Clinical Research Essays (Examples)

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Clinical Measures in Forensic Settings

Words: 710 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2942889

The authors of the article determined that by directing children into a specific line of questioning regraind a certain action "gives the child material that might appear in subsequent play or narrative" (Gilstrap and Cici, 2001).

The true relationship between both of these issues is that ultimately, Hewitt also engaged in leading children through the use of imagery, by asking them to draw how they would feel if something sexual did happen to them. Finally, the last problem identified with using clinical techniques in a forensic setting is related to relying on aspects of behavior as being congruous with abuse. Without properly attributing for the base rate of sexual abuse in the world or the population in which the children are, the propensity for gaining false positives is very real -- and problematic.

Thus, there are many different important concepts a forensic psychologist could take away form this particular article.…… [Read More]

References

Gilstrap, L.L., Ceci, S.J. (2001). "Difficulties inherent in integrating clinical wisdom with empirical research in forensic interview." PsycCRITIQUES. 46 (2). Retrieved from http://ehis.ebscohost.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/eds/detail?vid=6&sid=e8439b61-401f-4d44-b03d-9552b26c9259%40sessionmgr115&hid=107&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmUmc2NvcGU9c2l0ZQ%3d%3d#db=pvh&an=cnt-46-2-159

Litwack, T.R. (2001). "Actuarial vs. clinical assessments of dangerousness." Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 7(2), 409-443. Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/ehost/detail?sid=87617533-0386-4c21-a27f-bfc6df2dbdb5%40sessionmgr104&vid=1&hid=122&bdata=JnNjb3BlPXNpdGU%3d#db=pdh&an=2001-17852-005
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Clinical Supervision the Subject Supervisor

Words: 2443 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64456789

In certain countries, an effective supervisor possesses basic teaching skills, facilitation skills, negotiation and assertiveness skills, counseling and appraisal skills, mentoring skills, and knowledge of learning resources and certification requirements (Kilminster).

The most important aspect of the role of an effective supervisor is giving supervisee responsibility and the opportunity to practice it (Kilminster, 2000). Supervisees come to view the supervisor as a colleague and this leads them to become self-directed. Some supervisees consider teaching skills and techniques, interpersonal style and professional competence the most important characteristics of an effective supervisor. An effective supervisor shows empathy, is supportive, and exhibits flexibility, instruction, knowledge, interest in supervision and good tracking of supervisees. He is interpretative, respectful, focused ad practical. In contrast, an ineffective supervisor is rigid, shows little empathy and provides low support. He fails to consistently track supervisee concerns, teach or instruct. He is indirect and intolerant. He is close-minded. He…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Borders, L.D. (1994). The good supervisor. ERIC Digests: ERIC Clearinghouse on Counseling and Student Services. Retrieved on October 28, 2011 from http://www.ericdigest.org/1995-1/good.htm

Joslin, v. (2008). Ten traits of a good supervisor. Associated Content: Yahoo. Inc. Shine.

Retrieved on October 28, 2011 from http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/969660/ten_traits_of_a_good_supervisor.html

Kilminster, S.M. (2000). Effective supervision in clinical practice settings. Vol 34
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Clinical Theory Practice of the

Words: 1172 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13460142



Concisely, Comfort results when an individual keeps of negative or unhealthy living and sticks to positive and healthy living. Comfort has been associated with positive institutional outcomes that include patient satisfaction. The outcome of Comfort is therefore one of the most important indicator of measuring success in nursing practice particularly for patients and families going through some tough or stressful healthcare conditions.

Benefits of the Comfort theory to the Clinical Nurses of the 21st Century

Comfort theory is an important theory that is applicable to the 21st Century clinical practice because of its many inherent benefits or advantages. This theory defines the working environment for healthcare practitioners while at the same time it charts the direction for improving the services offered by the clinical nurses. The universality of the language and concepts used in presenting the theory also promotes its wide acceptance. The simplicity of the tenets of the Comfort…… [Read More]

References

Kolcaba, K. (2003) Comfort Theory and Practice: A Vision for Holistic Health Care and Kolcaba, K.Y. (1994). A theory of holistic Comfort for nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 19(6), 1178-1184.

Kolcaba, K., & DiMarco, M.A. (2005). Comfort Theory and its application to pediatric nursing. Pediatric Nursing. New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company, Inc.

Magyrary, D. (2002) Positive mental health: a turn of the century perspective. Issues of Mental Health Nursing, 23, 331-349

Malinowski, a., & Stamler, L.L. (2002). Comfort: exploration of the concept in nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 39(6), 599-606.
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Clinical Decision Making Guide Subjective

Words: 1292 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20564934

A level of 126 mg/dL or above, confirmed by repeating the test on another day, means that you have diabetes.

An oral glucose tolerance test measures your blood glucose after you have gone at least 8 hours without eating and 2 hours after you drink a glucose-containing beverage. This test can be used to diagnose diabetes or pre-diabetes. OGTT is more sensitive than the FPG test for diagnosing pre-diabetes, but it is less convenient to administer. The OGTT requires you to fast for at least 8 hours before the test. Your plasma glucose is measured immediately before and 2 hours after you drink a liquid containing 75 grams of glucose dissolved in water.

If your blood glucose level is between 140 and 199 mg/dL 2 hours after drinking the liquid, you have a form of pre-diabetes called impaired glucose tolerance or IGT, meaning that you are more likely to develop…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Braunald, Eugene., Fauci, Anthony S., Kasper, Dennis L., Hauser, Stephen L., Longo, Dan L., Jameson, J. Larry. 2001. Harrison's Principle of Internal Medicine, 15th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill Medical Publishing Division.

The Merck Manual (16th ed.). (1995). Portland, Oregon: Merck & Co., Inc.
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Clinical Residency for a Family

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80369850

According to the AACN's report, "Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Competencies in Specialty Areas: Adult, Family, Gerontological, Pediatric, and Women's Health" (2002), "Competencies are the domain or body of knowledge and skills that essentially define a profession or discipline. This domain of competencies guides training programs, provides expectations for employers, and drives the nature of assessment instruments and performance standards for credentialing institutions, certifying agencies, and accrediting organizations" (p. 14).

The core competencies for nurse practitioner graduates are intended to help candidates used what they have already learned and require a graduate-level education in order to attain certification as an APN and the AACN has developed this graduate curriculum as the basis for advanced practice nursing. As described by AACN, advanced practice nursing preparation includes ". . . graduate nursing core content (e.g., research, health policy, ethics, and more) and advanced nursing practice content (e.g., advanced health assessment, advanced physiology and…… [Read More]

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Clinical Supervision the Distribution of

Words: 1498 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19403960

Clinical supervision provides a mechanism of data collection and the information reclamation in support to the recent projects and the programmatic developments.

Management of the high number of complex mental health caseloads

These implementations occur under the influence of the Workplace Implementation Committees (WIC) that were established to the oversee agreement by the CMS at the local levels. The CMS is supposed to accompany the implementation of the policies that clearly outline the expectations and responsibilities based on periods and review methods (Cogan 1972). The implementations are expected to be transparent in the process of the WIC members and the staff groups. This includes the clear articulate mechanism for regular workload assessment, management and review.

I. egularly collect the workload from all the executives to make the caseload management process easier.

II. Use the caseload information to make the staff allocation of the resources while measuring their performances.

The workforce…… [Read More]

References

Cogan, M.L. (1972). Clinical supervision. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management., & National Institute of Education (U.S.). (1984). Clinical supervision. Eugene, or: ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management, College of Education, University of Oregon.

Powell, D.J. (1980). Clinical supervision: [1]. New York: Human Science Pr.

Bernard, J.M., & Goodyear, R.K. (1998). Fundamentals of clinical supervision. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
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Clinical Problem of Interest

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98420570

Clinical Problem of Interest

Anabolic Steroids and Their Effects on the Body

Even though governing bodies and media reports may have a person thinking otherwise, the use of anabolic steroids by athletes is nothing new or unique. The use of these drugs has been going on for some time throughout many different kinds of sports, and there is no reason to think that it will stop, despite the illegality of it and the dangers that are seen when athletes engage in the use of anabolic steroids and other drugs believed to enhance performance. The biological and psychological effects can be very strong, and can include an increase in desire for sex, aggressiveness, and an increase in behaviors that are typically considered to be masculine (Graham, et al., 2008). These behaviors can also include sleep disorders, paranoia, euphoria, confusion, hallucinations, and anxiety (Graham, et al., 2008). Naturally, these are the kinds…… [Read More]

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Clinical Psychology Mental Health Is an Essential

Words: 1268 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41604961

Clinical Psychology

Mental health is an essential part of overall health. The Surgeon General's report on mental health in 1999 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1999) and the 2001 supplement Mental Health: Culture, ace and Ethnicity (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2001) both highlighted mental health as a critical health aspect affecting a broad range of individuals today. Current paper is focused at exploring the concept of clinical psychology and how it is different from social psychology, counseling psychology and forensic psychology.

Clinical Psychology is the field of psychology in which theory, science and clinical knowledge are combined for the objective of comprehension, prevention and relieve distress and dysfunction based on psychology and for the promotion prejudiced comfort and personal development. The main features of clinical psychology are psychological assessment and psychotherapy. Though clinical psychologist participate in psychological research, teaching, counseling and forensic assessment. Clinical Psychology…… [Read More]

References

Goldstein, A.M. (2007). Forensic psychology: Toward a standard of care. In A.M. Goldstein (Ed.), Forensic psychology: Emerging topics and expanding roles (pp.3-41). New York: Wiley.

Heilbrun, K. (2001). Principles of forensic mental health assessment. New York: Kluwer.

Kane, A.W. (2007a). Basic concepts in psychology and law. In G. Young, A.W. Kane, & K. Nicholson (Eds.), Causality of psychological injury: Presenting evidence in court (pp. 261-292). New York: Springer Science + Business Media.

Mackenzie, B.D.(1977). Behaviorism and the limits of scientific method. Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Humanities Press.
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Clinical Assessment of Learners Clinical Assessment Involves

Words: 2688 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35872340

Clinical Assessment of Learners

Clinical assessment involves the evaluation of technical skills, communication skills, professionalism, knowledge base, and teaching skills, where applicable, of students who are about to enter independent practice. Technological changes have made it possible to assess clinical performance in ways that are far more advanced than pencil and paper tests relied on in the past (Dauphinee, 1995). In the late 1970s, clinical training programs utilized continuous practical assessments to evaluate learner competencies and as means of providing formative assessment feedback. These continuous practical assessments were considered to be "a much more valid, reliable, and realistic method of assessment" (Quinn, 1989). As clinical placements grew shorter and the number of staff, including those with "supernumerary status" grew larger, the quality of continuous practical assessments was substantively impaired (Girot, 1993). The goal of assessment has always been to identify a "competent practitioner" and to support the educational efforts required…… [Read More]

References

Andrews, M. And Chilton, F. (2000) Student and mentor perceptions of mentoring effectiveness, Nurse Education Today, 20 (7), 555-562.

Atkins, S. And Williams, A. (1995) Registered nurses' experiences of mentoring undergraduate nursing students, Journal of Advanced Nursing, 21, 1006-1015.

Cahill, H.A. (1996) A qualitative analysis of student nurses' experiences of mentorship,

Journal of Advanced Nursing, 24(4), 791-799.
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Clinical Coding Specialist Is a

Words: 655 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99921909



Salary

Employment Opportunities

Clinical coding specialists may work in hospitals, clinics, ambulatory, long-term and mental health care facilities, physicians' offices and government agencies that need coding expertise. (Western Kentucky University Website "Clinical Coding Specialist," 2003, NP)

Professional Association

American Health Information Management Association

233 N. Michigan Ave. Suite 2150

Western Kentucky University Website "Clinical Coding Specialist," 2003, NP)

According to an interview I conducted with a CCS, the traditional route to becoming a CCS has been to learn the systems on the job, especially with regard to institution specific computer coding systems, with minimal additional facility sponsored continuing education credit hours per year, yet as the job becomes increasingly important, with regard to accountancy and cost containment in medical care more and more institutions are requiring certification and therefore prior education with regard to clinical coding. The professional noted that when she began her job 15 years prior it was…… [Read More]

References

Johns, M.L. (2007) Information Management for Health Professionals Second Edition. AHIMA.

Tinsley, R. (1993). Engagements for Medical Professionals. Journal of Accountancy, 175(4), 34.

Western Kentucky University Website (2003) "Clinical Coding Specialist" Accessed September 8, 2008 http://www.wku.edu/Dept/Academic/chhs/scahec/clinicalcoding.htm
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Clinical Goal Course

Words: 522 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45174906

Clinical Goals

During this health assessment class I aim to close the gaps I currently have when considering experience in realistic clinical situations. An activity such as having to perform CPR on a patient can represent an important factor in making it possible for a student to gain a complex understanding of the domain. The class is going to provide me with the opportunity to assess the way that concepts such as cultural values, health notions, and caring practices performed in a particular institution work together in assisting people in need of health care.

I would apply theory in cases when laboratory results are either inconclusive or they are abnormal. This would mean that I would have to find a way to determine why these respective results are in this condition and get actively involved in trying to provide patients with solutions or with the ability to access treatment they…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Ward, H. & Barratt, J. "Passing Your Advanced Nursing Osce: A Guide to Success in Advanced Clinical Skills Assessment." "Radcliffe Publishing, 2009"

Zuzelo, P.R. "The Clinical Nurse Specialist Handbook," (Jones & Bartlett Publishers, 15 Oct 2010)
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Clinical Disorder Clinical Psychology and

Words: 3626 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49707748

This leaves many veterans prone to the condition known as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). This may be characterized as "an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a terrifying event or ordeal in which grave physical harm occurred or was threatened. Traumatic events that may trigger PTSD include violent personal assaults, natural or human-caused disasters, accidents, or military combat." (NIMH, 1) in the particular case of this discussion, military combat is a cause of PTSD that can have devastating long-term outcomes. Indeed, "studies estimate that as many as 500,000 troops serving in Iraq and Afghanistan will suffer from some form of psychological injury, with PTSD being the most common." (Eliscu, 58) the outcomes of this condition will run a wide range of symptoms that impact the ability of individuals to cope with the pressures of everyday life, to relate to those who have not experienced the traumas of war,…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Blanco, C.; Laje, G.; Olfson, Marcus, S.C. & Pincus, H.A. (2002). Trends in the treatment of bipolar disorder by outpatient psychiatrists. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 159(6), 1005-1011.

Craddock, N.; O'Donovan, M.C. & Owen, M.J. (2005). The genetics of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: dissecting psychosis. Journal of Medical Genetics, 42, 193-204.

Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS)1. (2006). Anorexia Nervosa. Women's Health.gov

Ellenberger, H. (1970). Discovery of the Unconscious. New York: Basic Books.
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Clinical Nurse Leader Role Implementing

Words: 4307 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71454882

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and the Council on Graduate Education for Administration in Nursing (AACN, 1996; Dienemann & Aroian, 1995) operationally define the professional nurse as one who has been prepared with a minimum of a baccalaureate or higher degree in nursing. (Feldman & Greenberg, 2005, p. 219)

These were necessary requirement in the 90's. Now in an ever increasing age of need for more highly educated professional, the Clinical Nurse Leader armed with a Master's degree or better, is more adapted to handle a wide range of situations and create a fulcrum from which to balance all the staff in a given unit.

Literature eview

Clinical Nurse Leader

Kennedy, M.S.. (2004) Introducing the Clinical Nurse Leader. American Journal of Nursing, 104 (10), 22.

This article is a report regarding the decisions calling for a new role for nurses. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing…… [Read More]

References

Dalton, B., & Wright, L. (1999). Using Community Input for the Curriculum Review Process. Journal of Social Work Education, 35(2), 275.

Feldman, H.R. & Greenberg, M.J. (Eds.). (2005). Educating Nurses for Leadership. New York: Springer.

Kennedy, M.S.. (2004) Introducing the Clinical Nurse Leader. American Journal of Nursing, 104 (10), 22.

Knorr, R.S., Condon, S.K., Dwyer, F.M., & Hoffman, D.F. (2004). Tracking Pediatric Asthma: The Massachusetts Experience Using School Health Records. Environmental Health Perspectives, 112(14), 1424-1439.
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Clinical Nurse Specialists and Nurse

Words: 2026 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59055950



Since modern medicine can sustain patients with proper medical follow-up for years, it becomes incumbent on the profession to follow the patients and provide them with the knowledge and tracking to insure that they are observing the procedures and medications which prolong their quality of life. Given hospitals' short-term orientation with the patients, there is a need to bridge patient care before, during and after acute-care visits.

While there are some nursing specialties which can be regarded as solely hospital- or community-based, many of the specialties call for a more holistic notion of patient care. y combining the CNS and NP specialties, this profession has a better chance of assuring better patient outcomes, and a better quality of life for the patient.

ibliography

ennett, .J. (1998). Psychiatric mental health nursing: thriving in a changing environment through outcomes-based measurements. Semin. Nurse Manage., 144-148.

erger, a.M.-F. (1996). Advanced practice roles for nurses…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bennett, B.J. (1998). Psychiatric mental health nursing: thriving in a changing environment through outcomes-based measurements. Semin. Nurse Manage., 144-148.

Berger, a.M.-F. (1996). Advanced practice roles for nurses in tomorrow's healthcare systems. Clinical Nurse Specialist, 250-255.

Chaska, N.L. (2001). The Nursing Profession Tomorrow and Beyond. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Cukr, P.L. (1997). The psychiatric clinical nurse specialist/nurse practitioner: an example of a combined role. Arch Psychiatr Nurs, 2-12.
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Clinical Psychology Krzysztof Kieslowski's a

Words: 2433 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3428760

We are engaged in what happened then. We are the same ones who were involved in the action; the memory brings us back as acting and experiencing there and then. Without memory and the displacement it brings we would not be fully actualized as selves and as human beings, for good and for ill (71).

Jacek is very clearly stuck in a place in his mind where he believes that he was to blame for what really happened. He was there and he remembers it as such and so it is so. The other element that feeds this is his imagination. According to Sokolowski, memory and imagination are structurally very alike and it is easy for one to slip into the other. The question is whether or not Jacek sees his true self in that memory or if it is an imagined being of himself. This matters because if Jacek…… [Read More]

References

Camus, Albert. (2002) Albert Camus and the philosophy of the absurd. Rodopi Bv

Editions.

De Beauvoir, Simone. (2000) The ethics of ambiguity. Citadel.

Mahon, Joseph. (1997) Existentialism, feminism and Simone de Beauvoir. Palgrave MacMillan.
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Clinical Psychology Many People E G Researchers Graduate

Words: 358 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17381539

Clinical Psychology

Many people (e.g., researchers, graduate students) can benefited from compulsive traits. What are some likely personality characteristics of such persons? What would such people NOT be like?

Compulsive individuals are likely also to be anxious, competent, deliberative, goal oriented, and dutiful.

Define "personality" and "trait."

Personality is enduring, creating the cohesive self that we recognize when we look inward. It comprises a number of different mechanisms and properties. One's personality mediates that individual's interactions with every level of the environment from internal to dyadic to social and cultural. A trait is a distinguishing feature and personality comprises all of an individual's traits.

According to Kuyken et al. (2003) what predicts worse psychological adaptation over the course of training for clinical psychology students? What predicts better adjustment over time?

Kuyken et al. (2003) found that trainees who felt that demands on them were reasonable, who reported having a good…… [Read More]

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Clinical Supervision Is a Phenomenon

Words: 1359 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18640378

In clinical situations, for example, problem-solving techniques are often required to ensure best practice. According to Lyth, some authors argue that a balance between roles should be maintained in order to optimize both clinical practice and theoretical knowledge.

Generally, it appears to be agreed among theorists that the focus of clinical supervision should be professional development and self-actualization. In addition, an inter-disciplinary approach to supervisory practice will also provide a platform for emerging best practice among the various professions, and ultimately benefit the practice in nursing. Although it appears that the theory on clinical supervision is often arbitrary and little researched, it is also true that the phenomenon has been in effect of many years, decades, and even centuries. For midwives, for example, supervision has been part of their profession since 1902, being a statutory requirement.

One problem with clinical supervision, according to Lyth (2000, p. 276), is the fact…… [Read More]

References

Lyth, Gordon M. (2000). Clinical supervision: a concept analysis. Jounral of Advanced Nursing, Vol 31, No. 3.

Macdonald, Joanna. (2002, Feb). Clinical Supervision: a review of underlying concepts and developments. Australian and New Aealand Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 35, Iss 1. Retrieved from http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a772090191

McLean, Duncan (1996). Clinical Supervision. Psychiatric Bulletin, Vol. 20. Retrieved from http://pb.rcpsych.org/cgi/reprint/20/1/1.pdf

Todd, C. & O'Connor, J. (2005). Clinical Supervision. In N. Skinner, a.M. Roche, J. O'Connor, Y. Pollard, & C. Todd (Eds.), Workforce Development TIPS (Theory Into Practice Strategies): A Resource Kit for the Alcohol and Other Drugs Field. National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA), Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. Retrieved from  http://www.unodc.org/ddt-training/treatment/VOLUME%20D/Topic%202/8.Workforce%20Development%20TIPS.pdf
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Clinical Psychology Psyd vs PhD

Words: 1116 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66668706

Thus, PysD programs prove beneficial in terms of professional expectations.

This more practice-orientated path goes beyond research. PsyD programs offer a "Comprehensive, carefully supervised training for practice and thorough training for research cannot both be accomplished in the time allowed," (Walfish & Hess 2001:54).

Preparation for the student within a PsyD program comes from actual practice, rather than simple observation. It is within this scope of practice which allows for more thorough preparation for clinical practice. According to the research, "The PsyD students were to have class work as rigorous as that of their fellow students who were working for a PhD, but instead of doing research-based dissertations, they spent more time in practicum work and submitted a final document focusing more on a clinical demonstration project instead," (Walfish & Hess 2001:48). Students are allowed to go beyond the classroom and experience the reality of clinical practice within a psychology…… [Read More]

References

Johnson, W. Brad & Mcminn, Mark R. (2003). Thirty years of integrative Doctoral training: historic developments, assessment of outcomes, and recommendations for the future. Journal of Psychology and Theology. 31(2):83-86.

Keith-Spiegel, Patricia & Wiederman, Michael W. (2000). The Complete Guide to Graduate School Admission: Psychology, Counseling, and Related Professions. NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Walfish, Steven & Hess, Allen K. (2001). Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students. NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
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Clinical Auditing and Governance

Words: 2506 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14301156

Clinical Governance and Auditing

Throughout this paper, an attempt has been made to demonstrate an understanding of the procedure of Clinical Audit (CA). The focus of this CA is the high risk area of patient safety, and with regard to how this is linked to patient safety, hand hygiene has been selected. The findings and the recommendations that follow combined with the CA tool and the selection criteria will be outlined in form of a Clinical Audit. For the purposes of improving clinical practice, CAs forms an integral aspect of clinical governance. It is indeed notable that CAs encapsulates practice which through analysis can result to quality enhancement, particularly for the patients. Various definitions of the term which are invariably the same and which tend towards verbosity exist, but a terse and precise definition is given by Coffey (2009) who puts forth that a CA is a systematic evaluation of…… [Read More]

References

Hart T. (2013).Promoting hand hygiene in clinical practice. Nursing Times; 109: 38, 14-15.

Tollefson, J. (2011). Clinical skills for enrolled/division 2 nurses. South Melbourne, Vic, Cengage Learning.

Scott, H.R., Blyth, K.G., & Jones, J.B. (2009).Davidson's Foundations of Clinical Practice. London, Elsevier Health Sciences UK..

Wilson, J. (2006). Infection control in clinical practice. Edinburgh, Elsevier, Baillie're Tindall.
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Clinical Nursing Practice for a

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19771195

27).

The proficient nurses perceive situations as wholes rather than in terms of distinct aspects, and performance is determined by maxims. Perceive or perception is the main word: The perspective is not thought out but presents itself based on experience and earlier events. Proficient nurses understand a situation because they perceive its meaning in regard to long-term goals. Because of their experience, proficient nurses can recognize when the expected normal picture does not materialize, which can considerably improve decision making (Benner, 1984, p. 27-29.)

Lastly, the expert performers do not have to count on an analytic principle, such as a rule, guideline or maxim, to connect their understanding of a situation to an appropriate action. Because of their strong background with an intuitive grasp of situations, they can zero in on the accurate region of the problem without trying unfruitful alternative solutions.

Benner's model of skill acquisition is based on…… [Read More]

Communicability: It is almost impossible for intuitive models to communicate something that is intangible and which the practitioner is unable to express. Given that Benner's model relies on experimental knowledge as the basis of "knowing" as opposed to the science of communicable research, it is difficult to think of a situation where nursing's knowledge base becomes a shared resource open equally to all practitioners.

Similarly, systematic-rational models may promote communicability, but the process itself may not be that relevant if it does not fit with reality of clinical practice (Thompson, 1999, p.1225).

Simplification: If the information processing model does not capture all variables in decision making and clinical diagnosis, and also communicating this incomplete picture to other practitioners in the form of scientific evidence, then nursing's knowledge base will continue to develop in an ad hoc manner with major holes in the complete picture. The intuitive model at least permits the complexity of decisions akin to healthcare provision and sees that health is more than the sum of its parts. Also,
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Clinical Learning Points

Words: 626 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80162637

Clinical Learning Points

Clinical Case Study Key Learning Points

Given the patient's history with angina and cardiac conditions, there is a clear need to ensure that he does not allow bad habits to continue in addition to the careful management and monitoring of his health. The patient's medical history also includes known diagnoses for diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. His father had also passed from heart disease, indicating a genetic predisposition to cardiac problems. The patient recently was discharged just a few days prior for a stent placement. He returned for an evaluation, claiming that his major cardiac symptoms, including crushing chest pain, shortness of breath and diaphoretic had subsided dramatically. Still, there is thought to be a high risk of future complications in regards to his cardiac health because of the fact that he has a very minimal support system in order to help him change his dietary and lifestyle…… [Read More]

References

American Heart Association. (2007). Patient-teaching for cardiac nurses. Nursing, 37(10), 14-16.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2012). Preventing High Blood Pressure: Healthy Living Habits. Retrieved from   http://www.cdc.gov/ bloodpressure/healthy_living.htm 

John Hopkins Medicine. (2014). High Cholesterol (Hypercholesterolemia). Heart & Vascular Institute. Retrieved from  http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/heart_vascular_institute/conditions_treatments/conditions/high_cholesterol.html
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International Clinical Harmonisation Proper Systems in Place

Words: 1196 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10839935

International Clinical Harmonisation

PROPER SYSTEMS IN PLACE

The International Congress Harmonisation

WHO Principles of Good Clinical Practice

Clinical research is conducted to insure the safety and efficacy of health and medical products and practices (WHO 2002). In the past, randomized controlled trials gave most of the information about the safety and efficacy of these products and treatments. Randomized clinical trials were considered the foundation of evidence-based medicine but reliably only when conducted according to principles and standards. These principles and standards comprise good clinical research or GCP. The guidelines were created to help national regulatory authorities, sponsors, investigators and ethics committees to implement GCP for overall clinical research. These were based on the guidelines provided by major international organizations, such as the International Conference on Harmonization or ICH GCP, and used as reference (WHO).

GCP incorporates accepted and established ethical and scientific quality standards complied with for the design, conduct,…… [Read More]

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Social Work Supervision of Clinical

Words: 5496 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54097164

By improving their self knowledge, leaders can change and develop as leaders of people. Clinical supervision for leaders is sometimes called administrative clinical supervision. This is managerial clinical supervision with a focus on problems related to leadership and organization of work, particularly human relations issues. Administrative clinical supervision makes use of experiential learning focused on oneself and one's work (Sirola-Karvinen and Hyrkas, 2008).

Administrative clinical supervision means clinical supervision for leaders that address leadership issues in order to achieve set goals. Supervision promotes cohesion within the organization and is directed at change. Administrative clinical supervision is the examination of leadership in which leaders have the chance to reflect upon the quality of their decisions and share their feelings. In terms of action, administrative clinical supervision involves process-like support and mentoring, which boost the leader's confidence in coping with leadership duties and changes associated with it. Administrative clinical supervision addresses issues…… [Read More]

References

Clinical supervision 'can inoculate staff against stress'. (2010). Mental Health Practice. 13(7),

p.8.

Clinical Supervision. (2009). Retrieved June 27, 2010, Australian College of Mental Health

Nurses Web site: http://www.acmhn.org/career-resources/clinical-supervision.html
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National Institute of Nursing Research NINR History

Words: 1877 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63067891

National Institute of Nursing esearch (NIN)

History of the organization

The National Institute of Nursing esearch is a body mandated with the principal responsibility of carrying out research that relates to the nursing and medical field in general. The institution dedicates its effort to improving the health and health care of Americans through funding of nursing research and research training. The involvement of the federal government led to the formation of the research institute as early as 1946. The federal government established a division of nursing within the office of the Surgeon General, Public Health Service. The NIN commenced its activities in 1955 when the institute established a Nursing esearch Study section, which was within the Division of esearch Grants. The purpose of this Study Section was to conduct a scientific review of the growing volume of applications in the nursing sector.

In 1960, a consolidation of the public health…… [Read More]

References

Fitzpatrick, J.J & Kazer, M. (2011). Encyclopedia of Nursing Research. 3rd edition. New York:

Springer Publishing Company.

Miller, A.C. (2009). Nursing for Wellness in Older Adults. Printed in China: Lippincott Williams

and Wilkins.
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St Jude Children's Research Hospital Founded by

Words: 1235 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79097607

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Founded by entertainer Danny Thomas, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital is celebrating its fiftieth year of operation; in that time the hospital has conducted important research and cured / saved the lives of numerous children with cancer and other diseases. This paper reviews the organization from a number of important perspectives.

Board of Directors and Governors

The chairman / president of St. Jude's Board of Directors is Camille Sarrouf, who is an attorney in Boston with the law practice, Sarrouf Law. The First Vice Chair is Richard "Rich" M. Unes, from Memphis, Tennessee. Second Vice Chair is Paul Ayoub and the Secretary of St. Jude's Fred R. Harris. As to the Board of Governors for St. Jude's, Robert Breit is the chairman and president and Terry Burman is the First Vice Chair. Martha Perine Beard is the Second Vice Chair for the Board of Governors…… [Read More]

Works Cited

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. "50 Years / Finding Cures / Saving Children." Retrieved

November 26, 2012, from http://www.stjude.org.
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Ethical Aspects in Research Studies the Essential

Words: 1340 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94884429

Ethical Aspects in esearch Studies

The essential aspects of research are the concern and respect that the researchers offer to the participants. esearch is aimed at producing insights that are beneficial to the society. However, the research should be conducted ethically. The ethical concern in research adduces that it should not advance a society at the detriment of others especially the participants in the research. Ethics in research is vital because it guides the working principles of the researcher for the research to conform to the required standards. This is the case especially when research subjects in health or medical research are often human beings. Therefore, it is vital to respect these individuals. The guiding principles in research ethics focus on preserving the rights and dignity of the research participants. In this regard, ethics focus on ensuring consent is obtained, no harm is done, the participant's privacy is respected, and…… [Read More]

References

Austin, W. (2007). The Ethics of Everyday Practice: Healthcare Environments as Moral Communities. Advances in Nursing Science, Volume 30 - Issue 1 - p 81-88.

Bernadette M.M. & Ellen F.O. (2011). Evidence-based practice in nursing and health care: a guide to best practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Carol J.H. (2013). Professional Issues in Nursing: Challenges and Opportunities. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Corey-L., Patricia M., Anita J., Marlene Z., & Alison M. (1999). Healthcare Reform: Its Effects on Nurses. Journal of Nursing Administration, Volume 29 - Issue 3 - pp 30-37.
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Interpretation of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III MCMI III

Words: 736 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98384104

Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI_III):

This individual was administered the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) to assist with the current diagnostic impressions. The pattern of response produced by this person indicates that the resulting clinical profile is a valid profile. There is no evidence that individual attempted to portray themselves in an excessively positive manner (Scale Y) or to present as being excessively distressed such as observed in a "cry for help" profile (Scale Z; Jankowski, 2002). Inspection of the profile indicates that the individual did not approach the questions with an overly defensive style or in an overly guarded manner that would invalidate the profile; however, there is reason to believe that this individual might be minimizing some of their distress (Scale X = 41; Jankowski, 2002). The clinical profile indicates a 2B/8A profile with moderate elevations on scales A, D, and CC.

There is no evidence that this…… [Read More]

References

Craig, R. J. (Ed.). (2013). The Millon clinical multiaxial inventory: A clinical research information synthesis. New York: Routledge.

Jankowski, D. (2002). A beginner's guide to the MCMI-III. Washington DC: American

Psychological Association.

Millon, T., Millon, C. M., Meagher, S., Grossman, S., & Ramnath, R. (2012). Personality disorders in modern life. New York: John Wiley & Sons.
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Experimental Research and Report Writing Research Has

Words: 2045 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34451425

Experimental esearch and eport Writing

esearch has shown that organizational strategies aid in memorization tasks such as word recall. Several studies have shown the effectiveness of using organizational strategies such as hierarchical categorization in aiding in word recall. Our experiment, a partial replication of the study conducted by Bower et al. (1969), examined the impacts of hierarchical word lists on word recall. College students were presented with word lists that were arranged either randomly or in categories. The number of words correctly recalled was measured for each participant. While our results were not as definitive as Bower et al. (1969) study, they do yield implications for further research for additional age groups.

The Impact of Categorization on Word ecall

Introduction

esearch has shown that organizational strategies aid in memorization tasks such as word recall. Matlin (2002) presents four such organizational strategies: chunking, first-letter technique, narrative technique, and hierarchy technique. In…… [Read More]

References

Bower, G.H., Clark, M.C., Lesgold, A.M., Winzenz, D. (1969). Hierarchical retrieval schemes in recall of categorized word lists. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 8, 323-343.

Cohen, B.H. (1963). Recall of categorized words lists. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 66(3), 227-234. doi:10.1037/h0048846

Longenecker, J., Kohn, P., Liu, S., Zoltick, B., Weinberger, D.R., & Elvevag, B. (2010). Data-driven methodology illustrating mechanisms underlying word list recall: Applications to clinical research. Neuropsychology, 24(5), 625-636. doi:10.1037/a0019368

Marzano, R.J. (2009). Setting the record straight on "high-yield" strategies. Phi Delta Kappan, 91(1), 30-37. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.
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Memorial Herman Business Research Applications

Words: 1338 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16578268

Being able to merge the resources of a variety of different specialists is one strength of the Memorial Herman approach. In the future, as the interrelationship between the body and the brain, and psychological disorders and overall functioning has become an accepted part of mainstream science: studies such as these will be even more important for research institutes. Memorial Herman is clearly on the cutting-edge of the field in this regard.

Because of its impressive outreach, the hospital is also able to draw upon a wide array of specific populations, as in the case of studies such as the "Evaluation of cardiovascular effects of smoking cessation in HIV-infected patients" (Bell 2009). Few other hospitals would be able to draw from a large amount of HIV-positive patients who were smokers and willing to participate in research studies. The study may prove beneficial to the research subjects as well as to the…… [Read More]

References

About us. (2009). Memorial Hermann. Retrieved November 12, 2009 at http://www.memorialhermann.org/aboutus/

Bell, Tanvir. (2009). Evaluation of cardiovascular effects of smoking cessation in HIV-infected patients. Memorial Herman. Retrieved November 12, 2009 athttp://www.memorialhermann.org/locations/texasmedicalcenter/heartandvascularinstitute/content.aspx?id=5772

Frazier, Lorraine. (2009). Interactions among depressive symptoms and genetic influences on cardiac outcomes. Memorial Herman. Retrieved November 12, 2009

http://www.memorialhermann.org/locations/texasmedicalcenter/heartandvascularinstitute/content.aspx?id=5772
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Learners a Clinical Setting --Desirable Staff Role

Words: 692 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49607540

learners a clinical setting --Desirable staff role models? What risks mitigated?

Discuss three assessment strategies you would use to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinical instructor

In-class, scheduled observations are one of the most common methods used to assess the effectiveness of instructors. Of course, this method is not foolproof -- an instructor will likely show off the class at its best, when he or she is anticipating a visit from an evaluator. However, even a planned visit at least demonstrates to the evaluator what the teacher believes are his or her strengths. The teacher's method of interacting with the class, the classes' responsiveness to the teacher's demeanor and the teacher's method of structuring the lesson plan can all be reviewed.

Unplanned observations, of course, take away the ability of the teacher to prepare for a visitor (although the teacher can be warned that unplanned assessments will occur throughout the…… [Read More]

References

Cardillo, Donna. (2005). Do nurses eat their young? Nurse Week. Retrieved:

http://www.nurseweek.com/news/Features/05-01/DearDonna_01-10-05.asp

Murray, Cyril & Andrew Main. (2005). Role modeling as a teaching method for student mentors. Nursing Times, 101 (26: 30).  http://www.nursingtimes.net/nursing-practice-clinical-research/role-modelling-as-a-teaching-method-for-student-mentors/203794.article
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Social Research Activities Whether Empirical Literature Review

Words: 2967 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86822578

Social Research

Research activities, whether empirical, literature review sponsored, descriptive, or historical, must exhibit and command interest, enthusiasm, and passionate commitment. It is vital that the researcher catch the essential quality of the excitement of discovery that comes from research well done if expected results are to be gained. If this sole tenet can be achieved then the difficulties and frustrations of the research performance, while they never completely vanish, play a much less significant role (Ferguson, 1967). To the enthused researcher there must be debate, discussion, and even argument if there is to exist intelligent conviction regarding the nature, design analysis, and inferences regarding the phenomenon or topic under investigation (Kerlinger, 1964). The remainder of this paper will examine two research studies from the perspective of data certification and whether or not the author's have adequately fulfilled the research requirements associated with the principle of data certification. The two…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Friedman T, Slayton WB, Allen LS, Pollock BH, Dumont-Driscoll M, Mehta P, Graham-Pole J.

Use of alternative therapies for children with cancer. Pediatrics December 1997, vol.

100, no. 6, p. e1.

Furgeson, George A. Statistical Analysis in Psychology and Education. New York: McGraw-
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Ethics Behind Stem Cell Research

Words: 1818 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74121630

Do patients understand what it means to donate tissue to science? Not only that, but use of EG cells confuses stem cell research with the debate over abortion, bring up the risk of biasing emotions (McDonald 7).

So, while stem cell research is an exciting new field that holds much promise, ethical problems arise to delay research, discovery of benefits or dangers, and involve many who have no knowledge of the complexities of the field. Though controversies usually accompany new discoveries in science, this biotechnological process involves manipulating the basis of life itself in embryonic stem cells. But the field is rapidly changing. hat is true today may be outmoded tomorrow. A neutral substitute for stem cells may be discovered that will prove to be the answer to these ethical questions.

orks Cited

Ethics Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. "Financial incentives in recruitment of oocyte donors." Fertil…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ethics Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. "Financial incentives in recruitment of oocyte donors." Fertil Steril 2004; 82:Suppl 1:S240-S244.

Hwang, W.S., Roh, S.I., Lee, B.C., et al. -- Patient-specific embryonic stem cells derived from human SNCT blastocysts." Science 2005;308.

Magnus, David and Cho, Mildred K. "Issues in oocyte donation for stem cell research." Science Express Magazine, Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and Department of Pediatrics, Vol. 308. no. 5729, June 2005. http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/summary/308/5729/1747.

McDonald, Chris. "Stem cells: a pluripotent challenge." BioScan Vol. 13, Iss. 4, (Toronto Biotechnology Initiative.) Fall 2001.
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Ethics Human Research the Nuremberg

Words: 615 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80577995



Declaration of Helsinki

In this article the author emphasizes that having a code of ethics is still as important as it has always been but this new code includes the idea of informed consent and how to deal with those that are unable to provide it. The author goes on to address how important human subjects are to the area of medical research but stresses that this importance does not outweigh the adherence to a code of ethics when conducting research.

The Declaration of Helsinki has a lot in common with the Nuremberg Code but really expands the code to include more things in greater detail. The code now contains a section that deals with informed consent. Although the code does not address research on those subjects who are unable to provide informed consent, the code does address such research, asserting the ethical acceptability under certain circumstances of what is…… [Read More]

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Reconciling Clinical and Safety Databases

Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24724690

Clinical and Safety Databases

Clinical databases and safety databases are some of the most common types of databases utilized by clinical and drugs safety organizations to comply with different data standards. These databases differ significantly in various ways including the fact that safety databases have much more strict requirements for quality and safety. While safety databases are derived from clinical databases, they vary in relation to the kinds of data included in them, their maintenance, and how and when they are used in data management. Despite their differences, an important aspect of clinical data management process is reconciling the two databases. Clinical esearch Associates (CAs) play an important role in reconciling clinical and safety databases. However, CAs role in this process may be influenced by the nature of adverse events, progress of the clinical trial, and the use of coding dictionaries.

CA ole in econciling these Databases

As previously indicated,…… [Read More]

References

Krishnankutty et al. (2012, March-April). Data Management in Clinical Research: An Overview. Indian Journal of Pharmacology, 44(2), 168-172.

Ruiter, G. (n.d.). Handling and Reconciliation of SAE Data: A CRO Perspective. Retrieved February 24, 2016, from http://www.psdm.eu/media/Previous%20events/SAE/17478_20080522_SAE_Recon_GR.ppt
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Looking Into Using Technology in Managing Data in Clinical Trials

Words: 662 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38646614

Technology in Managing Data in Clinical Trials

Even a casual observer will undoubtedly make note of the range of high-tech solutions that are causing disruptive change in the process of clinical trials. From webinars and multi-day meetings to an expanding pool of literature, technology has been establishing itself as the key to an era fixated on measurable improvements like accelerating the research start-up phase, restructuring clinical trial information transmission, and overhauling research monitoring. And the issue is no longer a distinct solution to apparently intractable glitches; instead, it revolves around sharing real-time information captured by these solutions for facilitating strategic decision-making by collaborators, with regard to a research's status as it is actually progressing. This constitutes a drastic change from the conventional paper-based techniques that underlie the industry's costly and time-consuming methods of carrying out international clinical research, in which data quality assessment depended on near-database locking or onsite monitoring,…… [Read More]

References

Morrison, R. (2015). Technology's Role in Clinical Trials. Retrieved May 13, 2016, from http://www.appliedclinicaltrialsonline.com/technology-s-role-clinical-trials

Weisfeld, N., English, R. A., & Claiborne, A. B. (Eds.). (2012). Envisioning a Transformed Clinical Trials Enterprise in the United States: Establishing an Agenda for 2020: Workshop Summary. National Academies Press.
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Analyzing Dissemination of Research

Words: 1043 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14459335

Dissemination of esearch

A Brief Description of your Capstone Project

A phase that is very important in clinical research, Clinical Data Management (CDM), is a process through which reliable, high-quality and statistically accurate data is generated from clinical trials. This drastically reduces the time taken by the process, from when drugs are developed to the time they are marketed. The CDM team members play an active role throughout the process, from the beginning to the end. They are required to have sufficient knowledge about the maintenance of CDM processes quality standards. There are several procedures in the process such as Case eport Form (CF) and its annotation, data entry, designing a database, validation of data, management of discrepancies, medical coding, extraction of data and data locking. During a trial, these procedures are assessed regularly to ensure that they meet high standards. Currently, there is increasing pressure to improve the standards…… [Read More]

References

Block, S. M. (1996). Do's and don'ts of poster presentation. Biophysical Journal, 71(6), 3527.

Gerrish, K. (2005). Getting published: practicalities, pitfalls and plagiarism. Journal of Community Nursing, 19:8 13-15

Krishnankutty, B., Bellary, S., Kumar, N. B. R., & Moodahadu, L. S. (2012). Data management in clinical research: An overview. Indian Journal of Pharmacology, 44(2), 168-172. doi. 10.4103/0253-7613.93842

Miracle, V. A., & King, K. C. (1994). Presenting research: Effective paper presentations and impressive poster presentations. Applied Nursing Research, 7(3), 147-151.
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Diabetes Nursing Research as Defined

Words: 899 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27230313

In many clinical practice situations, research and use of current evidence is neither prized nor supported as part of the nursing culture. One of the earliest and best-known nursing research utilization activities was the Conduct and Utilization esearch in Nursing project, awarded to the Michigan Nurses' Association by the Division of Nursing in the 1970s for a five-year study. The major objective of the project was to increase the use of research findings in the daily practice of registered nurses by disseminating research findings, facilitating organizational changes needed to implement innovations and encouraging collaborative clinical research (Polit, 2004, p. 676).

Many models for nursing research utilization have emerged since the 1970s. These various models developed from efforts to use or disseminate nursing research and ultimately improve patient outcomes. The first research utilization model was developed in the 1970s with the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education in Nursing egional Program…… [Read More]

References

Cormack, D. (2006) Research Process in Nursing. New York: Blackwell

Ervin, N.E. (2002). Evidence-based nursing practice: Are we there yet? The Journal of the New York State Nurses' Association, 33(2), 11-16.

Encyclopedia

Fitzpatrick, J. (Editor) (2005) Encyclopedia of Nursing Research. New York: Springer
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Medical Robotics in Spite of Research Gaps

Words: 472 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53091203

Medical Robotics

In spite of research gaps, medical robotics is a growing trend in the United States.

Advances in Medical Robotics (Diana, 2011)

Hybrid Assistive Limb 5 (HAL5) is an artificially powered ecoskeleton that helps double the amount of weight someone can carry unaided.

DaVinci Si HD Surgical System performs minimally invasive surgery through superior visualization and greater precision, with incisions of one to two centimeters causing less pain and speedier recovery. It reduces the hospital stay to one half and costs one third less.

Sofie incorporates force feedback allowing a surgeon to feel the pressure they apply making sutures and pushing tissue aside. Sofie is expected to develop in five years.

Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery System is a non-invasive alternative to surgery for treatment of cancerous and non-cancerous tumors.

Nursebot is designed to specifically help elderly deal with daily activities allowing them to live at home.

RIA is designed to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Davies, B. (2006). Essay: Medical robotics -- a bright future. The Lancet, vol 368, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(06)69929-7, S53-S54.

Diana, a. (2011, Jan 29). 12 Advances in Medical Robotics. Retrieved from InformationWeek Healthcare: http://www.informationweek.com/healthcare/patient/12-advances-in-medical-robotics/229100383

Huang, G.P. (2006). Robotics and clinical research: Collaborating to epand the evidence-based for rehabilitation. JRRD, 43(5), xiii-xvi.

Seaman, a. (2013, Jan 4). Racial gaps in access to robotic prostrate surgery. Retrieved from Yahoo Health: http://health.yahoo.net/news/s/nm/racial-gaps-in-access-to-robotic-prostrate-surgery
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Critique of Health and Quantitative Research

Words: 1496 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52133899

Nurses' Work Schedule Characteristics, Nurse Staffing, and Patient Mortality" (Trinkoff, et al. 2011 p 1). The authors argue that lower nursing staff level can lead to poor patients' outcome and poor care, however, higher nursing skills mix can assist in recording lower mortality rates. In overall, increase in a number of nursing staff is associated with improving patient outcome. The authors use the quantitative technique to collect data from 633 nurses working in different 71 acute non-federal hospitals in Illinois and North Carolina. The study also uses a generalized estimating equation to examine the hypothesis. The research examines whether the authors explicitly states the research questions or hypothesis.

Hypotheses or esearch Questions

Analysis of the research reveals that the authors do not explicitly state the research questions, and the absence of the research questions is not justified because one of the main features of quality quantitative research is to state…… [Read More]

Reference

Trinkoff, A. M., Johantgen, M., Storr, C. L., Gurses, A. P., Liang, Y., & Han, K. (2011). Nurses' work schedule characteristics, nurse staffing, and patient mortality. Nursing research, 60(1), 1-8.
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What Clinical Nursing Phenomena Are You Most Interested in

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52151476

University Doctor of Nursing Practice Program?

The Doctor of Nursing Practice is a unique degree in that it prepares nurses with the research skills to work more effectively in clinical settings. Unlike a purely academic degree, it is designed to prepare nurses to become leaders in the field, rather than work primarily in a university. But it still demands a rigorous understanding of evidence-based practice. The DNP reflects the fact that research can be critical in improving the quality of medicine while still ensuring that the research has a practical focus and can be used in a meaningful way to better the lives of patients and providers alike.

The increased complexity of healthcare regulation, the sophistication of medical technology, and the growing diversity of the patient population all reflect the need for leaders in the nursing field to pursue advanced degrees. To have the necessary background to act as an…… [Read More]

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Clinical Psychology as a Distinct Pursuit and

Words: 1554 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52515054

clinical psychology as a distinct pursuit and profession emerged in the late nineteenth century. However, a "climate of ideas receptive to the development of clinical psychology" emerged as early as the late 18th century (eisman, 1976, p. vii). Clinical psychology perspectives reflected trends in Enlightenment thinking and the rise of the scientific method as a primary means of investigating reality. Enlightenment issues like individualism underlie much of clinical psychology. The evolution of the professional field indicates the important role of both scientific research and methodology including statistical analysis. Imbuing psychology with the scientific method allowed clinical psychology to emerge as a credible profession dedicated to the explication and healing of mental health issues. Clinical psychology is one of many approaches to psychology and mental health. Psychiatry, counseling psychology, and social work all share elements in common with clinical psychology even though all are distinct professions.

eisman (1976) defines clinical psych…… [Read More]

References

Albee, G.W. (2000). The Boulder Model's fatal flaw. American Psychologist 55(2): 247-248.

Benjamin, L.T. (2005). A History of Clinical Psychology as a Profession in America. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology 1(1-30)

"Brief Institutional History of Clinical and Health Psychology," (n.d.). Chapter Two in Curriculum in Clinical and Health Psychology. Retrieved online:  http://www.cop.es/English/docs/brief.htm 

Fazakas-DeHoog, L. (n.d.). History of clinical psychology. Retrieved online: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=clinical%20psychology%20history&source=web&cd=7&ved=0CFoQFjAG&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.laurafazakas.com%2Fpdf%2Fpsych_260b_chap-02_history_of_clinical_2007-2008.pdf&ei=qvjGTun9BM-ctwe_0OytDA&usg=AFQjCNEEyhpcURpsU11hKeTwPKMV-Cketw
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Clinical Psychology the Field of Clinical Psychology

Words: 1204 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19328472

Clinical Psychology

The field of clinical psychology emerged as a viable method through which the theoretical foundations of cognitive studies could be effectively applied within the clinical setting to prevent and treat psychological syndromes. Derived from the first clinical psychology work conducted by Lightner Witmer in the late 19th century, and expanding throughout the 20th century as diagnostic tools were refined and classification systems for mental disorders were standardized, modern clinical psychology has been adapted to fulfill a niche within a whole host of divergent fields, including criminal justice, the social sciences and gender relations. Clinical psychologists premise their work on the use of empirical analysis to accurately investigate matters of cognitive processing, psychological assessment and mental illness, with the administration of personality tests, neurological scans and clinical interviews the most frequently utilized diagnostic resources. As clinical psychology expanded the base of knowledge pertaining to the human brain's highly refined…… [Read More]

References

Blackburn, R. (1993). The psychology of criminal conduct: Theory, research and practice. John Wiley & Sons.

Donohue, J., & Levitt, S. (2001). The impact of race on policing and arrests. Journal of Law and Economics, 44, 367-394. Retrieved from  http://pricetheory.uchicago.edu/levitt/Papers/LevittDonohueTheImpactOfRace2001.pdf 

Fite, P.J., Wynn, P., & Pardini, D.A. (2009). Explaining discrepancies in arrest rates between

Black and White male juveniles. Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, 77(5), 916. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2981137/ >.
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Clinical Educators Who Prepare the Students for

Words: 1668 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50509508

Clinical educators who prepare the students for enhancing knowledge and skills. They typically build the competent and provide quality clinical education. Many universities are offering these types of programmes to help students and prepare them for professional development of clinical educators. The educators develop themselves and their company for prospect healthcare challenges, this primarily help them in achieving their targets, and fulfill organization's need. It broad the horizon of student and give them inspiration to move ahead. We will also discuss the self-assessment criteria and other components of clinical education.

Goals of each workshop

In general the goal of each workshop was to learn, explore, and develop the phenomena of self-awareness. In the first module we have learned about the basic techniques of manipulating an optimal learning environment. The second module has demonstrated the abilities of learners to corroborate multiple skills throughout the framework to maximize value for patient care…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Benner, P, Sutphen, M., Leonard, V., & Day, L. (2010).Educating nurses. A call for tramsformation. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Benner, P. (1984). From novice to expert: Excellent and power in clinical nursing practice. Menlo Park, Calif: Addison-Wesley

Bransford, J. (2000). How people learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. Washington, DC: National Research Council

Chabel, MM. (2001). A model to facilitate reflective thinking in clinical nursing education.
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Clinical Supervision Tony Bush Wrote an Article

Words: 925 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27583298

Clinical Supervision:

Tony Bush wrote an article regarding overcoming the hindrances to effective clinical supervision, which was published in Nursing Times website. Bush's publication was influenced by the fact that clinical supervision is one of the most commonly misunderstood practices in contemporary nursing. However, clinical supervision provides a supportive and nurturing service to nurse practitioners by assisting them to critically reflect on the actions during the delivery of patient care. As a result, the author seeks to examine and explore the existing role and status of clinical supervision in the Nursing Health Service.

Clinical supervision is basically described as a complex activity with multi-faceted functions that seeks to provide emotional support to counselors receiving supervision and providing them with extra education. This concept can also be described as a means of evaluating and monitoring counselors' professional performance and enhancing the quality of their respective duties. In the nursing field, clinical…… [Read More]

References:

Bush, T. (2005, January). Overcoming the Barriers to Effective Clinical Supervision. Nursing Times, 101(2), 38-41. Retrieved from  http://www.nursingtimes.net/Journals/2013/02/15/j/v/s/050111GLsupervision.pdf 

Guindon, M.H. (2002). Toward Accountability in the Use of the Self-Esteem Construct. Journal of Counseling & Development, 80, 204-215.

Marley, E. (2011, December). Self-help Strategies to Reduce Emotional Distress: What Do

People Do and Why? A Qualitative Study. Counseling and Psychotherapy Research, 11(4), 317-324.
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Clinical Mental Health Counseling Has

Words: 826 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73505589

During this period, there was a rather dramatic paradigm shift from the rather "mechanistic-deterministic" philosophy of psychoanalysis and behaviorism to the "self-deterministism" of the humanistic philosophy that is envisioned in by Carl odgers as noted by Aubrey (1983).odger's impact on counseling as a profession, pragmatically and philosophically was great. This is because his work is what led to the birth of counseling as a separate professional entity from psychology, guidance as well as psychiatry. Therefore, the philosophical underpinnings of counseling as a profession can be traced and acknowledged on the work of odgers. Later on, the need for training professional counselors became important and then in 1958, the National Defense Education Act (NDEA) was formed. This act was created in order to prepare thousands of counselors (Aubrey,1983,p.79).later on, various professional accreditation bodies were created for the counseling profession. One such kind is the Council for the Accredition for Counseling and…… [Read More]

References

Aubrey, R.F. (1983). The Odyssey of counseling and images of the future. Personnel and Guidance Journal, 62, 78-8

Smith, HB., Robinson, GP (1995).Mental Health Counseling: Past, Present, and Future. Journal of Counseling & Development Vol.74 (2) pages 158 -- 162, November-December 1995

Myers, J.E. & Sweeney, T.J. (2001). Specialties in counseling. In D.C. Locke, J.E. Myers, & E.L. Herr (Eds.), the Handbook of Counseling, pp. 43-54. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Palmo, AJ., Weikel, WJ.,Borsos, DP (2006).Foundations of Mental Health Counseling. Charles C. Thomas Publisher.
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Clinical Integration Healthcare

Words: 3527 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71289994

Healthcare: Clinical Integration

Item Page

What is clinical integration

History of clinical integration

Goals of clinical integration

Importance of clinical integration

Health reform

New payment models

IT advancement

Barriers to clinical integration

Legal barriers

Lack of practitioner alignment

Lack of interoperability

How to achieve success in clinical integration

Incentive alignment

Knowledge alignment

Behavioral alignment

The future of health care systems

Physician acquisitions vs. clinical integration

HIEs -- solution to clinical integration?

Policy makers are beginning to appreciate the fact that only systemic change can effectively change, for the better, the manner of health care delivery in the U.S.; and that anything less would only alter the system's edges - with little or no substantial effect on cost-control, innovation-promotion, effectiveness of reward incentive schemes, coordination and coverage (AHA, 2010). Clinical integration has been found to be crucial to the change needed for the achievement of the aforementioned goals (AHA, 2010). Despite…… [Read More]

References

AHA. Clinical Integration -- the Key to Real Reform. Trend Watch. Retrieved from [HIDDEN]

Athena Health. (2014). History of the Clinical Integration Model. Athena Health. Retrieved from https://www.athenahealth.com/knowledge-hub/clinical-integration/clinical-integration-model.php

eHealth Initiative. (2012). The Rise of the Private Health Information Exchange and Changing Role of Public Exchanges. eHealth Initiative. Retrieved from [HIDDEN]

Fridsma, D. (2013). Interoperability Vs Health Information Exchange: Setting the Record Straight. Health IT Buzz. Retrieved from  http://www.healthit.gov/buzz-blog/meaningful-use/interoperability-health-information-exchange-setting-record-straight/
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Clinical Psychology Psychodynamic Cognitive-Behavioral Humanistic

Words: 702 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71685561

Also known as person-centered or client-centered, Rogerian therapy, it "places much of the responsibility for the treatment process on the client, with the therapist taking a nondirective role" Person-centered therapy, 2009, Mind disorders). However, although effective with some clients: "Person-centered therapy, however, appears to be slightly less effective than other forms of humanistic therapy in which therapists offer more advice to clients and suggest topics to explore," as the client may use the therapy sessions more to complain or go over old grievances, than use the therapy to move forward in his or her life (Person-centered therapy, 2009, Mind disorders).

Another type of therapy that has radically escalated in popularity is that of family or marital therapy, which, like cognitive-behavioral therapy, tends to be focused on specific problems and of a fairly short duration. "Marriage and family therapists regularly practice short-term therapy; 12 sessions on average" FAQs, 2009, AAMFT). The…… [Read More]

Works Cited

FAQs about marriage and family therapy. (2009). American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). Retrieved February 28, 2009 at http://www.aamft.org/faqs/index_nm.asp

Mulhauser, Greg. (2009). An introduction to cognitive therapy and cognitive-behavioral approaches. Counseling Resource. Retrieved February 28, 2009 at http://counsellingresource.com/types/cognitive-therapy/

Park, C. (2006, October 18). Best evidence summaries of topics in mental healthcare.

BEST in MH clinical question-answering service.