Eating Disorders Essays (Examples)

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Eating Disorder and Gender

Words: 5075 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8532186

Eating Disorders and Gender

There are medical conditions which more commonly occur in one gender over another. These conditions can be either mental or physical. Very often, they are both mental and physical conditions. Certain medical situations are extremely severe and can potentially result in serious harm to the body or perhaps even death. There are certain conditions which being with a mental impression, a false belief that has been ingrained within the mind which then manifests itself in the body of the individual. One of the most common and most disturbing types of condition is known as an eating disorder. By this term, it is meant that the patient suffers a mental conditioning which makes them either unwilling or unable to eat in a healthy manner resulting in either over or under eating and malnutrition. Eating disorders such as bulimia and anorexia are the result of psychological issues on…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bates, Daniel. "Globalization of Fat Stigma: Western Ideas of Beauty and Body Size Catching

on in Developing Nations." Daily Mail. 2011. Print.

Battiste, Nikki & Lauren Effron."EDNOS: Deadliest Eating Disorder Is Quietly the Most

Common." ABC News. ABC News Network, 14 Nov. 2012. Web. 19 Nov. 2012. .
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Eating Disorder Is Characterized by Abnormal Eating

Words: 3326 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38191377

Eating disorder is characterized by abnormal eating habits involving excessive or insufficient intake of food which is detrimental to the individual's physical and mental well-being. There are two common types of eating disorders although there are other types of eating disorders. The first is bulimia nervosa which is excessive eating coupled with frequent vomiting. The second type is anorexia nervosa which is immoderate restriction of food which leads to irrational weight gaining. The other types of eating disorders include eating disorders not otherwise specified which are essentially where a person has anorexic and bulimic behaviors, binge eating disorder which is compulsive overeating without any kind of compensatory behavior, and pica which is craving for certain non-food items such as glue, plaster, paper. It is estimated that roughly 10-15% of cases of eating disorders occur in males and statistics show that women are at a higher risk of developing eating disorders…… [Read More]

References

Doll, H.A., Petersen, S.E., & Stewart-Brown, S.L. (2005). Eating Disorders and Emotional and Physical Well-Being: Associations between Student Self-Reports of Eating Disorders and Quality of Life as Measured by the SF-36. Quality of Life Research, 14(3), 705-717. doi: 10.2307/4038820

Kime, N. (2008). Children's Eating Behaviours: The Importance of the Family Setting. Area, 40(3), 315-322. doi: 10.2307/40346135

Krauth, C., Buser, K., & Vogel, H. (2002). How High Are the Costs of Eating Disorders - Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa - for German Society? The European Journal of Health Economics, 3(4), 244-250. doi: 10.2307/3570016

Martin, A.R., Nieto, J.M.M., Jimenez, M.A.R., Ruiz, J.P.N., Vazquez, M.C.D., Fernandez, Y.C., . . . Fernandez, C.C. (1999). Unhealthy Eating Behaviour in Adolescents. European Journal of Epidemiology, 15(7), 643-648. doi: 10.2307/3582136
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Eating Disorder Group Sessions Group Session 1

Words: 1598 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22532584

Eating Disorder Group Sessions

Group Session 1 Obesity:

Hello, My name is Nancy and I am a counselor and a registered dietitian and I specialize in working with people who are seeking help for eating disorders. First when we talk about why people eat and why they do or do not gain weight we must talk about the balance between activity and calorie intake. In general when you eat more calories than your body needs to maintain your body and expend energy in movement the calories not needed for maintenance will be used by the body to build more tissue. Though weight does level off after time any temporary increase in calories over time will create a higher weight and the only way to lose this weight is to increase the amount of energy you use while decreasing the number of calories you eat, and this must be maintained even…… [Read More]

References

Abraham, S., Boyd, C., Lal, M., Luscombe, G., & Taylor, A. (2009). Time since menarche, weight gain and body image awareness among adolescent girls: onset of eating disorders?. Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology, 30(2), 89-94. doi:10.1080/01674820902950553

Eating can cause low blood pressure. (2010). Harvard Heart Letter, 20(11), 2. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

James, K. (2010). Living beauty. Thethruth about food additction. Better Nutrition, 72(10), 44. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

Katan, M.J. & Ludwig,, D.S.(2010) JAMA.;303(1):65-66. doi: 10.1001/jama.2009.1912
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Eating Disorder Is an Issue

Words: 933 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12820447

The youngsters and children who suffer from Anorexia Nervosa in early age suffer from low body development, lack of growth of good mental health and particularly with the low growth of sex hormones that make them weaker sexually. You can see many people who have poor body structure and lack of bone density due to their improper nutrition so these children usually have weak bones and there is fear that they may face with bone fracture in their life.

While besides physical body disturbance and weakness it put effect on the brain of human being and person who is diagnose with Anorexia Nervosa have weak structure of their brain and have physiological impact on those people including poor personality, shattered body image.

There are many ways that can be used to cure this disease but first of all you need to find out that you are also suffering from this…… [Read More]

Reference:

Cohen, Juliet. "Identifying Anorexia Nervosa Symptoms." EzineArticles 13 September 2007. 01 October 2007 http://ezinearticles.com/?Identifying-Anorexia-Nervosa-Symptoms&id=730487.

Birmingham CL, Goldner EM, Bakan R. Controlled trial of zinc supplementation in anorexia nervosa. Int J. Eating Disord. 1994;15:251-255.

Thomsen, S.R., Weber, M.M., & Brown, L.B. (2002). The relationship between reading beauty and fashion magazines and the use of pathogenic dieting methods among adolescent females. Adolescence, 37, 1-19

Crisp AH, Lacey JH, Crutchfield M. Clomipramine and 'drive' in people with anorexia nervosa: an inpatient study. Br J. Psychiatry. 1987;150:355-358
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Obesity Versus Eating Disorder

Words: 937 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33681009

Eating Disorders

According to Himmel (2009), "We could save a lot of pain, suffering and money by incorporating obesity into the range of illnesses now classified as eating disorders, and focusing on prevention" Obesity related issues are frequently classified separately from eating disorders, but there is more overlap than many people believe. When a person diagnosed with anorexia or bulimia, the traditionally recognized eating disorders, enter treatment with a professional counselor or psychologist, a Twelve Step program called Overeaters Anonymous is sometimes recommended. The Twelve Step program Overeaters Anonymous was not started to help people with anorexia and bulimia, and yet it has come to serve these populations as well, suggesting that what Himmel (2009) says is correct. Eating disorders encompass a range of disordered eating behaviors. Individual differences ensure that there are no two people who practice an eating disorder for the same reasons. By the same token, obesity…… [Read More]

References

Day, J., Ternouth, A. & Collier, D.A. (2009). Eating disorders and obesity: Two sides of the same coin? Epidemiological Psychiatry 18(2): 96-100.

Himmel, S. (2009). You must be hungry. Psychology Today. 18 Sept, 2009. Retrieved online: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/you-must-be-hungry/200909/is-obesity-eating-disorder
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Effectiveness of Peer-Led Eating Disorder Groups

Words: 902 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90454345

Posts

Program Evaluation Design

Eating Disorder Program

The university hospital in our city has developed a strong program focused on a spectrum of eating disorders. Disorders addressed include anorexia, bulimia nervosa, compulsive eating, obesity, and a variety of non-traditional eating disorders. Our hospital approaches these issues on many levels, and our staff includes highly trained psychiatrists and psychologists, as well as skilled nutritionists to develop personalized eating plans tailored to each patient. Gastroenterologists, endocrinologists, and other specialists are also part of our team, since the severity of eating disorders can lead to serious and life-threatening conditions.

We also recognize the value of peer support and have incorporated two peer-led groups that focus on eating disorders education as well as prevention. The groups have been meeting weekly for nearly six months. The meetings for each group are structured in the same way, and the length of each meeting is 90 minutes.…… [Read More]

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Binge Eating Disorder

Words: 501 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46830496

Binge Eating Disorder (BED)

This research concentrates on the role of body weight or shape on self-evaluation on individuals. A healthy individual will use their self-evaluation correctly to manage their weight. However, some individuals over evaluate their weight or body shape on their self-image and this is referred to as simply "overvaluation' (Grilo, 2013). Overvaluation of body shape or weight is a common characteristic among most eating disorders. However, there has been some debate about whether or not this characteristic is present in the binge eating disorder (BED).

BED is defined by recurrent binge eating (eating unusually large quantities of food in a discrete period accompanied by feelings of loss of control), binge-eating episodes are associated with at least 3 of 5 behavioral indicators (e.g., eating much more rapidly than usual), marked distress about the binge eating, and the absence of inappropriate weight-compensatory behaviors that are characteristic of bulimia nervosa…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Grilo, C. (2013). Why No Cognitive Body Image Feature Such As Overvaluation of. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 208-211.
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Binge Eating Disorder

Words: 487 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46509683

Binge Eating Disorder

The most prevalent eating disorder in adults has been identified to be the binge eating disorder (BED) (Iacovino, 2012). This disorder can be characterized when an individual eats an unusually large amount of food which is characterized by a loss of self-control. There is also an absence of other accompanying behaviors such as self-induced vomiting or exercise and these individuals can gain a significant amount of excess weight. It has been estimated that the disorder affects 3.5% of women and 2.0% of men in the U.S. And is equally present in different racial and ethnic groups (Iacovino, 2012).

There are wide arrays of different health consequences for individuals that suffer from BED. The health impacts all are derived from obesity related conditions such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease as well as self-image and social problems that can also occur. The lives of people who suffer…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Iacovino, J. (2012). Psychological Treatments for Binge Eating Disorder. Curr Psychiatry Rep., 432-446.
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Disordered Eating in College Students

Words: 5808 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39021106

Relationships provide the key experience that connects children's personal and social worlds. It is within the dynamic interplay between these two worlds that minds form and personalities grow, behavior evolves and social competence begins." (1999) Howe relates that it is being acknowledged increasingly that "...psychologically, the individual cannot be understood independently of his or her social and cultural context. The infant dos not enter the world as a priori discrete psychological being. Rather, the self and personality form as the developing mind engages with the world in which it finds itself." (Howe, 1999) Therefore, Howe relates that there is: "...no 'hard boundary' between the mental condition of individuals and the social environments in which they find themselves. The interaction between individuals and their experiences creates personalities. This is the domain of the psychosocial." (Howe, 1999) the work of Howe additionally states that attachment behavior "...brings infants into close proximity to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ainsworth, M.D.S. (1989). Attachments beyond infancy. American Psychologist, 44, 709-716.

Allen, Jon G. (2001) a Model for Brief Assessment of Attachment and Its Application to Women in Inpatient Treatment for Trauma Related Psychiatric Disorders Journal of Personality Assessment 2001 Vol. 76. Abstract Online available at http://www.leaonline.com/doi/abs/10.1207/S15327752JPA7603_05?cookieSet=1&journalCode=jpa

Armsden, G.C., & Greenberg, M.T. (1987). The inventory of parent and peer attachment: Individual differences and their relationship to psychological well-being in adolescence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 16, 427-454.

Barrocas, Andrea L. (2006) Adolescent Attachment to Parents and Peers. The Emory Center for Myth and Ritual in American Life. Working Paper No. 50 Online available at http://www.marial.emory.edu/pdfs/barrocas%20thesisfinal.doc
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Overeating Poor Eating Behavior

Words: 2589 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47278974

Alcoholism researchers developed this model. The model presumes that a consumer is in one phase of change at any given time. This model entails Maintenance, action, maintenance, preparation or pre-contemplation (Patrick 189). The concept is that consumers have to shift from one stage to the next. The stages prepare them to move to the next ones sequentially. This suggests that if consumers hurry through or if they skip stages they are likely to experience setbacks. In addition, different stages apply different strategies. For instance, a person who is addicted to smoking and is at the pre-contemplation stage: this means that the person is not even thinking of quitting the habit. Probably, such a person is always not ready to consider making a list of alternatives (Lucas 920).

This model has been successful in areas such as drug abuse, smoking, and alcohol. However, the model has been applied in changing health…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Biederman, J et al. Are girls with ADHD at risk for eating disorders? Results from a controlled, five-year prospective study. J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2007 Aug;28(4):302-7.

Busko, Marlene. Girls With ADHD Are at Increased Risk for Eating Disorders and Depression.

Nov 08, 2007. Medscape News Today. Web.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/565526
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Night Eating Explore the Individuals

Words: 7427 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41952902

"…people with NES tend to be more depressed than obese people without NES, and the mood of those with NES tends to worsen during the evening, something not seen in other obese people"(Logue, 2004, p. 185).

Among the many studies that provide insight into the background and origins of this syndrome, one of the most enlightening was Obesity by Stunkard, in Fairburn and Brownell (2002). This provides an in-depth analysis of night eating syndrome as well as a concise overview of the background of this condition. Stunkard also refers to a detailed overview of this condition.

Studies using the above criteria estimate that the prevalence of the night eating syndrome in the general population is approximately 1.5% and that prevalence increases with increasing weight, from about 10% of persons enrolling in obesity clinics to as high as 25% of patients undergoing surgical treatment for obesity…it occurs among about 5% of…… [Read More]

References

Allison K. et al. ( 2005) Neuroendocrine Profiles Associated with Energy Intake, Sleep, and Stress in the Night Eating Syndrome . The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 90(11), pp. 6214-6217.

Amanda Ursell's: Feel Good. (2001, January 7). Sunday Mirror (London, England), p. 16. Retrieved April 23, 2010, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5007796657

Arieti, S. & Brodie, H.K. (Eds.). (1981). Advances and New Directions. New York: Basic Books. Retrieved April 23, 2010, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101519121

Aronoff N., Geliebter a., and Zammit G. ( 2001) Gender and body mass index as related to the night-eating syndrome in obese outpatients. J Am Diet Assoc.101(1), pp.102-4.
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Assorts of Disorder Terms and Diagnose

Words: 969 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54392348

Autism is a developmental disorder, as can be seen in the fact that Peter was first diagnosed when he failed to develop speech at the rate of a normal child. Autism is also a spectrum disorder, meaning that individuals will manifest the condition in different ways and different aspects of normal speech, movement, and social interactions may be inhibited depending on the child and the condition's severity. There is no 'cure' for autism or universally-accepted treatment for the disorder although behavioral interventions such as ABA "encourages positive behaviors and discourages negative behaviors in order to improve a variety of skills" through methods such as "Discrete Trial Training (DTT) DTT is a style of teaching that uses a series of trials to teach each step of a desired behavior or response. Lessons are broken down into their simplest parts and positive reinforcement is used to reward correct answers and behaviors." (Treatment,…… [Read More]

References

Additional treatments for ADHD. (2013). Psych Central. Retrieved from:

http://psychcentral.com/lib/additional-treatments-for-adhd/0001205

Depression. (2013). NIMH. Retrieved from:

 http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/depression/index.shtml
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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Is

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80932247

While there are approximately 5 million people suffering from the illness at any one time in America, women are twice as likely to develop PTS as compared to men. In relation to children and teens, more than 40% has endured at least a single traumatic incident contributing the development of the disorder. However, PTS has occurred in nearly 15% of girls as compared to the 6% of boys.

Causative Factors of the isorder:

As previously discussed, the main cause of post traumatic stress disorder is exposure to a life-threatening, hugely unsafe, and frightening traumatic experience. These experiences are likely to contribute to the development of the disorder if the victim feels a constant sense of danger and painful experiences (Smith & Segal, 2012). As a result of this constant feeling of painful and frightening experience, the individual remains relatively unable to overcome the incident or feel normal again. Some of…… [Read More]

Diagnosis of the Disorder:

While post traumatic stress disorder has existed for as long as human beings have endured trauma, the illness was only recognized as a formal diagnosis in the 1980s (Dryden-Edwards & Stoppler, 2010). The diagnosis of PTSD is often comorbid with eating disorders, depression and substance abuse, anxiety disorders, and manic depression. The assessment of PTSD sometimes involves the use of rating scale or controlled psychiatric interview to test the disease. Some of the standardized screening tools for diagnosis of the disease include Trauma Screening Questionnaire and PTSD Symptom Scale.

Based on the DSM-IV-TR criteria for diagnosing PTSD, there are several necessary factors in this process including the patient's view of the trauma and duration and effect of associated symptoms (Grinage, 2003, p.2401). For this diagnosis to be conducted, the symptoms must exist for a minimum of one month and disrupted normal activities considerably. During this process, clinicians look for three major types of symptoms i.e. re-experiencing, avoidant, and increased arousal symptoms. The re-experiencing ones are those associated with recurrence of the traumatic event while avoidant are means in which the patient attempts to avoid the event and increased arousal symptoms are those associated with panic or anxiety attacks. The identification of
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Clinical Disorder Clinical Psychology and

Words: 3626 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49707748

This leaves many veterans prone to the condition known as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). This may be characterized as "an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a terrifying event or ordeal in which grave physical harm occurred or was threatened. Traumatic events that may trigger PTSD include violent personal assaults, natural or human-caused disasters, accidents, or military combat." (NIMH, 1) in the particular case of this discussion, military combat is a cause of PTSD that can have devastating long-term outcomes. Indeed, "studies estimate that as many as 500,000 troops serving in Iraq and Afghanistan will suffer from some form of psychological injury, with PTSD being the most common." (Eliscu, 58) the outcomes of this condition will run a wide range of symptoms that impact the ability of individuals to cope with the pressures of everyday life, to relate to those who have not experienced the traumas of war,…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Blanco, C.; Laje, G.; Olfson, Marcus, S.C. & Pincus, H.A. (2002). Trends in the treatment of bipolar disorder by outpatient psychiatrists. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 159(6), 1005-1011.

Craddock, N.; O'Donovan, M.C. & Owen, M.J. (2005). The genetics of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: dissecting psychosis. Journal of Medical Genetics, 42, 193-204.

Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS)1. (2006). Anorexia Nervosa. Women's Health.gov

Ellenberger, H. (1970). Discovery of the Unconscious. New York: Basic Books.
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Binge Eating Animal Models of Addiction Do

Words: 3066 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31876046

Binge Eating

Animal models of addiction do not generalize well to substance dependence in humans as there are different criteria involved. For example, in animals "addiction" has been traditionally defined by a caged laboratory animal's tendency to press a lever for a reinforcing substance, whereas in humans the criteria for dependence (the clinical term for addiction) include a number of behavioral criteria and consequences that could never exist in laboratory animals (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2000). These criteria include: tolerance, withdrawal, taking more of a substance than originally intended, a history of unsuccessful attempts to quit, inordinate amounts of time spent in using and seeking the substance, a reduction in activities (occupational, social, or education) due to use, continued usage despite adverse consequences (APA, 2000). Interestingly, only three of these criteria need to be met in a year, so one need not demonstrate significant physical signs such as tolerance and…… [Read More]

References

Adam, T.C. & Epel, E.S. (2007). Stress, eating and the reward system. Physiology and Behavior, 91, 449-458.

Alexander, B.K. (2008). The globalization of addiction: A study in the poverty of the spirit. New York: Oxford University Press.

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders-IV-text revision. Washington, DC: Author.

Bartsch, A.J., Homola, G., Biller, A., Smith, S.M., Weijers, H.G., & Wiesbeck, G.A. (2007). Manifestations of early brain recovery associated with abstinence from alcoholism. Brain, 130(1), 36-47.
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Panic Disorder During Pregnancy and

Words: 1880 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57684873

The authors state, "underlying mechanism through which exposure to childhood abuse is associated with increased risk of panic cannot be determined based on these data alone" (p. 888). They offer several possible explanations. Exposure to abuse as a child may result in an extreme and realistic fear of threat to survival. This may be how panic disorder starts. Later, it may persist, or recur spontaneously, even without abusive conditions. In the face of a real life threat, panic is not pathological, but in childhood panic may make the child more vulnerable to panic later. Exposure to abuse may lead to biochemical changes that increase the risk of a disorder. Because the study was based on interviews with 18 to 21-year-olds, who were asked to recall past experiences, the findings could be contaminated by recall bias in which young people with mental instability might be more likely to report abuse in…… [Read More]

References

Bandelow, B., Sojka, F. et al. (2006). Panic disorder during pregnancy and postpartum period. European Psychiatry, 21, 495-500.

Biederman, J., Petty, C., Faraone, S.V. et al. (2006). Effects of parental anxiety disorders in children at high risk for panic disorder: A controlled study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 94, 191-197.

Goodwin, R.D., Fergusson, D.M. And Horwood, L.J. (2004). Childhood abuse and familial violence and the risk of panic attacks and panic disorder in young adulthood. Psychological Medicine, 35, 881-890.

Warren, S.L., Racu, C., Gregg, V. And Simmens, S.J. (2006). Maternal panic disorder: Infant prematurity and low birth weight. Anxiety Disorders, 20, 342-352.
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Evidence Based Research and Meta Analysis on Children Feeding Disorders

Words: 2380 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23320118

Meta- Analysis and Evidence-Based esearch on Children Feeding Disorders

The eating disorders are among pediatric clinical problems in the United States that can cause distress to clinicians and parents. Typically, eating disorders are affecting more than 40% of children of pre-school and school ages, and the associated psychology and health problems of the eating disorders include a mental retardation, behavioral problems, growth retardation, and poor academic records in schools. This study carries out the critical appraisal of a quantitative research article written by Williams et al. (2012) to demonstrate children eating disorders, and behavioral intervention in treating the problems. The study evaluates the credibility and reliability of the study by evaluating its research design, research findings, qualifications of the authors and its relevance to the clinical outcomes.

Background

The objective of this paper is to carry out the critical appraisal of evidence-based research of the article titled "Pediatric Feeding Disorders:…… [Read More]

Reference

Dovey, T.M. & Martin, C.L. (2012). A Quantitative Psychometric Evaluation of an Intervention for Poor Dietary Variety in Children with a Feeding Problem of Clinical Significance. Infant Mental Health Journal. 33(2): 148-162. DOI: 10.1002/imhj.21315.

Melnyk, B.M. (1999). Building a case for evidence-based practice: Inhalers vs. nebulizers. Pediatric Nursing. 1999; 25: 102-103.

Melnyk, B.M. (2002). Strategies for overcoming barriers in implementing evidence-based practice. Pediatric Nursing. 28: 159-161

Melnyk, B.M. and Fineout-Overholt, E. (2002). Putting research into practice. Rochester ARCC. Reflections on Nursing Leadership. 28: 22-25
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Antisocial Behavior in Females With Comorbid Diagnoses of ADHD and Conduct Disorder

Words: 2635 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13071562

Antisocial ehavior in Females with Comorbid Diagnoses of ADHD

Detention centers and residential treatment facilities are replete with male and female youth that have been in and out of the juvenile justice system for many years. Although the majority of the populations in these facilities are male, the number of female juvenile offenders is continually increasing. Many of the children in these facilities have a history of behavioral difficulties that may or may not have been diagnosed during much of their childhood.

Antisocial behaviors are acts that violate social rules and the basic rights of others. They include conduct intended to injure people or damage property, illegal behavior, and defiance of generally accepted rules and authority, such as truancy from school. "These antisocial behaviors exist along a severity continuum (Clark, et al., 2002). When childhood antisocial behaviors exceed certain defined thresholds -- the diagnostic criteria specified in the Diagnostic and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Disgnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Washington DC APA.

Clark, Duncan. Vanyukov, Michael. Cornelius, Jack. (November, 2002). Childhood Antisocial Behavior and Adolescent Alcohol Use Disorders. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism: 66, 136-138.

Crawford, Nicole. (February, 2003). ADHD: a women's issue. Monitor on Psychology, APA: Volume 34, No. 2, p. 28.

Hinshaw, S.P. (2003). Preadolescent girls with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: I. Background characteristics, comorbidity, cognitive and social functioning, and parenting practices. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.
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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder What

Words: 1426 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83333850

17% of men and 13% of women have experienced more than three traumatic events in their lives, and the onset of PTSD is generally based on the degree and the extent of the trauma, and the duration, and the type. For example, when there is a rape, then there is a 49% chance that the women will experience PTSD, and when there is a physical assault, it would be 31.9%. For sexual assault, the percentage would be 23.7 and when the person has been in an accident, and then the percentage would be 16.8%. (What is PTSD?)

Other traumatic events may be a child's life threatening illness, or a natural disaster, or a witness or a victim of a shooting or a stabbing, and so on. (What is PTSD?) These people may also experience of several kinds of physical symptoms related to their traumatic experience, and some of them are:…… [Read More]

References

Gore, Allen. T; Richards, Georgeianna. (27 April, 2005) "Post Traumatic Stress

Disorder" Retrieved at http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic1900.htm. Accessed 6 November, 2005

Managing Traumatic Stress" American Psychological Association. Retrieved at http://www.apa.org/practice/traumaticstress.html. Accessed 6 November, 2005

What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder?" A National Center for PTSD Fact Sheet.
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Eating Gilbert Grape Gilbert Grapes

Words: 1007 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56624915



Mr. Grape's death left an indelible mark on his widow. Mama, who Gilbert claims was once "the prettiest girl in these parts," has become morbidly obese. Mrs. Grape won't leave the house and although she clearly loves her children, she has been debilitated since her husband's death. Her compulsive eating habits reflect her desire to stuff her pain deep inside, to smother her anger and fear with food. In fact, Mrs. Grape's overeating is mirrored in the way she treats Arnie: twice in the movie she bear hugs him, squeezing as if she could smother him. When Arnie is taken into police custody, she leaves the house for the first time in eight years. Her willingness to leave the house proves her love for her son and also enables her to experience an emotional catharsis, during which she screams in anger, "I want my son!"

Becky is the catalyst of…… [Read More]

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Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Disorder

Words: 1743 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65719540

This may consist of arising and seating in chairs securely. Following the progressive characteristics of this illness, all people gradually lose their capability simply to move and will need to advance and use a wheelchair.

eferences

Burbank, P.M. (2006). Vulnerable older adults: Health care needs and interventions. New York, NY: Springer Pub.

Donaldson, I.M., & Marsden, C.D. (2011). Marsden's book of movement disorders. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press.

Egerton, T., Williams, D. & Iansek, . (2009). Comparison of gait in progressive supranuclear palsy, Parkinson's disease and healthy older adults. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Fabio, ., Zampieri, C., Tuite, P. (2006). Gaze-shift strategies during functional activity in progressive supranuclear palsy. eceived: 20 July 2006 / Accepted: 26 September 2006 / Published online: 8 November 2006. Springer-Verlag 2006.

Fabio, ., Zampieri, C., Tuite, P. (2008). Gaze Control and Foot Kinematics During Stair Climbing: Characteristics Leading to Fall isk in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.…… [Read More]

References

Burbank, P.M. (2006). Vulnerable older adults: Health care needs and interventions. New York, NY: Springer Pub.

Donaldson, I.M., & Marsden, C.D. (2011). Marsden's book of movement disorders. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press.

Egerton, T., Williams, D. & Iansek, R. (2009). Comparison of gait in progressive supranuclear palsy, Parkinson's disease and healthy older adults. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Fabio, R., Zampieri, C., Tuite, P. (2006). Gaze-shift strategies during functional activity in progressive supranuclear palsy. Received: 20 July 2006 / Accepted: 26 September 2006 / Published online: 8 November 2006. Springer-Verlag 2006.
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Gall Bladder Disorders

Words: 821 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57229200

Anatomy [...] gall bladder disorders, with background information for the first page, and then homeopathic treatments on the second page. Must be alternative treatments to surgery, drugs etc. (ex, diet)

The gall bladder is a small, pear-shaped organ nestled beneath the liver. It stores treats the bile from the liver, and then dumps the bile into the intestines. Gall bladders can suffer several disorders, such as gallstones, gall bladder sludge, infection and inflammation, and even cancer. Some symptoms of gall bladder disorders include nausea or vomiting, pain in the upper abdomen or between the shoulders, abdominal bloating, continued intolerance of fatty foods, and gas and/or indigestion (Comforth). Patients may also notice a fever, or slight jaundice (yellow skin or whites of the eyes) (Bartel). Gallstones are the most common form of gall bladder disorder, and usually are the cause of at least 80% of gall bladder disorders. Usually, there are…… [Read More]

References

Bartel, Kent R. "Gall Bladder Symptoms." New Hope Health Clinic. 2003. 3 Dec. 2004.

<  http://www.newhopehealthclinic.com/gall_bladder_symptoms.htm 

Editors. Van Nostrand's Scientific Encyclopedia. 3rd ed. Princeton, NJ: D. Van Nostrand, 1958.

Comforth, Tracee. "Symptoms of Gallbladder Disease." About.com. 2004. 3 Dec. 2004.
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Digestive Disorders Pathophysiological Mechanisms Prior

Words: 596 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39374482

On a basic level, patients can make attempts to restructure their diet and general lifestyle choices to promote a more positive, health body in general. If this approach does not work, there are many sorts of antibiotics, painkillers, laxatives or anti-diarrhea pills that one can take to negate the effects of noxious symptoms. Corrective surgery is also an option, although it does not always work.

Some of the treatments for inflammatory bowel disease can work for irritable bowel syndrome, such as the taking of antibiotics, anti-diarrhea medicine, and fiber supplements. Additionally, corrective measures to one's diet and lifestyle to attempt to procure a stress free environment may work as well. Treatments specific to this condition, however, include antidepressants and counseling to assist with stress. Additionally, medications such as lubiprostone and alosetron also pertain strictly to this condition, and not to inflammatory bowel disease.

PATIENT FACTO: AGE

Age certainly has a…… [Read More]

References

Pace, F., Molteni, P., Bollani, S., Sarzi-Puttini, P., Stockbrugger, R., Porro, Bianchi, Drossman, D.A. (2003). "Inflammatory bowel disease vs. irritable bowel syndrome: a hospital-based, case-control study of disease impact on quality of life.." BMC Gastroenterol. 38 (10): 1031-1038.

Porter, C.K., Brooks, D.C., Pimentel, M., Akinseye, a., Riddle, M.S. (2012). "Risk of inflammatory bowel disease following a diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome." BMC Gastroenterol. 12: 55. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3444908/
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Psychological Disorder ADHD ADHD Is

Words: 1806 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61198795

My final recommendation was that the parents and Adam's teachers should work as a team to help Adam manage his condition. In other words, the parents should communicate with the teachers to determine if the interventions have been effective. I would then talk to the parents themselves every two months to make further recommendations as necessary.

CONCLUSION

While drug interventions for ADHD, especially in children, have been increasingly controversial because of their possible side-effects, their main advantage is the speed and efficacy with which they work. Those who have benefited reported that the effects were almost immediately visible, on the same day the drug was used.

On the other hand, drug therapies for any mental disorder have been imperfect and frequently plagued by side-effects and non-compliance. Continuous research is therefore necessary to improve not only drug therapies and identify potential harmful effects in the long-term, but also to find possible…… [Read More]

References

ADHD Information Library (2008). ADHD Treatment Options: many Good Choices. Newideas.Net. Retrieved from: http://newideas.net/adhd/treatment

Martin, B. (2011). Treatment for Attention Deficit Disorder (ADHD). PsychCentral. Retrieved from: http://psychcentral.com/lib/2007/treatment-for-attention-deficit-disorder-adhd/

Personal Health Lifestyles, Inc. (2001). Attention Deficit Disorder: Facts, Prevention and Treatment Strategies. Retrieved from:  http://www.healingwithnutrition.com/adisease/add-adhd/add-adhd.html#A1
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Medical Disorders

Words: 892 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45572513

Pernicious Anemia

Many people hate to go to the doctor's office -- especially when they know that they will be receiving an injection. However, I, along with millions of people the world over, consider ourselves very lucky to do just that, each and every month of our lives. You see, for people like me with a disorder known as "pernicious anemia," the doctor and her needle are the important link between a healthy life and a life of absolute misery. This is because, unlike classic anemia, the common form of the blood disorder that usually results in little more than fatigue, pernicious anemia can result in catastrophic changes in the body, chief among them severe neurological impairment that, in its severe form, can result in absolute madness. For those of us who suffer from this disease caused by an inherited deficiency, or caused from some disruption or disorder in the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Intelihealth. "Pernicious Anemia." Web site. 2004. Retrieved from Web site on April 10, 2004 www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/9339/20862.html

Medline Plus. "Pernicious Anemia." Medline Plus Medical Enclyclopedia. 2003 Retrieved from Web site on April 10, 2004 http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000569.htm
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Genitourinary Disorders Healthcare Plan and Management

Words: 2366 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41801097

Healthcare Plan for the Management of Genitourinary Disorders

Objective of this paper is to carry out a care plan for the patient, aged 60 years, who is suffering from genitourinary disorder. The study carries out the case evaluation and identifies the symptoms of the patient complication. The study also provides a comprehensive healthcare plan used for the treatment of the patients.

Case Study Evaluation

HPI (History of Present Illness).

Evaluation of the case study reveals that the patient is a Hispanic male, aged 60 years of age and complains of a decline of urinary flow. While the patient has experienced the symptom for more than two years, however, the symptom has increased significantly for the past two weeks. Although, the patient has not been diagnosed in the past, however, he faces difficulties in achieving a free flow of urine that interferes in his daily activities. The gradual worsening of the…… [Read More]

Reference

Benedetti, F. (2008). Placebo Effects: Understanding the Mechanisms in Health and Disease. Oxford Scholarship Online.

Bluie, T. Campbell, D.B. Fuchs, G.J. et al. (2010). Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders in Individuals With ASDs: A Consensus Report. Pediatrics. 125( 1): S1-S18;

Finnegan-John, J. & Thomas, V.J. (2013). The Psychosocial Experience of Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease and Its Impact on Quality of Life: Findings from a Needs Assessment to Shape a Service. Journal of Renal Care. 40(1): 74-81.

Jaarsma. T. (2005). Inter-professional team approach to Patients with Heart Failure. Heart. 91(6): 832-838.
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Self-Regulation Issues in Children and Adolescents With ADHD ODD and OCD

Words: 6305 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39399907

Self-egulation Issues in Children and Adolescence with ADHD, ODD, and OCD

Self-regulation in children and adolescence who suffer from ADHD, ODD, and OCD (Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and Oppositional Defiant Disorder) is often evident due to several things. A lot of the issues in relation to self-regulation stem from additional anxiety the child/teen may feel from the difficulties experienced from these kinds of mental disorders. OCD is known to cause anxiety and isolationist behaviors leading to decreased emotional self-regulation. ADHD at times can cause hyperfocus, making it difficult for the child/teen to switch tasks therefore limiting their ability to handle their emotions and activities that assist in regulating themselves. ODD, connected to ADHD, is a disorder that has the child react angrily and spitefully to people in otherwise normally responsive situations. The extreme feelings of children or adolescence who manifest ODD make it hard for them to…… [Read More]

References

Barkley, R.A. (2013). Oppositional Defiant Disorder: The Four Factor Model for Assessment and Management - by Russell A. Barkley, Ph.D. Retrieved from  http://www.continuingedcourses.net/active/courses/course079.php 

Blum, K., Chen, A.L., & Oscar-Berman, M. (2008). Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and reward deficiency syndrome. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 4(5), 893-918. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2626918/ 

Campbell, S.B. (1990). Behavior problems in preschool children: Clinical and developmental issues. New York: Guilford Press.

Cheng, M., & Boggett-Carsjens, J. (2005). Consider Sensory Processing Disorders in the Explosive Child: Case Report and Review. Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 14(2), 44-48.
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Treating Post Traumatic Stress Disorders With Serzone

Words: 3069 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38321776

Treating Post Traumatic Stress Disorders

WITH SERZONE

WHAT IS PTSD

Many adults suffer from the mental illness of Post Traumatic Stress Disorders, otherwise known as PTSD. PTSD is an extreme anxiety mental disorder that causes excessive concern, or worry over common problems, or problems that might happen, such as automobile not starting in the morning to get to work, although it has been running smoothly, the house catching on fire during the middle of the night with no apparent reason. Various treatments for PTSD have been experimented with, producing just as many different results, although a cure has not yet been discovered. In this essay, we will be discussing PTSD, how the drug Serzone has been used in treating this illness, and other possible cures for PTSD.

PTSD is a serious mental disorder, and the seriousness of this disease should not be underestimated, however, it is not to be confused…… [Read More]

GORMAN CHRISTINE, 2002

THE SCIENCE OF ANXIETY

TIME
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DP 2 AB the Psychological Disorder That I

Words: 686 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26996907

DP#2 AB

The psychological disorder that I have selected to explain from a variety of causal perspectives is bulimia. Bulimia is a condition in which people engage in the act of binge eating, and eat a lot more than is necessary or even healthy for an allotted period of time. Granted, there are certain physiological aspects of this sort of maladaptive behavior, in which individuals can train their bodies to trigger a specific reaction to help them purge themselves of the food. Most often purging involves either vomiting or exiting one's stool. egardless, there are a number of different causal factors that can contribute to this sort of abnormal behavior (Laureate Education, 2007) -- some more so than others.

As defined within Abnormal Psychology written by Butcher et al., the causal pattern of any sort of abnormal behavior is etiology (Butcher et al., p., 2012). Oftentimes, the etiology for bulimia…… [Read More]

References

Butcher, J.N., Mineka, S., & Hooley, J.M. (2012). Psychology (Laureate Education, custom 14th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2007). Diagnosis and assessment. Baltimore, MD: Author. "Introduction" with Dr. John Marszalek
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GAD and Anxiety Disorders

Words: 3244 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84131793

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Background/Definition/Epidemiology

Humans have a natural response to survival, stress and fear. Such responses enable an individual to pursue pertinent objectives and respond accordingly to the presence of danger. The 'flight or fight' response in a healthy individual is provoked via a real challenge or threat and is utilized as a means of acting appropriately to the situation. However, when an anxiety disorder manifests in someone, then an inappropriate/excessive state of arousal develops. People then feel symptoms of fear, apprehension, or uncertainty. These feelings or reactions may surface even when no real threat exists.

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), is a common anxiety disorder that affects roughly 5% of the United States general population. "GAD is commonly associated with psychiatric and medical comorbidities and is often chronic. GAD is associated with extensive psychiatric and medical utilization and, if left untreated, can cause impairment as severe as major depressive disorder…… [Read More]

References

Asmundson, G. J., Fetzner, M. G., DeBoer, L. B., Powers, M. B., Otto, M. W., & Smits, J. A. (2013). LET'S GET PHYSICAL: A CONTEMPORARY REVIEW OF THE ANXIOLYTIC EFFECTS OF EXERCISE FOR ANXIETY AND ITS DISORDERS. Depression and Anxiety, 30(4), 362-373. doi:10.1002/da.22043

Butnoriene, J., Bunevicius, A., Saudargiene, A., Nemeroff, C. B., Norkus, A., Ciceniene, V., & Bunevicius, R. (2015). Metabolic syndrome, major depression, generalized anxiety disorder, and ten-year all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in middle aged and elderly patients. International Journal of Cardiology, 190, 360-366. doi:10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.04.122

Chokroverty, S. (2013). Sleep Disorders Medicine: Basic Science, Technical Considerations, and Clinical Aspects. Elsevier Science.

Dodhia, S., Hosanagar, A., Fitzgerald, D. A., Labuschagne, I., Wood, A. G., Nathan, P. J., & Phan, K. L. (2014). Modulation of Resting-State Amygdala-Frontal Functional Connectivity by Oxytocin in Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder. Neuropsychopharmacology, 39(9), 2061-2069. doi:10.1038/npp.2014.53
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Nursing Consideration for Patients With

Words: 4208 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56689240

Behavioral approaches alone or combined cognitive behavior therapy may be used. Behavioral techniques might include simply not buying trigger foods or avoiding certain shops; that is, building up new habits to replace existing ones. Another example would be modifying eating behavior such as eating in the same place each day, or concentrating solely on eating and not watching television at the same time (Fiona Mantle, 2003)."

It is worth noting here that research has shown that people will change and transform their eating habits, once they learn the advantages and disadvantages of their eating behavioral patterns. However, at the same time, it is also worth noting here that since eating habits can be transformed through learning, they can also be unlearned, however, the process of unlearning may take place through a lengthy passage of time. As Fiona Mantle (2003) writes, "Eating behaviors are learned behaviors therefore they can be unlearned,…… [Read More]

References

Abraham S, Llewellyn-Jones D (2001) Eating Disorders: the facts. Oxford, Oxford University Press.

Bruch H (1973) Eating Disorders: Obesity, Anorexia Nervosa and the Person Within. New York, Basic Books.

Bunnell, D.W., Shenker, I.R., Nussbaum, M.P., Jacobson, M.S., & Cooper, P. (1990). Sub-clinical vs. formal eating disorders. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 9, 357-362.

Cathie E. Guzzetta. (2001). Developing and implementing a comprehensive program for children and adolescents with eating disorders. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing.
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Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia in Adolescents

Words: 1386 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96978982

Young people with poor eating habits can develop eating disorders or these disorders may be in response to various psycho-sociological issues that arise during adolescence. Irrespective of the cause, adolescents with eating disorders run the risk of a wide range of adverse healthcare outcomes, including obesity, high blood pressure, bone loss and even death. The problem is more common than many people believe, and the prevalence of eating disorders has been increasing in recent years due in part to improved recognition of the condition by clinicians. To determine the current state of affairs with adolescent eating disorders, this paper provides a review of the relevant peer-reviewed and scholarly literature to develop a background and overview of eating disorders, their effects and how these conditions are treated. Finally, a summary of the research and important findings about adolescent eating disorders are provided in the conclusion.

Background and Overview

Professional and public…… [Read More]

References

Cariun, C., Taut, D., & Baban, A. (2012, March). Self-regulatory strategies for eating behavior in children and adolescents: A concept mapping approach. Cognitie, Creier,

Comportament, 16(1), 49-54.

Enos, G.A. (2013, March/April). Addressing eating disorders earlier. Addiction Professional,

11(2), 40.
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Compulsive Overeating Psychology Compulsive Overeating or Excessive

Words: 1016 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90166903

Compulsive Overeating

Psychology

Compulsive overeating or excessive eating is one of several known eating disorders. Eating disorders are rampant diseases in western cultures. Eating disorders are expressions of abnormal and nearly always harmful behaviors, attitudes, and perceptions of food and eating. They usually center around a great lack or great abundance of food entering a person's body. Eating disorders also involved distorted perceptions of oneself and the development of compulsive thoughts and behaviors. Eating disorders show up in male and female populations, when for most of the disorders' history, they were thought to only show up in women. Current psychological research shows that the degree of westernization in a culture is directly proportional to the likelihood and prevalence of eating disorders, particularly in women. Compulsive overeating is a form of binge eating disorder when people eat compulsively as a response to stress. Compulsive overeaters eat too much when they are…… [Read More]

References:

Davis, C., Carter, J.C. (2009) Compulsive overeating as an addiction disorder. A review of theory and evidence. Appetite, 53, 1 -- 8.

Lightstone, J. (2004) Dissociation and Compulsive Eating. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 5(4), 17 -- 32.

Morgan, C.M., Yanovski, S.Z., Nguyen, T.T., McDuffie, J., Sebring, N.G., Jorge, M.R., Keil, M., & Yankoski, J.A. (2002) Loss of Control Over Eating, Adiposity, and Psychopathology in Overweight Children. Eat Discord, 31, 430 -- 441.

Overeaters Anonymous. (1993) Compulsive Overeating -- An Inside View. Overeaters Anonymous, Rio Rancho: NM.
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Language of Advertisements

Words: 665 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26449089

Globalization of eating disorders by Susan Bordo takes us through how the craze of having small bodies as opposed to having big and voluptuous has spread all over the world.it gives us details on how this phenomena has spread in many countries even those whose women t never took interest on having small bodies and their cultures loved women that were big and voluptuous. There are different advertisements with each keen on convincing a particular audience on a certain product the advertiser wants to sell. The first one is a GAP advertisement for selling clothes, the second one for Carlsberg an alcoholic drink, the third one is of MAC products the fifth is on sketchers, the sixth is on body fragrances and the last one is on milk at the same time trying to persuade the audience on the benefits of milk on ones body. The essay and advertisements are…… [Read More]

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Wafer-Thin Model Smiles Wanly at

Words: 1555 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55051794



orks Cited

Energy expenditure in anorexia nervosa." (Jan 2005).

Nutrition Research Newsletter. Retrieved 7 Feb 2006 at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0887/is_1_24/ai_n8968079

Murphy, Megan. (4 Feb 2007). "The struggle against anorexia: Former UNC swimmer battles the disease." Greeley Tribune. Retrieved 7 Feb 2006 at http://www.greeleytrib.com/article/20070204/NES/102030156

Paccagnella, Agostino, http://www.findarticles.com/p/search?tb=art&qt=%22Mauri%2C+Alessandra%22" Mauri, Alessandra, http://www.findarticles.com/p/search?tb=art&qt=%22Baruffi%2C+Carla%22" Baruffi, Carla, http://www.findarticles.com/p/search?tb=art&qt=%22Berto%2C+Rita%22" Berto, Rita, http://www.findarticles.com/p/search?tb=art&qt=%22Et+al%22" Et al (May / Jun 2006). "Application Criteria of Enteral Nutrition in Patients ith Anorexia Nervosa: Correlation Between Clinical and Psychological Data in a "Lifesaving" Treatment.

JPEN: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. Retrieved 7 Feb 2006 at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3762/is_200605/ai_n16350972/pg_3

Trebay, G. (6 Feb 2007). "Looking Beyond the Runway for Answers on Underweight

Models." The New York Times. Retrieved 7 Feb 2006 at http://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/06/fashion/shows/06DIARY.html?ref=shows… [Read More]

Works Cited

Energy expenditure in anorexia nervosa." (Jan 2005).

Nutrition Research Newsletter. Retrieved 7 Feb 2006 at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0887/is_1_24/ai_n8968079

Murphy, Megan. (4 Feb 2007). "The struggle against anorexia: Former UNC swimmer battles the disease." Greeley Tribune. Retrieved 7 Feb 2006 at http://www.greeleytrib.com/article/20070204/NEWS/102030156

Paccagnella, Agostino, http://www.findarticles.com/p/search?tb=art&qt=%22Mauri%2C+Alessandra%22" Mauri, Alessandra, http://www.findarticles.com/p/search?tb=art&qt=%22Baruffi%2C+Carla%22" Baruffi, Carla, http://www.findarticles.com/p/search?tb=art&qt=%22Berto%2C+Rita%22" Berto, Rita, http://www.findarticles.com/p/search?tb=art&qt=%22Et+al%22" Et al (May / Jun 2006). "Application Criteria of Enteral Nutrition in Patients With Anorexia Nervosa: Correlation Between Clinical and Psychological Data in a "Lifesaving" Treatment.
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Anorexia A Comparison of Two

Words: 1620 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66761532

In reality, however, this study did not expose anything that has not been discussed repeatedly for decades. The issue of control being a key issue in eating disorders has long been recognized and thus, despite their best efforts, the researchers did not really provide any new information that could be helpful in treating this disorder.

The Scharer study was somewhat more valuable in its findings simply because it focused on a specific treatment program for a specific person. While this could be considered a limitation in terms of the generalizability of the study to other subjects or populations, the intimate focal point actually provides the type of deeper insight that case studies are designed to provide. For example, specifics of Lisa's aftercare are given that help provide insight into what types of monitoring may be needed: "The neighbors who care for Lisa in the evenings may need to be included…… [Read More]

References

McNamara, C., Chur-Hansen, a. & Hay, P.J. (2008) Emotional responses to food in adults with an eating disorder: A qualitative investigation. European Eating Disorders Review, 16, 115-123

Scharer, K. (1999) Case Study: Eating Disorder in a 10-year-old Girl. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing. 12 (2). 79-86.
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Anorexia According to Guissinguer 2003 Anorectics React

Words: 2104 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62474991

Anorexia

According to guissinguer (2003) anorectics, "...react to loss of body weight by displaying adaptive responses that originally evolved to facilitate leaving food depleted areas." Discuss.

Anorexia is a disorder attributed to attempts to attain a fashionable shape, but numerous studies suggest that it is possible for psychological and societal factors to contribute in the development of this disorder. According to Kaye et al. (1998), anorexia is a disorder characterized by unusual feeding habits, weight control, perceptions of weight and shape, and the view of body shape. In this context, the people involved diet because they fear gaining weight. Nevertheless, the etiology of anorexia is complex, but numerous studies suggest that social, biological, and developmental process influence its growth.

Interestingly, the manner in which these processes interact to enhance its growth remains a mystery. Apparently, views towards the levels of attractiveness in a given society may influence the psychopathology of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Appetite. (2006). Monographic: Evolutionary perspectives on overeating and overweight. Appetite, 47 (1), pp. 1-35.

Eisler, I. (2005). The empirical and theoretical base of family therapy and multiple family day therapy for adolescent anoxeria nervosa. Journal of Family Therapy, 27, pp. 104-131.

Fredrickson, B.L., Roberts, T.A., Noll, S.M., Quinn, D.M., & Twenge, J.M. (1989). That swimsuit becomes you: Sex differences in self-objectification, restrained eating, and math performance. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 75, pp. 269-284.

Guisinguer, S. (2003). Adapted to Flee Famine: Adding an Evolutionary Perspective on Anorexia Nervosa. Psychological Review, 110, pp. 745-761.
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Participant's Experience A Qualitative Research Reflecting How

Words: 2610 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86671785

Partiipant's Experiene: A Qualitative Researh Refleting How to Prevent Eating Disorders in Order to Support Current Patients

This artile aims to present a qualitative researh of one woman's experiene of anorexia, a kind of eating disorder, using interpretative phenomenologial analysis (IPA). The details of the women's personal experiene of anorexia supposed to be unique, but the general outline is as ommon as on other patients. The delay of orret medial and mental treatment seems to miss the best time for omplete reovery. Supports from soiety are indispensable assistane, espeially from her family. Anorexia is a ommon illness whih highly happened around female, and it is always hidden by patients toward their family, dotors. Antiipating the psyhologial therapy and onsult an help to minimize trauma and maximize reovery. Talking and intervention in early stage of anorexia may assist the way of the woman lower potential to suh a serious situation.

Introdution…… [Read More]

cited in Stevens, 1983) have also been used to a perception of eating disorder, and literature developing from these two methods is measured in the following table which displays how a person that is suffering from the disorder feels about themselves

What are the effects of anorexia nervosa?

Anorexia has an emotional impact on the whole body. When the body is not getting the energy it requests to purpose normally, it goes into a mode of starvation. The body decelerates down and then turns to itself to gather the nutrients it needs, meaning the body starts to devour itself and the medical difficulties heap up (Healthguide, 2001-2010, sec. 2). Anorexics can suffer from not having their menstrual periods, anemia, little body fluids, withered bones, loss of mineral, changes in brain chemistry, unbalanced heartbeat, failure of the kidney, failure of the heart, the growth of osteoporosis, and in the end death (Kids Health. 1995-2010).

How can anorexia nervosa be treated?

Treatment for this disease stresses significantly on the physical and psychological features of the issue. Rendering to the National Institute of Mental Health (12 June 2009. Health Topic sec), treating anorexia comprises of three constituents: reinstating the individual to a health weight; handling the psychological matters that are related to the eating disorder; and plummeting or removing performances or opinions that lead to disorderly eating, and thwarting deterioration or relapse. The medical treatment for anorexia sometimes can involve hospitalization. Therapy is another constituent in treating anorexia. Some methods of therapy comprise of behavior therapy, family therapy nutritional counseling, cognitive therapy, and group rehabilitation (Heathguide, 2001-2010, sec 2.).
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Bdd in Men Various Problems

Words: 2572 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64723294

"

In addition, to media images that bombard men there are also biological factors that influence the development of BDD in men.

According to an article entitled "Bigger Isn't Always Better - muscle dysmorphia in men" the most severe cases of muscle dysmorphia involve a biological predisposition for the disease (Bartlett 2001). The author explains that from a biological standpoint the man suffering with the disease has a form of obsessive-compulsive disorder (Bartlett 2001). For instance someone who washes his hands 10 times per day is normal, however washing your hands one hundred times per day to the point that it hampers with the rest of your life is a symptom of a greater problem (Bartlett 2001). According to the article this example is used to illustrate "there isn't anything pathological about going to the gym regularly or dieting," but there is a problem when "a huge number of boys…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bartlett J. (2001) Bigger Isn't Always Better - muscle dysmorphia in men

American Fitness. Retrieved July 8, 2005 from; http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0675/is_1_19/ai_69651755

First Controlled Study of Muscle Dysmorphia Published, 2005. Retrieved July 8, 2005 from; http://www.driesen.com/muscle_dysmorphia.htm

Grieve F.G., Lorenzen L.A., Thomas a. (2004) Exposure to Muscular Male Models Decreases Men's Body Satisfaction.Sex Roles: A Journal of Research. Volume: 51: 743+.
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High-Fat High Calorie Diet on

Words: 1426 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60596162

In the STAI, the researcher asks the subjects how they feel at the moment and in the recent past, and how they anticipate feeling in the future (enazon & Coyne, 2000). This test is designed to overlap between depression and anxiety scales by measuring the most common anxiety symptoms which are minimally shared with depression (American, 1994). oth physiological and cognitive components of anxiety are addressed in the 21 items describing subjective, somatic, or panic-related symptoms (Kingsbury & Williams, 2003).

Once those tests are completed, the volunteers will be asked to cycle on an ergometer for 30 minutes. The Talk Test, Target Heart Rate Evaluation, and the org Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale will all be administered while the volunteer is cycling. This is done to determine the energy level - or the perceived energy level - of the volunteer. All of these tests and this same specific pattern will…… [Read More]

Bibliography

American Psychiatric Association (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.

Benazon, N.R., & Coyne, J.C. (2000). Living with a depressed spouse. Journal of Family Psychology, 14 (1), 71-79.

Dietz, W., MD, Ph.D. (2002). The obesity epidemic: Causes, consequences and solutions. Retrieved from University of Michigan, School of Public Health Web site: http://www.sph.umich.edu/symposium/2002/keynote.html.

Hewitt, P.L., et al. (2001). Death from anorexia nervosa: Age span and sex differences. Aging and Mental Health, 5(1), 41-46.
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Cut Is a Young Adult Novel by

Words: 1023 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16164710

Cut is a young adult novel by Patricia McCormick. Like Girl, Interrupted, Cut addresses issues related to the psychiatric treatment of adolescents as well as to adolescent psychiatric issues. Therefore, the novel offers young readers insight into their conditions, how and why certain treatments are used, and how systems of treatment might help them. Most importantly, the book helps young readers with psychiatric problems feel less alone and more willing to open up about their problems. However, it is important to evaluate novels like Cut in light of relevant empirical evidence. How well a novel reflects reality is essentially how important the novel is from an educational standpoint; otherwise the book is a complete work of fiction and has no relevance for meaningful study.

Cut addresses a whole gamut of psychiatric issues that impact girls. Therefore, the gender variable is critical to discuss within the framework of adolescent psychology. Several…… [Read More]

References

Biering, P. (2009). Child and adolescent experience of and satisfaction with psychiatric care: a critical review of the research literature. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing 17(1): 65-72.

Biering, P. & Jensen, V.H. (2009). The Concept of Patient Satisfaction in Adolescent Psychiatric Care: A Qualitative Study. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing 24(1): 3-10.

Claes, L., Houben, A., Vandereycken, W., Bijttebier, P. & Muehlenkamp, J. (2010). Brief report: The association between non-suicidal self-injury, self-concept and acquaintance with self-injurious peers in a sample of adolescents. Journal of Adolescence 33(5): 775-778.

Claes, L., Jimenez-Murcia, S., Aguera, Z., Castro, R., Sanchez, I., Menchon, J.M. & Fernandez-Aranda, F. (2011). Male Eating Disorder Patients With and Without Non-suicidal Self-injury: A Comparison of Psychopathological and Personality Features. European Eating Disorders Review 20(4): 335-338.
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Bone Density

Words: 646 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99005259

Bone Loss

Dancers depend on their bones and skeletal system. Bones in turn depend on key nutrients and micronutrients to maintain their density and their ability to carry out the dancers' often extreme demands. Because bone is living tissue, a thorough understanding of how bone density is created and maintained is essential for all dancers. Female dancers need to be especially aware of the impact of diet, lifestyle, and hormones on their bones. A clinically defined syndrome known as Female Athlete Triad refers to the three main variables that impact female bone mineral densities including disordered eating, irregular menstrual cycles, and osteoporosis. The triad itself also refers to energy availability, menstrual function, and bone health (Mountjoy et al., 2014). Bone health can be easily conceptualized as the balance between dietary energy intakes and energy expenditures. Maintaining balance and biological equilibrium can promote maximum health in professional dancers. Because the triad…… [Read More]

References

Friesen, et al. (2011). Bone mineral density and body composition of collegiate modern dancers. Journal of Dance Medicine and Science 15(1).

Hoch, et al. (2011). Association between the female athlete triad and endothelial dysfunction in dancers. Clin J. Sport Med 21(2), 119-125.

Mountjoy, et al. (2014). The IOC consensus statement: beyond the female athlete triad. British Journal of Sports Medicine 48, 491-497.