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Cultural Awareness Essays (Examples)

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Cultural Diversity Refers to the Diverse Varieties
Words: 1102 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48954019
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Cultural diversity refers to the diverse varieties of human cultures that exist in a certain region, society or in the world as a whole. The characteristics of diversity may include ethnicity, traditions, geographic background, language spoken, religious beliefs, race or physical features. This term is also based on the idea that different cultures should respect each other's differences. With the global integration, the need for communication in accordance with other person's cultural awareness has intensified. Many times, any gesture that is considered offensive in one culture is completely accepted in the other culture. Hence, people sometimes develop misunderstandings when communicating with someone from a different culture. Therefore, it is essential that differences are appreciated for an effective communication.

I am a Christian man who is originally from Ukraine. My mother tongue is Ukrainian and I came to United States some 10 years ago. I am very moderate in my religious…

Bibliography

Newsom, D., Turk, J.V., and Kruckeberg, D. (2004). This is PR: The Realities of Public Relations. Belmont, CA: Thomson/Wadsworth.

Rosener, J.B. (1990) "Ways Women Lead," Harvard Business Review, Vol. 68, No. 6, pp. 119-25

Cultural Competency in Nursing
Words: 1874 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 29513439
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Cultural Competency in Nursing

The basic knowledge in nursing or medical studies needs substantial facilitation in order to be effective and appropriate towards addressing the needs and preferences of the patients. Watson notes the need to integrate humanistic aspect into the career or nursing profession. He also believes on the need for the establishment of the caring relationship between the patients and nurses thus demonstration of unconditional acceptance of the patients in any condition. Nurses should integrate holistic and positive treatment with the aim of promoting health through knowledge and interventions thus elimination of interruptions during treatments or 'caring moments'. Modern patients have diverse problems and issues because of the cultural differences, races, and ethnicity thus the need to enhance the operations of the nurses. There is need to ensure that the nurses obtain cultural competencies with the aim of enhancing their ability to address diverse issues and problems faced…

References

Anderson, N.L.R., Calvillo, E.R., & Fongwa, M.N. (2007). Community-based approaches to strengthen cultural competency in nursing education and practice. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 18(1), 49S-59S.

Beach, M.C. (2005). Cultural competency: A systematic review of health care provider educational interventions. Cultural Competency, 43(4), 356-373.

Campinha-Bacote, J. (2002). The process of cultural competence in the delivery of healthcare services: A model of care. The Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 13(3), 181-185.

Rosswurm and Larrabee, (1999). A Model for Change to Evidence-Based

Cultural Diversity Interview Narrative Cultural
Words: 4850 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 8522541
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While in high school, she worked as a waitress at a local diner. Most of the population was black, therefore there was little contact with white customers or employees. Margaret feels that she was socially isolated until the 1950s. She was not exposed to white culture; it was foreign to her. She was only exposed to black culture of the time. They were not allowed in certain stores, restaurants, or other places of business. She remembers "white only" restrooms and "black only" fountains. This cultural isolation was oppressive.

Margaret feels that the oppressive attitudes and discrimination that she experienced as a child determined much of how her life proceeded in adulthood. The idea that she could only go so far was ingrained as a child. She never really broke free of this feeling. In her 40s, she moved to upstate New York. Here, she found that many women had succeeded…

References

Diller, D. (1999). Opening the dialogue: Using culture as a tool in teaching young African

American children. Reading Teacher, 52(8), 820-828. [Available electronically through ERIC/EBSCOhost]

Moll, L.C., Amanti, C., Neff, D., & Gonzalez, N. (1992). Funds of knowledge for teaching:

using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classrooms. Theory into Practice, 31 (2), 132-141.

Cultural Literacy - Issues &
Words: 2434 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57845496
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scu.edu).Andre goes on to say some critics see Hirsch's efforts to bring culture into the classroom are not so much "cultural literacy" but more like "cultural indoctrination." Not only is the Hirsch strategy and methodology seen as flawed, Andre and Velasquez continue, the "content" he prescribes is subject to criticism. For example, the question of "Whose form of knowledge, culture, vision, history and authority will prevail as the national culture?" should be asked, and Hirsch knows that is an issue. "Will they, like Hirsch, be white, middle-class males?" Andre wonders, and will they be elitist?

Hirsch meanwhile answers these accusations in his Core Knowledge Web site, saying that the contend must arise from "a broad consensus of diverse groups and interests." That consensus should include the parents, teachers, scientists, "professional curriculum organizations, and experts on America's multicultural traditions." The "central motivation behind" his core knowledge initiative is "to guarantee equal…

Bibliography

Booklist. "Reference Books Bulletin: The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy." (2003): 1702.

In the first edition of Hirsch's book, the author was criticized as being "elitist," but the Subsequent editions add "tools for assessing cultural literacy" that makes sense and Now it does "keep up with changes in American culture."

Chylinski, Manya S. "Hirsch, E.D. Jr., & others. The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know." Library Journal, 127.18 (2002): 78-80. Chylinski writes that the book has been given "an exciting update" - "sorely needed"...for those "who like to have a great reference work..."

Giddings, Louise R. "Beyond E.D. Hirsch and Cultural Literacy: Thinking Skills for Cultural

Cultural Differences in Management Styles
Words: 2900 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 12392752
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In a large measure, these concepts reflect the problems that have accompanied increased diversity as both a consequence and a cause of a great many social problems" (1999, p. 1). In this regard, Naylor defines culture as being "the learned way (or ways) of belief, behavior, and the products of these (both physically and socially) that is shared (at least to some degree) within human groups and serves to distinguish that culture group from another learning different beliefs and behaviors" (1999, p. 2). It is important to note as well that "cultural diversity is not restricted to particular nationalities; it includes issues of gender and individuals with disabilities" (Russell & McLean, 1999). Because there are some fundamental differences between cultural beliefs and behaviors, it is not surprising that cross-cultural differences can have a profound effect on organizational performance, and these issues are discussed further below.

Effect of Cultural Diversity on…

Cultural Profile of Danny Below Is the
Words: 913 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53226579
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Cultural Profile of Danny

Below is the profile of a college Freshman using the ADRESING format by Hays (Hays; Hays 309-315) This method of assessment of cultural awareness is used by many clinical psychologists in order to guarantee cultural sensitivity during therapy and to provide culturally relevant care:

Age or generational differences:

Danny is 19, and a Freshman in college

Disability:

He has no visible disabilities and none of which he is aware.

Religion:

He is a Christian, but is not currently attending any local church.

Ethnicity:

Danny is Han Chinese.

Social status:

At home in Beijing, Danny is upper middle class. His parents have good jobs and are party members, though they are not rich.

Sexual orientation:

Unknown

Indigenous heritage:

He is a member of the majority culture in Beijing, but is Asian minority in America.

Nationality:

Citizen of the PRC

Gender:

Male

Profile:

Danny is a college freshman…

Works Cited

"China - Chinese Geert Hofstede Cultural Dimensions Explained "Web. 11/23/2010 .

"China today "Web. 10/31/2010 .

Hays, Pamela A. "

Multicultural Applications of Cognitive-Behavior Therapy." Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 26.3 (1995): 309-15. Web.

Cultural Sensitivity in Social Work
Words: 770 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68305881
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Culture & Social Work

Regardless of the background and upbringing of an individual, there are common threads and patterns that typify everyone's life as a child and as they develop. However, there are most certainly variations when it comes to things like culture and the society that is lived within during this process. Even when speaking of a singular cultural area like a city, state or especially a nation, there will be differing norms, values and so forth based on the culture or cultures that one is exposed to and raised within. This report will look at the common Latino experience as well as a few other notable cultures and how this can affect and vary the interactions and reactions seen when it comes to social work. While trying to treat every situation with the same cultural and societal lens might seem attractive, the underlying cultures and patterns that actually…

Cultural Diversity in Rural Settings
Words: 478 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52197051
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Cultural Diversity in Rural Settings for Nurses

On a continuum of cultural awareness to cultural relativity, how do you view yourself and your interactions with others?

As a nurse practitioner, it is easy to see the patient simply as a patient, as a sick person needing treatment, rather than a well person who perceives his or her body as only temporarily ill, but sees his or her person as permanently a part of a family and culture outside of the hospital. As Small and Dennis (2003) counsel, the increase in immigration has resulted in greater diversity of both patients and practitioners within the United States, rather than in traditional urban locations. Thus Small and Dennis remind the nurse that it is not simply enough to treat the patient, but the patient must also understand his or her illness in culturally comprehensible terms. A nurse must be able to communicate to…

Works Cited

Dennis, Betty Pierce & Ernestine B. Small. (Jan-Feb, 2003) "Incorporating cultural diversity in nursing care: an action plan" The ABNF Journal.

"New Position Statement Originated by: Council on Cultural Diversity in Nursing Practice, Congress of Nursing." (1996) Adopted by: ANA Board of Directors.

Cultural Proficiency Receptivity Scale
Words: 882 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53434444
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Abstract
In this paper, I will reflect on my responses to the Cultural Proficiency Receptivity Scale. I will tell what my responses tell you about myself and my preparedness as an aspiring school
counselor. In this paper, I will also address cultural diversity and if there is a lack of it in my school.
Cultural Proficiency Receptivity Scale
After answering the questions on my preparedness as an aspiring school counselor I feel that overall, I am prepared to respond to cultural diversity concerns and issues in my school. I am convinced that if I fail to make an effort towards ensuring that my students are educated beyond the bare minimum, I would not be fully meeting their needs. In the words of Nieri (2012), schools “shape student’s cultural trajectories” and “these trajectories are tied to youth development and achievement.” With the world of today being largely a global village, where…

Cultural care of an Aboriginal patient in an Australian hospital
Words: 1901 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53146497
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Australia, indigenous people recognize themselves as belonging to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander or by descent, and also identified as the same by the society. A resistance has been observed in them to access hospitals for healthcare. Therefore, healthcare professionals need to plan, implement and maintain appropriate policies for their treatment. Also, cross-cultural awareness training should be given to paediatric hospital staff. (Munns & Shields, 2013, p. 22)

How would you support ianna and her family in this situation?

The poor health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians is well documented, and has been the subject of official policy and program attention for many years. The mainstream health system has responded to increased funding and clear portfolio responsibility, with increasing attention to the burden of illness that Aboriginal people experience and the need for effective health care (Dwyer et al., 2014). I would thus make arrangement for proper…

References

Ansuya. (2012). Transcultural Nursing: Cultural Competence in Nurses. International Journal of Nursing Education, Volume 4(1), pp. 5-7.

Durey, A, Wynaden, D, Thompson, SC, Davidson, PM, Bessarab, D & Katzenellenbogen, JM. (2012). Owning Solutions: A Collaborative Model to Improve Quality in Hospital Care for Aboriginal Australians. Nursing Inquiry, Volume 19(2), pp. 144-152.

Dwyer, J, Willis, E & Kelly, J. (2014). Hospitals Caring for Rural Aboriginal Patients: Holding Response and Denial. Australian Health Review, Volume 38(5), pp. 546-551.

Kelly, J & Willis, E. (2014). Travelling to the City for Hospital Care: Access Factors in Country Aboriginal Patient Journeys. Australian Journal of Rural Health, Volume 22(3), pp. 109-113.

Cultural Counselor Being a Counselor Can Sometimes
Words: 2185 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 34235489
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Cultural Counselor

Being a counselor can sometimes be a really tough job. Counseling can only be effective and beneficial when the counselor places himself or herself in the shoes of his or her client. If he or she is unable to do so, he or she will never become an effective counselor. Placing oneself in the circumstances of someone else is not easy, let alone placing oneself in the shoes of a person who is of a different race, religion or culture. That is the real test of a counselor. In this paper I shall discuss what is required to understand the cross-cultural relationships in counseling to help the client get over their problem easily. All the dimensions pertaining to counseling (of a client of a different background that the counselor) will discussed with the case scenario.

Case Scenario

When clients and counselors have different cultural (or ethnic or racial)…

References:

Cannon, E.P. (2008). "Promoting moral reasoning and multicultural competence during internship." Journal of Moral Education, 37(4), 503-518.

Crethar, Hugh C. And Ratts, Manivong J. (2008). "Why Social Justice is a Counseling Concern?"

Gilbert, Jane. (2002). "Cross-cultural issues in counseling skillstraining: lessons from Lesotho."

Journal of Social Development in Africa. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons.

Cultural Forms of Expression African-American
Words: 2857 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 48259043
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(Cha-Jua, 2001, at (http://www.wpunj.edu/newpol/issue31/chajua31.htm)

Another aspect of representation, however, concerns collective memory and the representation of a shared past. Through the context for dialogue they create, social movements facilitate the interweaving of individual stories and biographies into a collective, unified frame, a collective narrative. Part and parcel of the process of collective identity or will formation is the linking of diverse experiences into a unity, past as well as present. Social movements are central to this process, not only at the individual level, but also at the organizational or meso level of social interaction. Institutions like the black church and cultural artifacts like blues music may have embodied and passed on collective memories from generation to generation, but it was through social movements that even these diverse collective memories attained a more unified focus, linking individuals and collectives into a unified subject, with a common future as well as a…

Resources

Cashmore, E. (2003). Encyclopedia of Race and Ethnic Studies. New York: Routledge.

Cha-Jua, S.K. (Summer 2001) "Slavery, Racist Violence, American Apartheid: The Case for Reparations" New Politics, 8:3. At  http://www.wpunj.edu/newpol/issue31/chajua31.htm 

Dubois, W.E.B., (1987) Writings, New York: Library of America.

Davis, A. (1999) Blues Legacies and Black Feminism, New York: Vintage.

Cultural Difference This Proposed Study
Words: 1388 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 46835309
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There can be several reasons behind this enduring practice. Men and women feel that if parents have chosen someone for them, they would also support them through hard times. We understand that all marriages go through rough patches and some more than others. In these trying times, parents and other family members normally intervene to resolve problems. This is a common practice in India and all countries where arranged marriages are still in practice. However if a person chose to marry someone of their choice, it is very likely that during hard times, others would distance themselves saying; "didn't we already warn you." The fear of being left alone to ride out the tide might actually push some people in favor of arranged marriages.

The second reason is the ease and convenience that comes with having a partner chosen for you. In the western world, getting married doesn't come easy.…

References

Serena Nanda. Arranging a Marriage in India. From Stumbling Toward Truth: Anthropologists at Work, edited by Philip R. Devita, 2000, pp. 196 -- 204. Published by Waveland Press.

Jodi O'Brien in Robert Kupla edition. "Arranged marriages." Encyclopedia of Gender and Society. Volume 1, 2008

Cultural Perceptions of Time in Africa Time
Words: 6951 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52859355
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Cultural Perceptions of Time in frica

Time is a foundational factor in every culture. The perception of time is different for most cultures and the determining factor to those differences is often based on the means of production. "Most cultures have some concept of time, although the way they deal with time may differ fundamentally." (Kokole 1994, 35) Tracing the perception of the concept of time in frica can be seen as tracing the European racial prejudices of the intellect of the indigenous populations in the colonized regions of frica. Much of the information regarding the development of time concepts in frican culture is colonial and based on the European interlopers recorded ideas.

Some of those recorded ideas are those of missionaries and others are those of capitalist adventurers, with the intermittent mark of a very few true historians.

In Mali, as in many other parts of frica, there are…

Akan" is an ethnographic and linguistic term used to refer to a cluster of culturally homogenous groups living in central and southern Ghana and parts of the adjoining eastern Cote d'Ivoire. The Akan constitute two broad subcategories: the inland Asante, Bono, Akyem, Akwapem, and Kwawu, who speak the Twi, and the coastal Fante, who speak a dialect of the same name. The Akan dialects are, for the most part, mutually intelligible. Most of these ethnic groups constituted autonomous political systems in the pre-colonial period. www.questia.com/PageManagerHTMLMediator.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=55458430" (Adjaye 1994, 57)

Studies of Akan time perceptions and calendrical systems have been limited despite the fact that the existence of institutions and mechanisms for time-reckoning have been noted in the literature on the history and ethnography of the Akan for nearly two centuries. Beyond early sparse references by Rattray (1923) and Danquah (1968), a full-length monograph on the subject did not appear until Deborah Fink "Time and Space Measurements of the Bono of Ghana" (1974); however, the author's primary concern was with the applicability of Bono terminologies for measuring volume, weight, and time to formal education, rather than with time-marking systems P.F. Bartle brief five-page paper, "Forty Days: The Akan Calendar" (1978), was an exploratory essay into a single calendrical framework, the 40-day (adaduanan) cycle. Its treatment is consequently restrictive and limited to the 40-day calendrical structure. Similarly, Tom McCaskie "Time and the Calendar in Nineteenth-Century Asante: An Exploratory Essay" (1980) and Ivor Wilks ' "On Mentally Mapping Greater Asante: A Study of Time and Motion" (1992) are concerned primarily with a specific aspect of time: the scheduling of diplomatic and other governmental business in Asante.

(Adjaye 1994, 57)

Cultural Artifact Mental Health Drugs as Panacea
Words: 2205 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 95196658
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Cultural Artifact

Mental Health Drugs as Panacea

A culture is made up of people who have developed the same language (or at least dialect of a larger language), art forms, religion, and other means of distinguishing one group from another. It can be said that all groups have a certain culture that they have established by which they are constrained. For example, a company develops a culture that is specific to it, and that culture governs everyone who works at, or is affiliated with, that company. In ethnic terms, a culture will define the ways in which one ethnic grouping is different from another. Although certain groupings may have similar languages, religions and ways of doing things, they will also have differences which distinguish them. In the same way that different species of birds are characterized by slight differences in appearance or location, people are grouped by the culture from…

References

Cottone, R.R. (2007). Paradigms of counseling and psychotherapy, revisited: Is social constructionism a paradigm? Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 29(3), 189- 199.

Haylock, B. (2004). Resilience education and drug information. Australian Screen Education, 38, 142-144.

Sharav, V.H. (2005). Screening for mental illness: The merger of eugenics and the drug industry. Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry, 7(2), 111-121.

WebMD. (2005). Major depression (clinical depression). Retrieved from  http://www.webmd.com/depression/guide/major-depression

Cultural Sensitivity in Nursing 1
Words: 330 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88621784
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First, they can avoid cultural stereotyping simply by becoming aware of the issue in principle. Generally, the mere awareness of the issue and of its importance is likely to reduce any practitioner's tendency to succumb to cultural stereotyping. econd, nurses and other healthcare professionals can avoid cultural stereotyping by committing themselves to learning about different cultures and corresponding cultural sensibilities and expectations that are functions of cultural differences. In principle, professional practitioners who make that commitment tend to learn the most about different cultures and make the most conscientious effort to apply that knowledge in their everyday nursing responsibilities and practice.

ources Consulted

Mixer, .J. "Use of the culture care theory and ethnonursing method to discover how nursing faculty teach culture care." Contemporary Nurse, Vol. 28 (April 2008).

Taylor, C., Lillis, C., and LeMone, P. (2005). Fundamentals of Nursing: The Art and cience of Nursing Care. Philadelphia, PA:…

Sources Consulted

Mixer, S.J. "Use of the culture care theory and ethnonursing method to discover how nursing faculty teach culture care." Contemporary Nurse, Vol. 28 (April 2008).

Taylor, C., Lillis, C., and LeMone, P. (2005). Fundamentals of Nursing: The Art and Science of Nursing Care. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins.

Cultural Dimension Theory One of
Words: 1514 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 31126435
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Schwartz Values -- Conformity

Again, a paradigm shift between the old (traditional) ways and the new (seeing more Western influence

Tend to conform and obey clearer rules and structures; obeying parents, preserving the world as it is; no drastic changes.

Former ally, urban (non-conformist) versus rural (conformist); now non-conforming groups, fringe groups, opinions, blogs, political parties, social networking, clubs, etc. abound -- diversity is king; but there is a confrontation in this with advertising and media, which seeks to "sell" conformity in image.

EFEENCES

Hodgetts, ., et.al. (2005). International Management: Culture, Strategy and Behavior. New York: McGraw Hill.

Hofstede, G. (2001). Culture's Consequences: Comparing Values, Behaviors, Institutions and Organizations Across Nations. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

House, et.al., (1998). Cultural Influences on Leadership and Organizations. Project Globe. etrieved from: http://www.thunderbird.edu/wwwfiles/sites/globe/pdf/process.pdf

Killick, D. (2004). "Developing Awareness and Transforming Experience." Leeds

Metropolitan University. Cited in:

http://www.aiec.idp.com/pdf/Killick,%20David.pdf

Knoppen, D. And Saris, W. (2009).…

REFERENCES

Hodgetts, R., et.al. (2005). International Management: Culture, Strategy and Behavior. New York: McGraw Hill.

Hofstede, G. (2001). Culture's Consequences: Comparing Values, Behaviors, Institutions and Organizations Across Nations. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

House, et.al., (1998). Cultural Influences on Leadership and Organizations. Project Globe. Retrieved from:  http://www.thunderbird.edu/wwwfiles/sites/globe/pdf/process.pdf 

Killick, D. (2004). "Developing Awareness and Transforming Experience." Leeds

Cultural Competancy Recent Awareness About
Words: 596 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 11083706
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The study reveals the ways culture and religion intersect with gender, and in fact the authors base their research on the theory of intersectionality. White privilege, gender, and any other issue related to social justice and personal consciousness is situational. Each individual will experience race, class, gender, power, religion, and ethnicity in different ways.

When reading the three articles, I first note their similarities. All three articles address white privilege. The problem with white privilege is that it is built into the social institutions upon which societies are built. White privilege can also be extended to refer to gender privilege and patriarchy, which is why Greenwood & Christian (2008) note that women from whatever culture or religion tend to gloss over their differences to bond together in sisterhood. Sisterhood might trump experiences such as racial prejudice and bias. However, when faced with the problem of the hijab, women who are…

Culture and the Military Cultural
Words: 1915 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 48326917
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This also has major implications for military operations, both within a military unit and in the interaction between the military unit and another culture. Essentially, the problem of ethnocentrism can be seen at the root of the other cultural problems discussed in this context; it implies both a lack of understanding about the impacts of the unit's culture on the people of a foreign culture, as well as a lack of appreciation and understanding for that culture (Hoskins 2007).

Conclusion

Culture is strange, in that it is both constant and always changing. The only static culture is a dead one; as the various elements and generations of a culture interact, change is bound to happen. When there is no longer any interaction within a culture or between a given culture and other cultures, there is no longer any point to that culture, and indeed that culture could not realistically exist…

References

DiMarco, L. (2003). Traditions, changes, and challenges: Military operations and the Middle Eastern city. Diane Publsihing.

Harrison, D.; Light, L. & Rothschild-Boros, M. (2008). Cultural anthropology: Our diverse world. New York: Wadsworth.

Hoskins, B. (2007). "Religion and other cultural variable in modern operational environments." Accessed 16 October 2009.  http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA470675&Location=U2&doc=GetTRDoc.pdf 

O'Neil, D. (2007). "Characteristics of Culture." Accessed 16 October 2009. http://anthro.palomar.edu/culture/culture_2.htm

International Cultural Adjustments Business in
Words: 709 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65812428
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If a person is not focused on being culturally aware, he or she can really struggle to get anything done in a culture that looks at business much differently than his or her culture. As a collectivist nation, the Chinese are focused on the organization. The U.S., as an individualist nation, sees business people that are much more focused on themselves. There is nothing wrong with either choice - they are just different choices based on the cultures from which they are derived. One has to take one's time when doing business in China, because there are so many relationships that need to be built and strengthened. It is not customary (or even probable) to sign a contract quickly, for example (Castle, 2011). If a contract is signed quickly, the terms will be changed later because the Chinese business had no real intention of fulfilling the as-is contract at that…

Works Cited

Castle, J. (2011). Chinese business culture. Kwintessential. YouTube video.

Daniels, J., Radebaugh, L., & Sullivan, D. 2010. International business, 13th ed. New York, NY: Prentice Hall.

Cross Cultural Business Conducting Cross-Cultural Business Three
Words: 773 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1380218
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Cross Cultural Business

Conducting Cross-Cultural Business

Three Cross-Cultural Differences:

Certainly, among the most critical differences that must be accounted for before one begins practicing business in Asia is that regarding the way that people interact. In many ways, estern and Eastern culture stem from very different perceptions of the self and, consequently, how individuals should be expected to conduct themselves in interaction with one another. Indeed, Anbari (2008) et al. highlight this issue, indicating that "two main cultural differences have been identified. Hofstede distinguishes between individualism and collectivism. Trompenaars breaks down this distinction into two dimensions: universalism vs. particularism and individualism vs. communitarianism." (p. 2)

As we most certainly know from experience, the United States is a culture, both professionally and socially, where individuality is stressed. By contrast, in a general sense and throughout its business culture, Asia tends more toward collectivism or communitarianism. This influences how individuals express themselves…

Works Cited:

Anbari, F.T.; Khilkhanova, E.V.; Romanova, M.V. & Umpleby, S.A. (2008). Cross Cultural Differences and Their Implications for Managing International Projects. GWU.edu.

Kolesnikov-Jessop, S. (2012). Respecting Cultural Differences. New York Times.

Global Awareness and Cultural and Racial Diversity
Words: 2405 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 15658050
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Diversity

Global Awareness and Cultural and Racial Diversity

The need to successfully promote global awareness and cultural and racial diversity took on a completely new meaning recently. "There are over six billion people on this planet we call Earth. Diversity is more than just a notion. The term diversity has been defined by Merriam-ebster online as meaning 'differing from one another or unlike. Composed of distinct or unlike elements or qualities', this word is also used to simply mean different." (Burns) By Barak Obama becoming the nation's first black president, we have forever changed the nation's future; but in a sense, this momentous election will also alter how we will forever look at our nations past history. For more than two hundred years, the United States of America was traditionally managed by older white guys and by them being in charge, the world's thinking was shaped. The expectations of every…

Works Cited, continued

Schniedewind, Nancy. "There Ain't No White People Here!": The Transforming Impact of Teachers' Racial Consciousness on Students and Schools. Equity & Excellence in Education. 2005, 38: 280 -- 289.

Standards of Cultural Competent Care Emerging Standards
Words: 2144 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52199356
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Standards of Cultural Competent Care

Emerging Standards of Cultural Competent

This research paper is established to explore upon the emerging trends of culturally competent care in general organizational settings. However, the scope of this care will be narrowed down specifically to health care organization I am working with. All the bits and bytes allied with the phenomenon of cultural competent care have been included in this paper, including the overview of what this trend is all about, what are the standards being followed in this particular domain and how those standards are applicable within my workplace premises. All in all, this paper will serve as a primer for the culturally competent care that is required to be promoted within different workplace environments.

An Overview of Culturally Competent Care

As a matter of fact, United States has appeared to be one of the most ethnically diverse countries in the world. esearchers…

References

Callister, L.C. (2005). What has the literature taught us about culturally competent care of women and children? MCN: The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing, 30(6), 380-388.

Giddings, L.S. (2005). A theoretical model of social consciousness. Advances in Nursing

Science, 28(3), 224-239.

International Council of Nurses (1998). Nurses and Human Rights. Retrieved September 2, 2012, from  http://www.icn.ch/pshumrights.htm .

Analysis Cross-Cultural Tourist Research
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Cross-Cultural Tourist esearch

Cross-Cultural Interactions

From the onset, it would be prudent to offer a concise definition of two of the terms that will be variously used in this text, i.e. cross-cultural interactions and culture. Culture, according to Hofstede (as cited in Bowe and Martin, 2007, p. 80), is "the collective programming of the mind which distinguishes the members of one group or category of people from another." It, hence, has got to do with that cumulative deposit of roles, societal hierarchies, as well as values and beliefs adopted by a group of people over a long period of time. In that regard, therefore, cross-cultural interactions are in line with the ability of an individual or group of persons to not only form but also foster and enhance relationships with those who may not be members of their own culture. On this front, successful cross-cultural interactions are essentially based on…

References

Bowe, H. & Martin, K. (2007). Communication across Cultures: Mutual Understanding in a Global World. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Hong, J.K. & Lee, Y. (2014). The Influence of National Culture on Customers' Cross-Buying Intentions in Asian Banking Services: Evidence from Korea and Taiwan. New York, NY: Routledge.

Mueller, B. (2008). Communicating with the Multicultural Consumer: Theoretical and Practical Perspectives. New York, NY: Peter Lang Publishing.

Reisinger, Y. & Turner, L. (2012). Cross-Cultural Behavior in Tourism. Burlington, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann.

Cross-Cultural Negotiation in the Contemporary
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Typically, difference in expectations between Japanese and American is manifested because of the cultural variables. American believes that it is acceptable to express emotions openly. On the other hand, Japanese culture does not believe in overt expression. Japanese considers the overt expression as unacceptable, and in most cases, Japanese considers the American overt expression as a sign of aggressiveness.

Japanese considers endurance and harmony to be important. Japanese believes that individual is expected to endure hardship in fulfilling the business obligations and this is reflected in the Japanese business style. On the other hand, American believes in business deal that reflects little or no hardship. That is the reason American believes in achieving short-term and immediately goals in the business outcome. (Kumayama, 1991).

Saee (2008) discusses in how the non-verbal behavior varies between Japanese and American culture and its impact in the negotiation process. Non-verbal behaviors such as facial expression,…

References

Adachi, Y. (1997). Business Negotiations between the Americans and the Japanese. Global Business Languages. 2(4): 18-30. Retrieved 23 September 2012 From

 http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1018&context=gbl&sei-redir=1&referer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.ci%2Furl%3Fsa%3Dt%26rct%3Dj%26q%3DBusiness%2BNegotiations%2Bbetween%2Bthe%2BAmericans%2Band%2Bthe%2BJapanese%26source%3Dweb%26cd%3D2%26cad%3Drja%26ved%3D0CC8QFjAB%26url%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fdocs.lib.purdue.edu%252Fcgi%252Fviewcontent.cgi%253Farticle%253D1018%2526context%253Dgbl%26ei%3DLRViUPOeNMay0QXMroGIAw%26usg%3DAFQjCNEAZI68TatFGvUk80miysRPxqcE3Q#search=%22Business%20Negotiations%20between%20Americans%20Japanese%22 

Adair, W.L. (2003). Integrated Sequences and Negotiation Outcome in Same and Mixed Culture. International Journal of Conflict Management. 14 (3/4):. 273-296. Retrieved 23 September 2012 From

 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=1660055

Managerial Cross-Cultural Interaction
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Management STYLE IN THE United States

Cultural Values and Business

Theory X vs. Theory Y

Management the High Tech Way

Management STYLE IN THE DOMINICAN EPUBLIC

CULTUAL VALUES AND Business

ole of Entrepreneurship

In the United States, management values, beliefs and attitudes have undergone a gradual shift away from the simplistic stance of planning, organizing and directing. Valuable managerial skills, no matter what culture is being considered, have traditionally been masculine skills, highlighting the dominant, assertive, and decisive elements of management behavior and downplaying the team and supportive aspects that are more readily identified with women. This traditional view is now giving way in the United States to an approach where team behaviour is seen as increasingly important to a truly successful management style.

The global leadership skills of the future will evolve from a combination of individual/group and masculine/feminine traits involving strategic thinking and communication skills. The final result…

References

Arnold, D.J. & Quelch, J.A. (1998). "New strategies in emerging markets." Sloan Management Review, 40, 7-20.

Bakhtari, H. (1995). "Cultural Effects on Management Style: A Comparative Study of American and Middle Eastern Management Styles." International Studies of Management & Organization, 25(3), 97+.

Barham, K., Fraser, J. & Heath, L. (1988). Management for the future. Foundation for Management Education/Ashridge Management College.

Bennis, W., Heil, G. & Stephens, D. (2000). Douglas McGregor, revisited: Managing the human side of enterprise. New York: John Wiley.

U S Cuba Culture Cultural Differences Between the
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U.S. Cuba Culture

Cultural Differences between the U.S. And Cuba

The role of culture in society has become increasingly important as the United States continues to spread its influence around the globe. Developing a sense of cultural awareness represents a type of knowledge that can be useful in mitigating sources of conflict. In the military cultural factors have been a critical, yet mostly unexamined, aspect of missions conducted in Africa and the Middle East since the end of the first Gulf ar in 1991 and cultural factors played an important, but usually unacknowledged, role in shaping the scope of the United States' humanitarian intervention in Somalia during the 1990s[footnoteRef:1]. However, there has been a growing awareness that cultural awareness is a critical success factor that needs to be further developed because it can serves as a critical success factor in dealing with other nations. [1: (underle)]

Cuba and the U.S.…

Works Cited

Murray, M. Katrina aid from Cuba? No thanks, says U.S. 14 September 2005. Web. 13 April 2013.

Wunderle, W. Through the Lens of Cultural Awareness: A Primer for U.S. Armed Forces Deploying to Arab and Middle Eastern Countries. Fort Leavenworth: Combat Studies Institute Press, n.d. Print.

Analyzing the Social Cultural Diversity
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Social and Cultural Diversity

The U.S.A. is widely viewed as a unifying state in which immigrants are accommodated and assimilated into the largely 'white' dominant socio cultural structure. This principle has allowed the country to facilitate a friendly environment for the nation to sustain a pluralistic perspective. The immigrants retain and maintain their beliefs and ideals even as they adjust their lives to be practically functional in their new American society. Multicultural counseling has come up against three core challenges linked to such diversity. There is the culture, attitude and theoretical perspective; then there is the culture of the client and, finally the many variables naturally wound around individual characteristics (olton-rownlee, n.d.).

Oversimplifying the Client's Social asis: Application of universal categories is essential for our understanding of human experiences. However, if we lose sight of differences between individuals, it would lead to a range of ethical breaches. Clients are influenced…

Bibliography

ACA. (2014). 2014 ACA Code of Ethics. American Counselling Association.

Banks, J. A. (1996). Multicultural Education, Transformative Knowledge, and Action. New York: Teachers College Press.

Barnett, J., & Bivings, N. (n.d.). Culturally Sensitive Treatment and Ethical Practice. APA Divisions.

Bolton-Brownlee, A. (n.d.). Issues in Multicultural Counseling. Highlights: An ERIC/CAPS Digest. Retrieved from Eric Digests:  http://www.ericdigests.org/pre-925/issues.htm

How to Conduct a Study of Education and Cultural Diversity
Words: 655 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 70627257
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students perceive cultural diversity as an issue worth talking about both in and out of school. The purpose of this study is to better understand the climate in which educators seek to implement curricula designed to promote cultural awareness and diversity in schools. The study will show how students approach this subject, whether they embrace, view it skeptically, are concerned about it, think it important or superfluous and what their overall assessment of culture and diversity is when they leave the classroom and engage in the real world.

This will be a phenomenological study that will utilize first-hand interviews with students in middle school and high school from schools around the area where I live. It will be a random sample that will help to show a general view of what children grades 6-12 think about diversity and at what ages in adolescence and young adulthood their views really start…

References

Heyer, D. (2009). What if Curriculum (of a Certain Kind) Doesn't Matter? Curriculum

Inquiry, 39: 27-40.

Turner-Vorbeck, Tammy A. (2005). Expanding multicultural education to include family diversity. Multicultural Education,13(2), 6-10.

Cultural Ethnic and Gender Differences
Words: 892 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92009409
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Because these issues have become more pronounced in recent years, it is not surprising that efforts have been made to define these differences in an effort to measure them. In this regard, Hofstede (1980) identified five basic dimensions of culture as follows:

1. Power distance (focusing on the extent to which the less powerful expect and accept that power is distributed unequally);

2. Individualism-collectivism (focusing on the degree to which the society reinforces individual or collective achievement and interpersonal relationships -- highly individualist cultures believe individual is the most important unit, whereas highly collectivistic cultures believe group is the most important unit);

3. Uncertainly avoidance (focusing on the degree to which the society reinforces, or does not reinforce, uncertainty and ambiguity within the society)

4. Masculinity-femininity (focusing on the extent to which a society emphasizes achievement or nurturing -- masculinity emphasizes ambition, acquisition of wealth, and differentiated gender roles, whereas…

References

Bardovi-Harlig, K. & Hartford, B.S. (2005). Interlanguage pragmatics: Exploring institutional talk. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Mann, GA. (2006). A motive to serve: Public service motivation in human resource

management and the role of PSM in the nonprofit sector. Public Personnel Management

5(1), 33-34.

Cultural Differences in Today's World Then Explain
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cultural differences in today's world. Then explain two ways you might address those challenges in your professional life. Support your responses using current literature.

Challenges of diversity: Positives and negatives

Affirmative action embodies many of the paradoxes of the diversity of American society. On one hand, America has long proclaimed itself a land of freedom and equality. However, for many years, African-Americans and other minority groups were discriminated against, resulting in economic, educational, as well as political disenfranchisement. Affirmative action, or taking race into consideration to promote a more diverse environment in schools and in the workplace, is one way to create a fairer and more pluralistic society. It reflects the fact that persons who are privileged in America have historically come from specific races, classes, and ethnicities. However, many people believe that affirmative action's use of racial preference is, in effect, a form of discrimination itself. The courts have…

References

Kassin, S., Fein, S., & Markus, H.R. (2010). Social psychology. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.

The Harvard Clinical and Translation Science Center (2009). Cultural Competence in Research. Retrieved on February 10, 2013 from  http://www.mfdp.med.harvard.edu/catalyst/publications/Cultural_Competence_Annotated_Bibliograp 

hy.pdf.

Write Response to colleague's

Cultural Diversity Issues
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From WWMT.com comes the news story of Western Michigan University Bronson School of Nursing receiving $2 million in grant money for scholarships to students who are from different cultural backgrounds so that a more diverse culture of student nurses can be achieved (VanTimmeren, 2017). As Bryan (2014) points out, culture is very important in this day and age because it informs people’s perspectives and values about what is good and bad regarding others in society. If people have a very narrow and poorly conceived viewpoint or perspective on other cultures, there is going to be tension in the field. To discourage this tension, the Bronson School of Nursing is looking to bring a wider diversity to its student body with the aim being that the more diverse its student population is the more likely that population is to generate tolerant, accepting, respectful and understanding viewpoints of different cultures.

This news…

Cultural Competence Self-Assessment Reveals Several
Words: 349 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69513237
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We are more than welcome to assist any client who has trouble understanding anything. However, we do not offer to meet with clients whose first language is not English to decipher communications that they might not understand. Making this effort goes a long way toward promoting client health and well being.

We do have bilingual staff but Spanish is the only language besides English that is well-represented. It would be more helpful to hire people who have some command of other languages that our clients might speak. One of the areas I believe we do well in is sensitivity to diverse views of family and health. We allow extended members of the family to visit and consult with them too. I understand that people from different cultures grieve differently, too. Finally, I would be better off reading peer-reviewed journal articles as to the most current best practices that take cultural…

Cultural Priorities
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Cultural Priorities Affect Marketing

Cultural Priorities - Marketing

Author's note with contact information with more details on collegiate affiliation, etc.

How Cultural Priorities Affect Marketing

A key to any marketing strategy for any product or service is to know the target demographic very well. What is the use of marketing a product or service to a group of people about which one knows nothing? There is none; it is a waste of time, effort, and resources. Understanding a demographic requires more than incorporating knowledge gathered from statistics; understanding a demographic requires that those marketing to that group have a solid understanding of that group's culture. Culture is a key factor in understanding attitudes, behaviors, tastes, and modes of expression. Applied knowledge of cultures and cultural priorities should only benefit those marketing to that group. The more a marketing team considers the cultural priorities of the group to which it markets,…

References:

Hollis, N. (2009) "Culture Clash: Globalization Does Not Imply Homogenization." Millard Brown: POV, 1 -- 4.

Schwartz, S.H. (1999) "A Theory of Cultural Values and Some Implications for Work." Applied Psychology: An International Review, 48(1), 23 -- 47.

Cultural Diversity Affect You as
Words: 828 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27084026
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90).

Therefore, in the light of these current developments, I envisage that the nurses will require much more comprehensive training in issues related to cultural diversity in the future. For example, the nurse will need to become more knowledgeable about the way that various cultures respond to conventional medicine and that alternative medicine and therapies play in the healing process.

The subject of alternative therapies illustrates the way that the role of nursing is changing. For example, it has been found that "…44% of Mexican-Americans had used alternative practitioners at least once in the previous year" and that "Mental or physical illness is seen by many Hispanics to be a consequence of behavior, or simply the result of fate" (Breeding, Harley, ogers & Crystal, 2005).

This means that in future the nurse will need to be trained in greater depth in order to understand the way that other cultures perceive…

References

Breeding, R.R., Harley, D.A., Rogers, J.B., & Crystal, R.M. (2005). The Kentucky Migrant Vocational Rehabilitation Program: A Demonstration Project for Working with Hispanic Farm Workers. The Journal of Rehabilitation, 71(1), 32+.

Business Case for Diversity. Retrieved June 7, 2009, from  http://www.chubb.com/diversity/chubb4450.html 

Kim, H.S. & Kollak, I. (Eds.). (2006). Nursing Theories: Conceptual and Philosophical Foundations (2nd ed.). New York: Springer.

Varcoe C. ( 2004) Advancing Nursing Scholarship in Diversity: Complexity and Equity. CJNR Editorial, 36 (4).

Cultural Competence
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Health

Cultural competence: What does this really mean to health care professionals?

Cultural Competency is a significant issue that faces health care providers today. It is important for organizations to have and utilize polices, trained and skilled employees and resources to foresee, distinguish and respond to a variety of expectations in language, cultural and religion of members and health care providers. Health literacy takes place when there is shared understanding between healthcare providers or anyone communicating health information and patients. Joint understanding is not just good medicine; it is also a right and responsibility (Health Literacy and Cultural Competency Provider Tool Kit, 2008).

Addressing disparities in health care and health results is more and more becoming a main concern on national and state levels. The Department of Health is dedicated to generating health justness and devoted to endorsing cultural competency among health care providers, to enhance affirmative results for all…

References

Cultural Competence. (2008). Retrieved from http://www.culturediversity.org/cultcomp.htm

Cultural Competency in Health Services and Care. (2010). Retrieved from  http://www.doh.wa.gov/hsqa/professions/Publications/documents/CulturalComp.pdf 

Health Literacy and Cultural Competency Provider Tool Kit. (2008). Retrieved from  http://www.bcbst.com/providers/08-538CulturalCompProvToolKit.pdf

Cultural Diversity Issue of Non-American Employees Communicating
Words: 4611 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 43058477
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cultural diversity issue of non-American employees communicating frequently in their own native language creating an environment of sensitivity and bias amongst the non-Hispanic community.

Handling Diversity in an Organization

The contents of this paper focus on the cultural diversity involving Films ecovery Systems, an American company located at the heart of Chicago, Illinois. The paper takes an insight into the issue and also proposes solutions that can resolve the problem. The most important aspect of the paper is that it takes into account the material we find and read in books and compares to what degree the literature is actually applicable in real life situations.

Academic Literature

The study of public administration includes a spectrum of many disciplines, which include psychology, sociology, philosophy and also management sciences. Even though, the nature of public administration does not conveniently classify its elements into components, public administration is primarily categorized to highlight the…

References

Leaders are Learned Optimists - The CLEMMER Group Management

Consulting, available at http://www.clemmer.net/excerpts/leaders_learned.shtml accessed on: March 31, 2004

Robert Bacal, Conflict Prevention In The Workplace, available at  http://www.work911.com/products/i-coop.htm , accessed on March 31, 2004

QSM Consulting - Leadership Driving Change, available at http://www.qsmconsulting.com/lds/index.shtml, accessed on: March 31, 2004

Cultural Competence Sensitivity and Empowerment Nursing
Words: 3277 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 43772626
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Nursing: Cultural Competence, Sensitivity and Empowerment

Cultural Competence, Sensitivity and Empowerment: Nursing

The changing demographics of the modern-day multicultural world are increasingly challenging healthcare professionals to consider cultural diversity as a priority in the health sector. Being able to deliver effective care to patients from diverse backgrounds begins with understanding the values, beliefs, and customs associated with different cultures. This text summarizes the writer's experience in a Native American powwow, and explores the effect of the Native American culture on the nursing profession.

Nursing: Cultural Competence, Sensitivity and Empowerment

Diversity is a word that perhaps means something different to each and every individual (Campinha-Bacote, 2003). What is for sure, however, is that the changing demographics of the modern-day multicultural world have, and continue to challenge healthcare professionals to consider cultural diversity as a fundamental concern in the health sector. The U.S. population is projected to reach 400 million by 2050,…

References

Campinha-Bacote, J. (2003). Many Faces: Addressing Diversity in Healthcare. The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 8 (1), Manuscript 1. Retrieved from  http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Volume82003/No1Jan2003/AddressingDiversityinHealthCare.aspx 

Cooper, M. (2012, December 12). Census Officials, Citing Increasing Diversity, Say U.S. will be a Plurality Nation. The New York Times, p. A20.

Grandbois, D. M. (2012). The Impact of History and Culture on Nursing Care of Native American Elders. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 38(1), 3-5.

McCluskey, M. (2009). Indian Education for All: Your Guide to Understanding and Enjoying Powwows. Montana Office of Public Instruction. Retrieved from http://www.opi.mt.gov/Pdf/IndianEd/Resources/PowWows.pdf

Cultural Empowerment
Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 14448092
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Healthcare Disparity

Health -- Cultural Empowerment

Author's note with contact information and more details on collegiate affiliation, etc.

Healthcare is not a black and white issue. That is, to understand the healthcare experience in a multicultural context, one must let go of extremes. The experience is not always straight-forward or simple. Often there are many details one must gather to render a context in which to understand the healthcare experience. The relationships between doctors and patients are important, yet they are also often superficial. Doctors, because of various demands, do not always have a deep enough understanding or awareness of their patients to provide optimal healthcare. Patients must take responsibility and follow the doctor's instructions as they are given. Patients must also not be afraid to ask questions, seek second opinions when they can, as well as consult doctors in regards to alternatives not previously brought up. This paper examines…

Cultural Diversity in the Workplace Starbucks
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Starbucks- Cultural Diversity a Management Challenge

Katy Hollenbeck

This essay shows how Starbucks grew from its one store in Seattle to the global brand it is now. It also covers briefly how the message of diversity has evolved in recent times for Starbucks with Starbucks cooperating with ethnic organizations, promoting a more literal sense of inclusion among various ethnicities, races, ages, genders, and religions. Starbucks has a long history of being a socially conscious company. This has led to some extent, Starbucks to be viewed as a quality company that makes quality coffee.

When people see a Starbucks store, they associate quality and a slightly higher price. That is why people from the rich and famous to the everyman; go to get their cup of coffee at Starbucks. Because Starbucks is one of the largest coffee chains in the world and the largest coffee chain in merica, they must keep…

As Leavy explains, adding social value along with economic value promotes profit and growth within a company (Leavy, 2012). How did Starbucks grow to be so successful and synonymous with quality? The history of Starbucks shows the beginnings of what would one day be a worldwide, easily recognizable brand. As well as in recent history, Starbucks proves it will continue to be the brand for quality coffee for the masses.

Starbucks first opened its doors almost half a century ago, 43 years to be precise. They had a single store consisting of a roaster and retailer of ground coffee, whole beans, spices, and tea. From there after four decades, the company owns 21,160 retail stores in sixty-three countries with 175,000 employees. Most of those retail stores lie in the United States with 12,067 in total, making it one of the largest coffee chains worldwide. The company's mission statement is to nurture and inspire the human spirit, one cup, one person, and one neighborhood at a time (Morais et al., 2014).

Along with its history of ethical practices such as farmer loans and conservation, Starbucks wishes to focus on embracing diversity by including inclusion and diversity into the fundamentals of their leadership competencies. This means they expect all leaders to practice an inclusion

Cultural Identity Essay
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Abstract
This paper discusses all the facets and considerations inherent to a cultural identity essay. Namely, the paper describes the importance of cultural identity, the definition of cultural identity, and examples of cultural identity—both theoretical and literal examples in the world today. This paper seeks to show how one’s cultural identity is so much more than just a melee of one’s race, environment and heritage. Cultural identity is made up of so many factors and influences, both positive and negative, and both direct and covert. This paper sheds light on how one’s cultural identity manifests and how the cultural identity of two people from the same family can be slightly or tremendously different, as a result of a difference of lived experiences and preferences. Finally, this paper investigates some of the more dominant theories of cultural identity.

Related Topics 

Social identity

One’s cultural identity is closely connected to one’s social…

Cultural Impact on Hospitality Industry
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Tourism Management

The impact of technology and the increase of international travel and exploration, the global environment has provided a landscape that depends on the knowledge of other culture. The differences among the human race are everywhere and the denotation of such individualities create challenges for those wishing to attain a successful career based in international exposure.

The purpose of this essay is to explore various themes and ideas that relate to cross-cultural management theory applied in a practical and pragmatic manner. This essay aims to answer the following question:

Which international skills, knowledge, behaviours and experiences will be advantageous in the development of my future career?

My future career selection is not quite clear at this time but I have narrowed it down to becoming involved in hotel management in Central America. This essay will first examine the basics of culture to help give a theoretical background to my…

References

Branine, M. (2011). Managing across cultures: Concepts, policies and practices. Sage.

Crowne, K.A. (2008). What leads to cultural intelligence?. Business Horizons,51(5), 391-399.

De Bono, S., & Van Der Heijden, B. (2011). Managing cultural diversity. Meyer & Meyer Verlag.

Duncan, T. (2005). Current issues in the global hospitality industry. Tourism and Hospitality Research, 5(4), 359-366.

Cultural Appropriation and the Use of India
Words: 1043 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87232280
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Khadi Amongst Western Design Students

Qualitative Study:

The ancient hand-woven cotton fabric has been described not only as a fabric but a philosophy and movement. The political leader Mahatma Gandhi viewed the use of khadi as a political act. By establishing the use of home-spun fabric in India, versus foreign textiles, he hoped to free India of foreign dependence on imports, which had been fostered during the colonial era (Selin, 1997, p. 961). Since these early origins, khadi has become embraced outside of India because of its unique texture and appearance as well as its association with traditional culture. Khadi became synonymous with self-sufficiency for Indians and a proud example of how they might embrace their culture through the use of traditional handicrafts. This proposed qualitative study of Western design students is designed to assess their uses of khadi and their perceptions of incorporating it into their work. Its central…

References

Fernandez, C. (2015). The good, the bad and the offensive: A look back at the year in fashion cultural appropriation. Fashionista. Retrieved from:

 http://fashionista.com/2015/12/cultural-appropriation-in-2015 

Nittle, N. (2016). What is cultural appropriation and why is it wrong? About.com. Retrieved from:  http://racerelations.about.com/od/diversitymatters/fl/What-Is-Cultural-Appropriation-and-Why-Is-It-Wrong.htm 

Peralta, E. (2015). Theft and artistry: Coldplay, Beyonce in India spark discussion on appropriation. NPR. Retrieved from:  http://www.npr.org/2016/02/06/465622102/theft-and-artistry-coldplay-beyonc-in-india-spark-discussion-on-appropriation

Personal Awareness of Cultural Bias in Social and Cultural Diversity
Words: 2763 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49030133
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Cultural bias implies an emphasized distinction or preferential status that indicates a predilection for one culture, over another. It is often discriminative, and is characterized by an absence of integration in a group, in terms of social principles, codes of conduct, and beliefs. Cultural partisanship introduces the accepted behaviors of one group as superior, and more valued, than those of another lesser-respected cultural group. In my surroundings, most of the residents, and hence, patients are white, making us (Afro-Americans and Asians) minorities, feel different if not isolated. Such deferential factors are responsible for establishing where specific individuals live, and what opportunities are available to them, in the healthcare and educational context (Sue et al., 2009)

Question 2

The presence of cultural bias within the context of healthcare-related recommendations and decision-making gives rise to significant challenges. Well-documented inequalities in health status of different racial and ethnic communities, in addition to nationally-publicized…

Resources and Services Administration (http://www.hrsa.gov/culturalcompetence/)

American Psychiatric Association's Steering Committee to Reduce Disparities in Access to Psychiatric Care (2004) (Natl. Assoc. Social Workers 2007).

These and many more substantive readings from research are listed by the author for assimilating culture-centric education. (Sue, Zane, Nagayama Hall, & Berger, 2009)

Question 7

As a Counselor, I will need to be aware that being culturally aware implies delivering services in a manner consistent with the recipient's culture, through regards to linguistic variation and cultural discussion. I would seek to be more sensitive to unaccultured ethnic minority clients. In addition, I would use discretion in cases where patients of a particular community or ethnicity are prone to certain clinical problems (for which I would study the ethnic group and its history in more depth) and if certain ethnic groups respond poorly to EBT (Evidence-based Treatment). (Sue et al., 2009)

Social Cultural and Political Influence in Healthcare Delivery
Words: 4282 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 16620351
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Social, Cultural, And Political Influence in Healthcare Delivery

Social, cultural, and political inequalities are detrimental to the health and healthcare system of the U.S. This is because the U.S. is one of the most multicultural, overpopulated, diverse and undergoing rapid economic growth. The federal government has embarked on efforts geared at addressing unsustainable costs of health care in the U.S. With the leadership of the current president, Barrack Obama, initiatives of containing health care costs will evaluate and explore strategies to contain the growing costs of health care based on a system-wide while enhancing the value and quality of health care (Ubokudom, 2012). The apparent system of health care is rife with opportunities of minimizing waste, delivering coordinated, effective care, and improving well-being and health of all Americans. The government in collaboration with care providers must prioritize cost effective containment strategies with the greatest possibility for political success and non-partisan…

References

Albrecht, G.L., Fitzpatrick, R., & Scrimshaw, S. (2013). Handbook of social studies in health and medicine. London: Sage Publications.

Armstrong, E.G. (2011). The health care dilemma: A comparison of health care systems in three European countries and the U.S. Singapore: World Scientific.

Bale, J.R., Stoll, B.J., & Lucas, A.O. (2013). Improving birth outcomes: Meeting the challenge in the developing world. Washington, DC: National academies press.

Buseh, A.G. (2008). Empowering resilience: Improving health care delivery in war-impacted African countries: a case study of Liberia. Lanham, Md: University Press of America.

Compare and Contrast Situational Awareness With Situational Understanding
Words: 696 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19278532
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awareness entails using all available sensory modalities and cognitive processes. The individual who is situationally aware knows what to pay attention to and can make quick decisions based on knowledge and wisdom. Situation awareness requires some understanding also of goals and objectives. Situational understanding is a similar concept to situational awareness. However, situational understanding takes awareness a step further. As Maltz (2010) points out, situational understanding "unlike awareness, requires some useful grasp of the information at hand," (p. 53). If situational awareness is a state of being vigilant and conscious, then situational understanding is the application of non-contextual variables. For example, a soldier who is practicing situational awareness notices slight changes to the environment such as encroaching shadows or sudden sounds. The same soldier is also aware of where friendly troops are, and can easily determine the source of the sensory input and discern that from potential enemy presence. However,…

References

Maltz, R.S. (2010). Shared situational understanding. Military Review. Sept-Oct 2010. Retrieved online:  http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=shared%20situational%20understanding&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CDIQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fusacac.army.mil%2FCAC2%2FMilitaryReview%2FArchives%2FEnglish%2FMilitaryReview_20101031_art009.pdf&ei=3ZbiTr3uIYqOiALNzfS1Bg&usg=AFQjCNGETZR7XTV5QILqMn_AhHq-sl7t-A&cad=rja 

Toner, E.S. (2009). Creating situational awareness: A systems approach. White paper prepared for the June 10, 2009 workshop on medical surge capacity hosted by the Institute of Medicine Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events. Retrieved online:  http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=%20situational%20awareness&source=web&cd=4&ved=0CFAQFjAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fiom.edu%2F~%2Fmedia%2FFiles%2FActivity%2520Files%2FPublicHealth%2FMedPrep%2FJun-10-11-2009-Commissioned%2520Papers%2FJun-10-11-2009-Commissioned-Paper-Creating-Situational-Awareness-A-Systems-Approach.pdf&ei=n5fiTs6cGsiSiQLq272mBg&usg=AFQjCNFrhBlFSwbtKcapH0E8jUdvgSG1IA&cad=rja

Teenager's Awareness and Their Lack
Words: 8637 Length: 31 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 7405703
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In this article, the author describes the technological, demographic, and market forces shaping this new digital media culture and the rich array of Web sites being created for children and teens. Many nonprofit organizations, museums, educational institutions, and government agencies are playing a significant role in developing online content for children, offering them opportunities to explore the world, form communities with other children, and create their own works of art and literature. For the most part, however, the heavily promoted commercial sites, sponsored mainly by media conglomerates and toy companies, are overshadowing the educational sites. ecause of the unique interactive features of the Internet, companies are able to integrate advertising and Web site content to promote "brand awareness" and "brand loyalty" among children, encouraging them to become consumers beginning at a very early age. The possibility that a child's exploration on the Internet might lead to inappropriate content, aggressive advertising,…

Bibliography

Hansen, C. (2003). Catching potential Internet sex predators [Electronic Version]. MSNBC. Retrieved 27-

7-2006 at  http://www.webcitation.org/5JcD9Dul1 

Cassell, Justine and Cramer, Meg (2004) High Tech or High Risk: Moral Panics about Girls Online. Center for Technology & Social Behavior. online available at

Adolescent's Awareness and Their Lack
Words: 11261 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 10498624
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Studying a sample of 153 top commercial Web sites directed at children under 13, the CME found that COPPA has spurred changes in Web sites' data collection practices. Web sites had limited the amount and type of information (e.g., name, postal address, phone number, age) collected from children, and there was a three-fold increase in the posting of privacy policy information explaining sites' data collection practices. A few sites found innovative solutions (e.g., anonymous registration) that allowed children to interact with site content without revealing personal information. Overall, however, the Center found that many sites were not doing their best to comply with the provisions: Most (66%) did not place links to privacy policies in "clear and prominent" places, and only some sites (38%) obtained parental consent in accordance with key provisions. Further, researchers pointed out that in trying to discourage children under 13 from entering personal information, some sites…

Bibliography

Bay-Cheng, L.Y. (Aug., 2001). SexEd.com: Values and norms in Web-based sexuality education. Journal of Sex Research, 38(3), 241-251.

Beebe, T.J., Asche, S.E., Harrison, P.A., & Quinlan, K.B. (Aug., 2004). Heightened vulnerability and increased risk-taking among adolescent chat room users: Results from a statewide school survey. Journal of Adolescent Health, 35(2), 116-123.

Borzekowski, Dina L.G. & Rickert, Vaughn I. (2001b). Adolescent cybersurfing for health information: A new resource that crosses barriers. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 155, 813-817.

Brown, J.D. (Feb., 2002). Mass media influences on sexuality. Journal of Sex Research, 39(1), 42-45.

Diversity and Cultural Assessment
Words: 919 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73086588
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.....leader is someone that has confidence, enthusiasm, and vision. Many leaders exist in the world. However, most leaders can only lead well at home. Global leaders transcend cultural diversity and differences and provide effective leadership behaviors within any context. This is because they are aware of the key differences cultures have and can group them in such a way that allows for easier understanding and successful strategy implementation. Because cultural style can dictate the ethical perception of a leader in terms of authority, power, and influence, this paper will focus on diversity and ethical decision-making and its influences on leadership models. Additionally, the paper will explore certain commonly accepted leadership traits and how servant leadership may be used as an effective tool for influencing organizational culture.

Followers see an inspirational leader as more beneficial than a transactional leader across any cultural setting. However certain behaviors leaders may perform within one…

Global Business Cultural Analysis
Words: 8186 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 23504537
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business culture and expansion trends that exist for American companies in India. The paper focuses on answering the following questions: 1. What are the major elements and dimensions of culture in this region? 2. How are these elements and dimensions integrated by local conducting business in the nation? 3. How do both of the above items compare with U.S. culture and business? 4. What are the implications for U.S. businesses that wish to conduct business in that region? The paper also tackles the following aspects: Dimensions of Culture, Communication. Different Meaning of Words across Languages, Verbal, Nonverbal, High Context vs. Low Context and eligion -- Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Shinto and Ethics; Definitions, The Issue of Corruption, Corporate Social esponsibility, Values and Attitudes, Variances in Attitudes across Cultures, Concept of Time, Dealing with Change, The ole of Gender, Social Status, Business Manners and Customs across National Cultures, Social…

References

Bose, P. And Lyons, L.E. (2010). Cultural Critique and the Global Corporation. Tracking Globalization, Bloomington, IN.

Butler, Patty. (2012). India Business Etiquette, Manners, Cross Cultural Communication, and Geert Hofstede Analysis. International Business Etiquette and Manners. Cyborlink  http://www.cyborlink.com/besite/india.htm 

Doh, J., and Luthans, F. (2009). International Management: Culture, Strategy, and Behaviour. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Doh, J., and Luthans, F. (2009). International Management: Culture, Strategy, and Behavoir. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Social and Cultural Impacts of Establishing an
Words: 2030 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 23476641
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socal and cultural mpacts of establshng an eco-Toursm enterprse n Joao Pessoa, Brazl. The man focus of the dssertaton s on the followng areas:

An analyss of eco-toursm development

An assessment of the opportuntes - regonal, domestc, nternatonal

An evaluaton of the projects feasblty

An examnaton of the socal-cultural mpact of the eco-toursm

Brazl has a sanctuary of the fnest natural resources ("fauna & flora") n the world, and therefore toursm s n ascendence, and demands for md-class hotels are on the ncrease. The development of eco-toursm n specfc areas s antcpated due to partnershp wth local bankng ntutons; local government nterest and regulatons; and a general growth of awareness of the tenson between the tourst dollar, the envronment and local cultures.

Research Methods

Prmary research (ntervews and questonnares) wll be conducted to analyze the feasblty of the project. Secondary research wll be carred out, n the form of a…

i) Adventurers set out to discover other lands (e.g., Captain Cook) ii) People traveled for scientific research (e.g., Darwin) iii) People traveled for business (trade) iv) People traveled in order to visit friends and family (social), v) People traveled for leisure (relaxation) vi) People travel as Eco-Travelers (learners).

The development of tourism has influenced people and society, and has created thousands of organizations, at many levels: national and international, governmental or non- governmental. Tourism has thus led to the creation of million of jobs worldwide, in what is today is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. Tourism has led people to confront different attitudes and to admire eclectic cultures. In addition, to be able to understand these cultures, society at large has had to adapt to the pluralism of cultures by learning languages other than their own, different types of gastronomy and music, and also by adopting a greater tolerance of different religions.

Accordingly to Kaluf (2001), the development of tourism has been worldwide, and has been sustaining a growth of 20% over last five years: 5% in mass tourism and an incredible 15% in