relates that: "Many white Australians were convinced that any such hardship was better than the alternative of growing up as a member of an 'inferior' race and culture." (2005) it is plainly stated in a government document thus:

The destiny of the natives of Aboriginal origin, but not of the full blood, lies in their ultimate absorption by the people of the Commonwealth, and [the commission] therefore recommends that all efforts be directed towards this end." (eresford and Omaji, Our…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Dafler, Jeffrey (2005) Social Darwinism and the Language of Racial Oppression: Australia's Stolen Generations ETC.: A Review of General Semantics, Vol. 62, 2005.

Erich Fromm Foreword to a.S. Neill SummerHill (New York, 1960).

Hawkins, Social Darwinism; Shibutani, Tamotsu and Kwan, Kian M. Ethnic Stratification: A Comparative Approach. New York: The Macmillan Company (1965).

Jacques Ellul, the Technological Society (New York, 1967), 436.
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Traditional Se Asian Bamboo Flutes

Words: 28549 Length: 95 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64807002

The organization of the five chapters in the study includes:

Chapter I: Chapter I includes the design of the study, the study's research problem and three research questions, study objectives, the scope and limitations of the study, significance of the study of DNA, research methodology and philosophy of the studies from different related literature.

Chapter II: During Chapter II, the researcher presents information to address the first research question; presented in the introduction for the thesis: What evidence points to the origin of flutes in SEA? During Chapter II, the researcher relates the kinds of flute in SEA that have been passed on from one generation to the next and their physical structure hich attributes scale, sound, expressions, melody, and rhythm. In Chapter II, the researcher also discusses the studies on ethnic groups of SEA and their flutes, and additionally notes studies on history of geology and aboriginals' migration map…… [Read More]

works cited:

Purple highlight means reference from his thesis, chapters 1-5

Blue highlight means reference from his raw research that was sent (17 files)

Yellow highlight means that writer could not find reference; one of the 17 files received

Gray highlight means writer found this source
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Environmental Assessment

Words: 2079 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39135465

Environmental Assessing Canada

More and more countries have gotten actively involved in protecting the environment and Canada makes no exception from the rule, taking into account that it installed a series of programs meant to assist nature and discourage individuals or groups that might be inclined to damage it. The Canadian Environmental Act is probably one of the most significant steps that the country has taken with the purpose of making it mandatory for people and communities to conduct environmental assessments for diverse projects that they propose. Canadians have acknowledged the fact that some actions might have negative effects on the environment and thus developed environmental assessments meant to remove or diminish a project's capacity to harm to environment.

The 1868 Fisheries Act is probably one of the first significant environmental assessment programs that the government installed with the purpose of preventing individuals from harming the environment as a result…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, "Canada Enter the Nuclear Age: A Technical History of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited," (McGill-Queens, 1997)

"Fisheries Act," Retrieved November 11, 2012, from the Fisheries and Oceans Canada Website: http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/habitat/role/141/1415/14151-eng.htm

"Canadian Environmental Assessment Act," Retrieved November 11, 2012, from the Canadian Environmental Law Association Website:  http://www.cela.ca/taxonomy/term/212 

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