Adlerian Theory Essays (Examples)

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Margarita Adlerian the Margarita Case Study An

Words: 1581 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14399756

Margarita Adlerian

The Margarita Case Study: An Application of Adlerian Theory and Therapeutic Techniques

Margarita is a twenty-six-year-old Puerto ican woman who has lived in the United States since she was a teenager and is married to a thirty-six-year-old African-American male. The couple has two children, a three-year-old boy and a one-year-old girl, and Margarita has also recently been accepted into law school following earning her MBA. Both members of the couple hold prominent positions in their community. ecently, Margarita has been prone to bouts of depression and fits of inexplicable rage against her husband, including one incident in which she threatened her husband with a knife. No actual violence has occurred, according to Margarita, and she herself cannot explain why she has these outbursts against her husband -- she only knows that she feels a sense of relief after they occur.

The relationship between Margarita and her husband is…… [Read More]

References

Adler Graduate School. (2011). The theory and application of Adlerian psychology. Accessed 13 March 2011. http://www.alfredadler.edu/overview/adlerian.htm

Corey, G. (2009). Theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy. New York: Thomson Brooks/Cole.

Eischens, A. (1998). The dilemma of the only child. Accessed 13 March 2011.  http://www.personalityresearch.org/papers/eischens2.html 

Hazan, Y. (2001). About the psychotherapy of Adler. Accessed 13 March 2011.  http://www.centroadleriano.org/publicaciones/ABOUT%20THE%20PSYCHOTHERAPY%20OF%20ADLER.pdf
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Psychoanalytic and Adlerian Therapies Analysis

Words: 1287 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53227913

It assumes a person is in control of their own fate and not a victim to it. Starting at an early age, a unique style of life is created by the person and that life-style stays relatively constant throughout the remainder of life. Working toward success, connectedness with others, and contributions to society are considered hallmarks of mental health, as well as being motivated by goals, dealing with the tasks faced in life, and social interest. Birth order is considered important in understanding a person's current personality, yet the therapy is future-minded, rather than retrospective. (Psyweb Pro, 2006)

In Adlerian therapy, the therapist will gather as much family history as possible. This data will be used to help set goals for the client and to get an idea of the clients' past performance. This will help ascertain whether the goal is too low or high, and if the client has…… [Read More]

References

Adlerian Psychology, Psyweb.com 2006, http://psyweb.com/Mdisord/MdisordADV/AdvPsych.jsp (Retrieved August 20, 2006)

Corey, Gerald (1991) Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy

Carlson, Neil R. (1995) Foundations of Physiological Psychology

CTA: Cognitive Therapy Associates, http://www.cognitive-therapy-associates.com/therapy/adlerian-therapy.php
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Self-Confidence Theory Adler Influence According

Words: 1954 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27742129

Within months after Winfrey took over, the show went from last place in the ratings to overtaking Donahue as the highest rated talk show in Chicago. It was renamed the Oprah Winfrey Show. And the rest is history.

Considering her past, childhood and experiences and positive outlook in life, she didn't let anything deter her from reaching her goal and becoming successful. In fact, she uses them to inspire and reach out to others.

Conclusion

Self-confidence is an attitude which allows individuals to have positive yet realistic views of themselves and their situations. Self-confident people trust their own abilities, have a general sense of control in their lives, and believe that, within reason, they will be able to do what they wish, plan, and expect.

Surprisingly, lack of self-confidence is not necessarily related to lack of ability. Instead it is often the result of focusing too much on the unrealistic…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Self-Confidence. Retrieved April 27, 2007 from http://www.couns.uiuc.edu/New_Site/defaultwinter.html

Dr. C. George Boeree. (2006). B.F. Skinner, Personality Theories. Retrieved May 5, 2007 from  http://webspace.ship.edu/cgboer/skinner.html 

Oprah Winfrey. (2007). Retrieved May 5, 2007 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oprah_Winfrey

Alfred Adler, Core of Personality. Retrieved April 26, 2007 from http://psych.eiu.edu/spencer/Adler.html
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William Glasser Developed His Theory of Reality

Words: 888 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14924673

William Glasser developed his theory of eality Therapy in the early 1960s. He is best known for his book eality Therapy: A New Approach to Psychiatry (1965), and for founding the Institute for eality Therapy, which is now called The William Glasser Institute. He has also developed supplements to reality therapy in the form of choice theory and control theory, which are all now aligned under the heading "new reality therapy" (Corey, 2009, p. 315).

eality Therapy has its roots in Adlerian Therapy. Both of these models place a strong focus on the interactions of people with others, and the development of relationships. While these theories overlap in terms of the interaction/relationship focus, they also complement each other in the sense that Alderian therapy centers mostly on how the client interprets events, whereas eality Therapy is more concerned with how the client attempts to control events (Corey, 2009).

At its…… [Read More]

References

Corey, G. (2009). Theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy (8th ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson Brooks / Cole.

Glasser W. (1965). Reality therapy: A new approach to psychiatry. New York: Perennial / Harper & Row.

Murdock, N.L. (2004) Theories of counseling and psychotherapy: A case approach, University of Missouri-Kansas City
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Applying Theory to a Practice Problem

Words: 928 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47724863

Chronic Sorrow

Chronic illness is a concept that was brought to the fore over 40 years ago by Olshansky. The term is used to describe the grief and sadness experience that parents of children with disabilities go through for a lifetime. The intensity of this experience varies from person to person, family member to family member and situation to situation. Olshansky chose to view the phenomenon as a normal and continuous response as opposed to a pathological condition. Experts were encouraged to note the occurrence of the condition when dealing with a parent or a caregiver of a child with disability. They are encouraged to provide support the expressions and feelings of such parents (Peterson & Bredow, 2013, pp. 96-97).

The occurrence of chronic sorrow syndrome was validated by initial research carried out in the 80s. esearchers such as Burke et al. pointed out that the continuous nature of losing…… [Read More]

References

Ahlstrom, G. I. (2007). Experiencing Loss and Chronic Sorrow in Persons with Severe Chronic Illness. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 16(3A), 76-83.  https://www.researchgate.net/publication/6313596_Experiencing_loss_and_chronic_sorrow_in_persons_with_severe_chronic_illness 

Borkon, D. A. (2008). Is Chronic Sorrow Present in Maternal Caregivers of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disordered Children? Adlerian Counselling and Psychotherapy.  http://alfredadler.edu/sites/default/files/Borkon%20MP%202009.pdf 

Isaksson, A-K. (2007). Chronic Sorrow and Quality of Life in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis. Orebro Studies in Caring Sciences 12.  http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:137348/FULLTEXT01.pdf&sa=U&ei=mRpOU-_jNoHdtAaX_IHADQ&ved=0CEIQFjAH&usg=AFQjCNEOnPREJrlQluN534bq57kX56S8oQ 

Monsson, Y. (2010). The Effects of Hope on Mental Health and Chronic Sorrow in Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.  https://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/bitstream/handle/1808/6981/Monsson_ku_0099D_10980_DATA_1.pdf?sequence=1
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Online Human Services Class People Counseling Career

Words: 2459 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26473822

online Human Services class people counseling career. You book paper, therefor I've downloaded Professor's lesson overviews. Please contact . The book "Effective Helping: Interviewing Counseling Techniques" Seveneth Edition By, Barbara F.

Application of helping theories

Creating efficiency and effectiveness in the counseling career is a challenge for every counselor since they are required to apply different theories of helping which emphasize on the behavior, attitude, techniques and methods that are used by the counselor. With each theory having its own set of concepts and ideas, they create a daunting task for the counselor who is required to combine these to devise a technique for counseling the client that varies on the basis of the client's personal counseling needs and bears a cultural awareness that presents effective counseling for the patient Okun & Kantrowitz, 2008.

The patient chosen in this case is one that is suffering from inferiority complex. This means…… [Read More]

References

Corey, G. (2009). Theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Mosak, H., & Maniacci, M. (1999). The analytic~behavioral~cognitve psychology of alfred adler New York, NY: Brunner-Routledge.

Okun, B.F., & Kantrowitz, R.E. (2008). Effective Helping: Interviewing and Counseling Techniques. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.
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Adler In-Depth Research Regarding a

Words: 2410 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15805005

147).

Therefore, the therapist and counselor should be aware of the subjective view or interpretation of reality of the patient. This has important implications in many fields; for example, in education. Using Adler's theory, "…apparent under-achievement in school is to be understood more in terms of the student subjective interpretations than in terms of standardized test results" (Dunn, 1971, p. 8). This also relates to Adler's emphasis on the uniqueness of the individual. For example he states that, "I have found that each individual has a different meaning of, and attitude toward, what constitutes success. Therefore, a human being cannot be typified or classified ( Adler, 1964, p. 68). This is a crucial aspect of his theoretical stance and the refusal to categorize human beings leads to an open-ended view of personality.

Holism is a concept that has a particularly significant place in the overall meaning of Adlerian theory. This…… [Read More]

References

Adler a. ( 1964) Superiority and social interest: A Collection of Later Writings. New York: Basic Books.

Dunn, a. (1971) an Introduction to Adlerian Psychology for the School Counselor.

Annual Convention of the Canadian Guidance and Counseling Association, Toronto, Canada.

Ewen Robert B. An Introduction to Theories of Personality. 5th ed. Mahwah, NJ:
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Alcohol Drinking Among Young Jews

Words: 23454 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67540801

Paenting Style Influence on Excess Alcohol Intake Among Jewish Youth

Clinical Psychology

The health hazads that ae associated with adolescent alcohol use ae well documented, and thee is gowing ecognition among policymakes and clinicians alike that moe needs to be done to addess this public health theat. The pupose of this study was to examine the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish college students in the United States. The study daws on attachment theoy, social leaning theoy, and a paenting style model as the main theoetical famewoks to evaluate the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish adolescents to develop infomed answes to the study's thee guiding eseach questions concening the elationship between peceived paenting style and excess alcohol use of male, Jewish, college students aged 18-26 yeas, the elationship between academic achievement and the alcohol use fequency of male Jewish…… [Read More]

references to gender.

Scoring: The PAQ is scored easily by summing the individual items to comprise the subscale scores. Scores on each subscale range from 10 to 50.

Author: Dr. John R. Buri, Department of Psychology, University of St. Thomas, 2115

Summit Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55105.

Source: Buri, J.R. (1991). Parental Authority Questionnaire, Journal of Personality and Social Assessment, 57, 110-119
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Alcohol Drinking Among Young Jews

Words: 23424 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99740327

Paenting Style Influence on Excess Alcohol Intake Among Jewish Youth

Clinical Psychology

The health hazads that ae associated with adolescent alcohol use ae well documented, and thee is gowing ecognition among policymakes and clinicians alike that moe needs to be done to addess this public health theat. The pupose of this study was to examine the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish college students in the United States. The study daws on attachment theoy, social leaning theoy, and a paenting style model as the main theoetical famewoks to evaluate the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish adolescents to develop infomed answes to the study's thee guiding eseach questions concening the elationship between peceived paenting style and excess alcohol use of male, Jewish, college students aged 18-26 yeas, the elationship between academic achievement and the alcohol use fequency of male Jewish…… [Read More]

references to gender.

Scoring: The PAQ is scored easily by summing the individual items to comprise the subscale scores. Scores on each subscale range from 10 to 50.

Author: Dr. John R. Buri, Department of Psychology, University of St. Thomas, 2115

Summit Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55105.

Source: Buri, J.R. (1991). Parental Authority Questionnaire, Journal of Personality and Social Assessment, 57, 110-119
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Drinking With Younger Jews

Words: 24280 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42632920

Paenting Style Influence on Excess Alcohol Intake Among Jewish Youth

Ross

Maste of Science, Mental Health Counseling, College, Januay, 2008

Clinical Psychology

Anticipated; Decembe, 2016

The health hazads that ae associated with adolescent alcohol use ae well documented, and thee is gowing ecognition among policymakes and clinicians alike that moe needs to be done to addess this public health theat. The pupose of this study will be to examine the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish college students in the United States. The study daws on attachment theoy, social leaning theoy, and a paenting style model as the main theoetical famewoks to evaluate the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish adolescents to develop infomed answes to the study's thee guiding eseach questions concening the elationship between peceived paenting style and excess alcohol use of male, Jewish, college students aged 18-26…… [Read More]

references to gender.

Scoring: The PAQ is scored easily by summing the individual items to comprise the subscale scores. Scores on each subscale range from 10 to 50.

Author: Dr. John R. Buri, Department of Psychology, University of St. Thomas, 2115

Summit Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55105.

Source: Buri, J.R. (1991). Parental Authority Questionnaire, Journal of Personality and Social Assessment, 57, 110-119
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Personal Model of Helping Therapists Do Whatever

Words: 2318 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78225831

Personal Model of Helping

Therapists do whatever they can to help their clients overcome a wide range of problems ranging fromdeath of a pet to major life changing crisis, such as sudden loss of vision. However genuine a therapists' desire to help is, they will be limited by the tools he or she uses. It makes sense, then, as a therapist to design and integrate webs of models that have shown to yield efficacy. This new, personally designed model should work to assist and meet the requirement of every client. To embark upon this task of designing a personal model of helping, it is important to be aware of existing theories and models.

The first is the humanistic approach based on Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Maslow's triangle consists of basics needs at the base followed by needs of safety, love and belonging, achievements and lastly self-actualization at the top.…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Brew. (2007, Nov 27). Models of Helping. Retrieved April 3, 2011, from http://www.uk.sagepub.com/upm-data/18616_chapter3.pdf.

Eysenck 1965; Thomas et al. 1968; Heatherington and Parke 1986; Sheldon 1994a

Brian Sheldon, Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy: Research, Practice, and Philosophy (London: Routledge, 1995) iii, Questia, Web, 3 Apr. 2011.
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Counseling and Therapy

Words: 753 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94984912

Adlerian Therapy

An Adlerian approach to the case of B.A., the 14-year-old Guatemalan-American boy whose case was described by Layla, should primarily focus on B.A.'s feelings of inferiority and his sense of community and social being. Adlerian therapy generally concentrates on these two areas, and it is worth examining each specifically for B.A.

We can probably act from the assumption that B.A.'s feelings of inferiority are largely related to his family environment. Alfred Adler held that early childhood contains a lot of clues for how to interpret subsequent behavior -- in Corey's words, the Adlerian view is that "at around 6 years of age our fictional vision of ourselves as perfect or complete begins to form into a life goal." (Corey 99). In the case of B.A., he has had no physical contact with his mother from the age of five months -- too young to have any memories at…… [Read More]

References

Corey, G. (2008). Theory And Practice Of Counseling & Psychotherapy, 8th Edition. Belmont, CA: Brooks / Cole.
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Psychotherapies if Rape Were Legal This Is

Words: 1296 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10364136

Psychotherapies

If ape were legal

This is a story about a cancer patient who objectifies women and his life changes drastically for the better after his therapist takes an aggressive stance in one of the personal therapy sessions after a disturbing incident in his group therapy session. This paper reviews the relationship between the patient and the therapist by analyzing their dynamic through the following psychotherapies: Dynamic, Person-Centered, EBT and Alderian.

Dynamic

Psychodynamic psychologists research human habits by trying to find the unseen meanings in things that individuals think, do or state. This needs them to collect huge quantities of qualitative information about individuals, which is typically done with using the specific case-study technique. The topic of the case history is typically an individual who is dealing with a mental ailment and who is being treated with psychoanalysis. The professional gathers details from things the individual states or finishes treatment…… [Read More]

References

Gergen, K.J. (1999). An invitation to social construction. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Korobov, N. (2000). Social constructionist 'theory hope': The impasse from theory to practice. Culture and Psychology, 6, 365-373.

Martin, J., & Sugarman, J. (1997). The social-cognitive construction of psychotherapeutic change: Bridging social constructionism and cognitive constructivism. Review of General Psychology, 1, 375-378.

Sammons, A. (2007). Psychodynamic approach: the basics. Psychodynamic Psychology.
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Hispanic Culture Adler and the

Words: 1958 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52521037

There is the belief that Hispanics tend to make more eye contact then some other cultures, and have a tendency toward physical contact in greeting and things of that nature (Argyle, 1988). Moreover, it has been posited that Hispanics tend to sit and stand closer to each other then what is considered normal in U.S. culture. Additionally, the common gesture for 'okay' hand signal used in the U.S. is considered vulgar in some parts of South America. As such, a manager should be knowledgeable first of these gestures and how they translate in Hispanic culture and secondly be wary of using them in professional or personal communication (Argyle, 1988). Additionally, if a manager or leader were to present as stand-offish, maintain little to no eye contact, sit or stand at a great distance or respond negatively to a physical extension during a greeting, that leader may be seen as untrustworthy.…… [Read More]

References

Adler, P. & Kwon, S. (2002). Social capital: prospects for a new concept. The Academy of Management Review, 27(1), 17-40.

Argyle, M. (1988). Bodily Communication,2nd ed., Methuen & Co. Ltd.

Doktor, R., Tung, R., & Von Glinow, M. (1991). Incorporating international dimensions in management theory building. Academy of Management Review, 16(2), 259-261.

Goode, T., Jones, W., Dunne, C., & Bronheim, S. (2007). Promoting cultural and linguistic competency: self-assessment checklist for personnel providing behavioral health services. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development.
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Diagnostic Assessment

Words: 5224 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64538441

real problems faced by real people in the world, it might seem foolish to analyze a fictitious character. But sometimes it is easier to understand human nature when we look to art or fiction, in part because art provides us with some needed distance at times and in part because fictitious characters are often relatively pure distillations of character types. This is the case with the character of Grace from the television show "Grace Under Pressure." This paper provides an analysis of this character using first the Adlerian therapy model, then analyzing her through a behavior model and then finally suggesting a treatment plan for a person with the profile of Grace.

Grace's character - to begin with a thumbnail of her - is presented in the series as a no-nonsense, take-no-guff survivor of a bad marriage that was often abusive (at least in psychological terms). After eight years of…… [Read More]

References

Amen, D. (2000). Change your brain, change your life. New York: Times Books.

Corsini, R. & Wedding, D. (2000). Current Psychotherapies. New York: FE

Fernandez, E. (2002). Anxiety, depression, and anger in pain: research findings and clinical options. New York: Advanced Psychological Resources.

Foster, R.P., Moskowtiz, M. & Javier R.A. (Eds.) (1996). Reaching across boundaries of culture and class: Widening the scope of psychotherapy. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson.
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Analyzing Yalom's if Rape Were Legal

Words: 2027 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37312645

Yalom Analysis

The case surrounds Carlos, a man in his late 30s with a growing tumor that will not respond to radiation or chemotherapy. Carlos has been fighting this cancer for about a decade, but it is now to the point in which medical science can do no more for him. Carlos was referred to therapy by his oncologist, and responded somewhat to individual therapy but became combative and confrontational in group therapy. Carlos is a classic narcissist and misogynist. He has few friends, is estranged from his children, and is, at best cynical and sarcastic. However, through individual therapy, Carlos was able to come to some conclusions about the walls he built around himself, and the tremendous insecurity he harbored; typically using sex and sarcasm to cover up his need to belong. He eventually revealed that he had come up with two insights about himself and his relationship to…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Corsini, R., Wedding, D. (2011). Current Psychotherapies, 9th ed. Mason, OH: Cenage.

Yalom, I. (1989). Love's Executioner & Other Tales of Psychotherapy. New York: Harper

Collins.
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Clinicians Have Always Been Reminded

Words: 4252 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33632219

He can then be influenced to live what he now understands but has yet to do. The therapist or doctor must encourage the patient or awaken his social interest and raise his level of energy along with it. y developing a genuine human relationship with the patient, the therapist or doctor can re-establish the basic form of social interest, which the patient can use in transferring it to others. oth therapist and patient must realize that the latter's ultimate cure can come only from him.

Adler's approach has similarities with that of Socrates (Stein 1991). Socrates exhorted others to "know thyself," while Adler urged that people should think for themselves (Meyer 1980 as qtd in Stein 1991). Like Socrates, he would lead the person or patient through a series of questions to a contradiction within himself as revealed by his own answers. oth philosophers were committed to the search for…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adler, A. (1932). Mind and Body. What Life Should Mean to You. Unwin Books. http://www.marxists.org/references.org/subject/philosophy/works/at/adler.htm

Boeree, G. (1997). Alfred Adler. Shippensburg University. http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/adler.htm

Holmes, L. (2002). Clinicians' Personal Theories Influence Diagnosis of Mental Disorders. Mental Health Resource: Vanderbilt University. http://mentalhealth.about.com/library/sci/1202/blscdx1202.htm

Center for Existential Depth Psychology. (2004). Philosophical Forerunners of Existential Psychotherapy. Louis Hoffman. http://www.existential.therapy.co/Key%20Figures/Philosophical_Forerunners.htm
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Falsifiability in Psychological Science for

Words: 1416 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48012793



However, psychology, even scientific psychology, presents falsifiability challenges not evident in the natural scientists. Some scientists might argue that Freud has been shown to be a poor theorist, given what has been revealed about the brain since Popper's day. If a depressive shows no improvement after years of Freudian therapy, but does show improvement after taking Prozac, that could be said to prove Freud wrong. Unfortunately, so many other external factors can affect a person's mood it is hard to attribute a single cause to a person's remission. It could be the drug or other conditions in the individual's environment. While large drug trials try to use large sample sizes as a way of reducing the influence of extraneous variables as well as use control groups who receive a placebo, the less observable and testable the phenomenon, the more difficult it is to measure. Even attempts to demonstrate improvement of…… [Read More]

References

Cohen, Patricia. (2007). Freud is widely taught at universities, except in the psychology department. The New York Times. Retrieved April 3, 2010 at http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/25/weekinreview/25cohen.htm

Good and bad theories. (2007, April 27). On Philosophy. Retrieved April 2, 2010 at http://onphilosophy.wordpress.com/2007/04/27/good-and-bad-theories/

Lutus, Paul. (2009, May 12). Is psychology a science? Retrieved April 2, 2010 at http://www.arachnoid.com/psychology/

Marian, Lucian. (2008). Falsifiability. Debunking primal therapy. Retrieved April 2, 2010 at http://debunkingprimaltherapy.com/3_falsifiability-testable/
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Viktor Frankl Psychotherapy Viktor Frankl's

Words: 2242 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35799335

Frankl proposes that "he who can cling to no end point, to no time in the future, to no point of support, is in danger of allowing himself to collapse inwardly." [15]

However that point might alter as the person grows. It happens and should happen in the process of living because no one can cling to just one meaning all his life. Meaning when realized alters and take on another shape and that forms the crux of Logotherapy. The role of the therapist in this regard is only to facilitate the process. he/she cannot give a person meaning to a life that is lived by the patient. The therapist must help resolve any past issues which are retarding the personal growth of the individual. He should try to untie the spiritual or philosophical 'knots' that have developed to help the patient become healthier.

What is needed here is to…… [Read More]

References

Frankl, oral communication, 1971.

Frankl, the Will to Meaning (Cleveland, O.: New American Library, 1969), p. 21.

V. Frankl, "Self-transcendence as a Human Phenomenon," Journal of Humanistic Psychology (1966) 6:97-107.

Frankl V.E. (1976). Man's Search for Meaning. New York: Pocket Books. 78.
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Differential Social Work With Groups

Words: 2437 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96479029

Agency Type:

The DSS is a state agency charged with the responsibility of protecting children from child abuse and neglect. DSS is committed to protecting children and strengthening families. When children are abused or neglected by the people responsible for caring for them, DSS will intervene to ensure the safety of the children. DSS responds to reports of abuse or neglect 24 hours a day. DSS becomes involved if there are any concerns that caretakers, parents, step-parents, guardians or other persons responsible for caring for children may be abusing or neglecting these children. Whenever possible and appropriate, DSS attempts to keep families intact. DSS reviews all the reports of child abuse and neglect received by the agency. If it is determined that abuse or neglect has occurred, or if a child appears to be at risk of being hurt, or is being neglected, DSS

takes action to protect that child.…… [Read More]

References:

Berman-Rossi, T. (1993). "The tasks and skills of the social worker across stages of group development." Social Work with Groups: 26(1/2): pp. 70-81.

Duffy, T. (1994). "The check in and other go-rounds in group work: Guidelines for use."

Social Work With Groups, 17(1/2): 163- 174.

Gazda, G., Ginter, E. & Herne, A. (2001). Group counseling and group psychotherapy.
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Progressivism Post Modernism Perennialism and Reconstruction

Words: 735 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37304337

TESOL Weekly eflection

I think that post-modern thought can be both good and bad (helpful and problematic) in terms of its impact on education today. For example, it can be helpful in the sense that it rejects or counters the modernist view (situated in the Enlightenment) that pure eason can find an answer to all life's mysteries (Knight, 2008). Post-modernism points out that humans are often irrational in their thoughts and actions and that the subjective experience of the person is really all anyone knows. While I disagree with this point that subjectivity is all anyone knows, I view it is a helpful way to counter the emphasis on pure eason. At the same time it can be harmful if it is allowed to displace objectivity and truth completely. The post-modern perspective suggests that there is no real truth or at least no real way to it. I think this…… [Read More]

References

Haynes, C. (2009). Schools of Conscience. Educational Leadership, 66(8). Retrieved

from  http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/may09/vol66/num08/Schools-of-Conscience.aspx 

Knight, G. (2008). Issues and alternatives in educational philosophy (4th

ed.). Berrien Springs, MI: Andrews University Press.
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Solution Focused Brief Therapy Sfbt

Words: 1994 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14165036

Thus, giving the patient a 'bird's eye view' of his/her life gives him/her a chance to reconsider past actions committed and change these to improve his/her relations with a partner or family member. As in family brief therapies, reconstructing a family's life according to each member's interpretation and reflection helps the therapist identify the family member who adopts a constructive or destructive view of the 'reconstructed family life.' Through SFT, the therapist is able to create a therapeutic process that would be time-efficient and beneficial to patients.

itter and Nicoll (2004) elucidated effectively the effectiveness of brief therapy treatment for couples and families (64):

brief therapists seek to establish in their clients a renewed faith in self as well as optimism and hope for their immediate and long-term futures. It is caring, however, that guarantees the client support and a safe return in a future session, now matter how the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bury, D. (2000). "Constructivist paradigms in other therapies." Journal of Constructivist Psychology, Vol. 13, Issue 4.

Bitter, J. And W. Nicoll. (2000). "Adlerian brief therapy with individuals: process and practice." Journal of Individual Psychology, Vol. 56, Issue 1.

____. (2004). "Relational strategies: two approaches to Adlerian brief therapy." Journal of Individual Psychology, Vol. 60, Issue 1.

Disque, J.G. And J. Bitter. (2004). "Emotion, experience, and early recollections: exploring restorative reorientation processes in Adlerian therapy." Journal of Individual Psychology, Vol. 60, Issue 2.
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Counseling the Environment Can Have

Words: 2423 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 503442

This is accomplished by using a number of different tactics in conjunction with each other to include: examining their lifestyle, developing client insights, establishing a strong relationship with the patient and creating a change in behavior. When interacting with children, these views are used to comprehend how: their connections with friends and family members are influencing their desire to be accepted. ("Theories of Counseling," 2010) (, Tice, personal communication, October 25, 2012)

The Freudian approach is looking at how the child is developing base upon their relationship with others and the way they are dealing with the different stages in their lives. These include: studying the unconscious mind, analyzing dreams, examining the effects on the id / ego / superego and psychosexual development. The combination of these factors are designed to provide the therapist with a complete picture of what events are impacting the social, mental and emotional development of…… [Read More]

References

School Counseling. (2012). All About Counseling. Retrieved from:  http://www.allaboutcounseling.com/library/school-counseling/ 

School Counselors. (2012). Kids Health. Retrieved from: http://kidshealth.org/teen/school_jobs/school/school_counselors.html

Theories of Counseling. (2010). UNLV. Retrieved from: http://blogs.education.unlv.edu/csi/files/2010/02/nce-study-guide-theories-and-helping-relationships.pdf

Efford, B. (2012). Assessment for Counselors. Belmont, CA: Brooks / Cole.
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Analyzing Depression in Adolescents Group

Words: 3394 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83809960

Depression in Adolescents Group

Curriculum overview

This group aims at aiding participants in modifying their cognitions, maladaptive schemas, and behaviors. Participants acquire a grasp of how to be more relaxed and occupied in more pleasing activities. Such changes to behavior will trigger the succeeding profounder change levels. Participating individuals will be aided in altering their depressogenic and impractical thoughts as well, to thoughts that are more practical, successively decreasing their depression levels. In order to achieve true, longer-term change, as well as to lower the possibility of recurrence of depression, one needs to modify maladaptive schemas. The group is presented with the 'schemas' idea, group members are aided in distinguishing their respective schemas, and efforts are initiated towards altering schemas. However, one must bear in mind the fact that this process of schema transformation is time-consuming and won't be achieved by the time of the group's termination. Participants in the…… [Read More]

References

Association for Specialists in Group Work. (2007). Best practice guidelines 2007 revisions. Journal for Specialists in Group Work, 33(2). doi: 10.1080/01933920801971184

Clabby, J. F. (2006). Helping Depressed Adolescents: A Menu of Cognitive-Behavioral Procedures for Primary Care. Primary Care Companion to The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 8(3), 131-141.

Corey, G., Corey, M.S., & Callanan, P. (2011). Issues and ethics in the helping professions (8th ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Myers, J.E., Willse, J.T., & Villalba, J.A. (2011). Promoting self-esteem in adolescents: The influence of wellness factors. Journal of Counseling & Development, 89(1), 28-36. doi: 10.1002/j.1556-6678.2011.tb00058.x
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Clinical Psychology

Words: 60005 Length: 200 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12402637

Deam Content as a Theapeutic Appoach: Ego Gatification vs. Repessed Feelings

An Abstact of a Dissetation

This study sets out to detemine how deams can be used in a theapeutic envionment to discuss feelings fom a deam, and how the theapist should engage the patient to discuss them to eveal the elevance of those feelings, in thei pesent, waking life. It also discusses the meaning of epetitious deams, how medication affects the content of a deame's deams, and if theapists actually "guide" thei clients in what to say. This "guidance" might be the theapist "suggesting" to thei clients that they had suffeed some type of ealy childhood tauma, when in fact, thee wee no taumas in thei ealy childhoods. The oigin of psychiaty is not, as it would have people believe, medicine, theapy o any othe even faintly scientific endeavo. Its oiginal pupose was not even to cue mental affliction.…… [Read More]

references. This may be related to the large decrease in familiar settings in the post-medication dreams. Although Domhoff (1996) does not list a high percentage of elements from the past as an indicator of psychopathology, he does mention that people suffering post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a type of anxiety disorder, tend to have dreams in which distressing events are relived again and again. It may be that other anxiety disorders invoke a similar response in which the dreamer has a tendency to dwell on past events, which merits further research.

A final observation is that the results of this study provide support for Hartmann's (1984) biological model of the effects of drugs on dreams. An early study which focused mainly on long-term sleep patterns found little change in dream content associated with psychotropic drug administration (Hartmann & Cravens, 1974), but a later study conducted in Hartmann's laboratory indicated that increased levels of dopamine resulted in more vivid, nightmarish dreams (Hartmann, Russ, Oldfield, Falke, & Skoff, 1980). Based on his own research and the literature on drugs and nightmares, Hartmann (1984) proposed that drugs that increase the neurotransmitters dopamine or acetylcholine, or decrease norepinephrine or serotonin, produce nightmares and more vivid and bizarre dreams.

Drugs that have the opposite effects would decrease the incidence of disturbing dreams. The dreamer in this study was taking a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, which served to increase the effects of serotonin. According to the biological model, with the onset of medication the dreamer should have experienced a decrease in nightmares, or, in Hall and Van de Castle's terms, lower aggression, negative emotions, and other unpleasant factors. This was, in fact, the case.

The emphasis on statistically significant differences without regard to effect sizes slowed progress in the study of dream content by creating unnecessary polarities and focusing energy on methodological arguments. The introduction of effect sizes into the study of dream content makes it possible to suggest that the controversy over home and laboratory collected dream reports never should have happened. The emphasis in dream content studies henceforth should be on effect sizes and large samples. Then future dream researchers could focus on testing new ideas using dream reports collected either at home or in the sleep laboratory.

Summary
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Chronic Sorrow

Words: 1631 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67060671

Chronic sorrow is a continuous, pervasive sadness and also permanent and intermittently intense. An individual often encounters loss experience because of their disability, relative or chronic illness (Isaksson, 2007, p. 18). Chronic sorrow as a concept was introduced by Olshansky (1962) while he was dealing with children with disability of various kinds and their parents or relatives. He noted that the children's parents showed what he referred to as a pervasive reaction of psychological nature to the predicament of parenting mentally defective children (Monsson, 2010, p.16).

Such grief, he observed, was not dissimilar to the type shown by parents that have lost a child. The parents of mentally defective children have it worse because their pain is a continuous one. This is why he referred to the concept as chronic sorrow (Monsson, 2010, p. 16). It has been thought that chronic sorrow entails experiencing intermittent spans of distress and pain,…… [Read More]

References

Ahlstrom, G. I. (2007). Experiencing Loss and Chronic Sorrow in Persons with Severe Chronic Illness. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 16 (3A), 76-83.  https://www.researchgate.net/publication/6313596_Experiencing_loss_and_chronic_sorrow_in_persons_with_severe_chronic_illness 

Borkon, D. A. (2008). Is Chronic Sorrow Present in Maternal Caregivers of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disordered Children? Adlerian Counselling and Psychotherapy.  http://alfredadler.edu/sites/default/files/Borkon%20MP%202009.pdf 

Dozier, B. (2015). Application of Middle-Range Theory. Professional Practices in Nursing. Wordpress.com.  https://barbradozier.wordpress.com/2015/07/03/application-of-middle-range-theory/ 

Eakes, G., Burke, M. L. & Hainsworth, M. A. (1998). Middle-Range theory of Chronic Sorrow. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 30(2), pp. 179(6).  http://www.psychodyssey.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Middle-range-theory-of-chronic-sorrow.pdf
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Zero Tolerance Policies in Public Schools

Words: 5978 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28363637

Education:

The Intolerance of Zero Tolerance

Zero Tolerance Policies in Public Schools

One has only to turn on the television, log onto the Internet, or glance at a newspaper to see that violence is everywhere in our society. The nightly news is dominated by one act of depravity after another: murders, rapes, and violent assaults, among others. Hate crimes send shockwaves through seemingly peaceful communities. A cross is burned in a field, a Jewish cemetery is ransacked, the tombstones broken and covered with swastikas, a gay college student is crucified on a fence, left to die by his homophobic classmates, and a Black man is dragged behind a speeding car. Such horrific incidents seem almost commonplace. Mutual intolerance of one group for another breeds hatred and cruelty. People today appear quick to anger and even quicker to react...violently. Stabbings and shootings and bloody assaults are as frequent as fights on…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bauder, David. (14 October 1999). The Washington Post.

Fagan, Patrick. (1998). "The Breakdown of the Family: The Consequences for Children and American Society." Issues '98: The Candidate's Briefing Book, 6, 11. The Heritage Foundation.

Garbarino, James, PhD. (January 2001). "Where Do We Point the Finger of Blame?" Journal of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 155. The American Medical Association.

Kemp, Dawn; and Center, David. (2000, August) "Troubled Children Grown Up: Antisocial Behavior in Young Criminals." Education and Treatment of Children, 23, 3. Atlanta, GA: Georgia State University, 223-238.
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Affective and Alderian Systems Imagine Studying Affective

Words: 1492 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40474881

Affective and Alderian Systems

Imagine studying affective and Alderian systems of therapy. What will one discover? Is there anything different a person will learn from this experience? Therapy is a growing trend, and people are taking part in it on a regular basis. A number of areas are worth mentioning in regards to the case provided and to handle it from a therapeutic perspective.

When looking at this particular scenario, one needs to view it from that of the affective therapy domain. With the client, Darnell, the therapist begins by asking him to find out his day is going. The next question follows by means of eliciting emotion on how the counselor was struck by what he said. As a result, Darnell opened up on his emotions because he knew that his responses were safe knowing that his therapist is trustworthy (Corsini, J., & Wedding, 2008). Furthermore, the counselor is…… [Read More]

References

Corsini, J., R., & Wedding, D. (2008). Current psychotherapies. Belmont: Thomson.

Grunwald, Bernice Bronia. (1999). Guiding the family: practical counseling techniques.

New York: Brunner-Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group).

Harvard Medical School. (2006). Carl Rogers' client centered therapy: Under the microscope. Retrieved June 13, 2011, from Harvard Medical School:  http://www.health.harvard.edu/press_releases/client_centered_therapy .