Containment Policy Essays (Examples)

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Policy of Containment After World

Words: 427 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87995523

The Soviets desire to establish their "sphere of influence" in Eastern Europe and disagreement with the U.S. over the fate of Germany was another reason. The U.S. retaliated by issuing the Truman Doctrine in 1947 that authorized U.S. aid to anti-Communist forces in countries threatened by Communists. The Soviet testing of the atomic bomb in 1949 and its tacit approval of a North Korean attack on South Korea that led to the Korean War further soured relations between the two nations. The Vietnam War in which the U.S. intervened militarily to prevent a Communist take-over of the country was another area of conflict between the U.S. And the Soviet Union. (Bell, 2001)

eferences

Containment." (2006). Nuclear Files.org: Nuclear Age Peace Foundation. etrieved on November 18, 2006 at http://www.nuclearfiles.org/menu/key-issues/nuclear-weapons/history/cold-war/strategy/strategy-containment.htm

Bell, P.M.H. (2001). The World since 1945 -- An International History. London: Oxford University Press Inc.

The U.S. represented democracy, individual liberty…… [Read More]

References

Containment." (2006). Nuclear Files.org: Nuclear Age Peace Foundation. Retrieved on November 18, 2006 at  http://www.nuclearfiles.org/menu/key-issues/nuclear-weapons/history/cold-war/strategy/strategy-containment.htm 

Bell, P.M.H. (2001). The World since 1945 -- An International History. London: Oxford University Press Inc.

The U.S. represented democracy, individual liberty and capitalism, while the U.S.S.R. was the first Marxist state committed to a command economy and the spread of the communist revolution around the world
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Challenging the Beijing Consensus China Foreign Policy in the 21st Century

Words: 24240 Length: 60 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17194104

Foreign Policy of China (Beijing consensus)

Structure of Chinese Foreign Policy

The "Chinese Model" of Investment

The "Beijing Consensus" as a Competing Framework

Operational Views

The U.S.-China (Beijing consensus) Trade Agreement and Beijing Consensus

Trading with the Enemy Act

Export Control Act.

Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act

Category B

Category C

The 1974 Trade Act.

The Operational Consequences of Chinese Foreign Policy

The World Views and China (Beijing consensus)

Expatriates

The Managerial Practices

Self Sufficiency of China (Beijing consensus)

China and western world: A comparison

The China (Beijing consensus)'s Policy of Trading Specialized Goods

Chapter 5

The versions of China (Beijing consensus)'s trade development

The China (Beijing consensus) Theory of Power Transition

eferences

Foreign Policy of China (Beijing consensus)

Chapter 1

Abbreviations

ACD arms control and disarmament

ACDA Arms Control and Disarmament Agency

ADB Asian Development Bank

ADF Asian Development Fund

APEC Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation

AF ASEAN [Association of Southeast…… [Read More]

References

Barnett, A.D. (1977). China (Beijing consensus) and the Major Powers in East Asia. Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=34158088

Boorman, H.L., Eckstein, A., Mosely, P.E., & Schwartz, B. (1957). Moscow-Peking Axis: Strengths and Strains (1st ed.). New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=53424557

Sardesai, D.R. (1974). Chapter 6 India: A Balancer Power?. In Southeast Asia under the New Balance of Power, Chawla, S., Gurtov, M., & Marsot, A. (Eds.) (pp. 94-104). New York: Praeger. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=14691923

Chawla, S., Gurtov, M., & Marsot, A. (Eds.). (1974). Southeast Asia under the New Balance of Power. New York: Praeger. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=14691822
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Successful Policy Model Include Typically

Words: 702 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62660240

They exploited the opportunities created by relaxing those standards and eventually brought about exactly the kinds of fiascos that previous laws governing the relationships among and between investment firms, insurers, and savings banks were intended to prevent (Ehrenreich, 2009). The same is true in the case of health care lobbyists and their influence over government policies. Since the historic 2010 Supreme Court decision granting free speech rights to corporations, the wealthy have become more politically powerful than ever before.

4. At least 100 words - Identify three uses or lessons that can be learned from policy analysis and include an example of each use.

olicy analysis can identify areas of fiscal waste and corresponding opportunities to reduce waste of public resources. For example, when the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) identified certain types of urinary tract infections in hospitals that were caused primarily by poor care delivery, it…… [Read More]

Prentice Hall.

Reid, T. (2009). The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health

Care. New York: Penguin Books.
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Analyzing American Foreign Policy

Words: 621 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96480983

American Foreign Policy

The Policy of Containment post World War II

According to Bernstein (2002), in the post-World War era until the disintegration of Soviet Union in 1989-91, formulation of the foreign policy of U.S. was based on the plan of containment. United States continued following the policy of containment even in the 21st century to deal with countries with communist governments like Cuba, North Korea and China. Generally, containment means American endeavours to curtail spread of communism in the world through military, political and economic channels. Furthermore, this concept emerged after Second World War dynamics of global power and the concerns of U.S. leadership to avoid going into one more global war.

. In the view of Schoon (2011), primarily the concept of containment gained strategic importance and momentum after the author of the doctrine, George F. Kennan, a dominant foreign service officer in 1947 and further a regarded…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Bernstein, B. J. (2002). Containment. 2nd ed. Vol. 1.New York, 345-364.Retrieved December 13, 2015, from World History in Context: http://ic.galegroup.com

Pieper, M. A. (2012). Containment and the Cold War: Reexaming the Doctrine of Containment as a Grand Strategy Driving U.S. Cold War Interventions. Retrieved December 13, 2015, from Student Pulse4(08): http://www.studentpulse.com

Schoon, S. (2011, July 26). Cold War Containment: the role of the military. Retrieved December 13, 2015, from E-International Relations: www.e-ir.info
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Foreign Policy of President Reagan

Words: 5099 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83090795

Foreign Policy of President eagan

Before the disastrous Vietnam War, the U.S. held an undisputed dominant position worldwide, recognized locally as well as by other nations. The nation's historic actions towards defending freedom, by restraining the fascist faction during the Second World War, followed by organizing a large free-state coalition for combating communism, were supported by profound and sweeping domestic consensus. This consensus was destroyed by America's decision to wage war on Vietnam. Despite the rationale being the protection of free peoples battling communism, the Vietnam War resulted in caustic doubt and destabilizing discord among Americans. This suspicion and discord incited and guided by people opposed to the war, rather than the enemy's weaponry and zeal, explains America's failure, above every other factor. The U.S. had to battle internal resistance more than resistance from the Vietnamese adversary, and resulted in a self-inflicted defeat (Brenes 2015; LAISON 2013). Extremely serious repercussions…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, Martin. 1990. Revolution: The Reagan Legacy, Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press.

Armstrong, Scott and Peter Grier. 1986. Strategic Defense Initiative: Splendid Defense or Pipe Dream, New York: Foreign Policy Association.

Arquilla, John. 2006. The Reagan Imprint: Ideas in American Foreign Policy from the Collapse of Communism to the War on Terror, Chicago: Ivan R. Dee.

Baucom, Donald R. 1992. The Origins of SDI, 1944-1983, Lawrence, Kans.: University Press of Kansas.
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Public Policy

Words: 1582 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74785529

Policy

The state response to Ebola should be a coordinated communications effort. This will serve a number of purposes. First, it will maintain fiscal discipline. Second, communication is key to maintaining public order should there be an outbreak of Ebola. Third, communication helps to reduce the risk of an outbreak, because all members of our community will know how to avoid spreading Ebola.

The recent revelations that the World Health Organization and others botched their response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa has done little to calm the public here at home regarding this disease. A government that deals in evidence and has a realistic world view does not need to address irrational panic, but the fact that global and national-level bodies seem challenged to come up with a plan to deal with Ebola places the onus on the state to devise such solutions. Already, some states, such as…… [Read More]

References

AP. (2014). Canadian nurses: Updated ebola guidelines don't protect healthcare staff. Global News. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from  http://globalnews.ca/news/1623732/canada-releases-updated-ebola-guidelines-amid-calls-for-international-aid/ 

CBS. (2014). Christie announce MJ ebola team. CBS New York. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from  http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2014/10/22/christie-to-hold-nj-response-readiness-briefing-on-ebola/ 

Dixon, R. (2014). Eight reported dead in attack on Ebola workers in Guinea. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from  http://www.latimes.com/world/africa/la-fg-attack-ebola-guinea-outreach-20140918-story.html#
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American Foreign Policy Change From 1940 to

Words: 2017 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75317844

American foreign policy change from 1940 to the present?

Before the 20th century, the U.S. had a strong tradition of isolationism and non-interventionism. Beginning with American participation in World War I and continuing with its involvement in World War II after the invasion of Pearl Harbor, the U.S. increasingly began to conceive of itself as not only a player on the international stage, but also the ideological promoter and protector of democracy. When World War II ended with the U.S. bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, it was clear that America had taken a position of power in the world, both militarily and politically.

In the decade that followed World War II, American foreign policy pitted itself against Soviet Communism through the pursuit of "containment:" limiting the expansion of Soviet power and Communist ideology to other nations. This policy of containment was the primary driving force behind the "Cold War" and…… [Read More]

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U S Foreign Policy and the

Words: 956 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42976300

8 billion. The Occupation authorities also helped the Japanese government overcome postwar economic chaos, especially rampant inflation, by balancing the government budget, raising taxes and imposing price and wage freezes, and resuming limited foreign trade" (Kesselman et al., 203). The U.S. aid not only helped to rebuild the country, but also ensured that Japan was stable enough so that renegade seedlings of Communism or comparable institutions didn't suddenly flourish. The United States should sue this wise historical strategy that it deftly employed to help the economies of poorer nations in the Middle East. hen people are living in poverty, this makes them ripe breeding grounds for terrorism to build and people to be brainwashed by doctrines which vilify the est. Furthermore the United States should invest money in developing educational programs in the Middle East, so that the citizens there can actually envision a real future for themselves, without having…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bryne, P.J. The Chinese Revolution: The Triumph of Communism. Minneapolis: Compass Point

Books, 2007.

Kesselman, M., Krieger, J. And Joseph, W. Introduction to Comparative Politics. Boston:

Wadsworth Learnign, 2013.
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U S History and Foreign Policy

Words: 3087 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44277503

The events leading to the Vietnam conflict were determined by the administration in place at that time (VIETNAM CONFLICT (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam_War).

Initially it was decided that Vietnam would be occupied by Chinese and British troops and that they would supervise the surrender of Japan.

In 1960 Hanoi instructed the southern communists to establish an organization called the national liberation front. The purpose of this organization was to overthrow the government of the south. The organization was made up of two groups. The intellectuals of the South and who opposed the foundation of the government of South Viet Nam and the communists who had remained in the south after the partition.

The Di-m government was initially able to cope with the insurgency with the aid of U.S. advisers, and by 1962 seemed to be winning. Senior U.S. military leaders were receiving positive reports from the U.S. commander, Gen. Paul D. Harkins of…… [Read More]

References

CONTAINMENT of SOVIET UNION

http://www.foreignaffairs.org/19870301faessay7847/george-f-kennan/containment-40-years-later-containment-then-and-now.html

An Outline of American History (1994) http://www.let.rug.nl/~usa/H/1994/ch11_p5.htm

CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS
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U S Foreign Policy Towards North

Words: 2229 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45131135

(Efimova, 2007, paraphrased)

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION

North Korea underwent internal changes as well as changes due to external factors that placed North Korea in a defensive stance in its focus on strategically avoiding threats and in rebuilding its own self-reliance economically. For North Korea since the erlin Wall fell the use of conventional weapons by North Korea in defending itself from external foes has not been a feasible proposition, therefore, it is apparent that North Korea acquired nuclear capabilities because of the value of these capabilities as use as a method for ensuring adequate self-defense in what the regime in North Korea views as a highly unstable security environment and one in which North Korea is quite terrified that will result in the United States becoming aggressive from a military standpoint.

It really can not be held as true that the reason for the development of nuclear capability in North…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Lin, Liu (2006) The North Korean Nuclear Test and Its Implications. Central-Asia -- Caucasus Institute Silk Road Studies Program. Online available at: http://www.silkroadstudies.org/new/docs/Silkroadpapers/2006/LiuLin%20Final061204.pdf.

Yongho, Kim and Yi, Yurim (2005) Security Dilemmas and Signaling During the North Korean Nuclear Standoff. Asian Perspective. Vol. 29, No.3, 2005, pp. 73-97. Online available at: http://www.asianperspective.org/articles/v29n3-d.pdf

Xizhen, Zhang and Brown, Eugene (2000) Policies Toward North Korea: A Time for New Thinking. Journal of Contemporary China. Vol. 9, Issue 25, November 2000. pp.535-545.

Sujian, Guo and Stradiotto, Gary A. (2007) The Nature and Direction of Economic Reform in North Korea. Political Studies, Vol.55, No. 4 December 2007. pp. 754-778(25) Blackwell Publishing.
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U S Foreign Policy After the War

Words: 2716 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64793745

post war policies that the U.. And the world have adopted towards Iraq. It has 8 sources.

The war in Iraq and the protests of people around the world has given a clear signal to the American government and policy makers that the world has become a different place. That every attempt of American expansionism and corporate imperialism will be opposed, the unilateral policies of United tates has to change and being a superpower it has to realize its responsibilities. The opposition from the European countries, the Arab community and China should be a great concern to America. The American foreign policies clearly show that the goal of its leader is to expand the American empire with the method of progressive imperialism. The United tates because of its policies has become isolated in the world and has become an object of hatred around the world. If the unilateral and expansionism…… [Read More]

Sources:

Martin Schwarz, "We're all Americans: Why the Europeans Are Against This War," (Silver City, NM & Washington, DC: Foreign Policy In Focus, March 26, 2003).

Dworkin, Anthony, Iraq and the "Bush doctrine" of Pre-Emptive Self-Defense," August 20, 2002 at http://www.crimesofwar.org/expert/bush-intro.html

Louis Gerber, U.S. foreign policy on Iraq, 2003 at  http://www.cosmopolis.ch/english/cosmo34/us_american_foreign_policy_iraq_2.htm 

Phyllis Bennis, UNDERSTANDING THE U.S.-IRAQ CRISIS, A pamphlet of the Institute for Policy Studies, January 2003 at http://www.ips-dc.org/iraq/primer1.htm#4
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U S Foreign Policy in Southern

Words: 2383 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16355948

" Regan was able to discourage Congress' previous prohibitions for aid to UNITA and instead launched into the covert plan to leverage American weight on the side fighting the Marxist supporters. The Soviet Union reacted quickly; Cuban expeditionary forces were sent to the region in their satellite guerilla's aid and, in the bloody fight between ethnic groups in Angola, the larger Soviet-American conflict played out.

In 1987, the struggle came to a head. The United States assumed its supportive role for UNITA as reason preside over the tripartite negotiation that would end the civil war. At the bargaining table were also Cuban and South African forces, reaffirming the battle as one led by other issues more than directed by the cause of Angolan success. Cuba agreed to leave Angola, ultimately, but South Africa also agreed to relinquish its control over Namibia. Twenty years earlier, Marxist South-West Africa eople's Organization launched…… [Read More]

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American Foreign Security Policies What

Words: 1788 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36781574

But the U.S. must also set an example to the world on human rights, and that begins with a rejection of the kind of abuses that were carried out at Abu Ghraib in Iraq during the U.S. occupation of that sovereign nation.

orks Cited

Biden, Joseph. (2009). Biden Lays Out U.S. Foreign Policy Goals, Approaches. America.gov.

Retrieved Dec. 16, 2010, from http://www.america.gov.

Blanton, Shannon Lindsey. (2005). Foreign Policy in Transition? Human Rights, Democracy,

and U.S. Arms Exports. International Studies Quarterly, Vol. 49, 647-667.

Butler, Desmond. (2010). Lawmakers stretching out Russia nuke pact debate. The Seattle

Times. Retrieved Dec. 16, 2010, from http://seattletimes.nwsource.com.

Cardenas, Sonia. (2009). Human Rights in Latin America: A Politics of Terror and Hope.

Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Hamid, Shadi, and Brooke, Steven. (2010). Promoting Democracy to Stop Terror, Revisited,

Policy Review, No. 59, 45-58.

McCain, John. (2010). National History and Universal Values: Prioritizing Human Rights…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Biden, Joseph. (2009). Biden Lays Out U.S. Foreign Policy Goals, Approaches. America.gov.

Retrieved Dec. 16, 2010, from http://www.america.gov.

Blanton, Shannon Lindsey. (2005). Foreign Policy in Transition? Human Rights, Democracy,

and U.S. Arms Exports. International Studies Quarterly, Vol. 49, 647-667.
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Foreign Policy Is One of

Words: 1166 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70780661

It was however an essential move for the foreign policy of the United States in its quest for containment of the communist threat.

A proper example of the way in which the decisions taken in terms of foreign policy were the reflection of the interests of political parties vs. their electorate was the Carter administration that took some of the most important steps in the discussions with the ussian Communist forces on human rights issues. Better said, usually the first steps in improving the diplomatic relations with a country or a set of countries is the start of negotiations on smaller and less important aspects for the political forces. One such subject, in the late 70s and early 80s was the discussion on human rights. As opposed to the more stringent and real problems the U.S. had with the U.S.S.. that included nuclear threats or economic competition, the issue of…… [Read More]

Reference

Zelizer, J.E. (2010) "Arsenal of Democracy: The Politics of National Security - From World War II to the War on Terrorism." New York: Basic Books.
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Health Policy Economics Class Master Degree Level

Words: 2850 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91626873

Health Policy Economics class. Master Degree level. It 8-12 pages long 10 resources. The topic Over-Utilization Emergency oom Services. I uploading project details.

eliance on emergency departments for non-emergent services has been on the increase with many people visiting them since they provide timely access to primary care. The 1985 Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA) mandated Medicare institutions to provide emergency departments for patients despite their regardless of their ability to pay for these services. Many of the uninsured or underinsured thus find these emergency rooms as the most convenience sources of health care. Overutilization of emergency rooms is a vicious cycle as a result of increasing health care costs that are associated with this phenomenon. Three possible solutions to this problem are identified which are health care homes, retail clinics and telehealth with the best solution being the health care homes.

Overutilization of emergency room services…… [Read More]

References

Blackstone, E.A., Buck, A.J., & Simon, H. (2007). The Economics of Emergency Response. Policy Sciences, 40(4), 313-334. doi: 10.2307/25474342

Brailsford, S.C., Lattimer, V.A., Tarnaras, P., & Turnbull, J.C. (2004). Emergency and On-Demand Health Care: Modelling a Large Complex System. The Journal of the Operational Research Society, 55(1), 34-42. doi: 10.2307/4101825

Bristol, N. (2006). Overtaxed U.S. emergency care system needs reorganisation. BMJ: British Medical Journal, 332(7556), 1468. doi: 10.2307/25689667

Carey, K., Burgess, J.F., & Young, G.J. (2009). Single Specialty Hospitals and Service Competition. Inquiry, 46(2), 162-171. doi: 10.2307/29773415
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Ronald Reagan foreign Policy

Words: 2217 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95776619

Ronald Reagan Foreign Policy: Annotated Bibliography

ucker, Robert W. 1989. "REAGAN'S FOREIGN POLICY." Foreign Affairs 68, no. 1: 1-27.

he author of this article maintains that Ronald Reagan assumed the Presidential role rebuking the 70s' arms control attempts. As a majority of Reagan's fellow politicians were highly suspicious of any arms control pacts with Russia, the general belief was that the newly sworn-in President shared the same view. he cold-war agreement with respect to foreign policy remains consistently idealized since Vietnam. Rarely did it function with the now-envisaged efficacy and smoothness. his re-formation's key feature was, evidently, the restitution of a prevalent public opinion that perceived the exercising of U.S. power without guilt or distrust, once again. herefore, the chief Reagan foreign-policy legacy might well be that: the 40th President of the United States altered the inclination not to suffer for USA's global position into something of a firm resolve…… [Read More]

This article is an analysis of the cognitive style of Reagan as manifested through his statement on the U.S. and the USSR and the nature of the 1964-1972 international conflict. The analysis shows the black-and-white dichotomy thinking and the rigid perception. However, the authr argues that Reagan was able to modify his notion on winning or losing in war through the reorganization that the U.S. and the USSR had some common interests in the war, for example, constraining the nuclear arms race.

Fischer, B.A., 2000. The Reagan reversal: Foreign policy and the end of the Cold War. University of Missouri Press.

Even though there is the assumption that Reagan was reactive in bringing to conclusion the cold war, this book shows that the president had actually began seeking for rapprochement with the USSR earlier than Gorbachev took office. The author demonstrates how Reagan began calling for dialogue, understanding and cooperation between the superpowers. In general the book shows that Reagan was at time the driving force for the U.S.-USSR policy of his administration.
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Evolution of U S Foreign Policy

Words: 400 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39888462

Evolution of U.S. oreign Policy under Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon towards the Soviet Union

oreign Policy towards the Soviet Union under Presidents Truman through to Nixon (1945-1974) was characterized by the "Cold War" -- a period of heightened tension between the two 'super powers' of the world. Even while being constrained by the compulsions of the 'Cold War,' the relations between the two countries gradually evolved into a less hostile association under successive U.S. Presidents in this period.

Harry Truman who became the U.S. President towards the end of World War II was the architect of the policy of containment of the Communism, led by the Soviet Union, around the world enshrined in the 'Truman Doctrine.' He was also instrumental in establishing a strong Western alliance called NATO in Europe that checked Soviet designs beyond Eastern Europe. Eisenhower continued with his predecessors' policy of "containment" without direct…… [Read More]

Foreign Policy towards the Soviet Union under Presidents Truman through to Nixon (1945-1974) was characterized by the "Cold War" -- a period of heightened tension between the two 'super powers' of the world. Even while being constrained by the compulsions of the 'Cold War,' the relations between the two countries gradually evolved into a less hostile association under successive U.S. Presidents in this period.

Harry Truman who became the U.S. President towards the end of World War II was the architect of the policy of containment of the Communism, led by the Soviet Union, around the world enshrined in the 'Truman Doctrine.' He was also instrumental in establishing a strong Western alliance called NATO in Europe that checked Soviet designs beyond Eastern Europe. Eisenhower continued with his predecessors' policy of "containment" without direct confrontation with the Soviet Union. While he extended U.S. aid and protection to South Vietnam to prevent it from being over-run by the Communists, he did not intervene when the U.S.S.R. crushed an uprising in Hungary in 1956 to avoid a nuclear confrontation. President Kennedy displayed great courage to force the Soviet Union from deploying nuclear weapons in Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1961 but later signed a limited nuclear test ban treaty with the U.S.S.R., which cooled down the Cold War temperature somewhat. President Johnson, though bogged down by the escalating Vietnam War, sought to improve relations with the Soviet Union and managed to attain its co-operation in containing the 1967 Arab-Israeli War. Finally, Nixon pursued a policy of detente (based on "realist" rather than "moral" principles) in the 1970s and developed more cordial relations with the Soviet Union. This resulted in signing of important anti-ballistic missile (ABM) and SALT treaties between the two super-powers and lowered the Cold War tensions.

As we saw in this essay, the relations between the U.S. And the U.S.S.R. were by no means static in the post World War II period until the mid-seventies. Although involved in an intense ideological struggle during the Cold War, they managed to avoid direct confrontation and even improved their relations. This was owed in no small measure to the wise foreign policy of the U.S. presidents from Truman down to Nixon.
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China's Economy and Foreign Policy

Words: 3282 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99523028

China's Economy And Foreign Policy

There have been radical changes in the internal political and economic scenario of China during the last two decades. (Lampton, 2001) The growing economic stability and control has increased the status of china to a great extent among its trading counterparts. Further, it has become obligatory on the part of the Chinese Government to make it certain that the economic development to restructure the political discipline whose ideology had a severe jolt with the fall of Soviet Union. (Part Two - Chinese Foreign Policy) Ever since the inception of economic reforms in China during 1978 there is a considerable enhancement in the Gross Domestic Product to the tune of 9.5% per annum on average. It is pertinent to probe on the factors responsible for such a great success. The success is attributed to the adoption of institutions and policies by the Chinese Government that could…… [Read More]

References

Burns, Robert (1997) "Gore, Gingrich set missions to woo China" The Associated Press.

Carr, Earl. (February 19, 2004) "U.S. Diplomacy Needs Chinese Characteristics" Asia Times. pp: 5-7

Chinese Foreign Policy. Program for Contemporary Silk Road Studies. Retrieved from http://www.silkroadstudies.org/china.htm Accessed on 18 March, 2005

Chow, Gregory. (2000) China's Economic Reform and Policies at the Beginning of the 21st Century. Perspectives. Vol: 2; No: 1; pp: 47-53
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U S Foreign Policy Pre and

Words: 4171 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95331019

A long passage is quoted here by way of showing what all these various writers are concerned about: (Kane, 2003)May 2002 brought the odd spectacle of ex-President Jimmy Carter standing shoulder to shoulder in Havana with one of the U.S. government's oldest enemies, Cuban president Fidel Castro. Carter, on a mission to convey a message of friendship to the Cuban people and to seek some common ground between Cuba and the United States, made a point of meeting and encouraging local democratic, religious, and human rights activists. In a televised address, he endorsed the rights of dissidents and urged democracy on the island nation (Sullivan 2002). He also advocated an end to the U.S. embargo on Cuba (a call immediately echoed at home by 20 Democratic and 20 epublican representatives in Congress).

President George W. Bush's administration responded angrily to Carter's latest adventure as international arbiter. A senior state department…… [Read More]

References

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000729437

Beard, J.M. (2002). America's New War on Terror: The Case for Self-Defense under International Law. Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, 25(2), 559+. Retrieved May 9, 2005, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.

Buchanan, P.J. (1999) a Republic, Not an Empire: Reclaiming America's Destiny, Regenary, 1999, Washington, D.C.

Bryd, R.C. Senator, (2004) Losing America: Confronting a Reckless and Arrogant Presidency. W.W. Norton, New York http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001205015
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International Policies and Laws

Words: 1284 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86323620

Chernobyl Nuclear disaster took place in 1986 in Ukraine which is a former Soviet State. This plant was built back in 1970 and consisted of 4 reactors. The plant was scheduled to undergo a scheduled and controlled shut down so as to test the generator's ability to produce electricity using the plant's safety system. eactor 4 of this plant exploded after interior energy increased beyond control discharging radioactive debris and smoke on close by cities and created a radioactive cloud that spread out to a big region of the U.S.S.. And Europe. This catastrophe involved over 500,000 workers, and over 18 million ubles. It was considered an International disaster due to the large area that it impacted negatively.

Immediately after the incident, firefighters arrived at the scene and tried to put off the fires. Lieutenant Pravik was among the first commandants to arrive at the scene and he died in…… [Read More]

References

Alexey V.Y.; Vassily B. Nesterenko; Alexey V. (2009). Chernobyl: Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences) Wiley-Blackwell.

Berger, E.M. (2010). The Chernobyl Disaster, Concern about the Environment, and Life Satisfaction. Kyklos, 63(1), 1-8

Davletbaev, R (2001). Last shift Chernobyl. Ten years later. Inevitability or chance? Moscow: Energoatomizdat.

Jargin, S. (2012). Debate on the Chernobyl disaster: on the causes of Chernobyl overestimation. International Journal Of Health Services: Planning, Administration, Evaluation, 42(1), 29-34
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U S Foreign Policy on Terrorism

Words: 2230 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 572844

International Terrorism

Discussion Questions on International Terrorism

Explain the origins and evolution of long-term separatists and ethnic and nationalistic terrorism. Also, provide group names and their respective parts of the world.

Ethno- separatist/nationalist terrorism is not specifically a modern phenomenon. Historically, two Jewish movements in Judaea that desired to provoke the local population to rise against the oman occupiers used ethno-racial terrorism. However, it was only in 60s and 70s that terrorism came to be associated with ethnic- separatist/nationalist movements (Conser, Paynich & Gingerich, 2013). During that time, terrorism was seen as paying off on the reasons for effective, aggressive campaigns launched and won. The Palestine Liberation Organization's terrorist movement between 1968 and 1980 confirmed to other nationalist groups that internationalizing their cause could be valuable. The variety of ethnic-national/separatist terrorist movements effective worldwide, therefore, increased from three in 1968 to 30 in 1978 (Cassara, 2006).

Psychologists argue that the…… [Read More]

References

Conser, J.A., Paynich, R., & Gingerich, T. (2013). Law enforcement in the United States. Burlington, Mass: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Cassara, J.A. (2006). Hide and seek: Intelligence, law enforcement, and the stalled war on terrorist finance. Washington, DC: Potomac Books.

Dintino, J.J., & Martens, F.T. (2003). Police intelligence systems in crime control: Maintaining a delicate balance in a liberal democracy. Springfield, Ill: C.C. Thomas.

Fijnaut, C., & Paoli, L. (2004). Organized crime in Europe: Concepts, patterns, and control policies in the European Union and beyond. The Netherlands: Springer.
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How the War Still Affects American Society and Foreign Policy

Words: 1184 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12582372

Vietnam War

Japan had taken control of Vietnam during the Second World War. They had come in, in 1940, as a strategy to prevent China from ferrying weapons through the country. However, there was resistance to this through the efforts of Ho Chi Minh, who would later lead the independent country. He was a communist, and this would help him in accessing aid from the communist China when fighting against the French in the southern part of this country. The south was under the French rule, and thus, not part of the growing communism movement. Concerned over the threat of communist domination of the great part of Asia, the United States decided to back the French, so that they could set up a friendly government. However, they were defeated in the ensuing war, though they did not leave, but signed a peace agreement. Through the U.S. efforts, elections were halted…… [Read More]

References

Davis, Mr. American Involvement in Vietnam. http://www.schoolhistory.co.uk/gcselinks/britishworld/vietnam/vietnamusinvolvement.pdf Web. 12, November. 2015.

Leffler, P. M.Containment http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/pons/s2_9143.pdf Web. 12, November. 2015.

Brno. The Vietnam War, Public Opinion and American Culture. 2008. https://is.muni.cz/th/96666/pedf_m/Vietnam_War.pdf Web. 12, November. 2015.

Herring, Georgie C. America's Longest War, the United States and Vietnam 1950-1975. Second Edition. New York: Newbery Award Records, 1986.
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Correctional Policies and Efficiencies in the US

Words: 1235 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6145318

Agency's ole

The Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) is an agency under the prison health care systems. The Institution was established to provide a more humane and modern care for state prisoners, make the prison service more professional, and to oversee reliable and central management of the government prisons. The key role of this agency is to restrict perpetrator to a humane, safe, secure and cost-efficient location for them to spend time for the criminal offenses they have committed and receive the care that is needed. BOP also has a responsibility of reducing the possibility of future criminal offenses and law offenses wit programs where violators are prevented from breaking the law again. Statistically, these programs have proven to be very effective. BOP workers help criminals by offering a variety of services and programs to inmates, to help prepare them to regain a lifestyle with morals and live a life…… [Read More]

References

Siegel, L.J., & Bartollas, C. (2011). Corrections today. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.

Whitehead, J.T., Jones, M., & Braswell, M.C. (2008). Exploring Corrections in America. Burlington: Elsevier Science.
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Foreign Relations of the U S

Words: 3375 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80732255



A second lesson was found in Kennedy's management of the crisis. The basic lesson learned was that, in the midst of such a crisis, leaders need time away from the glare of the media to resolve their own thinking and communications, and they need the self-confidence to limit their objectives to only what is needed to resolve the crisis, not "win" it.

It is believed that the Soviet's lesson was that you can't mess with nuclear weapons. In other words, when it gets to the point that you know you might destroy millions of innocent people, that is the depth of fear that leaders must realize, confront, and not back away from. What they must do is back away from the unnecessary and catastrophic events their pride might trigger.

The lessons learned by European leaders were probably not good ones. Kennedy did not consult with them during this crisis. They…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Barnett, R.J. "America in Vietnam: The Four Interventions (excerpted from the book: Intervention and Revolution)." 1968. thirdworldtraveler.com. 28 JUly 2009 .

Brenner, P. "The Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962: Turning History on its Head." 2002. George Washington University. 29 July 2009 .

U.S. Dept. Of State. "Kennan and Containment, 1947." n.d. U.S. Department of State. 28 JUly 2009 .

"What ended the cold war?" 8 August 2003. Everything2.com. 28 July 2009 .
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U S Foreign Affairs Since 1898

Words: 3090 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8617183

President Johnson became even more fearful of a communist take-over.

In 1964, when two American ships were attacked by the North Vietnamese in the Gulf of Tonkin "the American Senate gave Johnson the power to give armed support to assist any country requesting help in defense of its freedom," effectively beginning the Vietnam War without a formal declaration of war (BBC 2009). The wide-scale bombing of the North in 'Operation olling Thunder' began in February 1965. By March 1965, the first American ground troops had landed in South Vietnam and by December 1965, there were 150,000 servicemen stationed in the country (BBC 2009).

ichard Nixon was elected to the presidency in 1968, promising a policy of Vietnamization or the taking-over of the war against the North by native Vietnamese troops. However, it would be four more years before substantial withdrawals of American servicemen occurred. Nixon also supported dictators in Laos…… [Read More]

References

An overview of the crisis. (1997). The Cuban Missile Crisis. Crisis Center. Thinkquest.

Retrieved January 1, 2009 at http://library.thinkquest.org/11046/days/index.html

The Berlin Airlift. (2010). Cold War Museum. Retrieved January 1, 2009 at  http://www.coldwar.org/articles/40s/berlin_airlift.asp 

Chang, Laurence & Peter Kornbluh. (1998). A national security archive documents reader.
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Nsc-68 Document Influence the U S A 's

Words: 1136 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25878577



NSC-68 represented a departure point for what would be the political attitude towards the communist phenomenon during the Cold War. While pointing out the imminence of the threat the U.S.S.. posed, by describing its political structures in terms completely opposed to the U.S. system of politics, the secret document also presented four various courses of action possible in the confrontation with the U.S.S.. These were the "continuation of current policies, with current and currently projected programs for carrying out these policies; isolation; war; a more rapid building up of the political, economic, and military strength of the free world" (NSC-68, 1950).

While the first options were argued and dismissed, the last one represented in the view of the document "the only course which is consistent with progress toward achieving our fundamental purpose. The frustration of the Kremlin design requires the free world to develop a successfully functioning political and economic…… [Read More]

References

Calvocoressi, Peter. (1987). World politics since 1945. New York: Longman.

Gaddis, John Lewis. (1982). Strategies of Containment: A Critical Appraisal of Postwar American National Security Policy. New York: Oxford University Press.

Kissinger, Henry. (1995). Diplomacy. London: Simon & Schuster.

NSC 68: United States Objectives and Programs for National Security. (April 14, 1950). A Report to the President Pursuant to the President's Directive of January 31, 1950. Retrieved 7 December 2007, at http://www.fas.org/irp/offdocs/nsc-hst/nsc-68-9.htm
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Southwest Airline Is One of

Words: 6479 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1715892

And many have got successful too in earning the market share. The emerging competition by new companies is a growing threat for the company and it should be tackled properly to avoid any future disturbances.

In order to further describe the competition Southwest Airlines is facing a Competitive Profile Matrix is designed. The following Competitive Profile Matrix tells about the tough competitors which are in a good position to have an edge over Southwest Airlines. It tells about the strengths and weaknesses of other competitors in contrast with Southwest Airlines.

Factors Weight Southwest Airlines United Airlines Delta Airlines Ratings Score

Ratings

Score 1. Low fares.15 4.60 3.50 4.60 2. Customer Service.15 2.30 4.60 3.50 3. Employee Relations.15 4.60 3.50 3.50 4. Rate of Expansion.10 2.20. 4.50 4.50 5. Marketing.15 4.60 4.50 4.50 6. Finance Structure.15 4.40 4.40 4.40 7. Management Policies.15 4.60 4.60 2.20

EXTERNAL FACTOR EVALUATION MATRIX

The external…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gittell, Jody Hoffer. The Southwest Airlines Way Using the Power of Relationships to Achieve High Performance. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2003.

More City Pairs Await Southwest - Kelleher Says Opportunities Remain Using Airline's Formula." Aviation Week & Space Technology. 143. 6 (1995): 40.

A www.marketingmix.com.au / www.mcdonalds.com / www.bbc.co.uk
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Vietnam Conflict

Words: 2292 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81975977

More often than not, the plan of containment has been used to describe U.S. foreign policy. It is equally frequently traced back to the achievements of President Truman with regard to the formation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).

In 1950, there was a shift in foreign U.S. policy after President Truman moved from passive to active containment by signing the top-secret policy plan NSC-68. It took a much more drastic approach towards the spread of Communism, which according to the new twist, claimed that Russia was en route for the domination of the world. It should be noted however that the doctrine had some major weaknesses and was repeatedly subject to contradictory interpretations. This may have led several other presidents and policy makers to toy with it at will. It could also very well explain some of the many long involvements of the U.S. In diverse wars and…… [Read More]

.

7 Michael O'Malley, "The Vietnam War and the Tragedy of Containment."

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Nursing Finance

Words: 6762 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48790188

Healthcare Practices in Nursing Today

Over the last 50 years, health care systems all over the world have experienced rapid and significant changes. Some of these changes have been the result of innovative developments in medical science and technology that have greatly benefited patients, prolonging and saving the lives of millions. Some of these changes, however, have had the unfortunate result of limiting patient access to prescribed treatment and diminishing the overall quality of care.

Significant challenges are being faced in health care as systems restructure and reinvent themselves in a difficult and often painful effort to make more efficient use of their available resources (ICN, 2001). Since health care is such a labor-intensive industry, the stresses on these systems inexorably trickle down to affect those employed by the system. Nurses, who are the most highly trained caregivers who have ongoing, regular patient contact, stand at the very heart of…… [Read More]

References

Abramson, S. (1980). Adverse Occurrences in Intensive Care Units. Journal of the American Medical Association 244 (14): 1582-1584.

Ahmadi, M. (1989). Traditional vs. Nontraditional Work Schedules. Industrial Management 31(2), 20-23.

Bennett, M. & Hylton, J. (1990). Modular Nursing: Partners in Professional Practice. Nursing Management 21(3), 20-24.

Beauchamp, T.L. & Childress, J.F. (1994). Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 4th ed. New York: Oxford University Press.
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Kennedy Doctrine and the Cold War in

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19816699

Kennedy Doctrine and the Cold War

In his inaugural address as the President of the United States on January 1961, John F. Kennedy (popularly called "JFK") delivered a message that directly discussed the United States' official stance regarding its move to implement a foreign policy waging a "cold war" against Communist forces that have been gaining popularity in Asia, South America, and parts of the Middle East during this period. his U.S. foreign policy, popularly called the containment policy against Communism, was the pretext from which the eventual Cold War between Democratic and Communist forces escalated until the 1970s. During this period, JFK was assigned the task of continuing the American legacy of democracy and liberty by promoting a campaign of international alliance and cooperation against the Communist forces. At this point, Communist forces were gaining ground in South America, increasing the threat to both American soil and the country's…… [Read More]

These words communicate the message that the support poor nations might be receiving from the Communist forces such as Russia/Soviet Union (one of the stronger forces promoting Communism worldwide during this time), can be met and equaled by the United States, without sacrificing their liberties and human rights. JFK reiterated that human rights are given by the "hand of God," and not from the "generosity of the state," which characterized the complete control of the state/government under the Communist/Socialist society (Kennedy 1961). The doctrine ended with a reminder to United States allies to cooperate and join forces with the American government in its fight for democracy and freedom, as well as the containment of Communism worldwide. He presented a challenge to the American government's ally nations in "defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger," signaling the serious threat that Communism presented to the U.S. during JFK's term (Kennedy 1961). With its direct reference against Communism and its political and military forces in South America and neighboring countries of the United States, the doctrine had indeed solidified the country's fight against Communism -- albeit diplomatically and without the threat of weapons. It was hoped that the United States could prevent the Cold War with the U.S.S.R. from requiring military action and thankfully the war ended without either side having to fire a single shot.

Analysis of the U.S. government's containment policy during JFK's term as president was, in hindsight, shown to be geo-politically and economically-motivated. Leffler's (1984) explication of the United States' containment policy against Communist nations such as the Soviet Union was mainly a response to protecting U.S. interests in South American nations. During JFK's term, the U.S. had numerous interests in the region, which the author called the country's "strategic sphere," having established an "overseas base, air transit rights" that were beneficial to U.S. national security (Leffler 1984,-page 348). With Communism influencing nations in the South American region, the U.S. stood to lose all these strategic benefits, increasing the risk of its security from a geopolitical standpoint. A similar assessment was developed by Naji and Jawan (2011), who contended that what motivated the U.S. government to contain Communism in the Middle Eastern was not so much about the principles of democracy and freedom, but to protect its economic interests in the oil-rich region, as most of the oil companies are either owned, operated, or supported by U.S. companies (page 206-7). The imperative thing for the government was in keeping control of valuable resources and ensuring that these same resources remained out of the hands of the enemies of the American government.

Considering the effects that the containment policy contributed to international politics and the world order during JFK's time, it can be said that the policy made nations rethink about the world order and status quo as it stood
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What Went Wrong in Vietnam

Words: 595 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87777773

Vietnam War: Its History and Harmful Effects

The Vietnam War is considered as one of America's failure to promote its containment policy in Southeast Asia during the latter 1950s until 1970s. The Vietnam War is a military conflict between South and North Vietnam during the period of 1959-1975, wherein the U.S. had actively participated and supported South Vietnam against the North Vietnamese, who are considered supporters of Communism.

Communism plays a big part for the escalation of and participation of U.S. In the Vietnam War. America's Containment Policy in Southeast Asian nations was implemented right after World War II, wherein the spread of Communism was prevented by fighting the elements that support and spread Communist principles and beliefs, as well as actively participating in a military arms struggle for the cause of Communism. The U.S. containment policy is implemented during Dwight Eisenhower's term s president of the U.S., wherein the…… [Read More]

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American History During the 1940s America Had

Words: 1426 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68012031

American History

During the 1940s, America had just experienced the onslaught of World War II. After massive fighting against the Axis power nations (Germany, Italy, and Japan), America, along with its allies in the war, was able to conclude the conflict by deciding to drop the atomic bomb in Japan. The war ended with the Axis power conceding defeat, and America went on to rehabilitate its nation after the war. The rehabilitation of America as a nation weary of possible atrocities among nations in the world is twofold. After the war, America experienced a resurgence in economic growth, primarily brought about by the development of new technologies that spurred the country's commercial market. Furthermore, the growth of new technologies and manufacturing industry in America encouraged social mobility, enabling the middle class society to increase in number, narrowing the gap between the rich and the poor. Thus, the technological revolution and…… [Read More]

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Killing Zone Critical Discussion of

Words: 631 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78080799



The second motive behind the internationalist actions was a desire for control. This is especially seen in Kennedy's reaction to Guatemala. By the mid-1960's, Guatemala had finally begun creating an independent government. hat's more, the people even wanted to have an open election. However, Kennedy caught wind of a threat by the former dictator Arevalo, who planned to re-enter the country and run in the election. Instead of trusting the people to elect the right leader, Kennedy reacted in fear and used American military and intelligence to rig the election in favor of a civilian leader (Rabe 56) and a military independent of that government.

The third motive, and one that is rarely considered, behind the assaults on Latin America was imperialism. Prior to the cold war, America kept its own boundaries safe and nothing else. It only went to war when absolutely necessary and did not concern itself with…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cottam, Martha. Images and Intervention: U.S. Policies in Latin America. University of Pittsurgh Press, 1994.

Holden, Robert H. & Zolov, Eric. Latin America and the United States: A Documentary History. Oxford University Press, 2000.
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Bush vs Bush Iraq Redux

Words: 2512 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7590197

Primarily, both Bushes wanted to show the world that America is a powerful force with which to be reckoned -- even if not a single or sole superpower, a force that can at least militarily have its way in the world, especially with regard to rogue, weaker states.

Also, both Bushes believed in cut-and-dried reactions. Communism and Saddam Hussein are simply "bad" without complicating factors such as reasons or motivations for their actions. Going hand in hand with that assessment, communism and Saddam Hussein must be defeated thoroughly, recognizing that even small victories on the part of Iraq, for instance, could draw support to Hussein's ranks and erode America foreign policy world opinion.

However, that is where the similarities ended. For George Bush, the homeland in the United States was never under a serious threat. The most perilous years of the Cold War were behind America when Bush took the…… [Read More]

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Saddam Hussein & His Totalitarian

Words: 2601 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73694026

In the words of BBC Middle East analyst Gerald Butt (2001), "…his (Saddam's) opponents have not been able to nominate anyone else who might hold Iraq together -- with its Kurds in the north, Sunni Muslims in the centre [sic], and Shi'a in the south. What the outside world calls terror, Saddam calls expediency." Interestingly, Butt's analysis took into consideration the fact that despite the atrocities that Saddam had and has purportedly done to Iraqis and Iraq's neighbors, world leaders, particularly Western leaders like the U.S. And Britain, are still actually taking an active role in Saddam's political decision-making, albeit the latter has chosen to contain himself within Iraq's borders. Prior to 9/11, U.S. leadership continued to tolerate Saddam's regime, only until the point that it is able to find a 'suitable' replacement for the dictator (Dickey and Thomas, 2002).

In addition to "covert actions" taken to secure that Iraq…… [Read More]

References

Butt, G. (January 2001). "Saddam Hussein profile." BBC News World Edition website. Available at:  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/1100529.stm 

Dickey, C. And E. Thomas. (September 2002). "How the U.S. helped create Saddam Hussein." Global Policy Forum website. Available at: http://www.globalpolicy.org/component/content/article/167/34978.html

O'Reilly, B. (2004). "Document connects Saddam Hussein to 9/11 terrorists." Fort Worth Business Press.

Paz, M. And J. Aviles. (2009). "Demonizing the tyrant: Saddam Hussein's image in Spanish news programs during the Second Persian Gulf War." International Journal of Contemporary Iraqi Studies, Vol. 3, No. 1.
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U S Foreign Relations and the Cold War

Words: 917 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38655790

Rise of Soviet Union Power and the Fall of U.S.-USSR Relations: United States and Soviet Union in the Post-World War II Period

The onset of 20th century in the history of human society is characterized by three important events that changed the present socio-political landscape of nations of the world today: World War I, World War II, and the Cold War. These events are linked with each other, with the First World War being the primary reason for the eventual development and declaration of the Second World War. Similarly, WWII became one of the precursors that triggered the Cold War.

The Cold War, a long-term conflict between the Communist states in the Eastern region and the United States, began after WWII, wherein the rise in the popularity and increasing influence of Socialist (Communist) ideology was happening. While the rise of Communism became popular in USSR, China, and other countries like…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Henriksen, M. (1997). Dr. Strangelove's America: Society and Culture in the Atomic Age. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Roberts, B. (1995). Order and Disorder after the Cold War. Cambridge: MIT Press.
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Strategic Planning for Private Hospitals

Words: 3377 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20709842

Lukacs, RN, asserts (Lukacs, 1984, p. 11). So, with those issues clearly on the table (as they are today in many hospitals), strategic planning in hospitals offers nursing directors a direct path to increased effectiveness, Lukacs explains. The way for nurses to get in on the strategic planning movement and increase their clout and effectiveness within the hospital structure, Lukacs explains, is to do the research necessary that matches patient / client needs and preferences "with specific provider strengths and competencies" (p. 12). Doing that research and making certain that those data and narrative get into the strategic plan is paramount to upgrading their departments, Lukacs goes on. "Knowledge of user needs must be accompanied by free and direct communication with the public," Lukacs reminds. She goes on, insisting that nurse executives "…carefully review and contribute to information upon which institutional plans are based…in order to identify implications for nursing…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beckham, Dan, 2010, 'Physician Involvement in Hospital Strategic Planning', Trustee, Vol. 63, No. 6, 6-7.

Butler, Timothy W., Leong, Keong G., and Everett, Linda N, 1996, 'The operations management role in hospital strategic planning', Journal of Operations Management, Vol. 14, 137-156.

Champagne, Francois, Contandriopoulos, Andre-Pierre, Larouche, Danielle, Clemenhagen, Carol, and Barbir, Caroline, 1987, 'Strategic Planning for Hospitals -- a Health-Needs Approach', Long-Range Planning, Vol. 20, No. 3, 77-83.

Christman, Corey, 2007, 'Strategic planning, the hospital board, and you', Healthcare Strategic Management, Vol. 5, No. 5, 1-3.
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Sputnik & Cold War the

Words: 1236 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59900155

It is in this context that the U.S. felt Soviet Union as a threat, since improved and increased production of space technology meant that there is also a corresponding increase in the capacity of the country to defend itself militarily. This threat was verbalized by the U.S., wherein containment of Communist nations such as Soviet Union was necessary because "...the Soviet Union has acquired awesome military capabilities" (Mueller, 2004:621).

The unprecedented and initial launching of Sputnik I, which served as the catalyst for the space race between Soviet Union and the U.S., compelled the latter to create alliances to support its military activities in Eastern Europe and Asia. In light of the expanding scope of the Communist ideology in both regions, U.S. deemed it wise to create a strong alliance with another Western country, Great ritain. Prior to the threat of communism, Soviet Union, U.S., and Great ritain were considered…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Martel, W. And T. Yoshihara. (2003). "Averting a Sino-U.S. Space Race." The Washington Quarterly, Vol. 26, No. 4.

Mueller, J. (2004). "What was the Cold War about? Evidence from its ending." Political Science Quarterly, Vol. 119, No. 4.

Ronis, S. (2004). "Transformational recapitalization: rethinking USAF aircraft procurement philosophies." Defense at&L.
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European Union Member States Relations With Their Overseas Territories

Words: 17554 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16781713

political framework of EU and OCT

European Union (EU) and Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs) are in association with each other via a system which is based on the provisions of part IV of the Treaty on the Functioning of the EU (TFEU), consisting of detailed rules and measures which are laid down in the document issued on 27th November 2001 title Oversees Association Decision. The expiry date of this association decision is 31st December 2013. Stress has been laid down by the European Council in its conclusions issued on 22nd December 2009 that the relationship between OCT and EU should continuously be updated in order to reflect latest developments not only in EU and OCT but thorough out the world. The commission has also been encouraged to make revisions to the Overseas Association Decision and present it in front of the council prior to July 2012 (Hill et al.,…… [Read More]

References

Agnew John, "Geopolitics re-vision world politics," Routledge Taylor & Francies Group, pp 1-5

Alan Taylor, American Colonies: New York: Viking, 2001, pp. 57 -- 8.

Baldwin, David. Ed. Neo-Realism And Neoliberalism: The Contemporary Debate, New York: Columbia University Press, 1993.

Balzacq, T. (Ed.). Understanding securitization theory. The design and evolution of security problems. Oxon: Routledge, 2010.
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Fred I Greenstein the Presidential Difference Leadership

Words: 1598 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78318684

Fred I. Greenstein, The Presidential Difference: Leadership Style from FDR to Barack Obama, Third Edition. Princeton University Press, 2009.

Fred I. Greenstein's central point The Presidential Difference is that in the modern U.S. political system since the Great Depression and Second World War, the presidents are now they key actors, far more so than the pre-1933 period when Congress was the most important branch of government. Because the role of the executive expanded exponentially in both foreign and domestic affairs, the leadership style of the presidents became a crucial factor in policymaking and policy failures. He analyzes the leadership style of the thirteen presidents from Franklin Roosevelt to Barack Obama, including their communication abilities (or lack thereof), personality and emotional makeup, cognitive/intellectual abilities, and organizational talents. If Roosevelt set the pattern and served as the template for the modern chief executive -- and there seems to be little doubt that…… [Read More]

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Authors Referenced Works Specific Recent Circumstances Discussed That Have Changed the Nature of Warfare

Words: 4784 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54918187

Changing Nature of arfare

According to generals like Rupert Smith and David Petraeus, postmodern conflict is radically different from warfare between industrialized states, such as the American Civil ar and the world wars of the 20th Century. It does not begin with a condition of peace or return to it after the total defeat of the enemy, but rather is a "continuous crisscrossing between confrontation and conflict," often with indecisive results (Smith 19). Confrontations with North Korea and Serbia, for example, continued long after the end of the actual fighting on the battlefield, and the political issues that gave rise to the conflicts remained unresolved. These types of conflicted often dragged on for years or even decades, as in Afghanistan and Somalia, and were always fought among the people, with enemies who had a strong tactical advantage over their better funded and equipped opponents because of their familiarity with local…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Bacevich, Andrew J. The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism. Holt Paperbacks, 2009.

Petreaus, David H. And James F. Amos, The U.S. Army and Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Field Manual. University of Chicago Press, 2007.

Smith, Rupert. The Utility of Force: The Art of War in the Modern World. Vintage Books, 2008.
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Western Europe Since the End of WWII

Words: 1177 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7553776

estern Europe Since the End of II in 1945

hat do you consider the biggest changes to have taken place in estern Europe after 1945? After orld ar II, Europe became divided into two blocs: the East and the est. This division was caused by the rapid spread of Communism in Eurasia or Eastern Europe propagated by the Soviet Union. hile the Eastern Europe was converted into becoming a Communist-Socialist society, estern Europe was given foreign aid by the United States through the European Recovery Program. The ERP is part of the U.S.-led Marshall Plan for the European and Asian regions, in its attempt to regain control over other countries and curb the growing influence of Communism in the said regions. Because the Eastern Europe was already influenced by Communism, Eastern Europe, although it remained susceptible to Communist influence, gained from the ERP and was able to economically recover and…… [Read More]

What were the origins of the Cold War? Could it have been avoided? How has the end of Cold War affected global politics? The origins of the Cold War dates back as early as the pre-WWII period, wherein Soviet Union and the U.S. are already showing an antagonistic relationship. It was only during the WWII that they were compelled to become allies, with the objective that they will seek dominant control and power over all nations of the world after the war. Thus, the Cold War was an inevitable event, since it was based on the conflict between two superpowers during the time. Although the end of the Cold War also marked the downfall and failure of the Communist experiment in the Soviet Union, the Cold War instilled in the minds of the people that the prevailing ideologies that are capitalism and democracy can be challenged and changed.

Why was the revolution of 1989 in Eastern Europe a relatively peaceful one? The Revolution of 1989 manifested the eventual fall-out of Eastern European countries with Soviet Union and Communism. This revolution was a relatively peaceful one because these countries adopted liberal democracy and the free market and trade model of the U.S. Thus, the revolution was not so much a "revolution" but a change from being a Communist-Socialist to a Capitalist-Democratic society.

What are the main problems facing the European Union in the next five years? The main problem that the EU will be facing in the next five years is the issue of widening its membership and ensuring the success of the euro, the region's single currency program that aims to promote and spur European economic growth and stability.
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Not Decide Yet

Words: 1252 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50902429

Japanese and Chinese forces battled against each other from 1937-1945 to gain control of the Chinese mainland. The Communist China defeated the Nationalist Japan and this incident gave birth to a number of other conflicts.

United States entered into the Sino-Japanese War after the Japanese attack on the Pearl Harbor. China declared war on Germany and Italy as well. Thus, the World War II began. China was helped by the United States and Britain who gave it immense loans and supplies. The two Super Powers also established their military air bases in China. With the help of America and Britain, China was able to overpower the Japanese troops ("Sino-Japanese War, Second").

Cold War

Cold War is the difference of opinion between the Soviet Union-led Communist Nations and the United States-led Egalitarian nations. Nations all over the world involve themselves in cold war through half truths, economic conflicts, diplomatic negotiations and…… [Read More]

References

Chung, TK. "COLD WAR 1945-1960." fun front. TheCorner.org, 1979. Web. 4 Dec 2011. .

Howe, Christopher, ed. China and Japan: History, Trends, and Prospects. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996. Questia. Web. 5 Dec. 2011.

"Imperialism, War, and Revolution in East Asia: 1900-1945; Korea as a Colony of Japan." Asia for Educators. Columbia University, n.d. Web. 5 Dec 2011. .

Mason, John W. The Cold War, 1945-1991. New York: Routledge, 1996. Questia. Web. 4 Dec. 2011.< http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=103102552#>
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Arthur Miller's Refusal to Testify

Words: 547 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75569730

He was labeled for a belief that he did not openly admitted subsisting to; he was labeled based on the fact that he refused to testify against an ideology.

It is not surprising, then, that the primary message of "The Crucible" resonated his thoughts and feelings about the McCarthy administration's containment policy against Communism. The arguments he presented in the play showed how Miller viewed the government's offensive action against Communism not only futile, but reflection of how American society was slowly developing into: "...for good purposes, even high purposes, the people of Salem developed a theocracy, a combination of state and religious power whose function was...to prevent any kind of disunity that might open it to destruction by...ideological enemies."

This passage aptly described the American society's condition under the paranoid and highly-offensive McCarthy administration. Like John Proctor in his play, Miller refused to say anything against an ideology that,…… [Read More]

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Vietnam Turning Point the Alleged Attack on

Words: 729 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68044598

Vietnam Turning Point

The Alleged Attack on U.S. Maddox in 1964

Why is your chosen turning point actually a turning point and not just another event?

The incident leading up to the claim of an attack against the U.S. Maddox, a Destroyer naval vessel is a turning point in history. This is because it sparked the beginning of a war with Vietnam that would last nearly ten years and divide and change U.S. citizens feelings about government authority forever. Up until this time Americans were unified in support of the President and Congress for the most part and willing to send their young men into war. Fathers and Mothers felt it was their patriotic duty to support the U.S. Military and citizens admired and respected those that served in the Armed Forces. This would change dramatically over the course of this war with Vietnam which in reality was not between…… [Read More]

References

Moss, D.G. (2010). Vietnam: An American Ordeal. Pearson Education Inc. 6 Ed.

Allen, G.W. (2001) None so Blind A Personal Account of Intelligence Failure Vietnam. Chicago: Ivan R. Publishing. pp. 182.

Duiker, W.J. (1994) U.S. Containment Policy and Conflict in Indochina. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. pp.320.
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Equal Access to a Comprehensive

Words: 2462 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66333312



A third approach in this area is the establishment of new co-pay programs which force patients to bear the costs of more procedures and treatments. This theory tends to shift part of the blame for over treatment back on the patient. Doctors claim that they order additional treatments because their patients insist on them. Forcing patients to share a greater portion of the costs of these additional treatments should arguably result in their being less demanding about receiving them.

Bureaucracy and overhead created in the delivery of health care and the administration of insurance benefits has also contributed to the substantial increase in health costs (Woodhandler 2003). The health insurance industry has campaigned to reduce health care costs but, in the process, has created a bureaucratic system that has effectively contributed to the problem. Additionally, compliance with governmental regulations has contributed to the bureaucratic difficulties as well. Practicing physicians and…… [Read More]

References

Avraham, Ronen. The Impact of Tort Reform on Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance Premiums. Research, Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 2009.

Bodenheimer, T. "High and rising health care costs ." Annals of Internal Medicine, 2005: 932-937.

Davis, K. Mirror, mirror on the wall: an international update on the comparative performance of American health care. Research Study, New York: The Commonwealth Fund, 2007.

Epstein, Arnold M. "Health Care in America - Still too Separate, Not Yet Equal." New England Journal of Medicine, 2004: 603-605.
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Managed Health Care and Evaluates

Words: 1605 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6549719

"

The bulk of quality improvement measures are working for managed care by providing insight as to what can be done to improve care therefore reduce mortality rates, and maintain a high level of customer satisfaction which in turn helps to build the managed care health business.

Population Health Focus

Population health refers to the physical, social, cultural, and economic environment in which we work and live (adzyminski, 2006)."

This has become a focus of many managed health care organizations as they work to reduce the risks to their local consumers by way of stress, environmental factors and other elements that have a direct impact on the consumer health concerns.

The goal of population health is to maximize the health of any given population. In doing so it contains elements of program development, development/evaluation of health care policy, and program and systems evaluation. It uses an approach that concentrates on…… [Read More]

References

Jacobson, Peter (1995) Washington State Health Services Act: implementing comprehensive health care reform.(Medicaid and State Health Reform)

Health Care Financing Review

Exton, Lee (2002) Defined contribution health plans: cutting edge? (an Advertising Supplement: Staffing & Employee Benefits).(cost containment strategies for employee health care) Los Angeles Business Journal

Fletcher, Meg (1995) Managed care use rises for workers comp plans.
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Urban Sprawl and How States Are Dealing With the Issue

Words: 5621 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59571043

Land Use Planning Policies and Urban Sprawl

IMPORTANCE

Land planning for distribution has progressed manifolds in the past century. Increase in the number of communities in the country raises the demand for urban development. Developments are often referred as revolutionary plans meant for better living. However, by the end of the 20th century perception of better living means away from the mainstream urbanism. Communities shifted to new areas with open space, tranquility and yet with almost the same kind of amenities as those in the urban areas [illiams, 2000].

Urban spread has become a major concern for various reasons. According to some urban sprawl should be controlled through extensive planning campaigns. Proponents of this group argue that the open spaces for farmland, once considered an off-limits arena for the urban commuters, today with the help of developers has slowly encroached on farm designated land. Opponents to sprawl are quick to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Jacobs, Harvey M. Fighting Over Land America's Legacy... America's Future? Vol. 65 no, Journal of the American Planning Association, 04-15-1999.

Oliver, Charles. "Regulations Are Crimping the Suburbs," Investor's Business Daily, June 23, 1998.

Kaiser, Edward J.; Godschalk, David R., Twentieth century land use planning: a stalwart family tree... Vol. 61, Journal of the American Planning Association, 06-22-1995, pp 365(21).

Gordon, Peter; Richardson, Harry W., Are compact cities a desirable planning goal? Vol. 63, Journal of the American Planning Association, 01-01-1997, pp 95(12).
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Healthcare Propsal Are Immigrants Left

Words: 2880 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45935050

Unless the physicians can succinctly argue their case for care and services, the managed care entity will, for reasons of medical necessity, deny access to care and services.

What Cost-Added atio Based on Illegal Immigrant Population?

The argument by opponents that loopholes exist that would allow illegal immigrants to access Obama's proposed legislation on healthcare services is rendered moot in lieu of the fact that those illegal immigrants are currently receiving healthcare services Medicaid and through Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS). The Federal eimbursement of Emergency Health Services Furnished to Undocumented Aliens states:

"Section 1011 of the (Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act (MMA) (P.L. 108-173)) MMA appropriated $250 million dollars in FY 2005 through 2008 for payments to eligible providers for emergency health services provided to undocumented aliens and other non-specified citizens who are not eligible for Medicaid (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, 2009, found online, p.…… [Read More]

Reference List

Birenbaum, A. (1997). Managed Care: Made in America, Praeger Publishers, Westport,

CT.

Birenbaum, A. (2002). Wounded Profession: American Medicine Enters the Age of Managed Care, Praeger Publishers, Westport, CT.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2009). Uninsured Americans: Newly
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Home and Community-Based Care Today

Words: 4884 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5260119

egistered nurses are both qualified, educated, and certified to provide a high quality of various care services that an individual may need in a home setting or elsewhere. Hence, providing these practitioners with the power to certify and provide home care is a solution to an overwhelming problem that has plagued the health care environment in recent years. Nursing practitioners, as a result of the nature of their work, are closely connected to the needs of individual patients. This means that they, more than many other health care providers and institutions, are able to assess the needs of individuals, their households, and the level of care they require. This places them in a position to accurately determine the need and/or of such individuals to obtain long-term home care and when such home care becomes unviable. As such, registered nurses who serve individuals in the home setting are able to maintain…… [Read More]

References

AARP Public Policy Institute. (2013). FAQs. Retrieved from:  http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/ppi/ltc/ltss_faq.pdf 

Brassard, A. (2011). Removing Barriers to Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Care: Home Health and Hospice Services. AARP Public Policy Institute. Retrieved from:  http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/public_policy_institute/health/removing-barriers-advanced-practice-registered-nurse-home-health-hospice-insight-july-2012-AARP-ppi-health.pdf 

Doty, P. (2000, June). Cost-Effectiveness of Home and Community-Based Long-Term Care Services. U.S. Department of health and Human Services. Retrieved from: http://aspe.hhs.gov/daltcp/reports/2000/costeff.htm

Lynch, M., Estes, C., and Hernandez, M. (2007, June). Long-Term Care Policy Option Proposal: Consumer Controlled Chronic, Home, and Community Care for he Elderly and Disabled. Georgetown University Long-Term Care Financing Project: Working Paper No. 4. Retrieved from: http://ltc.georgetown.edu/forum/4lynch061107.pdf
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Healthcare Reform Review of Literature

Words: 6070 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45810582

(Menzel, 1990, p. 3) Fisher, Berwick, & Davis alude to the idea of integration in health care, with providers linking as well as creating networks of electronic medical records and other cost improvement tactics.

The United States and other nations over the last twenty or so years, have begun a sweeping change in health care delivery, regarding the manner in which health information is input, stored and accessed. Computer use in the medical industry has greatly increased over the last thirty years the culmination of this is fully networked electronic medical record keeping. (Berner, Detmer, & Simborg, 2005, p. 3) the electronic medical record trend began in the largest institutions first, as hospitals and large care organizations attempted to reduce waste and improve patient care, while the adoption has been much slower among physician's practices and smaller medical institutions. (Hillestad, et al., 2005, pp. 1103-1104) Prior to this time medical…… [Read More]

Resources, and Utilization
Kahnamoui, N. (2004). Electronic medical records. pp. 1-31.

Kant Patel, M.E. (2006). Health Care Politics and Policy in America. Armonk, NY: ME Sharp Inc.

Kumar, K., & Subramanian, R. (1998). Meeting the Expectations of Key Stakeholders: Stakeholder Management in the Health Care Industry. SAM Advanced Management Journal, 63 (2), 31-38.

LeGrand, J. (2009). Choice and competition in publicly funded health care. Health Economics, Policy and Law, 4, 479-488.
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Medicare Diabetes Prevention Act of

Words: 1429 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26075126

The CDC has provided almost $7 million in funding to establish DPPs for research purposes, which means the number of pre-diabetes individuals helped by these programs will be very limited (CDC, 2012). While these programs will probably provide free or nearly-free diabetes preventive services to a large number of individuals, most underserved patients will not benefit from these programs.

S. 452 is worded in such a way that establishing DPPs under Medicaid will be optional for states (Sebelius, 2010). As of 2010, 43 states covered the expense of screening Medicaid patients for diabetes, but only 13 states provided reimbursement for obesity preventive services. This suggests that states are willing to pay for screening, but not preventive services like lifestyle interventions; however, if only a few states implement DPPs for Medicaid recipients, this will provide a proof-of-principle experiment in a real-world setting and establish the overall healthcare savings such programs can…… [Read More]

References

CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). (2012). National Diabetes Prevention Program. Funded Organizations. CDC.gov. Retrieved 17 Apr. 2013 from http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/foa/index.htm.

Civic Impulse, LLC. (2013). S. 452: Medicare Diabetes Prevention Act of 2013. GovTrack.U.S.. Retrieved 17 Apr. 2013 from http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/113/s452.

DPPRG (Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group). (2003). Costs associated with the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the diabetes prevention program. Diabetes Care, 26, 36-47.

Green, Lawrence W., Brancati, Frederick L., Albright, Ann, and PPDWG (Primary Prevention of Diabetes Working Group). (2012). Primary prevention of type 2 diabetes: Integrative public health and primary care opportunities, challenges and strategies. Family Practice, 29, i13-i23.
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Duty to Rescue' in U S

Words: 1592 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57595608

Here, criminal law is of course preemptive in all jurisdictions, yet enforcement is restricted to agencies dedicated to law enforcement investigation and apprehension of individuals.

In spite of billions of dollars spent on homeland security, in the aftermath of Katrina pediatric-specific preparations continue to lag behind. Lack of disaster readiness for hospitalized children and for those undergoing reunification process sheds light on the disjuncture of public administration duty to rescue of minors; regardless of state intervention as 'duty' in all other areas of their lives (i.e. foster care). Children's advocates argue that,

"federal and state policy makers should dedicate research funding for the development of redundant strategies for implementation in states to assure timely reunification of infants, toddlers, and children and with their correct parents and caregivers" (Dolan and Krug, 64).

Articulation of those terms and the implications of not doing so are inflected in a broader discussion that is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dolan, M.A. And Krug, S.E. Pediatric Disaster Preparedness in the Wake of Katrina: Lessons to be Learned. Clinical Pediatric Emergency Medicine. Elsvier, 2006, 59-66.

Handfield, R. In the Wake of Hurricane Katrina: Lessons Learned through the Lens of Supply Chain Disruptions - Part 1. Supply Chain Management 08 Sept 2005.

Implementation of the Post-Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act And Other Organizational Changes. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), 2006. Web.

Laws and Regulations. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), 2010. Web.
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Seeds of the Cold War

Words: 1368 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70341826

Strangely, America's role as policeman in Europe actually led to its becoming involved in military conflicts in Southeast Asia. Although the U.S. did not fight the Soviet Union directly in Korea or Vietnam, both conflicts were due to the U.S.'s policy of defeating the spread of Communism no matter where it might occur. Fears of escalation during both the Korean and Vietnam conflicts caused the U.S. To adopt a military strategy that favored limited warfare (Brodie).

The Cold ar had a tremendous impact on the growth of the United States as an industrial and world military power. America's presence throughout the world militarily and the dependence of estern Europe and Japan on the American economy for the sustenance of their own economies caused America's political and economic influence to expanded substantially. Beginning with the Berlin airlift (Reeves) where the United States provided food and other vital items to est Berliners…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brodie, Bernard. War and Politics. New York: Macmillan Co., 1973.

Comstock, Douglas A. "NASA's Legacy of Technology Transfer and Prospects for Future Benefits." AIAA Space Conference & Exposition. Long Beach, CA: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2007. 1-9.

Cox, M. "The Cold War as a system." Critique (1986): 17-82.

Lieber, Keir A. "The Rise of U.S. Nuclear Primacy." Foreign Affairs (2006): 42-67.
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Capital Purchase Costing 5 000 Company Benefit

Words: 2954 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25264020

capital purchase, costing $5,000, company benefit . Examples include a X-ray machine, MI processor, software filing patient records, a research library, large item company . o Identify management goals expenditure support

Capital purchase

The health care field is becoming presented with more and more pressures in today's society. There are numerous changes in the social and economic environments, which become combined to generate new pressures for the health care providers. The life expectancy of the population increases, generating increased needs for medical care for several years. Then, the Baby Boomers are retiring, causing a demanding generation, used to financial resources and access to services, to turn to the medical care sector for more services. The policies regulating the field also change as do the demands and expectations of patients.

In such a context, the health care institutions find themselves in a position in which they have to be better managed…… [Read More]

References:

Brown, M., 1992, Health care information: strategy, structure and process, Jones & Bartlett Learning

Daft, R.L., 2009, Organizational theory and design, 10th edition, Cengage Learning

Finkler, S.A., Ward, D.M., Calabrese, T., 2011, Accounting fundamentals for health care management, 2nd edition, Jones & Bartlett Publishers

2012, Absolute Medical Equipment,  http://www.absolutemed.com/Medical-Equipment/MRI-Machines  last accessed on June 29, 2012
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Cold War the Heightened Tension

Words: 1786 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34908440

S. administration after Truman's adopted Kennan's policy of 'containment' or its variation as a cornerstone of their foreign policy right until the eventual collapse of Communism in 1989. ("Kennan and Containment" n.d.)

eferences

Bell, P.M.H. (2001). The World since 1945 -- an International History. New York: Oxford University Press

George F. Kennan on the Web" (2005). History Politics and Future. etrieved on May 28, 2005 at http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/2496/future/kennan.html

Historian Walter Lefeber on Truman's Soviet Policy." (2000). PBS Online. etrieved on May 28, 2005 at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/truman/filmmore/it_1.html

Kennan and Containment." (n.d.) Bureau of Public Affairs: U.S. Department of State. etrieved on May 28, 2005 at http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ho/time/cwr/17601.htm

Legvold, . (2005). "Cold War." Article in Encyclopedia Encarta Online. etrieved on May 28, 2005 at http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761569374/Cold_War.html#p11

While the U.S. represented democracy, individual liberty and capitalism, the U.S.S.. was committed to the spread of the communist revolution among the 'down-trodden' masses of the world

The USS had…… [Read More]

References

Bell, P.M.H. (2001). The World since 1945 -- an International History. New York: Oxford University Press

George F. Kennan on the Web" (2005). History Politics and Future. Retrieved on May 28, 2005 at http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/2496/future/kennan.html

Historian Walter Lefeber on Truman's Soviet Policy." (2000). PBS Online. Retrieved on May 28, 2005 at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/truman/filmmore/it_1.html

Kennan and Containment." (n.d.) Bureau of Public Affairs: U.S. Department of State. Retrieved on May 28, 2005 at  http://www.state.gov /r/pa/ho/time/cwr/17601.htm
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U S Foreign Affairs Since 1898

Words: 1847 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81460756

S. officials and other entities were very well informed), but rather on indecisiveness and incapacity to react with direct, concrete means in these situations.

5. The major issues of American foreign policy during the 1950s were generally circumscribed to the Cold War between the U.S. And the Soviet Union and the relations between these two countries, ranging form mutual containment to escalation (towards the end of the decade).

The first issue emerging from this policy was the Korean War. The Korean War, characterized by the initial invasion of South Korea by North Korean troops and the subsequent implication of American and Chinese troops, was a direct consequence of the post-WWII conditions when each superpower attempted to promote and spread its own military and ideological system.

With the American army first pushed back all the way to Pusan and then following General Macarthur's landing at Inchon behind enemy troops and the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Howard Jones. 2001. Crucible of Power: A History of American Foreign Relations from 1897, Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources.

2. Robert Kennedy. 1999. Thirteen Days: A Memoir of the Cuban Missile Crisis, New York: Norton

3. Samantha Power, a Problem From Hell: American in the Age of Genocide
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Default Dispute Termination of Contract Default and

Words: 1716 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36362944

Default Dispute Termination of Contract

Default and Dispute (contract law)

In government contracting, the government through a contracting officer who is the government agent enters into a legally binding agreement with a contractor. This contractor is a seller who is to deliver services and the government as the buyer pays for these services as agreed upon in the contract. However, situations arise where the agreements may be terminated in order to settle disputes that arise between the contracting agents and the contractor. Normally, the government may terminate the contract for default of the contractor or by convenience (Kathuria, 2009). Federal Acquisition egulations define termination for convenience as the exercise of the government's right to terminate a contract when it is in the government's interest

Termination for default

The government has a right to terminate a contract on a situation where the contractor does not meet the set contractual obligations (umbaugh,…… [Read More]

References

Kathuria, S. (2009). best practices for compliance with the new government contractor compliance and ethics rules under the federal acquisition regulation. Public Contract Law Journal.

Loulakis, M.C. (2003). Default Must Be Proven to Justify Termination. Civil Engineering (08857024), 73 (3), 96.

Nemet, G.F. (2010). Cost containment in climate policy and incentives for technology development. Climatic Change, 103 (3/4), 423-443. doi: 10.1007/s10584-009-9779-8

Robert, F. (2004). Construction law handbook. Gaithersburg [MD: Aspen Law & Business.
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Social Cultural and Political Influence in Healthcare Delivery

Words: 4282 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16620351

Social, Cultural, And Political Influence in Healthcare Delivery

Social, cultural, and political inequalities are detrimental to the health and healthcare system of the U.S. This is because the U.S. is one of the most multicultural, overpopulated, diverse and undergoing rapid economic growth. The federal government has embarked on efforts geared at addressing unsustainable costs of health care in the U.S. With the leadership of the current president, Barrack Obama, initiatives of containing health care costs will evaluate and explore strategies to contain the growing costs of health care based on a system-wide while enhancing the value and quality of health care (Ubokudom, 2012). The apparent system of health care is rife with opportunities of minimizing waste, delivering coordinated, effective care, and improving well-being and health of all Americans. The government in collaboration with care providers must prioritize cost effective containment strategies with the greatest possibility for political success and non-partisan…… [Read More]

References

Albrecht, G.L., Fitzpatrick, R., & Scrimshaw, S. (2013). Handbook of social studies in health and medicine. London: Sage Publications.

Armstrong, E.G. (2011). The health care dilemma: A comparison of health care systems in three European countries and the U.S. Singapore: World Scientific.

Bale, J.R., Stoll, B.J., & Lucas, A.O. (2013). Improving birth outcomes: Meeting the challenge in the developing world. Washington, DC: National academies press.

Buseh, A.G. (2008). Empowering resilience: Improving health care delivery in war-impacted African countries: a case study of Liberia. Lanham, Md: University Press of America.